Sample records for raman lidar vertical

  1. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrare, Richard

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  2. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ferrare, Richard

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  3. Raman lidar and MPL Measurements during ALIVE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  5. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  6. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  7. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  8. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  9. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  10. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  11. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  12. Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

  13. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  14. Analysis and Calibration of CRF Raman Lidar Cloud Liquid Water Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.D.

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Raman lidar (RL), located at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF), is a unique state-of-the-art active remote sensor that is able to measure profiles of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud properties at high temporal and vertical resolution throughout the diurnal cycle. In October 2005, the capability of the RL was extended by the addition of a new detection channel that is sensitive to the Raman scattering of liquid water. This new channel permits the system, in theory, to measure profiles of liquid water content (LWC) by the RL. To our knowledge, the ARM RL is the only operation lidar with this capability. The liquid water Raman backscattering cross-section is a relatively weak and spectrally broad feature, relative to the water vapor Raman backscatter signal. The wide bandpass required to achieve reasonable signal-to-noise in the liquid water channel essentially eliminates the ability to measure LWC profiles during the daytime in the presence of large solar background, and thus all LWC observations are nighttime only. Additionally, the wide bandpass increases the probability that other undesirable signals, such as fluorescence from aerosols, may contaminate the observation. The liquid water Raman cross-section has a small amount of overlap with the water vapor Raman cross-section, and thus there will be a small amount of ‘cross-talk’ between the two signals, with water vapor contributing a small amount of signal to the LWC observation. And finally, there is significant uncertainty in the actual strength of the liquid water Raman cross-section in the literature. The calibrated LWC profiles, together with the coincident cloud backscatter observations also made by the RL, can be used to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius. By combining these profiles of effective radius in the lower portion of the cloud with the aerosol extinction measurements made below the cloud by the RL, the first aerosol indirect effect can be investigated using a single instrument, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with aligning the different sampling periods and fields of view of multiple instruments. We have applied a “first principles” calibration to the LWC profiles. This approach requires that the relative differences in optical efficiency between the water vapor and liquid water channels be known; this relative difference is easily computed using the efficiency values of the beam splitters and interference filters in the lidar that were provided by the vendors of these components. The first principles approach then transfers the calibration from the water vapor mixing ratio to the LWC using the difference in the optical efficiency and an interpolated value of the liquid water Raman cross section from the literature, and the better established water vapor Raman cross section. After accounting for all known error sources, the vertical integral of LWC was compared against a similar value retrieved from a co-located ground-based infrared radiometer. The RL and infrared radiometer have significantly different fields of view; thus to compare the two sensors the data were averaged to 5 min intervals where only cloudy samples were included in the average of each. While there is fair scatter in the data (r=0.47), there is also a clear indication of a positive correlation between the infrared and the RL values. The value of the slope of the regression is 0.49, which indicates a tendency of the RL measurements to underestimate the total liquid amount with respect to the infrared retrieval. Research continues to investigate the source of the bias, but the most likely candidate is the large uncertainty in the liquid water Raman cross-section as there have been no direct measurements made of this parameter at the lidar’s laser wavelength of 355 nm. The calibrated LWC profile was then used together with the cloud backscatter coefficient profile from the RL to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number density. These profiles o

  15. Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrare, R.A.

    2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  16. RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRARE,R.A.

    2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  17. Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newson, R

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Raman lidars are semi-autonomous ground-based systems that transmit at a wavelength of 355 nm with 300 mJ, {approx}5 ns pulses, and a pulse repetition frequency of 30Hz. Signals from the various detection channels are processed to produce time- and height-resolved estimates of several geophysical quantities, such as water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol scattering ratio, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization ratio. Data processing is currently handled by a suite of six value-added product (VAP) processes. Collectively, these processes are known as the Raman Lidar Profiles VAP (RLPROF). The top-level best-estimate (BE) VAP process was introduced in order to bring together the most relevant information from the intermediate-level VAPs. As such, the BE process represents the final stage in data processing for the Raman lidar. Its principal function is to extract the primary variables from each of the intermediate-level VAPs, perform additional quality control, and combine all of this information into a single output file for the end-user. The focus of this document is to describe the processing performed by the BE VAP process.

  18. Macrophysical Properties of Tropical Cirrus Clouds from the CALIPSO Satellite and from Ground-based Micropulse and Raman Lidars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, D.; Turner, David D.

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and In- frared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cy- cle is significantly different than zero only below about 11 km; where it is the opposite sign (i.e. more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geomet- rical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both datasets have signficantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the vast im- provement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds as well as a valuable ground-based lidar dataset for the validation of CALIPSO observations and to help im- prove our understanding of tropical cirrus clouds.

  19. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols at the US Southern Great Plains Climate Study Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Blair, F.H.; Bisson, S.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program, Southern Great Plains CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site in northern Oklahoma. Research conducted at several laboratories has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We have developed and installed a ruggedized Raman lidar system that resides permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to eliminate the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar provides quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

  20. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP

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  1. Raman Lidar Receives Improvements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

  3. Lidar characterization of crystalline silica generation and gravel plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trzepla-Nabaglo, K.; Shiraki, R.; Holm'en, B. A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lidar vertical pro?les and wind speed data were used toof wind speed and concentration (based on lidar verticalvertical plane at a given height, z, was calculated as the product of the wind speed

  4. Lidar Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollpert.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

  5. Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, C; Comstock, J

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lidar backscattered signal is a useful tool for identifying vertical cloud structure in the atmosphere in optically thin clouds. Cloud boundaries derived from lidar signals are a necessary input for popular ARM data products, such as the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product. An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been implemented for use with the ARM Micropulse Lidar (MPL) systems. In addition to retrieving cloud boundaries above 500 m, the value-added product (VAP) named Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask (MPLCMASK) applies lidar-specific corrections (i.e., range-square, background, deadtime, and overlap) as described in Campbell et al. (2002) to the measured backscattered lidar. Depolarization ratio is computed using the methodology developed by Flynn et al. (2007) for polarization-capable MPL systems. The cloud boundaries output from MPLCMASK will be the primary lidar cloud mask for input to the ARSCL product and will be applied to all MPL systems, including historical data sets.

  6. Airborne Multiwavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) Observations During TCAP 2012: Vertical Proles of Optical and Microphysical Properties of a Smoke/Urban Haze Plume Over the Northeastern Coast of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Kolgotin, A.; Hair, John; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David; Rogers, R. R.; Hare, Rich; Cleckner, Craig; Obland, Michael; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Berg, Larry K.; Schmid, Beat

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present rst measurements with the rst airborne multiwavelength High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2), developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was operated during the Department of Energy (DOE) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012. We observed out ow of urban haze and fresh biomass burning smoke from the East Coast of the US out over the West Atlantic Ocean. Lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm were ... sr indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. Extinctionrelated Angstrom exponents were 1.5{2 pointing at comparably small particles. Our novel automated, unsupervised data inversion algorithm retrieves particle e*ective radii of approximately 0.2 *m, which is in agreement with the large Angstrom exponents. We nd reasonable agreement to particle size parameters obtained from situ measurements carried out with the DOE G-1 aircraft that ew during the lidar observations.

  7. Ris-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the spinner axis's vertical tilt and the wind turbine's yaw relative to the mean wind speed direction: Data Files 54 Appendix B: Wind Speed Vertical Profile 55 Appendix C: Sonic Cup Comparison 59Risø-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a Rotating Spinner: "SpinnerEx 2009" Nikolas

  8. Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Kaiguang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) directly measures canopy vertical structures, and provides an effective remote sensing solution to accurate and spatiallyexplicit mapping of forest characteristics, such as canopy height and Leaf Area Index...

  9. Raman Nanometrology of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calizo, Irene Gonzales

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 Optical image of the graphene layers. . . . . .Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Grapheneand Graphene Multi-Layers . . . . Raman Spectroscopy

  10. Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, A; Flynn, C

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is the same as for radar. Pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is infered. Besides real-time detection of clouds, post-processing of the lidar return can also characterize the extent and properties of aerosol or other particle-laden regions.

  11. Forbidden vertices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. In this work, we introduce and study the forbidden-vertices problem. Given a polytope P and a subset X of its vertices, we study the complexity of linear ...

  12. ARM - PI Product - Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

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  13. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  14. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  15. airborne oceanographic lidar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Channels Landslides Spatial Cognition The emergence of airborne lidar data cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables...

  16. Portable raman explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  17. JOURNAL OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY J. Raman Spectrosc. 2005; 36: 864871

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    traditionally been utilized to indicate the phase transition. Comparisons with the Raman spectra of spodumene

  18. Raman scattering in crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  20. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

  1. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with rotational speed control systems. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotating shaft by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the shaft and being provided with aerodynamic control elements operating manually or automatically to control the rotational speed of the turbine.

  2. Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcell, Wesley Tyler

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Popescu Proof of concept lidar research has, to date, examined wall-to-wall models of forest ecosystems. While these studies have been important for verifying lidars efficacy for forest surveys, complete coverage is likely not the most cost effective... year of my graduate studies. Also, to Jin Zhu and the other members of the Aerial Photography project at the Texas Forest Service for opening my eyes to the practical uses of GIS and remote sensing, their encouragement for me to obtain a graduate...

  3. Raman accumulator as a fusion laser driver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.; Swingle, J.C.

    1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for simultaneous laser pulse amplification and compression, using multiple pass Raman scattering in one Raman cell and pulse switchout from the optical cavity through use of a dichroic device associated with the Raman cell.

  4. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne lidar measurements Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne INSAR is 2-5 m over... . However, LIDAR has potential as a complementary measurement to INSAR. The LIDAR data used in this study... estimate and the adjacent LIDAR ......

  6. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  7. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  8. Nanopillars array for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Chang, A; Bora, M; Nguyen, H T; Behymer, E M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Carter, J C; Bond, T C

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a new class of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. Two types of nanopillars within this class are discussed: vertical pillars and tapered pillars. For the vertical pillars, the gap between each pair of nanopillars is small enough (< 50 nm) such that highly confined plasmonic cavity resonances are supported between the pillars when light is incident upon them, and the anti-nodes of these resonances act as three-dimensional hotspots for SERS. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of 1,2 bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE), benzenethiol (BT) monolayer and toluene vapor. The results show that SERS enhancement factor of over 0.5 x 10{sup 9} can be achieved, and BPE can be detected down to femto-molar concentration level. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors such as volatile organic compounds.

  9. Superradiant Raman Laser Magnetometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Joshua M; Bohnet, Justin G; Chen, Zilong; Thompson, James K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a proof-of-principle magnetometer that relies on the active oscillation of a cold atom Raman laser to continuously map a field-sensitive atomic phase onto the phase of the radiated light. We demonstrate wideband sensitivity during continuous active oscillation, as well as narrowband sensitivity in passive Ramsey-like mode with translation of the narrowband detection in frequency using spin-echo techniques. The sensor operates with a sensitivity of 190 pT/Hz^(1/2) at 1 kHz and effective sensing volume of 2 * 10^-3 mm^3. Fundamental quantum limits on the magnetic field sensitivity of an ideal detector are also considered.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman scattering has been used extensively to study the vibrational and rotational properties of molecules under a variety of conditions. Here, interest is in the behavior of water molecules shocked to high pressures and temperatures. Behind the shock front the water molecules undergo changes in bonding and the molecules may become ionized. Raman spectroscopy can be used to determine the molecular species behind the shock front. In addition, changes in Raman spectra can yield information regarding inter- and intramolecular potentials and the temperature behind the shock front.

  11. Lidar techniques for search and rescue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, W.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four techniques for using LIDAR in Search and Rescue Operations will be discussed. The topic will include laser retroreflection, laser-induced fluorescence in the visible, laser-induced fluorescence during daylight hours, and laser-induced fluorescence in the uv. These techniques use high-repetition rate lasers at a variety of frequencies to induce either fluorescence in dye markers or retroreflection from plastic corner cubes on life preservers and other emergency markers.

  12. 2.1 RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors with the use of narrowband (~0.4 nm bandpass) filters, reduces the background skylight and, therefore

  13. Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014SocietyJ. Dudhia51 Posters7551

  14. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision

  15. Ris-PhD-Report Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAs;#12;Author: Ferhat Bingöl Title: Complex terrain and wind lidars Division: Wind Energy Division Risø-PhD-52 and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated

  16. EN-025 Tools & Applications December 2008 Lidar Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IS LIDAR? Lidar (light detection and ranging system) is a relatively new type of active remote sensing are small-footprint, discrete return systems that record two to five returns for each emitted laser pulse fashion as an aerial photography camera. · An inertial measurement unit that records the pitch, yaw

  17. Ris {R{1127(EN) Lidar data used in the COFIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3.1 Generation of arti cial smoke 7 4 Data processing 8 4.1 The lidar equation 8 4.2 Backscatter, see below. In FLADIS the smoke were added to an initial heavy gas plume. 2 Experimental design Figures response. However, the Lidar does have a averaging volume due to the leng

  18. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

  19. Micropulse Lidar The ARM Program studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1 Micropulse Lidar The ARM Program

  20. ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM DatagovMeasurementsVertical

  1. JOURNAL OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY J. Raman Spectrosc. 2003; 34: 769775

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Science (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/jrs.1051 Raman spectroscopic study of spodumene (LiAlSi2O6 spectrum of a natural specimen of the pyroxene spodumene, from its low-pressure (C2/c) to its high, was not observed. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: spodumene; pyroxene; pressure-induced phase

  2. Inversion-free, noiseless Raman echoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byoung S. Ham

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using double optical Raman rephasing, an inversion-free resonant Raman echo is studied in an inhomogeneously broadened spin ensemble of a solid medium, where the Raman optical field-excited spin coherence has a frozen propagation vector. Unlike photon echoes whose quantum memory application is strictly limited due to \\pi rephasing pulse-induced population inversion causing quantum noises, the optical Raman field-excited spin echo is inherently silent owing to the frozen propagation vector. Thus, the doubly rephased Raman echo can be directly applied for quantum interface in a population inversion-free environment.

  3. Intermodal entanglement in Raman processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswajit Sen; Sandip Kumar Giri; Swapan Mandal; C. H. Raymond Ooi; Anirban Pathak

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The operator solution of a completely quantum mechanical Hamiltonian of the Raman processes is used here to investigate the possibility of obtaining intermodal entanglement between different modes involved in the Raman processes (e.g. pump mode, Stokes mode, vibration (phonon) mode and anti-Stokes mode). Intermodal entanglement is reported between a) pump mode and anti-Stokes mode, b) pump mode and vibration (phonon) mode c) Stokes mode and vibration phonon mode, d) Stokes mode and anti-stokes mode in the stimulated Raman processes for the variation of the phase angle of complex eigenvalue $\\alpha_{1}$ of pump mode $a$. Some incidents of intermodal entanglement in the spontaneous and the partially spontaneous Raman processes are also reported. Further it is shown that the specific choice of coupling constants may produce genuine entanglement among Stokes mode, anti-Stokes mode and vibration-phonon mode. It is also shown that the two mode entanglement not identified by Duan's criterion may be identified by Hillery-Zubairy criteria. It is further shown that intermodal entanglement, intermodal antibunching and intermodal squeezing are independent phenomena.

  4. Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: • An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 • Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 • MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

  5. airborne lidar mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A minimum height of 1 m was applied to define woody understorey. Critical to this process were a Digital Terrain Model (extracted from the leaf-off last return LiDAR data)...

  6. URBAN MODELING FROM LIDAR DATA IN AN INTEGRATED GIS ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    are analyzed and possible solutions are proposed by fusing lidar data with other image data. Study shows: it allows rapid generation large-scale DTM (digital terrain model); is daylight independent; is relatively

  7. absorption lidar dial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Development of an eye-safe diode-laser-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (MP-dial) for atmospheric water-vapor and aerosol studies. Open Access Theses...

  8. A motor drive control system for the Lidar Polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Waiming

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MOTOR DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LIDAR POLARIMETER A Thesis by Waiming Leung Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A/M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF, May 1977 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering A MOTOR DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LIDAR POLARIMETER A Thesis by Waiming Leung Approved as to style and content by: Chairman o Comm' ee ea o epartment Member Mem er May 1977 ABSTRACT A Motor Drive Control...

  9. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  10. Mapping surface fuels using LIDAR and multispectral data fusion for fire behavior modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Muge

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , LIDAR derived data provides accurate estimates of surface fuel parameters efficiently and accurately over extensive areas of forests. This study demonstrates the importance of using accurate maps of fuel models derived using new LIDAR remote sensing...

  11. Raman activity in synchronously dividing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne, S.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a spectrometer equipped with an optical-multichannel analyzer as the detector (OMA), we have observed the Stokes laser-Raman spectra of metabolically active Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium from 100 - 2100 cm/sup -1/. After lengthy investigation, no Raman lines attributable to the metabolic process nor the cells themselves were found. Previous Raman spectra of active bacteria cannot be used to support nonlinear theories in biology. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal densities; therefore, geospatial analysis, when applied to decadal lidar time series, needs to address

  13. Alternate spatial sampling approaches for ecosystem structure inventory using spaceborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    used in aircraft lidar remote sensing where power, heat, and reliability are less of a concern since January 2011 Accepted 29 January 2011 Available online 23 March 2011 Keywords: Lidar Remote sensing Laser collected in transects and should be considered for future lidar remote sensing missions. © 2011 Elsevier

  14. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  15. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  16. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  17. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon, M.; Vercherin, B.; Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine-mounted lidars provide preview measurements of the incoming wind field. By reducing loads on critical components and increasing the potential power extracted from the wind, the performance of wind turbine controllers can be improved [2]. As a result, integrating a light detection and ranging (lidar) system has the potential to lower the cost of wind energy. This paper presents an evaluation of turbine-mounted lidar availability. Availability is a metric which measures the proportion of time the lidar is producing controller-usable data, and is essential when a wind turbine controller relies on a lidar. To accomplish this, researchers from Avent Lidar Technology and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory first assessed and modeled the effect of extreme atmospheric events. This shows how a multirange lidar delivers measurements for a wide variety of conditions. Second, by using a theoretical approach and conducting an analysis of field feedback, we investigated the effects of the lidar setup on the wind turbine. This helps determine the optimal lidar mounting position at the back of the nacelle, and establishes a relationship between availability, turbine rpm, and lidar sampling time. Lastly, we considered the role of the wind field reconstruction strategies and the turbine controller on the definition and performance of a lidar's measurement availability.

  18. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  19. Vertical axis wind turbine acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Charlie

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Acoustics Charlie Pearson Corpus Christi College Cambridge University Engineering Department A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy September 2013 Declaration Described in this dissertation is work... quickly to changing wind conditions, small- scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have been proposed as an efficient solution for deployment in built up areas, where the wind is more gusty in nature. If VAWTs are erected in built up areas...

  20. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA’s High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  1. FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

  2. Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, Thomas J.

    Cameron Dickinson,1 Leonce Komguem,1 and Clive Cook1 Received 30 August 2007; revised 9 March 2008 of backscattered laser light from airborne dust and clouds. These observations will be coordinated with solar, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10

  3. absorption lidar performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption lidar performance First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a...

  4. absorption lidar sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption lidar sensitivity First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a...

  5. absorption lidar system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption lidar system First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a differential...

  6. INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkingham, Peter

    101 INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR TRACKSITE (WYOMING Resource Technology Section, National Operations Center, Bu- reau of Land Management, Bldg. 50 Denver, CO of successful schemes is testament to the advances made in attitudes and approaches to fossil site management

  7. Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schirmacher, Walter

    Inelastic neutron and low-frequency Raman scattering in a niobium-phosphate glass for Raman gain: Raman scattering; Neutron scattering; Raman gain; Boson peak We present measurements of the vibrational, extracted from specific-heat or neutron scattering measurements [7,8]. Only very recently two of the present

  8. The vibrational Raman spectrum of CS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Harold Noble

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CSp A Thesis By HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD Approved as to style and content by Chairman o| Committee THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CS2 HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD A Thesis Suhmitted to the Graduate School... in the procurement of necessary equipment. SECTION I: INTRODUCTION. SECTION II: CLASSICAL THEORY OF RAHAM SCATTERING . SECTION III: THEORY OF NORMAL VIBRATIONS AND VIBRATIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS. A, Morsel Vibrations B. Vibrational Wave Eqnation and lhergy Levels...

  9. High fidelity nanohole enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahns, J. T.; Guo, Q.; Gray, S. K.; Jaeger, H. M.; Chen, L.; Montgomery, J. M.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a sensitive technique that can even detect single molecules. However, in many SERS applications, the strongly inhomogeneous distribution of intense local fields makes it very difficult for a quantitive assessment of the fidelity, or reproducibility of the signal, which limits the application of SERS. Herein, we report the development of exceptionally high-fidelity hole-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HERS) from ordered, 2D hexagonal nanohole arrays. We take the fidelity f to be a measure of the percent deviation of the Raman peaks from measurement to measurement. Overall, area averaged fidelities for 12 gold array samples ranged from f {approx} 2-15% for HERS using aqueous R6G molecules. Furthermore, intensity modulations of the enhanced Raman spectra were measured for the first time as a function of polarization angle. The best of these measurements, which focus on static laser spots on the sample, could be consistent with even higher fidelities than the area-averaged results. Nanohole arrays in silver provided supporting polarization measurements and a more complete enhanced Raman fingerprint for phenylalanine molecules. We also carried out finite-difference time-domain calculations to assist in the interpretation of the experiments, identifying the polarization dependence as possibly arising from hole-hole interactions. Our results represent a step toward making quantitative and reproducible enhanced Raman measurements possible and also open new avenues for a large-scale source of highly uniform hot spots.

  10. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

  11. SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint Citation Details In-Document...

  12. Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

  13. Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soriano, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buttler, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baldasano, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

  14. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA); Herbst, Richard L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  15. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  16. Short-range, Non-contact Detection of Surface Contamination Using Raman Lidar Arthur J. Sedlacek, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -time detection and identification of bulk amounts of substances on surfaces. Optical spectroscopic methods detection and identification of chemical spills is discussed. The new chemical sensor combines the spectral-range (meters to tens of meters), non-contact detection and identification of unknown substances on surfaces

  17. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6099359380

  18. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  19. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  20. 7, 1275112779, 2007 Vertical distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . In an urban area there are many buildings, which cause large inhomogeneities in the energy and wind profilesACPD 7, 12751­12779, 2007 Vertical distribution of O3 and VOCs in Mexico City E. Velasco et al of Mexico City E. Velasco1,2 , C. M´arquez3 , E. Bueno3 , R. M. Bernab´e3 , A. S´anchez3 , O. Fentanes 3 , H

  1. ARM: ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  2. All Sky Camera, LIDAR and Electric Field Meter: auxiliary instruments for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leto, Giuseppe; Bellassai, Giancarlo; Bruno, Pietro; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Martinetti, Eugenio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASTRI SST-2M is the end-to-end prototype telescope of the Italian National Institute of Astro- physics, INAF, designed to investigate the 10-100 TeV band in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope has been installed in Italy in September 2014, at the INAF ob- serving station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna. The telescope is foreseen to be completed and fully operative in spring 2015 including auxiliary instrumentation needed to support both operations and data anal- ysis. In this contribution we present the current status of a sub-set of the auxiliary instruments that are being used at the Serra La Nave site, namely an All Sky Camera, an Electric Field Meter and a Raman Lidar devoted, together with further instrumentation, to the monitoring of the atmospheric and environmental conditions. The data analysis techniques under development for these instruments could be applied at the CTA sites, where similar auxiliary instrumentation will be installed.

  3. Vertical Integration and Technology: Theory and Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    We study the determinants of vertical integration. We first derive a number of predictions regarding the relationship between technology intensity and vertical integration from a simple incomplete contracts model. Then, ...

  4. Real-time Raman system for in vivo disease diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motz, Jason T.

    Raman spectroscopy has been well established as a powerful in vitro method for studying biological tissue and diagnosing disease. The recent development of efficient, high-throughput, low-background optical fiber Raman ...

  5. Absolute Raman matrix elements of graphene and graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Stephanie

    Using sample substitution [Grimsditch et al., J. Raman Spectrosc. 10, 77 (1981)] we deconvolve the highly wavelength-dependent response of the spectrometer from the Raman spectra of graphene suspended on an SiO[subscript ...

  6. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman study of asymmetrically substituted viologens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, T.; Cotton, T.M.; Hurst, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.P.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The normal Raman (NR), resonance Raman (RR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of the three redox forms of several asymmetric viologens, N-octyl-N'-methylviologen (C/sub 8/MV), N-dodecyl-N'-methylviologen (C/sub 12/MV), and N-hexadecyl-N'-methylviologen (C/sub 16/MV), have been characterized and compared with the corresponding spectra of the three redox forms of methylviologen (MV). It was observed that the substituents of the two N atoms of the viologen do not affect its overall symmetry. Only the Raman bands near 1200 cm/sup /minus/1/, containing major contributions from the N-alkyl stretching vibrations, are affected by the asymmetric substitution. The RR spectra of both the monomer and dimer forms of the cation radicals were obtained by varying the experimental conditions used in their preparation. As previously observed for MV, dimerization of the asymmetric viologen radicals produces splitting of certain RR bands. Resonance Raman spectra of the fully reduced viologens were also obtained and used to monitor the disproportionation reaction between the dication and fully reduced form of the viologen. Surface-enhanced Raman and SERRS spectra of the different asymmetric viologens were found to vary slightly due to changes in their adsorption behavior with increasing chain length of the alkyl substituent.

  7. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  8. Double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates: an intuitive coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Westcott, L. R. Hirsch, J. L. West, and N. J. Halas, "Controlling the surface enhanced Raman effect via

  9. LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights Alfredo Peña1 , Sven at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm. The influence of atmospheric stability on the surface layer wind shear: Charnock, LiDAR, Marine boundary layer, Offshore, Surface layer, Wind profile. 1 Introduction There is

  10. Turbine Reliability and Operability Optimization through the use of Direct Detection Lidar Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, David K; Lewis, Matthew J; Pavlich, Jane C; Wright, Alan D; Johnson, Kathryn E; Pace, Andrew M

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this Department of Energy (DOE) project is to increase wind turbine efficiency and reliability with the use of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system. The LIDAR provides wind speed and direction data that can be used to help mitigate the fatigue stress on the turbine blades and internal components caused by wind gusts, sub-optimal pointing and reactionary speed or RPM changes. This effort will have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs of turbines across the industry. During the course of the project, Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) modified and tested a prototype direct detection wind LIDAR instrument; the resulting LIDAR design considered all aspects of wind turbine LIDAR operation from mounting, assembly, and environmental operating conditions to laser safety. Additionally, in co-operation with our partners, the National Renewable Energy Lab and the Colorado School of Mines, progress was made in LIDAR performance modeling as well as LIDAR feed forward control system modeling and simulation. The results of this investigation showed that using LIDAR measurements to change between baseline and extreme event controllers in a switching architecture can reduce damage equivalent loads on blades and tower, and produce higher mean power output due to fewer overspeed events. This DOE project has led to continued venture capital investment and engagement with leading turbine OEMs, wind farm developers, and wind farm owner/operators.

  11. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    #12;Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology Arlen F. Chasea,1. The impor- tance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from in the remote geospatial imaging of cultural landscapes, including ancient communities and their anthropogenic

  12. A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements Chuanfeng algorithm to detect aerosols and clouds based on micropulse lidar measurements. A semidiscretization is then introduced. Combined with empirical threshold values, we determine if the signal waves indicate clouds

  13. Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou and Ulrich models for residential areas from aerial LiDAR scans. The key differ- ence between downtown area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually contains rich vegetation. Thus, we propose a robust

  14. Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually con- tains rich vegetation. Thus representing the 3D urban reality of residential areas. Keywords: urban modeling, LiDAR, residential area

  15. Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy of High-temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy of High-temperature Superconductors C. Thomsen and G. Kaczmarczyk-temperature Superconductors C. Thomsen and G. Kaczmarczyk Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany 1 INTRODUCTION Raman after the discovery of high- critical-temperature Tc superconductors:2 while reports on Raman scattering

  16. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy Yan Zhou Cheng-Hui Liu Yi Sun Yang Pu://biomedicaloptics.spiedigitallibrary.org/ on 11/16/2012 Terms of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro

  17. Special Section Guest Editorial Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Special Section Guest Editorial Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical Applications. The combination of high resolution and molecular contrast has moved Raman techniques into the biomedical spotlight on biomedical imag- ing. The spontaneous Raman interaction is weak, yielding insufficient photons for fast

  18. Identifying the top of the tropical tropopause layer from vertical mass flux analysis and CALIPSO lidar cloud observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    deep convection from the tropical rainfall measuring mission precipitation radar, Alcala and Dessler defined as the level of zero net radiative heating, which occurs near 14.5­15 km [e.g., Folkins et al convection occurring below this level will sink back to the surface, and air detraining above this level

  19. Raman laser with controllable suppression of parasitics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for switching energy out of a Raman laser optical cavity. Coherent radiation at both the pump and first Stokes wave frequencies are introduced into the optical cavity from the same direction, and a second Stokes wave is utilized to switch the energy out of the cavity.

  20. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report A Protat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser TheLessons LearnedLibraryTeamingLidar

  1. Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

  2. Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shuang; Sullivan, Maurice O.; Hui, Rongqing

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement Shuang Gao,1,2 Maurice O’Sullivan,3 and Rongqing Hui2,* 1Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China... lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in- phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation...

  3. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  4. Downstream Competition, Foreclosure, and Vertical Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Downstream Competition, Foreclosure, and Vertical Integration Gilles Chemla ¤ July 8, 2002 and Management Strategy 12, 2 (2003) 261-289." #12;Downstream Competition, Forclosure, and Vertical Integration Abstract This paper analyzes the impact of competition among downstream ¯rms on an upstream ¯rm's payo

  5. Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and Backscatter Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison of mineral dust aerosol retrievals from two instruments, MODIS and CALIPSO lidar. And, we implement and evaluate a new mineral dust detection algorithm based on the analysis of thin dust radiative signature. In comparison, three commonly used...

  6. Accessing the Energy Department’s Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Energy Department’s floating lidar buoy off of Virginia Beach, Virginia, in less than 30 meters (m) of water,...

  7. SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a...

  8. NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION by GIJS DE BOER local forcing. A wide range of scales is simulated using the nesting capability of the University

  9. Development of a lidar polarimeter technique of measuring suspended solids in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presley, David W

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W. PRESLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject; Electrical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W, PRESLEY Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committee H d of Department...

  10. Graphene and its derivatives : fabrication and Raman spectroscopy study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Chunxiao.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis presents results on fabrication and Raman spectroscopy studies of graphene and its derivates. The works can be divided into two parts as follows.… (more)

  11. Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy. Citation: Windisch CF, Jr, CH Henager, MH Engelhard, and WD Bennett.2011."Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature Oxidation of...

  12. Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOX fuel mixtures. Citation: Windisch CF, Jr, CH Henager, Jr, MH Engelhard, and WD Bennett.2009."Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions using miniature...

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and DFT investigations of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and DFT investigations of the adsorption of phenanthrenequinone on onion-like carbon Daniela M. Anjos a , Alexander I. Kolesnikov a , Zili Wu a...

  14. An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

  15. MODIFYING AN INVERTED LABORATORY MICROSCOPE FOR RAMAN Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODIFYING AN INVERTED LABORATORY MICROSCOPE FOR RAMAN MICROSCOPY A Thesis Presented in Partial modifications a spectroscopic imaging instrument, a Raman microscope, can be constructed from a common inverted

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - adeep-ultraviolet resonance raman Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maruyama Summary: Temperature dependence of resonance Raman of single-walled carbon nanotubes Shohei Chiashi... , Mototeru Oba and Shigeo Maruyama Raman scattering from...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-stokes raman spectroscopic Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic imaging device in which two laser pulse trains... . August 19, 2008 System and method for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering...

  18. Optical pumping via incoherent Raman transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Boozer; R. Miller; T. E. Northup; A. Boca; H. J. Kimble

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new optical pumping scheme is presented that uses incoherent Raman transitions to prepare a trapped Cesium atom in a specific Zeeman state within the 6S_{1/2}, F=3 hyperfine manifold. An important advantage of this scheme over existing optical pumping schemes is that the atom can be prepared in any of the F=3 Zeeman states. We demonstrate the scheme in the context of cavity quantum electrodynamics, but the technique is equally applicable to a wide variety of atomic systems with hyperfine ground-state structure.

  19. Quantum-entanglement-initiated super Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has now been possible to prepare a chain of ions in an entangled state and thus the question arises: How will the optical properties of a chain of entangled ions differ from say a chain of independent particles? We investigate nonlinear optical processes in such chains. Since light scattering is quite a versatile technique to probe matter, we explicitly demonstrate the possibility of entanglement-produced super Raman scattering. Our results suggest the possibility of similar enhancement factors in other nonlinear processes like four-wave mixing.

  20. CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER : PROPOSED INTERIORS FOR CABIN CUM MEETING ROOM AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, C V RAMAN AVENUE, BANGALORE COMPLEX, KAMARAJ ROAD, II CROSS, BANGALORE - 560042 #12;INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080

  1. Raman Measurements on Electrochemically Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Raman Measurements on Electrochemically Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes P. M. Rafailov, M and studied the Raman response of electro- chemically doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using different salt solutions. The fre- quency shift of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the high-energy mode

  2. Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation S.J.V. Frankland *, D hydrogen in individual single-shell carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes using a semiclassical model. The calculations predict that isolated hydrogen molecules inside of nanotubes have a Raman frequency that increases

  3. Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzman de Villoria, R.

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), sometimes called forests or carpets, are a promising material due to their unique physical and scale-dependent physical properties [1-3]. Continuous production of VACNTs is ...

  4. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  5. Vertical Glider Robots for Subsea Equipment Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Brooks L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an underwater vehicle that offers significant performance improvements over existing sub sea elevators. Our Vertical Glider Robot falls under its own weight to a precise location on the seafloor, employing ...

  6. Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

  7. Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannitsis, Constantine

    The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindInnovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors This project seeks to advance large offshore vertical-axis wind...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationSandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research Presented at Science of Making Torque from Wind Conference Sandia Vertical-Axis...

  10. WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

  11. Wind velocity measurements using a pulsed LIDAR system: first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    . A laser beam of 1.54 µm wavelength takes measurements of the wind speed in beamwise direction. To obtain the three-dimensinal wind vector, the beam is inclined by 30 from vertical direction and measurements 12345 t [s] vh[m/s] Figure 2. Segment of measured time series of the horizontal wind speed magnitude vh

  12. Deriving a Framework for Estimating Individual Tree Measurements with Lidar for Use in the TAMBEETLE Southern Pine Beetle Infestation Growth Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stukey, Jared D.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . TAMBEETLE was used to compare spot growth between a lidar-derived forest map and a forest map generated by TAMBEETLE, based on sample plot characteristics. The lidar-derived forest performed comparably to the TAMBEETLE generated forest. Using lidar to map...

  13. Simple Doppler Wind Lidar adaptive observation experiments with 3D-Var and an ensemble Kalman filter in a global primitive equations model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    the next few years, the first Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) will be deployed in space by the European Space1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Simple Doppler Wind Lidar adaptive Experiments, we compare several adaptive observation strategies designed to subsample Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL

  14. Remote control and telescope auto-alignment system for multiangle LIDAR under development at CEILAP, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallotta, Juan; Otero, Lidia; Chouza, Fernando; Raul, Delia; Gonzalez, Francisco; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET), a multiangle LIDAR is under development to monitor aerosol extinction coefficients in the frame of the CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) Project. This is an initiative to build the next generation of ground-based instruments to collect very high energy gamma-ray radiation (>10 GeV). The atmospheric conditions are very important for CTA observations, and LIDARs play an important role in the measurement of the aerosol optical depth at any direction. The LIDAR being developed at CEILAP was conceived to operate in harsh environmental conditions during the shifts, and these working conditions may produce misalignments. To minimize these effects, the telescopes comprising the reception unit are controlled by a self-alignment system. This paper describes the self-alignment method and hardware automation.

  15. A low order model for vertical axis wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drela, Mark

    A new computational model for initial sizing and performance prediction of vertical axis wind turbines

  16. Angular output of hollow, metal-lined, waveguide Raman sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biedrzycki, Stephen; Buric, Michael P.; Falk, Joel; Woodruff, Steven D.

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow, metal-lined waveguides used as gas sensors based on spontaneous Raman scattering are capable of large angular collection. The collection of light from a large solid angle implies the collection of a large number of waveguide modes. An accurate estimation of the propagation losses for these modes is required to predict the total collected Raman power. We report a theory/experimental comparison of the Raman power collected as a function of the solid angle and waveguide length. New theoretical observations are compared with previous theory appropriate only for low-order modes. A cutback experiment is demonstrated to verify the validity of either theory. The angular distribution of Raman light is measured using aluminum and silver-lined waveguides of varying lengths.

  17. Detection of Physiologically Relevant Alcohol Concentrations Using Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Joshua L.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first step in a series of studies to test the feasibility of using Raman Spectroscopy (RS) to non-invasively detect physiologically relevant blood alcohol concentrations. Blood tests, urine tests, and the breathalyzer are currently...

  18. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on a flat graphene surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Weigao

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an attractive analytical technique, which enables single-molecule sensitive detection and provides its special chemical fingerprints. During the past decades, researchers have ...

  19. Quantitative biological Raman spectroscopy for non-invasive blood analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long term goal of this project is the measurement of clinically-relevant analytes in the blood tissue matrix of human subjects using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy, with the shorter term research directed towards ...

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  1. PATTERI'JSOF VERTICAL AND REPRODUCIIONIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    of six corTrrno species of Hawaii-an Oplophoridae are presented. Trvo different patterns of adult conmon species lived above 7OO m and undervrent extensive vertical migrat-ions to shallorver rvaters aE of the adultsl the type of embryonic develop- mentl and Ehe amount of yolk in the embryo aE the time of hatching

  2. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

  3. Using LIDAR in Highway Rock Cuts Norbert H. Maerz, Ph. D., P. Eng,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    the data needed to begin the process of modeling the rock raveling process. INTRODUCTION LIDAR damage, injury, and even death. Highways impeded by even small spills of rock material by blasting techniques to facilitate the highway construction. A constant danger to the motoring public

  4. Measuring forest structure and biomass in New England forest stands using Echidna ground-based lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni-Meister, Wenge

    Measuring forest structure and biomass in New England forest stands using Echidna ground Accepted 12 March 2010 Available online 14 May 2011 Keywords: Ground-based lidar Forest structure Biomass biomass with very good accuracy in six New England hardwood and conifer forest stands. Comparing forest

  5. Master Thesis: Dual-Doppler technique applied to scanning lidars for the characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    of single wind turbines for the validation or tuning of wake models [1]. Recent full-field campaigns showed the opportunity to apply ground based scanning lidar or radar measurements to evaluate the wind field in the wake the correlated wind field. The scope of this master thesis is to study the interaction of wakes on the basis

  6. LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model 1 dynamics, lIre performed at four diameters behind a 95 kW wind turbine. The wake 111eaeasurement technique allows esti111ation of qUClsiinstantancou~ two dimensional wind fields in an area

  7. A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic extraction. Following this preprocessing, channels are defined as curves of minimal effort, or geodesics and geodesic paths, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F01002, doi:10.1029/2009JF001254. 1. Introduction [2] The detection

  8. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiments (Lake-ICE), on December 21, 1997 the University of Wisconsin VolumeLIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT G circulation over Lake Michigan. Backscatter returns revealed a steady offshore flow extending 1.5 to 4 km

  9. Improved forecasts of extreme weather events by future space borne Doppler wind lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marseille, Gert-Jan

    sensitive areas. To answer these questions simulation experiments with state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) models have proved great value to test future meteorological observing systems a prioriImproved forecasts of extreme weather events by future space borne Doppler wind lidar Gert

  10. Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes Matthew V. Bilskie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    : Shallow water equations Unstructured mesh Lidar DEM Storm surge Accuracy a b s t r a c t This study water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th, urban regions, etc.) and have coarse mesh resolution in areas outside the focus region (e.g. deep water

  11. Metal uorescence lidar (light detection and ranging) and the middle atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lidar takes advantage of the naturally occurring sodium atoms between 80 and 110 km above sea level (the though it is exposed to constant solar radiation. The hope of explaining a region strongly coupled as the `-pause' of the layer below them (see ®gure 1). Radiative absorption and emission are dominating eects

  12. Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingöl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike Courtney, Gunner Larsen, Ebba Dellwik Juan Jose Trujillo* and Hans E. Jørgensen Wind Energy Department Risø of the presentation · Introduction to wind energy · Accurate profiles of the mean wind speed · Wakes behind turbines

  13. Remote sensing the wind using Lidars and Sodars Ioannis Antoniou (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the met masts increases rapidly with height. The evolution of new multi-MW wind turbines has resulted), as met towers increase in height, increases rapidly. The second reason is the measurement of the windRemote sensing the wind using Lidars and Sodars Ioannis Antoniou (1) , Mike Courtney(1) , Hans E

  14. Impact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    forecast errors of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. Tropical mass­windImpact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation, De Bilt, Netherlands CHRISTOPHE ACCADIA AND PETER SCHL�SSEL European Organisation

  15. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  16. Master thesis: "Validation of wake-simulation models based on long-range lidar measurements."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    REpower 6M wind turbines with rotor blades of different designs installed in the Ellhöft/Westre wind farm developed by the wind turbine manufacturer. Work plan 2011 2012 Task 11 12 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Figure 1: Simulation of lidar measurements in the wake of a wind turbine using a LES generated wind field

  17. Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Chemical Species in Hanford Tank Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy Technology: FY94Florida State University Raman Spectroscopy Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, F.R.

    1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  18. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  19. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  20. Mass transfer at vertically oscillating surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomaa, H.G. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Landau, J. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Tawell, A.M.A. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of mass transfer at vertically oscillating surfaces is presented. It takes into account the interaction between forced and natural convection and can be used under conditions where the fluid velocity outside the boundary layer changes direction. Because of the good agreement with experimental data, the model can explain the multi-fold increase in mass transfer coefficient obtained under oscillatory conditions. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt. Graham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagelin, S; Lascaux, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of the wind speed vertical distribution V(h) is fundamental for an astronomical site for many different reasons: (1) the wind speed shear contributes to trigger optical turbulence in the whole troposphere, (2) a few of the astroclimatic parameters such as the wavefront coherence time (tau_0) depends directly on V(h), (3) the equivalent velocity V_0, controlling the frequency at which the adaptive optics systems have to run to work properly, depends on the vertical distribution of the wind speed and optical turbulence. Also, a too strong wind speed near the ground can introduce vibrations in the telescope structures. The wind speed at a precise pressure (200 hPa) has frequently been used to retrieve indications concerning the tau_0 and the frequency limits imposed to all instrumentation based on adaptive optics systems, but more recently it has been proved that V_200 (wind speed at 200 hPa) alone is not sufficient to provide exhaustive elements concerning this topic and that the vertical d...

  2. Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Samuel Bruce

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

  3. acesso transeptal vertical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or itemsets is a fundamental and essential problem in many data miningFast Vertical Mining Using Diffsets Mohammed J. Zaki and Karam Gouda Computer Science Dept of vertical...

  4. Marine vertical cable multiple attenuation beyond up/down separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Andre

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine vertical cable acquisition is an emerging technology. It represents an alternative to surface seismic acquisition in areas congested by platforms or other obstacles. The vertical cable acquisition consists of recording pressure at several...

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Carbon Dust Samples from NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Raitses, C.H. Skinner, F. Jiang and T.S. Duffy

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raman spectrum of dust particles exposed to the NSTX plasma is different from the spectrum of unexposed particles scraped from an unused graphite tile. For the unexposed particles, the high energy G-mode peak (Raman shift ~1580 cm-1) is much stronger than the defect-induced D-mode peak (Raman shift ~ 1350 cm-1), a pattern that is consistent with Raman spectrum for commercial graphite materials. For dust particles exposed to the plasma, the ratio of G-mode to D-mode peaks is lower and becomes even less than 1. The Raman measurements indicate that the production of carbon dust particles in NSTX involves modifications of the physical and chemical structure of the original graphite material. These modifications are shown to be similar to those measured for carbon deposits from atmospheric pressure helium arc discharge with an ablating anode electrode made from a graphite tile material. We also demonstrate experimentally that heating to 2000-2700 K alone can not explain the observed structural modifications indicating that they must be due to higher temperatures needed for graphite vaporization, which is followed either by condensation or some plasma-induced processes leading to the formation of more disordered forms of carbon material than the original graphite.

  6. Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Henson, Tammy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumel, Leslie J. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

  7. Maximizing Vertical Air on a Quarter Pipe February 14, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Maximizing Vertical Air on a Quarter Pipe February 14, 2011 Abstract The current record for maximum vertical air achieved by a snow- boarder on a half pipe is 24 feet and 11 inches. We wish to construct a number of moves. To optimize vertical air we suggest a quarter pipe were incoming velocity and therefore

  8. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  9. Noise figure and photon statistics in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    ). 11. J. Perina, "Photon statistics in Raman scattering with frequency mismatch," Optica Acta 28, 1529 (1981). 12. J. Perina, "Photon statistics in Raman scattering of intense coherent light," Optica Acta 28

  10. The application of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of excitatory amino acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Dennis Patrick Doucet

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on aqueous silver colloids. This study examines methods to monitor the colloidal reactions for the calibration of the enhancement observed. Thirty second Raman spectral scans were taken utilizing a 50 mW argon laser...

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) optimized by exploiting optical interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xi

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to study the interference between the coherent nonresonant four-wave-mixing (FWM) background and the Raman-resonant signal in the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The nonresonant background is usually...

  12. Tip-Enhanced Near-Field Raman Spectroscopy Probing Single Dye...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tip-Enhanced Near-Field Raman Spectroscopy Probing Single Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanoparticles. Tip-Enhanced Near-Field Raman Spectroscopy Probing Single Dye-Sensitized TiO2...

  13. G? band in double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes: A Raman study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschmann, Thomas Ch.

    Double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are studied in detail by laser energy-dependent Raman spectroscopy in order to get a deeper understanding about the second-order G[superscript '] band Raman process, general ...

  14. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Study on Graphene-Coated Metallic Nanostructure Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Study on Graphene-Coated Metallic Nanostructure Substrates University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene, we combine graphene with conventional metallic surface- enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates

  15. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - auger resonant raman Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Gas hydrate measurements at Hydrate Ridge using Raman spectroscopy K.C. Hester a , R.M. Dunk b , S... for the first time using a seagoing Raman spectrometer at...

  17. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kyle, Kevin R. (Brentwood, CA); Brown, Steven B. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  18. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinke, Reinhard, E-mail: rene@physik.tu-berlin.de; Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Fokin, Andrey A. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, D-35392 Giessen (Germany) [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Department of Organic Chemistry, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, pr. Pobedy 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)] [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Rodionov, Vladimir N. [Department of Organic Chemistry, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, pr. Pobedy 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine)] [Department of Organic Chemistry, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, pr. Pobedy 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the ?-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  19. Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

  20. HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

  1. Eddy-resolving Lidar Measurements and Numerical Simulations of the Convective Internal Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    in speed. The vertical gradient of wind-speed decreases offshore because of strong vertical mixing caused correlation functions and winds derived from horizontal (PPI) and vertical (RHI) scans of the VIL during Lake.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 DOWNSTREAM WIND SPEEDS FROM RHI SCANS ON 13 JANUARY 1998 SPATIALLY RESOLVED 5-m WINDS

  2. Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, UtahResources/Full Version <VertexVertical

  3. Outline Phonon spectra of graphene Raman spectra of graphene Crystal lattice dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seminar Heng Wang University of Konstanz July 11, 2013 Heng Wang University of Konstanz () Crystal lattice Raman spectra of graphene What is Raman scattering Applications of Raman spectroscopy of graphene Heng (2013). Heng Wang University of Konstanz () Crystal lattice dynamics July 11, 2013 3 / 19 #12;Outline

  4. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Algae: Composition Analysis and Fluorescence Background Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Algae: Composition Analysis and Fluorescence Background performed using Stokes Raman scattering for compositional analysis of algae. Two algal species, Chlorella while acquiring Raman signals from the algae. The time dependence of fluorescence background is char

  5. Raman scattering in carbon nanotubes revisited J. Maultzsch, S. Reich, and C. Thomsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    of whether the high-energy Raman spectrum in carbon nanotubes is also dominated by processes that allow for understanding the high-energy modes in carbon nanotubes attribute the ob- served Raman peaks to -pointRaman scattering in carbon nanotubes revisited J. Maultzsch, S. Reich, and C. Thomsen Institut fu

  6. Variable temperature Raman microscopy as a nanometrology tool for graphene layers and graphene-based devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Variable temperature Raman microscopy as a nanometrology tool for graphene layers and graphene; accepted 24 July 2007; published online 15 August 2007 Raman microscopy of graphene was carried out over-band frequencies extracted from Raman spectra of the single-layer graphene are - 1.6±0.2 10-2 cm-1 /K and - 3

  7. ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/InfraredProductsMicroPulse LIDAR

  8. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  9. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, Robert V. (St. Louis County, MO)

    1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  10. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  11. Stimulated Raman scattering in an ethanol core microstructured optical fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Delaye, Anne Rouvie, Jordi Chinaud, Robert Frey, Gérald Roosen Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d" Phys. Rev. Lett. 9, 455 (1962) 2. Y.R. Shen "The principles of nonlinear optics" (John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1994). 4. R.Frey, F. Pradère "Powerful tunable infrared generation by stimulated Raman

  12. CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    1 CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER FOR : PROPOSED HOSTEL BLOCK AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, FELLOWS RESIDENCY NEXT TO ISRO QUARTERS, JALAHALLI AND PLUMBING WORKS : 136-138 #12;3 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED

  13. Electrochemical and Raman measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Electrochemical and Raman measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes M. Stoll a,*, P performed on a carbon nanotube mat as a working electrode using different salt solutions. The gravimetric capacitance of the nanotube material was estimated and its effective surface area was de- termined in a purely

  14. Raman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes Christian Thomsen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    energy [4]. Theoretically, the electronic dispersion of nanotubes may be described by an- alyticRaman Scattering in Carbon Nanotubes Christian Thomsen1 and Stephanie Reich2 1 Institut f¨ur Festk of single-walled carbon nanotubes reflect the electron and phonon confinement as well as the cylindrical

  15. Probing the Intrinsic Properties of Exfoliated Graphene: Raman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Tony F.

    Probing the Intrinsic Properties of Exfoliated Graphene: Raman Spectroscopy of Free-standing graphene monolayers prepared by mechanical exfoliation of graphite are investigated. The graphene,7 or to solubilize macroscopic quantities of graphene,8 mechanical exfoliation of graphite9 currently remains

  16. Raman Amplification of Laser Pulses in Microcapillary Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of overcoming the power limit of current chirped-pulse-amplification (CPA) CP641, X-Ray Lasers 2002: 8th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers, edited by J. J. Rocca et al. > 2002American Institute of Physics 0 of the optics. Such Raman amplifiers can be useful to produce ultra-intense laser pulses for pumping soft x-ray

  17. hal00276997, Raman spectra of misoriented bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    hal­00276997, version 1 ­ 5 May 2008 Raman spectra of misoriented bilayer graphene P. Poncharal 1 spectra from single layer graphene with a bilayer in which the two layers are arbitrarily misoriented to the similarity of the electronic structures of single layer graphene and misoriented bilayer graphene. Another

  18. Postdoc Position in Microfluidics and Single Cell Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Matthias

    Postdoc Position in Microfluidics and Single Cell Raman Spectroscopy Department of Microbial and Environmental Microfluidics Group (http://web.mit.edu/romanstocker) Department of Civil & Environmental (junior or senior) with strong expertise in microfluidics and an interest in applying it to microbial

  19. Technical Notes UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Detection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    - in wastewater for the real-time control of water treatment plants. The reliability and performance of biological nutrient removal (BNR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can be enhanced by the ability to monitor the utility of UV resonance Raman3-8 spectroscopy to monitor nitrate and nitrite in wastewater treatment

  20. Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad “tail” arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt “network.” Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

  1. Graphene as a Substrate To Suppress Fluorescence in Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liming Xie; Xi Ling; Yuan Fang; Jin Zhang; Zhongfan Liu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), which can enhance Raman signal by 107 times than normal Raman spectroscopy, is a powerful approach to characterize structures of chemicals (especially biomolecules) at low concentrations.1-4 However, fluorescence (FL) background is a major obstacle in RRS because the FL cross section (?10-16 cm2) is much larger than the RRS cross section (?10-22 cm2).3 Several approaches, such as ultraviolet RRS (UV-RRS),1 time-resolved Raman detection,5,6 femtosecond broadband stimu-lated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS),7 and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS),8 have been used to suppress or reject FL background in RRS. However, these approaches need expensive and complex equipments and have other limitations, such as sample degradation in UV-RRS. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another powerful approach to characterize structures of chemicals at extremely low concentrations or even at the single

  2. Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNerney, G.M.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  3. COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATIONS FOR PREDICTING VERTICAL DAYLIGHT LEVELS IN ATRIUM BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiangtao Du; Steve Sharples

    This paper investigates the impact of well geometry and surface reflectance on vertical daylight levels in atria with square forms under a CIE standard overcast sky. By reviewing some previous investigations and comparing with scale model measurements the vertical daylight factor calculated using Radiance are validated. More simulated vertical daylight factors for a very wide range of atrium geometries and reflectances are given. From the results the attenuation and distribution of the vertical daylight levels on the wall of a square atrium with different reflectances are displayed. Also, the comparisons between simulations and two analytical theories have been performed. Finally some conclusions for supporting daylight design in atria are presented.

  4. Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

  5. Preparation and Characterisation of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Rui

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis presents the preparation of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using porous anodic alumina templates via thermal chemical vapour deposition. The characteristics of prepared carbon… (more)

  6. Vertically aligned crystalline silicon nanowires with controlled diameters for energy conversion applications: Experimental and theoretical insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razek, Sara Abdel; Swillam, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K., E-mail: nageh.allam@aucegypt.edu [Department of Physics, School of Sciences and Engineering, The American University in Cairo, New Cairo 11835 (Egypt)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically orientated single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with controlled diameters are fabricated via a metal-assisted chemical etching method. The diameter of the fabricated nanowires is controlled by simply varying the etching time in HF/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrolytes. The fabricated SiNWs have diameters ranging from 117 to 650?nm and lengths from 8 to 18??m. The optical measurements showed a significant difference in the reflectance/absorption of the SiNWs with different diameters, where the reflectance increases with increasing the diameter of the SiNWs. The SiNWs showed significant photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra with peaks lying between 380 and 670?nm. The PL intensity increases as the diameter increases and shows red shift for peaks at ?670?nm. The increase or decrease of reflectivity is coincident with PL intensity at wavelength ?660?nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirm the high crystallinity of the fabricated SiNWs. In addition, the Raman spectra showed a shift in the first order transverse band toward lower frequencies compared to that usually seen for c-Si. Finite difference time domain simulations have been performed to confirm the effect of change of diameter on the optical properties of the nanowires. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental results for the SiNWs of different diameters.

  7. Meas. Sci. Technol. 10 (1999) 11781184. Printed in the UK PII: S0957-0233(99)06575-3 Submarine lidar for seafloor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    for the detection of dissolved and sunken pollutants. One of these instruments is the submarine lidar, combining: fluorescence lidar, range-gating video, seafloor monitoring 1. Submarine sensor network for pollution of Oldenburg, Laser Remote Sensing Group), · an acoustic sensor for measuring the acoustic impedance

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System are disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal. 5 figures.

  9. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System is disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal.

  10. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dridi; S. Guerin; V. Hakobyan; H. R. Jauslin; H. Eleuch

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on {\\it parallel adiabatic passage} by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3 $\\pi$, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically pico- and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  11. Raman scheme for adjustable-bandwidth quantum memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Goueet, J.-L.; Berman, P. R. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS UPR3321, Universite Paris Sud, Batiment 505, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France); Department of Physics and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scenario of quantum memory for light based on Raman scattering. The storage medium is a vapor and the different spectral components of the input pulse are stored in different atomic velocity classes. One uses appropriate pulses to reverse the resulting Doppler phase shift and to regenerate the input pulse, without distortion, in the backward direction. The different stages of the protocol are detailed and the recovery efficiency is calculated in the semiclassical picture. Since the memory bandwidth is determined by the Raman transition Doppler width, it can be adjusted by changing the angle between the input pulse wave vector and the control beams. The optical depth also depends on the beam angle. As a consequence the available optical depth can be optimized depending on the needed bandwidth. The predicted recovery efficiency is close to 100% for large optical depth.

  12. X-ray Raman scattering study of aligned polyfluorene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Galambosi; M. Knaapila; J. A. Soininen; K. Nyg\\aard; S. Huotari; F. Galbrecht; U. Scherf; A. P. Monkman; K. Hämäläinen

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study at the carbon K-edge on aligned poly[9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-fluorene-2,7-diyl] and show that the x-ray Raman scattering technique can be used as a practical alternative to x-ray absorption measurements. We demonstrate that this novel method can be applied to studies on aligned $\\pi$-conjugated polymers complementing diffraction and optical studies. Combining the experimental data and a very recently proposed theoretical scheme we demonstrate a unique property of x-ray Raman scattering by performing the symmetry decomposition on the density of unoccupied electronic states into $s$- and $p$-type symmetry contributions.

  13. Multi mode nano scale Raman echo quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Moiseev; E. S. Moiseev

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low loss magnetic surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes characterized by enhanced electrical field component and subwavelength confinement on the dielectric and negative-index metamaterial interface are presented. We demonstrate a possibility of storage and perfect retrieval of the low loss magnetic SPP fields by using a photon echo quantum memory on Raman atomic transition. We describe specific properties of the proposed technique which opens a possibility for efficient nano scale multi-mode quantum memory.

  14. The infrared and Raman spectra of N-alkyl ethylenimines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashby, Theodore Leroy

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Assi nments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 5 A, Structural Considerations. . . . ~ . . . , . . . , 5 B, Assi"na ent of Spectra. . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . 9 1, Yethod, 9 2. N-Yethyl Ethylenimine, . . . . , . . . . . . . 10 3. N-Ethyl... the Or ientation of the Principal Axes. Page 2. The Infrared Spectrum of I!-Yythyl Ethy- lenimine from 4000 to 50 cm . . . . . . . , . . . . 11 3. The Raman Spectrum of !! i~'. ethyl Ethylenimine. 13 4. The Infrared Spectrum of N-Ethyl Ethy- lenimine from...

  15. Hedging and Vertical Integration in Electricity Markets Gilles Chemla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touzi, Nizar

    /or demand insurance rationale for vertical integration as most important. 1 In the 1970s, for example, oil and vertical integration are two separate mechanisms for demand and spot price risk diversification that both integration restores the symmetry between producers' and retailers' exposure to demand risk while linear

  16. Raman fiber optic probe assembly for use in hostile environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Falk, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a device for Raman spectroscopic measurement of composition and concentrations in a hostile environment by the use of a first fiber optic as a means of directing high intensity monochromatic light from a laser to the hostile environment and a second fiber optic to receive the lower intensity scattered light for transmittal to a monochromator for analysis. To avoid damage to the fiber optics, they are protected from the hostile environment. A preferred embodiment of the Raman fiber optic probe is able to obtain Raman spectra of corrosive gases and solutions at temperatures up to 600.degree. F. and pressures up to 2000 psi. The incident exciting fiber optic cable makes an angle of substantially 90.degree. with the collecting fiber optic cable. This 90.degree. geometry minimizes the Rayleigh scattering signal picked up by the collecting fiber, because the intensity of Rayleigh scattering is lowest in the direction perpendicular to the beam path of the exciting light and therefore a 90.degree. scattering geometry optimizes the signal to noise ratio.

  17. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  18. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  19. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/InfraredProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

  20. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

  1. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryzhii, V., E-mail: v-ryzhii@riec.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University and Institute of Ultra High Frequency Semiconductor Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 111005 (Russian Federation); Satou, A.; Otsuji, T. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, M. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Mitin, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 1460-1920 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Departments of Electrical, Electronics, and Systems Engineering and Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption phonon raman Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absorption phonon raman Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SELECTION RULES FOR SECOND ORDER INFRARED...

  3. VERTICAL BEAM SIZE CONTROL IN TLS AND TPS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUO, C.C.; CHEN, J.R.; CHOU, P.J.; CHANG, H.P.; HSU, K.T.; LUO, G.H.; TSAI, H.J.; WANG, D.J.; WANG, M.H.

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical beam size control is an important issue in the light source operations. The horizontal-vertical betatron coupling and vertical dispersion were measured and corrected to small values in the TLS 1.5 GeV storage ring. Estimated beam sizes are compared with the measured values. By employing an effective transverse damping system, the vertical beam blow-up due to transverse coherent instabilities, such as the fast-ion beam instability, was suppressed. As a result, the light source is very stable. In NSRRC we are designing an ultra low emittance 3-GeV storage ring and its designed vertical beam size could be as small as a few microns. The ground and mechanic vibration effects, and coherent instabilities could spoil the expected photon brightness due to blow-up of the vertical beam size if not well taken care of. The contributions of these effects to vertical beam size increase will be evaluated and the counter measures to minimize them will be proposed and reported in this paper.

  4. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  5. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  6. Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

    2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

  7. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  8. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS AND COMMON-VOLUME LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE MESOSPHERIC FE AND NA LAYERS AT BOULDER (40N, 105W)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xinzhao

    inputs can reproduce some large-scale characteristics but are challenged in simulating small- scale the general structures more precisely as well as simulating the challenging small scale features. In Aug. The Fe Boltzmann temperature lidar was under upgrading and validating at Boulder before its deployment

  10. Space of the vertices of relativistic spin networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barbieri

    1997-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The general solutin to the constraints that define relativistic spin networks vertices is given and their relations with 3-dimensional quantum tetrahedra is dicussed. An alternative way to handle the constraints is also presented.

  11. An ecological perceptual aid for precision vertical landings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Cristin Anne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pilots of vertical landing vehicles face numerous control challenges which often involve the loss of outside visual perceptual cues or the control of flight parameters within tight constraints. These challenges are often ...

  12. 3D Temperature Measurement in IC Chips using Confocal Raman Spectroscopy Javad Shabani, Xi Wang, and Ali Shakouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for remote temperature measurement in depth was investigated value where the surface temperature starts to rise due to heating by incident light. #12;Raman

  13. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  14. Vertical velocity in oceanic convection off tropical Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Christopher

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . v Vl Vl I I 1 3 6 10 Description of the Data Data Processing . . Event Criteria 10 15 21 III RESULTS . . . 26 Cores. Environment 26 34 IV COMPARISON WITH OTHER STUDIES . . . . . 40 Cores... Variations with altitude of median and strongest 10'/o-level statistics of (a) average vertical velocity, (b) maximum vertical velocity, (c) mass flux per unit length normal to the flight track and (d) diameter 32 Figure Page Reconstructed temperature...

  15. Characterization of the Lumsden-Lynch vertical elutriator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Carl Brian

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LUMSDEN-LYNCH VERTICAL ELUTRIATOR A Thesis by CARL BRIAN GRIMM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Unrversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 19gl... Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LUMSDEN-LYNCH VERTICAL ELUTRIATOR A Thesis by CARL BRIAN GRIMM Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommittee) ( mber) embe (Member) ead of Department) August, 1981 ABSTRACT...

  16. Raman studies of corrosion layers formed on archaeological irons in various media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    147 Raman studies of corrosion layers formed on archaeological irons in various media Ludovic mandana.saheb@cea.fr, f philippe.dillmann@cea.fr Keywords: Raman spectroscopy, iron corrosion, ancient artefact, imaging. Abstract. The description and identification of corrosion products formed

  17. In situ Raman spectroscopy of lanthanum-strontium-cobaltite thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breucop, Justin Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman spectroscopy is used to probe the structural change of Lanthanum Strontium Cobaltite (La1.xSrxCoO 3 -8) thin films across change in composition (0%-60% strontium) and temperature (30*C-520°C). Raman shift peaks were ...

  18. Raman spectroscopy of carbon dust samples from NSTX Y. Raitses a,*, C.H. Skinner a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    for the diagnosis of the microscopic structure of different forms of carbon. The intensity of D-mode at 1350 cmÃ?1Raman spectroscopy of carbon dust samples from NSTX Y. Raitses a,*, C.H. Skinner a , F. Jiang b , T. The Raman measurements indicate that the production of carbon dust particles in NSTX involves modifications

  19. Raman intensity measurements of single-walled carbon nanotube suspensions as a quantitative technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    Raman intensity measurements of single-walled carbon nanotube suspensions as a quantitative, Biological and Materials Engineering, Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), University of Oklahoma, 100 the purity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bulk samples based on Raman spectroscopy is reported

  20. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY OF MACROSCALE FIBERS COMPRISED OF CARBON NANOTUBES OF DIFFERENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY OF MACROSCALE FIBERS COMPRISED OF CARBON NANOTUBES OF DIFFERENT LENGTHS UNDER University Carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers are considered an excellent material for high performance engineering) Fibers Raman Spectroscopy of Macroscopic Fibers Spun from Carbon Nanotubes under Tensile Strain D

  1. Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 The Academy or email before 20 December 2013 to: The Executive Secretary Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue: 1. The Academy reserves the right to restrict the number of candidates for interview to a reasonable

  2. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 134, 234310 (2011) False estimates of stimulated Raman pumping efficiency caused

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 134, 234310 (2011) False estimates of stimulated Raman pumping June 2011; published online 20 June 2011) One technique for measuring the fraction of molecules pumped to the excited state in stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is to record the depletion of molecules in the lower state

  3. Raman excitation profiles for the (n1, n2) assignment in carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Raman excitation profiles for the (n1, n2) assignment in carbon nanotubes H. Telg , J. Maultzsch indices n1 and n2 in semiconducting and metallic nanotubes was performed comparing resonance Raman nanotube families. Ever since the discovery of how to keep isolated nanotubes from rebundeling in solu

  4. 10.1098/rsta.2004.1444 Resonant Raman spectroscopy of nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    10.1098/rsta.2004.1444 Resonant Raman spectroscopy of nanotubes By Christian Thomsen1 , Stephanie. The experimental situation in carbon nanotubes is reviewed in view of these criteria. The evidence for the D mode for the application of Raman scattering to the characterization of nanotubes are discussed. Keywords: carbon nanotubes

  5. POLARIZED RAMAN MEASUREMENTS IN ZEOLITE-GROWN SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    POLARIZED RAMAN MEASUREMENTS IN ZEOLITE-GROWN SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES J. Maultzsch*, P. M, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin, E-Mail: janina@physik.tu-berlin.de The Raman spectra of carbon nanotubes able to grow carbon nanotubes inside the channels of an AlPO4 zeolite crystal [1]. The directions

  6. Raman characterization of boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes J. Maultzsch,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    . We interpret this result as an indication that the high-energy mode in carbon nanotubes is defectRaman characterization of boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes J. Maultzsch,a) S. Reich, and C of boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The Raman intensities are analyzed as a function

  7. Raman scattering in carbon nanotubes Technische Universitat Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    in carbon nanotubes is the strong excitation-energy dependent Raman shift of the socalled D-mode, which for instance for metallic nanotubes near the K-point. For a given incident photon energy, there is an incomingRaman scattering in carbon nanotubes C. Thomsen Technische Universit¨at Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse

  8. Origin of the high-energy Raman modes in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Origin of the high-energy Raman modes in single-wall carbon nanotubes J. Maultzsch, C. Thomsen, S nanotubes. Similar to the disorder-induced D mode, the high-energy modes are deter- mined by double of the first-order high-energy Raman modes in carbon nanotubes has been a puzzling question since the first

  9. Raman spectroscopy on single and multi-walled nanotubes under high pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    dependence of the high-energy Raman modes in single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes was measuredRaman spectroscopy on single and multi-walled nanotubes under high pressure C. Thomsen, S. Reich, H properties of carbon nanotubes have become of scienti c interest since it was recognized that the low atomic

  10. Imaging Lignin-Downregulated Alfalfa Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Imaging Lignin-Downregulated Alfalfa Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy Yining-downregulated alfalfa lines were imaged using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The 1,600-cm-1 (CARS) . Lignin-downregulated alfalfa Introduction Lignocellulosic biomass is under consideration

  11. Sulfates on Mars: A systematic Raman spectroscopic study of hydration states of magnesium sulfates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulfates on Mars: A systematic Raman spectroscopic study of hydration states of magnesium sulfates of magnesium sulfates on the martian surface. In situ identification of the hydration states of magnesium of magnesium sulfate. Characteristic and distinct Raman spectral patterns were observed for each of the 11

  12. Breaking the Stokesanti-Stokes symmetry in Raman heterodyne detection of magnetic-resonance transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, Dieter

    is the source of the Raman field. The Raman wave is phase locked to the excit- ing laser field heterodyne detection, using the excitation laser as the local oscillator. In this case, the two sidebands that contains a coherent excitation. Figure 1 schematically shows the simplest quantum-mechanical system

  13. Noise suppression and enhanced focusability in plasma Raman amplifier with multi-frequency pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noise suppression and enhanced focusability in plasma Raman amplifier with multi-frequency pump A. Fisch Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 and Department of Astrophysical Laser pulse compression­amplification through Raman backscattering in plasmas can be facilitated

  14. UV Resonance Raman Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coal Liquid Distillates*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    UV Resonance Raman Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coal Liquid Distillates samples, such as petroleum and coal, or for man-made samples, such as coal liquids, a major desire- nique for studying coal-liquid samples. 1-4 We demon- strated that the Raman spectra of polycyclic

  15. A versatile femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy setup with tunable pulses in the visible to near infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Liangdong [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Liu, Weimin [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Fang, Chong, E-mail: Chong.Fang@oregonstate.edu [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a versatile and efficient setup to perform femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Technical innovations are implemented to achieve the wavelength tunability for both the picosecond narrowband Raman pump pulse and femtosecond broadband Raman probe pulse. Using a simplified one-grating scheme in a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor followed by a two-stage noncollinear optical parametric amplifier, we tune the Raman pump pulse from ca. 480 to 750?nm. To generate the suitable Raman probe pulse in tandem, we rely on our recently demonstrated broadband up-converted multicolor array technique that readily provides tunable broadband laser sidebands across the visible to near-infrared range. This unique setup has unparalleled flexibility for conducting FSRS. We measure the ground-state Raman spectra of a cyclohexane standard using tunable pump-probe pairs at various wavelengths across the visible region. The best spectral resolution is ?12?cm{sup ?1}. By tuning the pump wavelength closer to the electronic absorption band of a photoacid pyranine in water, we observe the pre-resonantly enhanced Raman signal. The stimulated Raman gain of the 1627?cm{sup ?1} mode is increased by over 15 times.

  16. Molecular dynamics in liquid cyclopropane. Raman and magnetic nuclear resonance studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    723 Molecular dynamics in liquid cyclopropane. II. 2014 Raman and magnetic nuclear resonance as a function of temperature (155, 300 K) and pressure (up to 3 kilobars). 13C and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments are performed in the same temperature range. The isotropic and anisotropic Raman profiles

  17. Determination of substrate pinning in epitaxial and supported graphene layers via Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferralis, Nicola

    The temperature-induced shift of the Raman G line in epitaxial graphene on SiC and Ni surfaces, as well as in graphene supported on SiO[subscript 2], is investigated with Raman spectroscopy. The thermal shift rate of ...

  18. Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology Ji 11747-3157 USA ABSTRACT Laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with fast., 1990). Duncan et al. constructed the first CARS microscope by use of two dye laser beams

  19. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of refractive index microstructures in silicone-based hydrogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy of refractive index microstructures in silicone-based hydrogel polymers 26, 2009 (Doc. ID 102944); published March 3, 2009 Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to study transparent hydro- gel polymer materials through a high (or medium) nu- merical aperture (NA) objective

  20. Realignment-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and three-dimensional imaging in anisotropic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kachynski; A. N. Kuzmin; P. N. Prasad; I. I. Smalyukh

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy to characterize director structures in liquid crystals.

  1. Estimating the fracture density of small-scale vertical fractures when large-scale vertical fractures are present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yuwei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When fractures are vertical, aligned and their dimensions are small relative to the seismic wavelength, the medium can be considered to be an equivalent Horizontal Transverse Isotropic (HTI) medium. However, geophysical ...

  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Green Towers Vertical Aquaponic Microfarm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Green Towers Vertical Aquaponic gardens" inside of vertically placed, twenty-foot tall shipping containers. The gardens utilize aquaponic

  3. Detection and quantitative analysis of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide: FY 93 Florida State University Raman spectroscopy report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, C.K.; Vickers, T.J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of work to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with tank waste materials. It contains Raman spectra from organics, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetetraacteic acid (HEDTA), imino diacetic acid (IDA), kerosene, tributyl phosphate (TBP), acetone and butanol, anticipated to be present in tank wastes and spectra from T-107 real and BY-104 simulant materials. The results of investigating Raman for determining moisture content in tank materials are also presented. A description of software algorithms developed to process Raman spectra from a dispersive grating spectrometer system and an in initial design for a data base to support qualitative and quantitative application of remote Raman sensing with tank wastes.

  4. The effect of substrates on the Raman spectrum of graphene: Graphene-on-sapphire and graphene-on-glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effect of substrates on the Raman spectrum of graphene: Graphene- on-sapphire and graphene The authors investigated the influence of substrates on Raman scattering spectrum from graphene. The room-temperature Raman signatures from graphene layers on GaAs, sapphire, and glass substrates were compared with those

  5. 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    . Here, we report that when using 785 nm excitation, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little

  6. Pump side scattering in ultrapowerful backward Raman amplifiers A. A. Solodov, V. M. Malkin, and N. J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pump side scattering in ultrapowerful backward Raman amplifiers A. A. Solodov, V. M. Malkin, and N of a laser pump by plasma noise might be suppressed by an appropriate detuning of the Raman resonance, even scattering of laser pumps by plasma noise in backward Raman amplifiers. Though its growth rate is smaller

  7. New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shilin

    New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol Traditionally, the Raman spectrum of ethanol in the C-H vibrational stretching region between 2800 cm-1 and 3100, and the -CH3 antisymmetric stretching. In this report, new Raman spectral features were observed for ethanol

  8. Sedimentological Reinterpretation of Surficial Unconsolidated Debris Flows and Stream Deposits of the Southern Flanks of Grand Mesa, CO: An Integrated LiDAR Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakeley, Mitchell W.

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . This study developed a sedimentological description and interpretation of these deposits and tested the capabilities of terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) for use in sedimentological studies. This research addressed the origin of the deposits...

  9. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage System (SERODS) is disclosed. In the improved system, entities capable of existing in multiple reversible states are present on the storage device. Such entities result in changed Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) when localized state changes are effected in less than all of the entities. Therefore, by changing the state of entities in localized regions of a storage device, the SERS emissions in such regions will be changed. When a write-on device is controlled by a data signal, such a localized regions of changed SERS emissions will correspond to the data written on the device. The data may be read by illuminating the surface of the storage device with electromagnetic radiation of an appropriate frequency and detecting the corresponding SERS emissions. Data may be deleted by reversing the state changes of entities in regions where the data was initially written. In application, entities may be individual molecules which allows for the writing of data at the molecular level. A read/write/delete head utilizing near-field quantum techniques can provide for a write/read/delete device capable of effecting state changes in individual molecules, thus providing for the effective storage of data at the molecular level.

  10. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage System (SERODS) is disclosed. In the improved system, entities capable of existing in multiple reversible states are present on the storage device. Such entities result in changed Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) when localized state changes are effected in less than all of the entities. Therefore, by changing the state of entities in localized regions of a storage device, the SERS emissions in such regions will be changed. When a write-on device is controlled by a data signal, such a localized regions of changed SERS emissions will correspond to the data written on the device. The data may be read by illuminating the surface of the storage device with electromagnetic radiation of an appropriate frequency and detecting the corresponding SERS emissions. Data may be deleted by reversing the state changes of entities in regions where the data was initially written. In application, entities may be individual molecules which allows for the writing of data at the molecular level. A read/write/delete head utilizing near-field quantum techniques can provide for a write/read/delete device capable of effecting state changes in individual molecules, thus providing for the effective storage of data at the molecular level. 18 figures.

  11. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods and their Raman activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlambo, Mbuso [Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, Advanced Materials Division, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Mdluli, Phumlani S.; Shumbula, Poslet; Mpelane, Siyasanga [Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, Advanced Materials Division, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Moloto, Nosipho, E-mail: Nosipho.Moloto@wits.ac.za [Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert [Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, Advanced Materials Division, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanorods surface functionalization. - Highlights: • Mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. • Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. • HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin as a Raman active compound. - Abstract: The cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared by seed-mediated route followed by the addition of a Raman active compound (HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin) on the gold nanorods surfaces. Different stoichiometric mixtures of HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin and HS-PEG-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}COOH were evaluated for their Raman activities. The lowest stoichiometric ratio HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin adsorbed on gold nanorods surface was detected and enhanced by Raman spectroscopy. The produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods were characterized by UV-vis spectrometer for optical properties, transmission electron microscope (TEM) for structural properties (shape and aspect ratio) and their zeta potentials (charges) were obtained from ZetaSizer to determine the stability of the produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. The Raman results showed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement at the lowest stoichiometric ratio of 1% HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin compared to high ratio of 50% HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin on the surface of gold nanorods.

  13. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  14. Rayleigh LIDAR and satellite (HALOE, SABER, CHAMP and COSMIC) measurements of stratosphere-mesosphere temperature over a southern sub-tropical site, Reunion (20.8° S; 55.5° E): climatology and comparison study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, V.; Vishnu Prasanth, P.; Kishore, P.; Bencherif, H.; Keckhut, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climatology of the mid- dle atmosphere from long-termLIDAR measurements at mid- dle and low latitudes, J.Over the southern tropics, mid- dle atmosphere temperature

  15. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R. (Bronx, NY); Wang, Wubao (Flushing, NY)

    2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  16. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  17. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  18. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  19. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  20. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  1. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  2. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  3. Nanosensors based on functionalized nanoparticles and surface enhanced raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA); Huser, Thomas R. (Livermore, CA); Hollars, Christopher W. (Brentwood, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Laurence, Ted A. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that utilizes metal surfaces to provide enhanced signals of several orders of magnitude. When molecules of interest are attached to designed metal nanoparticles, a SERS signal is attainable with single molecule detection limits. This provides an ultrasensitive means of detecting the presence of molecules. By using selective chemistries, metal nanoparticles can be functionalized to provide a unique signal upon analyte binding. Moreover, by using measurement techniques, such as, ratiometric received SERS spectra, such metal nanoparticles can be used to monitor dynamic processes in addition to static binding events. Accordingly, such nanoparticles can be used as nanosensors for a wide range of chemicals in fluid, gaseous and solid form, environmental sensors for pH, ion concentration, temperature, etc., and biological sensors for proteins, DNA, RNA, etc.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  5. Multiphonon resonant Raman scattering in MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go?asa, K., E-mail: Katarzyna.Golasa@fuw.edu.pl; Grzeszczyk, M.; Wysmo?ek, A.; Babi?ski, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Ho?a 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Leszczy?ski, P.; Faugeras, C.; Nicolet, A. A. L.; Potemski, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses, CNRS-UJF-UPS-INSA, 25, avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical emission spectrum of a resonantly (??=?632.8?nm) excited molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) is studied at liquid helium temperature. More than 20 peaks in the energy range spanning up to 1400?cm{sup ?1} from the laser line, which are related to multiphonon resonant Raman scattering processes, are observed. The attribution of the observed lines involving basic lattice vibrational modes of MoS{sub 2} and both the longitudinal (LA(M)) and the transverse (TA(M) and/or ZA(M)) acoustic phonons from the vicinity of the high-symmetry M point of the MoS{sub 2} Brillouin zone is proposed.

  6. Third harmonic stimulated Raman backscattering of laser in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paknezhad, Alireza [Physics Department, Shabestar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shabestar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, Shabestar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shabestar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dorranian, Davoud [Laser Lab., Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser Lab., Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article studies the nonlinear Raman shifted third harmonic backscattering of an intense extraordinary laser wave through a homogenous transversely magnetized cold plasma. Due to the relativistic nonlinearity, the plasma dynamic is modified in the presence of transversely magnetic field, and this can generate the third harmonic scattered wave and an electrostatic upper hybrid wave via the Raman scattering process. Using the nonlinear wave equation, the mechanism of nonlinear third harmonic Raman scattering is discussed in detail to obtain the maximum growth rate of instability in the mildly relativistic regime. The growth rate decreases as the static magnetic field increases. It also increases with the pump wave amplitude.

  7. Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magesh Kumar, K.K.; Singh, Ranjeet; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is proposed and studied. In the presence of ambient magnetic field, the plasma wave present in the system produces electron density ripple (perturbation) which couples with the velocity imparted by the nonlinear ponderomotive force at twice the laser frequency producing the Raman shifted third harmonic field. The wave vector of the plasma wave provides the uncompensated momentum necessary for phase matching condition. The applied magnetic field can be adjusted to have the phase matching for the given plasma frequency. The energy conversion ratio from pump to the Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is analyzed.

  8. Time?resolved anisotropic coherent anti?Stokes Raman scattering: A new probe of reorientational dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Chaozhi; Johnson, Carey K.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TRA CARS) and spontaneous Raman (TRA Raman) as probes of rota­ tional motion. II. THEORY When a sample system is illuminated by three laser beams at frequencies (Uo, (UI, and (U2, the incident fields induce a third... is described by a nonlinear sus­ ceptibility tensor containing three independent compo­ nents in the L=O subspace and six independent compo­ nents in the L = 2 subspace. First we write the molecular susceptibility MU11(0) iIi terms of the direct product...

  9. k-PROTECTED VERTICES IN BINARY SEARCH TREES MIKLOS BONA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bona, Miklos

    k-PROTECTED VERTICES IN BINARY SEARCH TREES MIKL´OS B´ONA Abstract. We show that for every k, the probability that a randomly selected vertex of a random binary search tree on n nodes is at distance k - 1. In another model, leaves may represent end-users (customers) of a company, and in that case, it may

  10. Scaling hard vertical surfaces with compliant microspine arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    has been developed that allows a robot to scale concrete, stucco, brick and masonry walls without vertical surfaces such as windows and interior walls. None of these approaches is suitable for porous and typically dusty exterior surfaces such as brick, concrete, stucco or stone. Other robots employ hand

  11. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser scale test data. The short-term behavior of ground-coupled heat pump systems is important for the design

  12. Two phase pressure drop in inclined and vertical pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of calculating the pressure drop in inclined and vertical oil-gas wells is proposed. The data used to establish the method is from a variety of sources but is largely from air and water flowing in systems close ...

  13. Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-075 Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets: Empirical Evidence from in Retail Gasoline Markets Empirical Evidence from Contract Changes in Southern California Justine S, if any, of the differences in retail gasoline prices between markets is attributable to differences

  14. Feedback on vertical velocity. Rotation, convection, self-sustaining process.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebovitz, Norman

    Feedback on vertical velocity. Rotation, convection, self-sustaining process. Fabian Waleffe the mechanisms involved in the nonlinear feedback from u to v, yielding a self-sustaining process for shear flows feedback from the streak instability into the rolls sufficient to lead to a self-sustaining process

  15. Cloud vertical distribution from radiosonde, remote sensing, and model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Cloud vertical distribution from radiosonde, remote sensing, and model simulations Jinqiang Zhang's radiation budget and atmospheric adiabatic heating. Yet it is among the most difficult quantities to observe Great Plains and along with ground- based and space-borne remote sensing products, use it to evaluate

  16. Characterizing Vertical Mass Flux Profiles in Aeolian Saltation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Eugene

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    *) - 0.4133 (r^2=0.65). The values of beta ranged from 6.11 ? 17.83 for all the experiments. The Rouse profiles calculated using this approach predict very similar vertical distributions to the observed data and predicted 86% and 81% of the observed...

  17. NAVARRO VERTICES AND NORMAL SUBGROUPS IN GROUPS OF ODD ORDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossey, James P.

    NAVARRO VERTICES AND NORMAL SUBGROUPS IN GROUPS OF ODD ORDER JAMES P. COSSEY Abstract. Let p be a prime and suppose G is a finite solvable group and is an ordinary irreducible character of G. Navarro character of Q, which is unique up to conjugacy. This pair is called the Navarro vertex

  18. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511522 In situ Raman spectroscopy of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511­522 In situ Raman spectroscopy. In this situation, a low energy excitation (e.g. visible light) is needed to excite an electron to a neighboring

  19. Diradicals acting through diamagnetic phenylene vinylene bridges: Raman spectroscopy as a probe to characterize spin delocalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González, Sandra Rodríguez; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; González Cano, Rafael C.; López Navarrete, Juan T., E-mail: vecianaj@icmab.es, E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es, E-mail: casado@uma.es; Casado, Juan, E-mail: vecianaj@icmab.es, E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es, E-mail: casado@uma.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Málaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, Málaga 29071 (Spain)] [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Málaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, Málaga 29071 (Spain); Lloveras, Vega; Vidal-Gancedo, José; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume, E-mail: vecianaj@icmab.es, E-mail: teodomiro@uma.es, E-mail: casado@uma.es [Department of Molecular Nanoscience and Organic Materials, Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus Universitari de Bellaterra, E-08193 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain) [Department of Molecular Nanoscience and Organic Materials, Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus Universitari de Bellaterra, E-08193 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); NANOMOL group, Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Campus Universitari de Bellaterra, E-08193 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Novoa, Juan J.; Mota, Fernando [Dpt. de Química Física and IQTCUB, Fac. Química, Univ. de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal, 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)] [Dpt. de Química Física and IQTCUB, Fac. Química, Univ. de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal, 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain); Corro, Elena del; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G. [MALTA-Consolider Team, Department of Physical Chemistry, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)] [MALTA-Consolider Team, Department of Physical Chemistry, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a complete Raman spectroscopic study in two structurally well-defined diradical species of different lengths incorporating oligo p-phenylene vinylene bridges between two polychlorinated triphenylmethyl radical units, a disposition that allows sizeable conjugation between the two radicals through and with the bridge. The spectroscopic data are interpreted and supported by quantum chemical calculations. We focus the attention on the Raman frequency changes, interpretable in terms of: (i) bridge length (conjugation length); (ii) bridge conformational structure; and (iii) electronic coupling between the terminal radical units with the bridge and through the bridge, which could delineate through-bond spin polarization, or spin delocalization. These items are addressed by using the “oligomer approach” in conjunction with pressure and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic data. In summary, we have attempted to translate the well-known strategy to study the electron (charge) structure of ??conjugated molecules by Raman spectroscopy to the case of electron (spin) interactions via the spin delocalization mechanism.

  20. Beyond Myopic Inference in Big Data Pipelines Karthik Raman, Adith Swaminathan, Johannes Gehrke, Thorsten Joachims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachims, Thorsten

    ]: Learning General Terms Algorithms, Experimentation, Theory Keywords Big Data Pipelines, Modular Design Detection & Recognition pipeline. creation, model construction, testing, and visualization. In orderBeyond Myopic Inference in Big Data Pipelines Karthik Raman, Adith Swaminathan, Johannes Gehrke

  1. Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active...

  2. Raman excitation profile of the G band in single-chirality carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moura, L. G.

    We present in this work measurements of the Raman excitation profile of the high-energy phonons (G band) in single-chirality (n,m) semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes using more than 70 laser excitation energies, ...

  3. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in Si and C ion-implanted double-wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresselhaus, Mildred

    The effect of 170 keV Si and 100 keV C ion bombardment on the structure and properties of highly pure, double-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated using resonance Raman spectroscopy. The implantations were performed ...

  4. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  5. Fingerprint and high-wavenumber Raman spectroscopy in a human-swine coronary xenograft in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motz, Jason T.

    Intracoronary Raman spectroscopy could open new avenues for the study and management of coronary artery disease due to its potential to measure the chemical and molecular composition of coronary atherosclerotic lesions. ...

  6. Zone folding effect in Raman G-band intensity of twisted bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresselhaus, Mildred

    The G-band Raman intensity is calculated for twisted bilayer graphene as a function of laser excitation energy based on the extended tight binding method. Here we explicitly consider the electron-photon and electron-phonon ...

  7. UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy Using a New cw Laser Source: Convenience and Experimental Simplicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    into the spectrometer. We dem- onstrate the ability of this laser to excite Raman spectra of solid samples such as coal-liquid- alytical applications. Examples include studies of PAHs in coal-derived liquids4-~and in petroleum

  8. Double resonance Raman spectra of graphene : a full 2D calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narula, Rohit

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible range Raman spectra of graphene are generated based on the double resonant process employing a full two-dimensional numerical calculation applying second-order perturbation theory. Tight binding expressions for ...

  9. Uniaxial strain in graphene by Raman spectroscopy: G peak splitting, Grüneisen parameters, and sample orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohiuddin, T. M. G.

    We uncover the constitutive relation of graphene and probe the physics of its optical phonons by studying its Raman spectrum as a function of uniaxial strain. We find that the doubly degenerate E[subscript 2g] optical mode ...

  10. Rotational-Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy for Measurements of Thermochemistry in Non-isobaric Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayeh, Alexander C.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work examines line measurements of pressure, temperature, and density in high speed, non-isobaric flows emanating from an underexpanded jet nozzle. Line images of rotational and vibrational Raman spectra are collected for a 8-mm linear...

  11. Raman spectroscopy for characterization of annealing of ion-implanted InP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.R.; Gourley, P.L.; Vaidyanathan, K.V.; Dunlap, H.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman spectroscopy has been used as a noncontacting, nondestructive tool to evaluate the properties of Si/sup +/- and Be/sup +/- implanted InP samples annealed at temperatures ranging from 600 to 750C using phosphosilicate glass (PSG) as the encapsulant. Carrier activation, carrier mobility and recovery of damage as a function of anneal temperature obtained from analysis of Raman data agree very well with independent electrical measurements.

  12. X-ray Raman compression via two-stream instability in dense plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Son; Sung Joon Moon

    2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A Raman compression scheme suitable for x-rays, where the Langmuir wave is created by an intense beam rather than the pondermotive potential between the seed and pump pulses, is proposed. The required intensity of the seed and pump pulses enabling the compression could be mitigated by more than a factor of 100, compared to conventionally available other Raman compression schemes. The relevant wavelength of x-rays ranges from 1 to 10 nm.

  13. Summary of raman cone penetrometer probe waste tank radiation and chemical environment test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, F.R.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of testing Raman sapphire windows that were braze mounted into a mockup Raman probe head and stainless steel coupons in a simulated tank waste environment. The simulated environment was created by exposing sapphire window components, immersed in a tank simulant, in a gamma pit. This work was completed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM-50) for Technical Task Proposal RL4-6-WT-21.

  14. Modeling conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain with WAsP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the vertical wind speed W changes linearly with the downwind position x. This could crudely mimic the flow over to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured

  15. University of Wisconsin High Spectral Lidar operations during MPACE: Examples of AHSRL-MMCR particle size retrievals E.W.Eloranta, I.A.Razenkov, J.P.Garcia, and J.P.Hedrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    where valid lidar and radar measurements were obtained. 6) Lidar and radar data were averaged and altitude bins.Measurements within 6 dBZ of the radar's minimum detectable reflectivity are removed along signal-to-noise level can also be specified to exclude noisy data points AHSRL data was used extensively

  16. Physics of vertically integrated waveguide photodetectors and amplifiers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, E.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the efforts supported by LLNL under the Subcontract No. B239593 at the University of Arizona during the Fiscal Year 1992. A solid physical foundation has been developed for understanding the operation of vertically integrated photodetectors and amplifiers. This has been achieved through a combination of numerical simulation and development of simple coupled-mode theories. Coupled-mode theory has been used to elucidate the physics underlying the operation of vertically integrated photodetectors. In particular, the relation between the spatial transients observed in experiments and numerical simulations, and the non-power orthogonality of the underlying modes has been clarified. The coupled-mode theory has been extended to the case of coupled waveguide-amplifiers.

  17. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  18. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  19. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  20. Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naiser, Donald David

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF TABLES Table Page 1. Soil profile considered in all sample calculations, 2. Gardner's coefficient. 3. Measured suction profile values. 4. Summary of vertical differential soil movements for Appendix C. . . . 50 . . . 54 70 . . . . 74 LIST... OF FIGURES Figure 1. United States map of expansive soils after Wiggins. 2. Center lift distortion mode Page 3. Edge lift distortion mode. 4. The structure of kaolinite (a) atomic structure (b) symbolic structure. . . 5. The structure of serpentine (a...

  1. Water coning calculations for vertical and horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weiping

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakthrough Time WOR after Breakthrough RATE SENSITIVITY 8 12 13 16 WATER CONING CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH MOBILITY RATIOS . . 19 Method of Developing Correlations Correlations for a Vertical Well Correlations for a Horizontal Well Discussion 19 26... APPENDIX E: BASE CASE AND SIMULATION RUNS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS 98 APPENDIX F: TEST CASES AND RESULTS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS 100 APPENDIX G: ADDINGTON'S METHOD APPENDIX H: CALCULATION OF HEIGHT h~ APPENDIX I: BASE CASE AND SIMULATION RUN SUMMARY...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO REMOTELY NAVIGATE VERTICAL PIPE ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krementz, D.; Immel, D.; Vrettos, N.; Nance, T.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Situations exist around the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) complex where it is advantageous to remotely navigate vertical pipe arrays. Specific examples are waste tanks in the SRS Tank Farms, which contain horizontal cooling coils at the tank bottom, vertical cooling coils throughout and a limited number of access points or ''risers''. These factors limit accessibility to many parts of these tanks by conventional means. Pipe Traveler technology has been developed to address these issues. The Pipe Traveler addresses these issues by using the vertical cooling coils as its medium of travel. The unit operates by grabbing a pipe using dual grippers located on either side of the equipment. Once securely attached to the pipe a drive wheel is extended to come in contact with the pipe. Rotation of the drive wheel causes the unit to rotate around the pipe. This action is continued until the second set of grippers is aligned with the next pipe. Extension pistons are actuated to extend the second set of grippers in contact with a second pipe. The second set of grippers is then actuated to grasp the pipe. The first set of grippers releases the original pipe and the process is repeated until the unit reaches its desired location. Once at the tool deployment location the desired tool may be used. The current design has proven the concept of pipe-to-pipe navigation. Testing of the Pipe Traveler has proven its ability to transfer itself from one pipe to another.

  3. Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

  4. Low profile, high load vertical rolling positioning stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Barraza, Juan (Aurora, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stage or support platform assembly for use in a synchrotron accurately positions equipment to be used in the beam line of the synchrotron. The support platform assembly includes an outer housing in which is disposed a lifting mechanism having a lifting platform or stage at its upper extremity on which the equipment is mounted. A worm gear assembly is located in the housing and is adapted to raise and lower a lifting shaft that is fixed to the lifting platform by an anti-binding connection. The lifting platform is moved vertically as the lifting shaft is moved vertically. The anti-binding connection prevents the shaft from rotating with respect to the platform, but does permit slight canting of the shaft with respect to the lifting platform so as to eliminate binding and wear due to possible tolerance mismatches. In order to ensure that the lifting mechanism does not move in a horizontal direction as it is moved vertically, at least three linear roller bearing assemblies are arranged around the outer-periphery of the lifting mechanism. One of the linear roller bearing assemblies can be adjusted so that the roller bearings apply a loading force against the lifting mechanism. Alternatively, a cam mechanism can be used to provide such a loading force.

  5. Micro-Raman spectroscopic study of nanolaminated Ti{sub 5}Al{sub 2}C{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Li, Z. J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, X. H. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xiang, H. M.; Zhou, Y. C, E-mail: yczhou714@gmail.com [Science and Technology of Advanced Functional Composite Laboratory, ARIMPT, No.1 South Dahongmen Road, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-Raman spectroscopic study and lattice dynamics calculations were conducted to study a recently identified layered ternary carbide, Ti{sub 5}Al{sub 2}C{sub 3}. The experimental Raman shifts were remarkably consistent with the calculated values. Polarized Raman spectrum was collected in the polycrystalline sample, which confirmed the theoretical symmetry assignment of the Raman modes. In addition, the atomic vibrations of the peaks at 192?cm{sup ?1}, 311?cm{sup ?1}, and 660?cm{sup ?1} were identified to be the combination of the counterparts in Ti{sub 2}AlC and Ti{sub 3}AlC{sub 2}.

  6. Vertical Flow Dynamics in Kelp Forests: Implications for Nutrient Uptake, Condition and Survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change and ENSO impacts on kelp forests. As yet, we areVertical Flow Dynamics in Kelp Forests: Implications forof ocean waves on giant kelp fronds results in the vertical

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - addressable vertical-cavity laser Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vertical-cavity laser Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: addressable vertical-cavity laser Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 J. Phys. III...

  8. Potential impacts of vertical cable seismic: modeling, resolution and multiple attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ryan Justin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical cable seismic methods are becoming more relevant as we require high quality and high resolution seismic data in both land and marine environments. Our goal in this thesis is to demonstrate the impacts of vertical cable surveying...

  9. Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

  10. Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, D.E.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

  11. Contornos Jurídicos e Matizes Econômicas dos Contratos de Integração Vertical Agroindustriais no Brasil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paiva, Nunziata Stefania Valenza

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dados contratuais coletados, tornou-se possível uma reconstrução sistemática dos contratos de integração vertical com base

  12. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  13. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  14. Identification of minerals and meteoritic materials via Raman techniques after capture in hypervelocity impacts on aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, M J; Mann, J; Creighton, J A; Kearsley, A; Graham, G A; Esposito, A P; Franchi, I A; Westphal, A J; Snead, C

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    For this study, an extensive suite of mineral particles analogous to components of cosmic dust were tested to determine if their Raman signatures can be recognized after hypervelocity capture in aerogel. The mineral particles were mainly of greater than 20 micrometers in size and were accelerated onto the silica aerogel by light gas gun shots. It was found that all the individual minerals captured in aerogel could be subsequently identified using Raman (or fluorescent) spectra. The beam spot size used for the laser illumination was of the order of 5 micrometers, and in some cases the captured particles were of a similar small size. In some samples fired into aerogel there was observed a shift in the wavenumbers of some of the Raman bands, a result of the trapped particles being at quite high temperatures due to heating by the laser. Temperatures of samples under laser illumination were estimated from the relative intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman bands, or, in the case of ruby particles, from the wavenumber of fluorescence bands excited by the laser. It was found that the temperature of particles in aerogel varied greatly, dependent upon laser power and the nature of the particle. In the worst case, some particles were shown to have temperatures in the 500-700 C range at a laser power of about 3 mW at the sample. However most of the mineral particles examined at this laser power had temperatures below 200 C. This is sufficiently low a temperature not to damage most materials expected to be found captured in aerogel in space. In addition, selected meteorite samples were examined to obtain Raman signatures of their constituent minerals and were then shot into aerogel. It was possible to find several Raman signatures after capture in aerogel and obtain a Raman map of a whole grain in situ in the aerogel. Finally, a Raman analysis was carried out of a particle captured in aerogel in space and carbonaceous material identified. In general therefore it is concluded that Raman analysis is indeed well suited for an in-situ analysis of micrometer sized non-terrestrial materials captured in aerogel.

  15. Effect of Dynamic Stall on the Aerodynamics of Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Effect of Dynamic Stall on the Aerodynamics of Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines Frank Scheurich of the aerodynamic performance of vertical-axis wind turbines pose a significant challenge for computational fluid of the aerodynamics of a vertical- axis wind turbine that consists of three curved rotor blades that are twisted

  16. Interface instabilities during displacements of two miscible fluids in a vertical pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Eric

    Interface instabilities during displacements of two miscible fluids in a vertical pipe J. Scoffoni vertical displacement of one miscible fluid by another in a vertical pipe at sufficiently high velocities. INTRODUCTION The hydrodynamic stability of two-phase flow in pipes and channels has been the subject of many

  17. Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    ­10]. Among the finite enclosures, free convective heat transfer in a differentially heated vertical porous in a vertical annular enclosure for a wide range of radius and aspect ratios, and also used an approximateNumerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating M. Sankar

  18. Experimental investigation of the performance of a diffuser-augmented vertical axis wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Experimental investigation of the performance of a diffuser- augmented vertical axis wind turbine Experimental investigation of the performance of a diffuser-augmented vertical axis wind turbine by Arash The performance of a vertical axis wind turbine with and without a diffuser was studied using direct force

  19. Ris-R-Report Analysis of vertical wind direction and speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-Report Analysis of vertical wind direction and speed gradients for data from the met. mast Cariou, Rozenn Wagner, Julia Gottschall Title: Analysis of vertical wind direction and speed gradients.): The task of this project has been to study the vertical gradient of the wind direction from experimental

  20. Light trapping in thin-film solar cells measured by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledinský, M., E-mail: ledinsky@fzu.cz [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., Cukrovarnická 10, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Moulin, E.; Bugnon, G.; Meillaud, F.; Ballif, C. [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Ganzerová, K.; Vetushka, A.; Fejfar, A. [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., Cukrovarnická 10, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, Raman spectroscopy is used as a tool to determine the light-trapping capability of textured ZnO front electrodes implemented in microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) solar cells. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited on superstrates of various roughnesses are characterized by Raman micro-spectroscopy at excitation wavelengths of 442?nm, 514?nm, 633?nm, and 785?nm, respectively. The way to measure quantitatively and with a high level of reproducibility the Raman intensity is described in details. By varying the superstrate texture and with it the light trapping in the ?c-Si:H absorber layer, we find significant differences in the absolute Raman intensity measured in the near infrared wavelength region (where light trapping is relevant). A good agreement between the absolute Raman intensity and the external quantum efficiency of the ?c-Si:H solar cells is obtained, demonstrating the validity of the introduced method. Applications to thin-film solar cells, in general, and other optoelectronic devices are discussed.

  1. The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

  2. Raman Database Considerations for Near-Infrared Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunkel, Brenda M.; Su, Yin-Fong; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Stephan, Eric G.; Joly, Alan G.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For Raman spectroscopy the ability to detect is often limited by the existence and quality of the reference library to which field spectra are compared. Developing such databases is often labor- and resource-intensive; typically the generated data are not transferred to other instruments. Still other considerations may exist for comparing data at visible and ultraviolet excitation wavelengths such as resonance enhancement. However, for the common near-infrared wavelengths of 785, 830, 960, 1047 and 1064 nm where this is normally of a lesser concern, it is logical to consider whether data can be ported from one spectrometer to another so as to obviate the expensive and time-consuming process of generating reference data for each system. The present experiment generated a list of 125 chemical and common substances and formed a database from their corresponding 1064 nm spectra. The same molecules were then measured using a 785 nm system the new spectra were treated as “unknowns” and compared to the 1064 nm database using a commercial search algorithm. We found that at least 108 of the 125 spectra recorded at 785 nm were correctly identified using the search algorithm. For the few that were incorrectly identified, in most cases the spectra were extremely similar or the 785 nm signal was degraded due to fluorescence, as would occur regardless of reference data. Our results indicate that if the spectrometers are properly calibrated on both their wavelength and intensity axes, “foreign” data recorded at a different NIR wavelength can be successfully used as reference libraries

  3. A joint study of the lower ionosphere by radar, lidar, and spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Qihou.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics and associated phenomena occurring in the lower ionospheric-E region, especially the mesopause region between 80 km to 110 km at low latitude, are studied. In particular, incoherent scatter radar (ISR), sodium lidar and airglow spectrometry are used to study the ionospheric structure and neutral sodium structure. The simultaneous study of the ionospheric plasma and neutral atomic sodium is unprecedented in scope and detail. The joint study of the mesopause region reveals that plasma, neutral densities and temperature are interconnected through the same atmospheric dynamics. The theme of the thesis is to explain the formation of the controversial sporadic sodium layer (SSL) events. Strong correlation is established between the average total ion and sodium concentrations, and between sporadic-E and SSL events. The mechanism proposed in the thesis, which invokes temperature fluctuations induced by tides and gravity waves, finds good agreement with observations. Tides and gravity waves can converge ions into thin layers through the windshear mechanisms and can influence the concentration of atomic sodium through temperature fluctuations. Sodium abundance is shown to augment rapidly when the temperature is increased. Gravity wave theory states that the ion convergence node coincides with a temperature maximum for a westward propagating gravity wave, and coincides with a temperature minimum for an eastward propagating wave. Because tidal winds propagate westward, the ion layer coincides with the temperature maximum which consequently induces higher sodium concentration. This can account for the general correlation between sodium and total ion concentration and is supported by the O2(0-1) rotational temperature. Gravity waves and their interaction with tidal winds are believed to be responsible for the close association between sudden sodium layers and sporadic-E layers.

  4. Fiber-optic apparatus and method for measurement of luminescence and raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael L. (Livermore, CA); Angel, Stanley M. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual fiber forward scattering optrode for Raman spectroscopy with the remote ends of the fibers in opposed, spaced relationship to each other to form a analyte sampling space therebetween and the method of measuring Raman spectra utilizing same. One optical fiber is for sending an exciting signal to the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter for filtering out background emissions generated in the fiber. The other optical fiber is for collecting the Raman scattering signal at the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter to prevent the exciting signal from the exciting fiber from entering the collection fiber and to thereby prevent the generation of background emissions in the collecting fiber.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Lithium Hydride Corrosion: Selection of an Appropriate Excitation Wavelength to Minimize Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stowe, A. C.; Smyrl, N. R.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent interest in a hydrogen-based fuel economy has renewed research into metal hydride chemistry. Many of these compounds react readily with water to release hydrogen gas and form a caustic. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFT) has been used to study the hydrolysis reaction. The LiOH stretch appears at 3670 cm{sup -1}. Raman spectroscopy is a complementary technique that employs monochromatic excitation (laser) allowing access to the low energy region of the vibrational spectrum (<600 cm{sup -1}). Weak scattering and fluorescence typically prevent Raman from being used for many compounds. The role of Li{sub 2}O in the moisture reaction has not been fully studied for LiH. Li{sub 2}O can be observed by Raman while being hidden in the Infrared spectrum.

  6. Relation between squeezing of vacuum fluctuations, quantum entanglement and sub-shot noise in Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Pathak; Jaromir Krepelka; Jan Perina

    2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A completely quantum description of Raman process is used to investigate the nonclassical properties of the modes in the stimulated, spontaneous and partially spontaneous Raman process. Both coherent scattering (where all the initial modes are coherent) and chaotic scattering (where initial phonon mode is chaotic and all the other modes are coherent) are studied. Nonclassical character of Raman process is observed by means of intermodal entanglement, single mode and intermodal squeezing of vacuum fluctuations, sub-shot noise and wave variances. Joint photon-phonon number and integrated-intensity distributions are then used to illustrate the observed nonclassicalities. Conditional and difference number distributions are also provided to illustrate the nonclassical character. The mutual relation between the obtained nonclassicalities and their variations dependent on phases, rescalled time and ratio of coupling constants are also reported.

  7. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V., E-mail: vr.optics1@gmail.com [Department of Laser Studies, School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, India. (India); Kottaisamy, M. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  8. VERTICAL RELAXATION OF A MOONLET PROPELLER IN SATURN'S A RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, H.; Seiss, M.; Spahn, F. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two images, taken by the Cassini spacecraft near Saturn's equinox in 2009 August, show the Earhart propeller casting a 350 km long shadow, offering the opportunity to watch how the ring height, excited by the propeller moonlet, relaxes to an equilibrium state. From the shape of the shadow cast and a model of the azimuthal propeller height relaxation, we determine the exponential cooling constant of this process to be {lambda} = 0.07 {+-} 0.02 km{sup -1}, and thereby determine the collision frequency of the ring particles in the vertically excited region of the propeller to be {omega}{sub c}/{Omega} = 0.9 {+-} 0.2.

  9. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  10. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  11. Torque ripple in a Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, R.C. Jr.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction between a steady wind and a rotating, Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine produces time periodic aerodynamic loads which cause time dependent torque variations, referred to as torque ripple, to occur in the mechanical link between the turbine and the electrical generator. There is concern for the effect of torque ripple upon fatigue life of drive train components and upon power quality. An analytical solution characterizing the phenomenon of torque ripple has been obtained which is based upon a Fourier expansion of the time dependent features of the problem. Numerical results for torque ripple, some experimental data, determination of acceptable levels and methods of controlling it, are presented and discussed.

  12. Functionality Tuning in Vertically Aligned Nanocomposite Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Aiping

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Aligned Nanocolumnar TC Curie Temperature TEM Transmission Electron Microscopy TMI Metal-Insulator Transition Temperature TMR Tunnel Magnetoresistance PLD Pulsed Laser Deposition PLOAD Pulsed Laser Oblique-Angle Deposition VAN Vertically Aligned... structure. ................ 5 FIG. 1.2. (a) Electronic phase diagram of La1-xSrxMnO3 (Reproduced from Ref. 14). (b) TC versus tolerance factor t from equation (1-1) for the system A0.7A?0.3MnO3 (Reproduced from Ref. 15). 14, 15...

  13. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri MechanicalofVehicles -winsVenueVertical

  14. Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, UtahResources/Full Version <VertexVertical

  15. Category:Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV Economics By Building Type Jump to:CategoryVertical

  16. DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002027 Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Single-and Few-Layer Graphene by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002027 Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Single- and Few-Layer Graphene*[a] Introduction Raman spectroscopy has been utilized as a powerful tool for the characterization of graphene and any defects in the graphene.[1] A Si substrate with a metal oxide layer of a specific thick- ness has

  17. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 184202 (2011) Can stimulated Raman pumping cause large population transfers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 184202 (2011) Can stimulated Raman pumping cause large 2011; published online 9 November 2011) When stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is applied to a stream with the energy difference between the pump and Stokes laser pulses. Using the optical Bloch-Feynman equations, we

  18. 785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    using 785 nm excitation with 1 µm spot size, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond films785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser School is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little work has been reported

  19. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  20. Theory of Two-Magnon Raman Scattering in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C. C.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the parent iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides are itinerant antiferromagnets, the use of local moment picture to understand their magnetic properties is still widespread. We study magnetic Raman scattering from a local moment perspective for various quantum spin models proposed for this new class of superconductors. These models vary greatly in the level of magnetic frustration and show a vastly different two-magnon Raman response. Light scattering by two-magnon excitations thus provides a robust and independent measure of the underlying spin interactions. In accord with other recent experiments, our results indicate that the amount of magnetic frustration in these systems may be small.

  1. Enhancement of photoluminescence and raman scattering in one-dimensional photonic crystals based on porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonchar, K. A., E-mail: k.a.gonchar@gmail.com [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation); Musabek, G. K.; Taurbayev, T. I. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Physics Department (Kazakhstan); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In porous-silicon-based multilayered structures that exhibit the properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals, an increase in the photoluminescence and Raman scattering intensities is observed upon optical excitation at the wavelength 1.064 {mu}m. When the excitation wavelength falls within the edge of the photonic band gap of the structures, a multiple increase (by a factor larger than 400) in the efficiency of Raman scattering is detected. The effect is attributed to partial localization of excitation light and, correspondingly, to the much longer time of interaction of light with the material in the structures.

  2. Manipulation of the Raman process via incoherent pump, tunable intensity, and phase control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Li-Gang; Qamar, Sajid; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manipulation of the Raman process via incoherent pump, tunable intensity, and phase control Li-Gang Wang,1,2,3 Sajid Qamar,1 Shi-Yao Zhu,1,2,3 and M. Suhail Zubairy1,4,5 1Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology..., Texas 77845, USA 5Texas A&M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Education City, Doha, Qatar #1;Received 14 May 2007; published 18 March 2008#2; We present a proposal to manipulate the Raman process via incoherent pump, tunable intensity, and phase...

  3. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman microspectroscopy using spectral focusing with glass dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha-Mendoza, Israel; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola [School of Biosciences and School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate experimentally that coherent anti-Stokes Raman microspectroscopy with high spectral resolution is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses chirped up to a few picoseconds by glass elements of known group-velocity dispersion without significant intensity losses. By simply choosing the length of the glass, the chirp of Stokes and pump pulses is tailored to obtain a spectral resolution given by the Fourier limit of the chirped pulse duration. We show that for chirped pulse durations shorter than or comparable to the Raman coherence time, maximum signal occurs for a pump arriving after the Stokes pulse, a time-ordering effect confirmed by numerical simulations.

  4. Role of noise operators on two-photon correlations in an extended coherent Raman medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Role of noise operators on two-photon correlations in an extended coherent Raman medium C. H. Raymond Ooi1,2,3,4,* and M. Suhail Zubairy3,5 1Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 Korea 2Max... & Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544, USA 5Texas A&M University at Qatar, Education City, P.O. Box 23874, Doha, Qatar #1;Received 8 January 2007; published 29 May 2007#2; An extended medium driven in a double Raman configuration...

  5. IntroductionIntroduction The use of small scale vertical axis wind turbinesThe use of small scale vertical axis wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    IntroductionIntroduction The use of small scale vertical axis wind turbinesThe use of small scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) is being studied at McMaster University using(VAWT) is being studied at McMaster University using a prototype wind turbine provided bya prototype wind turbine provided

  6. DESCRIPTION OF THE THREEMILEROAD BRECCIA PIPE The breccia pipe is a 40-50 meter wide vertical pipe-shaped deposit that exhibits a sharp vertical contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luczaj, John A.

    #12;DESCRIPTION OF THE THREEMILEROAD BRECCIA PIPE The breccia pipe is a 40-50 meter wide vertical pipe-shaped deposit that exhibits a sharp vertical contact with the host dolostoneand cuts all the stratigraphic levels exposed in the quarry (Fig. 2). The breccia pipe is located along a fracturezone that runs

  7. 382 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 22, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2004 Effect of a Raman Co-Pump's RIN on the BER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoba, Taras I.

    382 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 22, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2004 Effect of a Raman Co-Pump's RIN from a Raman co-pump, on the bit-error rate (BER). We show that a given amount of the transferred RIN spontaneous emission (ASE) noise, than erbium amplifiers. The backward-pumping scheme, where the Raman pump

  8. Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

  9. Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data ERWIN L. A. WOLTERS, ROBERT A. ROEBELING, AND ARNOUT J. FEIJT Royal Netherlands 2007) ABSTRACT Three cloud-phase determination algorithms from passive satellite imagers are explored

  10. A comparison of automated land cover/use classification methods for a Texas bottomland hardwood system using lidar, spot-5, and ancillary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernon, Zachary Isaac

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    decisions affecting these disappearing systems. SPOT-5 imagery from 2005 was combined with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data from 2006 and several ancillary datasets to map a portion of the bottomland hardwood system found in the Sulphur River Basin...

  11. SilviLaser 2011, Oct. 16-19, 2011 Hobart, Australia Towards automated and operational forest inventories with T-Lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    inventories with T-Lidar A. Othmani1 , A. Piboule2 , M. Krebs3 , C. Stolz1 and L.F.C. Lew Yan Voon1 1 Cluny, France, michael.krebs@ensam.eu Keywords: terrestrial laser scanning, forest inventory, tree detection, DBH. Abstract Forest inventory automation has become a major issue in forestry. The complexity

  12. An investigation of the depolarization of backscattered electromagnetic waves using a lidar polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelmi, Gary Joe

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of the samples was varied from a very rough to a moderately rough surface. Using these targets, polarized and depolarized backscatter measurements were recorded using both horizon- tal and vertical transmit polarization for angles of in- cidence between 0...' . . . . . . . . . . . 48 III -3 III-4 II I- 5 III-6 Intensity pattern for p /p a s Intensity pattern for p /p a s Intensity pattern for p /p a s 2. 0 x 10 1. 0 x 10 2. 62 x 10 Experimental arrangement for collimated beam experiment 49 50 51 53 III- 7...

  13. Control system for a vertical-axis windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, R.V.

    1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical-axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90 and 270/sup 0/ to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  14. Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

  15. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  16. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

  17. Detection and quantitative analysis of chemical species in Hanford tank materials using Raman spectroscopy technology: FY94, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickers, T.J.; Mann, C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  18. Structure in Nascent Carbon Nanotubes Revealed by Spatially Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or filtration [1], supercapacitors [2], composite materials [3,4]. They are mainly prepared by CVD (Chemical1 Structure in Nascent Carbon Nanotubes Revealed by Spatially Resolved Raman Spectroscopy Périne: The understanding of carbon nanotubes (CNT) growth is crucial for the control of their production. In particular

  19. Quantitative concentration measurements of creatinine dissolved in water and urine using Raman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Andrew J.

    to the lack of suitable materials with refractive indices lower that of water (n 1.33). Recently, howeverQuantitative concentration measurements of creatinine dissolved in water and urine using Raman in water and in urine. At short integration times, where shot noise is most troublesome, the enhanced

  20. Development of the Mars microbeam Raman spectrometer (MMRS) Alian Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mineralogy in a planetary exploration. INDEX TERMS: 3672 Mineralogy and Petrology: Planetary mineralogy and petrology (5410); 3694 Mineralogy and Petrology: Instruments and techniques; 3994 Mineral Physics: Raman spectroscopy, Mars in-situ mineralogy, Planetary on-surface mineral identification, Water on Mars

  1. Murchison presolar carbon grains of different density fractions: A Raman spectroscopic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for inorganic sp2 -bonded carbon. Based on their D/G intensity ratios, those grains were grouped.1), "glassy carbon" (D/G > 1.1), and "unusual sp2 -bonded graphitic car- bon" (with extremely intense 2ndMurchison presolar carbon grains of different density fractions: A Raman spectroscopic perspective

  2. Excitonic effects of photoluminescence and resonance Raman intensity of single wall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Excitonic effects of photoluminescence and resonance Raman intensity of single wall carbon been widely used for the optical characterization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) since the intensity and energy of PL and RRS depend on the diameter and chirality of SWNTs. The optical absorption

  3. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080. Indian Academy of the Academy consist of publication of scientific journals, election of Fellows, organizing scientific meetings, initiatives such as promoting science education,etc. The Academy is looking for a suitable person to fill

  4. Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 No. : IASc/ /13 System' The Indian Academy of Sciences is in need of `Multi-point Video Conference System: The Purchase In-charge, Indian Academy of Sciences latest by 30th December 2013 by 15:00 PM. Technical

  5. Raman spectroscopy on surfacted ferrofluids in a magnetic field J. E. Weber,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    a magnetic excitation with an intensity growing in proportion to the magnetization of the ferrofluid becomes of counteracting in- teractions. On one hand, thermal motion and electrostatic or surfactant-mediated repulsion scatter- ing in general and Raman spectroscopy in particular are a very powerful and sensitive tool

  6. BARANIDHARAN (BARANI) RAMAN, B.Eng., M.S., Ph.D. Brauer Hall, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Barani

    , and M. Stopfer, "Temporally diverse firing patterns in olfactory receptor neurons underlie spatio microsensors," IEEE Sensors, Special Issue on Sensors for Breath Analysis, Vol. 10, pp. 137-144, January 2010. Raman, and M. Stopfer, "Frequency transitions in odor- evoked neural oscillations," Neuron, Vol. 64, pp

  7. Raman and conductivity studies of boron doped microcrystalline diamond, facetted nanocrystalline diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    superconductivity at temperatures polycrystalline boron-doped CVD diamond filmsRaman and conductivity studies of boron doped microcrystalline diamond, facetted nanocrystalline diamond and cauliflower diamond films P.W. May a,*, W.J. Ludlow a , M. Hannaway a , P.J. Heard b , J

  8. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films grown by Hot Filament CVD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    H4 flow-rate ratio of standard polycrystalline diamond deposition parameters on formationRaman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films grown by Hot Filament CVD of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia b,c Diamond Research Laboratory, School

  9. Journal of Crystal Growth 288 (2006) 5356 Spatially resolved photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a waveguide with a core consisting of GaAs/AlAs short superlattice (SSL) structure using quantum well spectroscopy measurements, where Raman spectra were collected at different depths of the SSL through probing the SSL layer cross-section. SSL-related phonon states were clearly observed for the lower part of the SSL

  10. hal-00276997,version1-5May2008 Raman spectra of misoriented bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hal-00276997,version1-5May2008 Raman spectra of misoriented bilayer graphene P. Poncharal1 , A layer graphene with a bilayer in which the two layers are arbitrarily misoriented. The profiles of the 2 of the electronic structures of single layer graphene and misoriented bilayer graphene. Another new aspect

  11. Quasitransient backward Raman amplification of powerful laser pulses in dense plasmas with multicharged ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are found. The calculation, applicable to infrared, ultraviolet, soft x-ray, and x-ray laser pulses, takes technique is also applicable to shorter wavelength laser pulses including x-ray pulses for which CPA cannotQuasitransient backward Raman amplification of powerful laser pulses in dense plasmas

  12. Raman spectra of out-of-plane phonons in bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Kentaro

    The double resonance Raman spectra of the overtone of the out-of-plane tangential optical (oTO) phonon and of combinations of the LO, ZO, and ZA phonons with one another are calculated for bilayer graphene. In the case of ...

  13. Saturation of the Raman amplification by self-phase modulation in silicon nanowaveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of short pulses in order to project and optimize the performance of future silicon-based data processing to a regime in which sensitivity to FCA is strongly reduced.7-10 However, depending on the pulse energy-off Raman gain is measured in terms of the pump intensity and shows a clear saturation that is attributed

  14. Homogeneous Decomposition Mechanisms of Diethylzinc by Raman Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    for direct reaction products in an inverted, impinging-jet test reactor coupled to a Raman spectrometer. The homogeneous thermal decomposition of DEZn in N2 carrier was followed in an impinging-jet, up-flow reactor vibrational frequencies of DEZn, as well as anticipated intermediates and products. Comparison of the measured

  15. ROTATIONAL AND VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY FOR FLOW FROM AN UNDEREXPANDED JET NOZZLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayeh, Alexander

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    will be carried out using roational-vibrational Raman line imaging through the axis of the jet exhaust. In this way measurements of the flow field under high pressure, temperature, and velocity can be made without disrupting it. Because of the increasing push...

  16. THE RAMAN SPECTRUM OF MAGNESIUM FLUORIDE By R. S. KRISHNAN and R. S. KATIYAR,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    627. THE RAMAN SPECTRUM OF MAGNESIUM FLUORIDE By R. S. KRISHNAN and R. S. KATIYAR, Department, NOVEMBRE 1965, I Magnesium fluoride, which occurs in nature as the mineral sellaite, crystallizes spectrum of magnesium fluoride (MgF2) taken with a medium Quartz spectrograph. (b) Its microphotometer

  17. Spectroscopic Raman Nanometrology of Graphene and Graphene Multilayers on Arbitrary Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectroscopic Raman Nanometrology of Graphene and Graphene Multilayers on Arbitrary Substrates I to be an effective tool for characterization of graphene and graphene multilayers on the standard Si/SiO2 (300 nm) substrates, which allows one to determine non-destructively the number of the graphene layers and assess

  18. High-Sensitivity Raman Spectrometer To Study Pristine and Irradiated Interstellar Ice Analogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    to ionizing radiation which produces small quantities of new chemical species within the bulk of the icesHigh-Sensitivity Raman Spectrometer To Study Pristine and Irradiated Interstellar Ice Analogs Chris with low temperature ices relevant to the solar system and interstellar medium. The design is based

  19. Thermal metamorphism in the lesser Himalaya of Nepal determined from Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    Thermal metamorphism in the lesser Himalaya of Nepal determined from Raman spectroscopy of central and far-western Nepal, including data from near the MCT zone, where a comparison with conventional on the thermal evolution of the Himalaya in Nepal using the RSCM method. This emblematic geological setting

  20. Investigation of the Thermal Decomposition of Triethylgallium Using in situ Raman Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    (TEGa) were followed using in situ Raman spectroscopy measurements in an up-flow, cold-wall CVD reactor an design with ss beads to p ure 1. Schem asurements. dy, the gas p ectroscopy i h numerical ons, which w Ex

  1. Numerical Procedure to Extract Physical Properties from Raman Scattering Data in a Flow Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    in an up-flow cold-wall CVD reactor was monitored using in situ Raman spectroscopy. A two uncertainties by removing complicating phenomena or sim- plifying model development. An up-flow cold-wall CVD of the process would be useful, e.g., for optimizing an existing process or designing a new reactor. Accurate

  2. Coded Aperture Raman Spectroscopy for Quantitative Measurements of Ethanol in a Tissue Phantom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsianis, Nikos P.

    - mard transform spectroscopy'' (HTS).9 Initially, HTS systems were designed to use multiplexing tissue phantom. With 60 mW of excitation power at 808 nm, leave-one-out and blind cross spectroscopy; Multiplexing; Chemometrics. INTRODUCTION Raman spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool

  3. Layers for Effective Volume Rendering Sundaresan Raman, Oleg Mishchenko, and Roger Crawfis, Member, IEEE Computer Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Layers for Effective Volume Rendering Sundaresan Raman, Oleg Mishchenko, and Roger Crawfis, Member, IEEE Computer Society Abstract--A multi-layer volume rendering framework is presented. The final image is obtained by compositing a number of renderings, each being represented as a separate layer. This layer

  4. Developments in enzyme immobilization and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy with downstream renewable energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupoi, Jason [Ames Laboratory

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on techniques for (1) increasing ethanol yields from saccharification and fermentation of cellulose using immobilized cellulase, and (2) the characterization and classification of lignocellulosic feedstocks, and quantification of useful parameters such as the syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) lignin monomer content using 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics.

  5. Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  6. Rotational and Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy for Thermochemistry Measurements in Supersonic Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayeh, Alexander C

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the development of new line imaging diagnostics for thermochemistry measurements in high speed flows. A novel combination of vibrational and rotational Raman scattering is used to measure major species densities (O_2, N_2, CH_4, H_2O,CO_2, CO, & H_2...

  7. Semicoke production and quality at Chinese vertical SJ furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.M. Strakhov; I.V. Surovtseva; A.V. D'yachenko; V.M. Men'shenin [Kuznetsk Center, Eastern Coal-Chemistry Institute (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Russia there has been little interest on the thermal processing of non-sintering coal. However it may be used to obtain many special types of coke and semicoke that are necessary for processes other than blast furnace smelting and employing small metallurgical coke fractions that do not meet the relevant quality requirements. China has recently made great progress in developing the thermal processing of coal (mainly energy coal) to obtain a highly effective product, semicoke, primarily used in metallurgy and adsorption process. The article considers the operation of a Chinese semicoking plant equipped with vertical SJ furnaces. The plant is in the Shenmu district of Shanxi province (Inner Mongolia). The enterprise includes two furnaces of total output of about 100,000 t/yr of semicoke.

  8. Test reports for K Basins vertical fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical fuel handling tools, for moving N Reactor fuel elements, were tested in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility (CTF) in the 300 Area. After fabrication was complete, the tools were functionally tested in the CTF using simulated N Reactor fuel rods (inner and outer elements). The tools were successful in picking up the simulated N Reactor fuel rods. These tools were also load tested using a 62 pound dummy to test the structural integrity of each assembly. The tools passed each of these tests, based on the performance objectives. Finally, the tools were subjected to an operations acceptance test where K Basins Operations personnel operated the tool to determine its durability and usefulness. Operations personnel were satisfied with the tools. Identified open items included the absence of a float during testing, and documentation required prior to actual use of the tools in the 100 K fuel storage basin.

  9. High efficacy plasma display panel with vertically raised bus electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ok, Jung-Woo; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Chung-Hoo; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Choi, Kwang-Yeol [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pusan National University, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); PDP R and D Department, PDP Division, LG Electronics Inc., Gumi 730-030 (Korea, Republic of); Digital Display Research Laboratory, LG Electronics Inc., Seoul 137-724 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a high efficacy alternating current plasma display panel utilizing vertically raised multilayer bus electrodes. The cell structure was designed to provide an opposite discharge mode and low discharge current in a relatively long gap. The test panels having discharge gaps of 330, 350, and 370 {mu}m were fabricated and basic properties of the panel were investigated in terms of current-voltage characteristics, luminance, and luminous efficiency. The cells with proposed structure show higher luminance and lower current simultaneously. The improvement in luminous efficiency is found to be a factor of 2 compared with the conventional coplanar structure having an electrode gap of 60 {mu}m. Emission spectra and spatio-temporal distribution of infrared light in discharge were measured. It is shown that high luminous efficiency of proposed cell originates from high excitation efficiency, low surface loss of charged particles, and enlarged discharge volume.

  10. Parity-violating vertices for spin-3 gauge fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulanger, Nicolas; Leclercq, Serge; Cnockaert, Sandrine [Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Academie Wallonie-Bruxelles, Mecanique et Gravitation, Avenue du Champ de Mars 6, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, U.L.B. Campus Plaine, C.P. 231, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of constructing consistent parity-violating interactions for spin-3 gauge fields is considered in Minkowski space. Under the assumptions of locality, Poincare invariance, and parity noninvariance, we classify all the nontrivial perturbative deformations of the Abelian gauge algebra. In space-time dimensions n=3 and n=5, deformations of the free theory are obtained which make the gauge algebra non-Abelian and give rise to nontrivial cubic vertices in the Lagrangian, at first order in the deformation parameter g. At second order in g, consistency conditions are obtained which the five-dimensional vertex obeys, but which rule out the n=3 candidate. Moreover, in the five-dimensional first-order deformation case, the gauge transformations are modified by a new term which involves the second de Wit-Freedman connection in a simple and suggestive way.

  11. Raman and absorption spectrophotometric studies of selected lanthanide, californium-doped lanthanide, and actinide trihalides in the solid state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid-state absorption spectra of Cf(III) ions as a dopant in lanthanide trihalide hosts (LnCl/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, and Y; LnBr/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, Tb, and Y; LnI/sub 3/: Ln = Ce and Y) have been recorded. The spectra of Cf(III) have been correlated with the various crystal structures. The phonon Raman spectra and solid-state absorption spectra of PmF/sub 3/, PmCl/sub 3/, PmBr/sub 3/, and two crystal modifications of PmI/sub 3/ have been recorded. Symmetry assignments have been made for the Raman-active bands for these trihalides and also the sesquioxide. The room-temperature absorption spectra have been correlated to crystal field effects. The symmetry assignments of the Raman-active phonon modes have been made based on polarized Raman spectra from single crystals of YF/sub 3/-type orthorhombic TbF/sub 3/ and PuBr/sub 3/-type orthorhombic NdBr/sub 3/. Raman spectra of other isostructural lanthanide compounds have been recorded and compared. Symmetry assignments for these compounds have been made by analogy to the single-crystal assignments. Raman spectra have been obtained and catalogued for a number of actinide compounds. Symmetry assignments have been made for the observed Raman-active phonon bands in this work based on the assignments made for isostructural lanthanide compounds. 29 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christina Lynn

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing layer (ML) heights inferred from radiosondes, wind profilers, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler (MTP), and in-situ aircraft data were compared during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study in the Houston area...

  13. Multidimensional resonance raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing in the deep UV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Giokas, Paul G.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M., E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional (2D) resonance Raman spectroscopies hold great potential for uncovering photoinduced relaxation processes in molecules but are not yet widely applied because of technical challenges. Here, we describe a newly developed 2D resonance Raman experiment operational at the third-harmonic of a Titanium-Sapphire laser. High-sensitivity and rapid data acquisition are achieved by combining spectral interferometry with a background-free (six-pulse) laser beam geometry. The third-harmonic laser pulses are generated in a filament produced by the fundamental and second-harmonic pulses in neon gas at pressures up to 35 atm. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by probing ground-state wavepacket motions in triiodide. The information provided by the experiment is explored with two different representations of the signal. In one representation, Fourier transforms are carried out with respect to the two experimentally controlled delay times to obtain a 2D Raman spectrum. Further insights are derived in a second representation by dispersing the signal pulse in a spectrometer. It is shown that, as in traditional pump-probe experiments, the six-wave mixing signal spectrum encodes the wavepacket's position by way of the (time-evolving) emission frequency. Anharmonicity additionally induces dynamics in the vibrational resonance frequency. In all cases, the experimental signals are compared to model calculations based on a cumulant expansion approach. This study suggests that multi-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopies conducted on systems with Franck-Condon active modes are fairly immune to many of the technical issues that challenge off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies (e.g., third-order cascades) and photon-echo experiments in the deep UV (e.g., coherence spikes). The development of higher-order nonlinear spectroscopies operational in the deep UV is motivated by studies of biological systems and elementary organic photochemistries.

  14. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Esherick, P.; Jewell, J.L.; Lear, K.L.; Olbright, G.R.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications. 9 figs.

  15. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (12700 Indian School Rd. NE., Apt. 604, Albuquerque, NM 87112); Esherick, Peter (1105 Sagebrush Trail SE., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Jewell, Jack L. (12 Timberline Dr., Bridgewater, NJ 08807); Lear, Kevin L. (13713 Vic Rd. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Olbright, Gregory R. (3875 Orange Ct., Boulder, CO 80304)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-rolling active vertical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nodes Coupled Degrees of Freedom Local Coordinate System... serve to reinforce this load-bearing area. The upper spring perch allows for vertical adjustment... in all three...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - accounting standards-the vertical Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematics 39 Perception, 1998, volume 27, pages 1287-1304 Temporal aspects of slant and inclination perception Summary: transformations) of either horizontal or vertical...

  18. Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Test of Raising Rivals' Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard; Hastings, Justine

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Testfor the reÞning and distribution of gasoline and the whole-sale price of unbranded gasoline sold to independent

  19. Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Test of Raising Rivals' Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard; Hastings, Justine

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Testoligopoly, market power, gasoline Abstract: This paperand distribution of gasoline and the wholesale price of

  20. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Sanuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphries, Seth D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaniman, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, S. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Misra, A. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Dyar, M. D. [MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Smrekar, S. E. [JET PROPULSION LAB.

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to quantitatively determine the major elemental abundance of the remaining samples. PLS analysis suggests that the major element compositions can be determined with root mean square errors ca. 5% (absolute) for SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(total), MgO, and CaO, and ca. 2% or less for TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO, K{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}O. Finally, the Raman experiments have been conducted under supercritical CO{sub 2} involving single-mineral and mixed-mineral samples containing talc, olivine, pyroxenes, feldspars, anhydrite, barite, and siderite. The Raman data have shown that the individual minerals can easily be identified individually or in mixtures.

  1. Charge Density Waves in Exfoliated Films of van der Waals Materials: Evolution of Raman Spectrum in TiSe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charge Density Waves in Exfoliated Films of van der Waals Materials: Evolution of Raman Spectrum graphene-like mechanical exfoliation of TiSe2 crystals to prepare a set of films with different thicknesses

  2. Multiscalar line measurements in nonisobaric high-pressure underexpanded supersonic jets using rotational-vibrational raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Benjamin Nathan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    line. In every point, temperature will be measured by examining the Boltzmann decay of the rotational spectrum, while molar fraction will be measured from the vibrational Raman spectrum. The temperature and concentrations will then be combined to obtain...

  3. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  4. A new concept of vertically integrated pattern recognition associative memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ted; Hoff, Jim; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab; ,

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hardware-based pattern recognition for fast triggering on particle tracks has been successfully used in high-energy physics experiments for some time. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the Fermilab Tevatron is an excellent example. The method used there, developed in the 1990's, is based on algorithms that use a massively parallel associative memory architecture to identify patterns efficiently at high speed. However, due to much higher occupancy and event rates at the LHC, and the fact that the LHC detectors have a much larger number of channels in their tracking detectors, there is an enormous challenge in implementing fast pattern recognition for a track trigger, requiring about three orders of magnitude more associative memory patterns than what was used in the original CDF SVT. Scaling of current technologies is unlikely to satisfy the scientific needs of the future, and investments in transformational new technologies need to be made. In this paper, we will discuss a new concept of using the emerging 3D vertical integration technology to significantly advance the state-of-the-art for fast pattern recognition within and outside HEP. A generic R and D proposal based on this new concept, with a few institutions involved, has recently been submitted to DOE with the goal to design and perform the ASIC engineering necessary to realize a prototype device. The progress of this R and D project will be reported in the future. Here we will only focus on the concept of this new approach.

  5. Intermittent dry granular flow in a vertical pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yann Bertho; Frederique Giorgiutti-Dauphine; Jean-Pierre Hulin

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The intermittent compact flow of glass beads in a vertical glass pipe of small diameter is studied experimentally by combining particle fraction, pressure, and air and grain flow rates measurements with a spatio-temporal analysis of the flow. At the onset of the flow, a decompaction front is observed to propagate from the bottom to the top of the tube at a velocity much larger than that of the grains. The blockage front also propagates upwards and at a still higher velocity. The decompaction induces a decreasing pressure wave strongly amplified as it propagates upwards towards the top of the tube. Pressure variations of 3000 Pa or more are detected in this region while particle fraction variations are of the order of 0.02. Grain velocities during the flow period also increase strongly at the top of the tube while the corresponding fraction of total time decreases. A 1D numerical model based on a simple relation between the effective acceleration of the grains and the particle fraction variations reproduces the amplification effect and provides predictions for its dependence on the permeability of the packing.

  6. Methods and apparatus for vertical coupling from dielectric waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaacobi, Ami; Cordova, Brad Gilbert

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency-chirped nano-antenna provides efficient sub-wavelength vertical emission from a dielectric waveguide. In one example, this nano-antenna includes a set of plasmonic dipoles on the opposite side of a SiYV.sub.4 waveguide from a ground plane. The resulting structure, which is less than half a wavelength long, emits a broadband beam (e.g., >300 nm) that can be coupled into an optical fiber. In some embodiments, a diffractive optical element with unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material collimates the broadband beam for higher coupling efficiency. In some cases, a negative lens element between the nano-antenna and the diffractive optical element accelerates the emitted beam's divergence (and improves coupling efficiency), allowing for more compact packaging. Like the diffractive optical element, the negative lens element includes unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material that can be designed to compensate for aberrations in the beam emitted by the nano-antenna.

  7. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  8. Tunable capillary-induced attraction between vertical cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennifer M. Rieser; P. E. Arratia; A. G. Yodh; J. P. Gollub; D. J. Durian

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation of a fluid interface caused by the presence of objects at the interface can lead to large lateral forces between the objects. We explore these fluid-mediated attractive force between partially submerged vertical cylinders. Forces are experimentally measured by slowly separating cylinder pairs and cylinder triplets after capillary rise is initially established for cylinders in contact. For cylinder pairs, numerical computations and a theoretical model are found to be in good agreement with measurements. The model provides insight into the relative importance of the contributions to the total force. For small separations, the pressure term dominates, while at large separations, surface tension becomes more important. A cross-over between the two regimes occurs at a separation of around half of a capillary length. The experimentally measured forces between cylinder triplets are also in good agreement with numerical computations, and we show that pair-wise contributions account for nearly all of the attractive force between triplets. For cylinders with equilibrium capillary rise height greater than the height of the cylinder, we find that the attractive force depends on the height of the cylinders above the submersion level, which provides a means to create precisely-controlled tunable cohesive forces between objects deforming a fluid interface.

  9. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  10. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injectingcarbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoidingatmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and consequent global warming.One of the key questions regarding the feasibility of this technology isthe potential rate of leakage out of the primary storage formation. Weseek exact solutions in a model of gas flow driven by a combination ofbuoyancy, viscous and capillary forces. Different combinations of theseforces and characteristic length scales of the processes lead todifferent time scaling and different types of solutions. In the case of athin, tight seal, where the impact of gravity is negligible relative tocapillary and viscous forces, a Ryzhik-type solution implies square-rootof time scaling of plume propagation velocity. In the general case, a gasplume has two stable zones, which can be described by travelling-wavesolutions. The theoretical maximum of the velocity of plume migrationprovides a conservative estimate for the time of vertical migration.Although the top of the plume has low gas saturation, it propagates witha velocity close to the theoretical maximum. The bottom of the plumeflows significantly more slowly at a higher gas saturation. Due to localheterogeneities, the plume can break into parts. Individual plumes alsocan coalesce and from larger plumes. The analytical results are appliedto studying carbon dioxide flow caused by leaks from deep geologicalformations used for CO2 storage. The results are also applicable formodeling flow of natural gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or formodeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration.

  11. Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, J.D. Mammosser, C.E. Reece, R.A. Rimmer,L. Lin, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 {mu}m of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 {mu}m/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.

  12. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser in a plasma in the presence of a co-propagating electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parashar, J. [Department of Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh 464001 (India)] [Department of Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh 464001 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam co-propagating with a high power laser in plasma is shown to add to the growth of the stimulated Raman back scattering of the laser. The growth rate is sensitive to phase matching of electron beam with the plasma wave. In the case of phase mismatch, the growth rate drops by an order. The energy spread of the electron beam significantly reduces the effectiveness of the beam on the stimulated Raman process.

  13. ABUNDANCE AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISHES IN A COBBLE-BOTTOM KELP FOREST OFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABUNDANCE AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISHES IN A COBBLE-BOTTOM KELP FOREST OFF SAN ONOFRE composition,vertical distribution,and standingstockoffishes ina forest of giant kelp and a nearby kelp substrates, were rare or absent in these low-relief, cobble- bottom habitats. The species present in the kelp

  14. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  15. All-Fiber Pulsed Lasers Passively Mode-Locked by Transferable Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    All-Fiber Pulsed Lasers Passively Mode-Locked by Transferable Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan An all-fiber passive laser mode locking is realized with a vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube film that can be transferred onto an arbitrary substrate using only

  16. Mode-locked fiber lasers using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes directly synthesized onto substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Mode-locked fiber lasers using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes directly synthesized onto novel passively mode-locked fiber lasers using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes synthesized using.4890) Organic materials 1. Introduction Passively mode-locked fiber lasers have been used in many applications

  17. WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1 were carried out to study the aerodynamic performance of three vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs. On the other hand, the characteristics of unsteady flow around the helical wind turbine were studied with a hot

  18. CLIMATOLOGY OF VERTICAL AIR MOTION DURING RAINFALL IN NIAMEY, NIGER AND BLACK FOREST, GERMANY USING AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATOLOGY OF VERTICAL AIR MOTION DURING RAINFALL IN NIAMEY, NIGER AND BLACK FOREST, GERMANY USING in Niamey, Niger and eight months in Germany's Black Forest. The AMF includes a vertically pointing 95 GHz of the orographically influenced precipitation in Germany's mountains. __________ NOTICE: This manuscript has been

  19. 4/3 law of Granular Particles Flowing through a Vertical Pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayakawa, Hisao

    4/3 law of Granular Particles Flowing through a Vertical Pipe Osamu Moriyama, Naoya Kuroiwa­01, Japan (Received June 16, 1997) Density waves of granular material (sand) flowing through a vertical pipe have been investigated. Clear density waves emerge when the cock attached to bottom end of the pipe

  20. Evaluation of a Pump and Reeled Hose System for Studying the Vertical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    545 Evaluation of a Pump and Reeled Hose System for Studying the Vertical Distribution of Small Evaluation of a Pump and Reeled Hose System for Studying the Vertical Distribution of Small Plankton Advantages and limitations of a pump and reeled hose system 8 Literature cited 9 #12;#12;Evaluation of a Pump

  1. "Enhanced Field Emission from Vertically Oriented Graphene by Thin Solid Film Coatings"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    "Enhanced Field Emission from Vertically Oriented Graphene by Thin Solid Film Coatings" MICHAEL films such as nanotubes, nanohorns, and graphene due to their favorable field emission properties, we have developed field emission arrays of vertically oriented graphene (carbon nanosheets) that have

  2. How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis DANIEL of vertical wind shear on the structure of warming and descent in the eye; results are compared with the no environment, time-averaged eye descent is maximized at 12­13-km height. Warming is not generally maximized

  3. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A SAMPLER FOR MEASURING THE NEAR-BOTTOM VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A SAMPLER FOR MEASURING THE NEAR-BOTTOM VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF PINK distribution of shrimp was considered essential to the design of an effective shrimp trawl since the vertical. Subsequently a multipurpose shrimp sampler was designed to facilitate investigation of shrimp distributions

  4. DIEL MOVEMENT AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE ANADROMOUS FISH IN TURBINE INTAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIEL MOVEMENT AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE ANADROMOUS FISH IN TURBINE INTAKES BY CLIFFORD, WASH. 98102 ABSTRACT The behavior of fingerling salmonids was measured in turbine intakes of The Dalles in Kaplan turbines. At The Dalles Dam, diel movement and vertical distribution were sampled at both ends

  5. Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine , S. Tullis2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine R. Bravo1 , S. Tullis2 , S. Ziada3 of electric production [1]. Although most performance testing for small-scale wind turbines is conducted vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) in urban settings, full-scale wind tunnel testing of a prototype 3.5 k

  6. Response of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine to Time Varying Wind Conditions found within the Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Response of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine to Time Varying Wind Conditions found within the Urban, 2010 PP 389­401 389 ABSTRACT Experimental testing of a vertical axis wind turbine within the urban of the turbine. Temporal variation of the wind with respect to the direction and velocity fluctuations

  7. Blade Offset and Pitch Effects on a High Solidity Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Blade Offset and Pitch Effects on a High Solidity Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Andrzej J. Fiedler ABSTRACT A high solidity, small scale, 2.5m diameter by 3m high Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT in an open-air wind tunnel facility to investigate the effects of preset toe-in and toe-out turbine blade

  8. CFD Simulation of Dynamic Thrust and Radial Forces on a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    CFD Simulation of Dynamic Thrust and Radial Forces on a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade K. Mc vibration source of a small scale vertical axis wind turbine. The dynamic loading on the blades of the turbine, as they rotate about the central shaft and travel through a range of relative angles of attack

  9. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar DEANNA A Measurement Mission satellite's Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone separated by the melting layer. The ice layer is a combination of particles imported from the eyewall

  10. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    1 Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar Deanna A (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone rainbands. Radar-echo2 statistics show that rainbands have a two-layered structure, with distinct modes separated by the3 melting layer. The ice layer

  11. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    1 Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar Deanna A's Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone rainbands. Radar-echo statistics show that rainbands have a two-layered structure, with distinct modes separated by the melting layer

  12. Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Test of Raising Rivals' Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-084 Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Test of Raising Rivals' Costs Justine-5180 www.ucei.org #12;Vertical Integration in Gasoline Supply: An Empirical Test of Raising Rivals' Costs gasoline prices. The 1997 acquisition of Unocal's West Coast refining and marketing assets by Tosco

  13. A Low Order Model for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines Isaac M. Asher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    A Low Order Model for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines Isaac M. Asher , Mark Drela and Jaime Peraire and performance prediction of vertical axis wind turbines is presented. The model uses a 2D hybrid dynamic vortex taken into account. Fast convergence is obtained for a large range of solidity and tip speed ratio

  14. Vibration Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade , S.Tullis 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Vibration Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade K. Mc Laren 1 , S.Tullis 2 and S.Ziada 3 1 vibration source of a small-scale vertical axis wind turbine currently undergoing field-testing. The turbine at a blade-tip speed ratio (the ratio of the blade rotational velocity to the ambient wind velocity) of 1

  15. Improving the detection ...1 Improving the detection of On-line Vertical Port Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Improving the detection ...1 Improving the detection of On-line Vertical Port Scan Improving the detection of On-line Vertical Port Scan in IP Traffic Yousra Chabchoub , Christine Fricker and Philippe to detect port scan attacks in IP traffic. Only relevant information about destination IP addresses

  16. Soft-X-Ray-Charged Vertical Electrets and Its Application to Electrostatic Transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    Soft-X-Ray-Charged Vertical Electrets and Its Application to Electrostatic Transducers Makoto A novel charging method for vertical electrets in narrow gaps using soft X-rays has been developed is necessary after charging the electrets. Recently, we have developed a new charging method using soft X-ray

  17. Pressure drop characteristics of gasliquid two-phase ow in vertical miniature triangular channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    air±water two-phase ¯ow through vertical miniature triangular channels having hydraulic diameters of 0 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Air±water two-phase ¯ow; Drift velocity; Void] experimentally investigated the ¯ow of co- current upward air±water two-phase ¯ow in vertical miniature

  18. Studies of ground-state dynamics in isolated species by ionization-detected stimulated Raman techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, P.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First, the author aims to develop methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. Second, the author wishes to apply such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species (molecules, complexes, and clusters) in supersonic molecular beams. In the past year, the author has made progress in several areas. The first pertains to the application of mass-selective ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS) to the size-specific vibrational spectroscopy of solute-solvent{sub n} clusters. The second involves the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The third pertains to the use of IDSRS methods in the study of intermolecular vibrational transitions in van der Waals complexes.

  19. Laser irradiation of carbon nanotube films: Effects and heat dissipation probed by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialichi, J. R.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin,' Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-859 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verissimo, C.; Moshkalev, S. A. [Centro de Componentes Semicondutores, Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-870 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal properties of thin films formed by single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes submitted to laser irradiation using Raman scattering as a probe of both the tube morphology and the local temperature. The nanotubes were submitted to heating/cooling cycles attaining high laser intensities ({approx}1.4 MW/cm{sup 2}) under vacuum and in the presence of an atmosphere, with and without oxygen. We investigate the heat diffusion of the irradiated nanotubes to their surroundings and the effect of laser annealing on their properties. The presence of oxygen during laser irradiation gives rise to an irreversible increase of the Raman efficiency of the carbon nanotubes and to a remarkable increase of the thermal conductivity of multi-walled films. The second effect can be applied to design thermal conductive channels in devices based on carbon nanotube films using laser beams.

  20. Raman Scattering of Water and Photoluminescence of Pollutants Arising from Solid-Water Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallée, P; Ghomi, M; Jouanne, M; Vall\\'{e}e, Philippe; Lafait, Jacques; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Jouanne, Michel

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic Raman experiments performed on water and water-ethanol samples, stored in different containers (fused silica, polypropylene, soda-lime glass type III) for several hours, have shown that the luminescence contribution to the Raman signal fluctuations is directly related to the container composition. Intensity fluctuations as large as 98%, have been observed in the spectral regions corresponding to the both water intramolecular and intermolecular vibrations, despite the fact that the wavenumbers of the modes remained unchanged. We undoubtedly attribute these fluctuations to a luminescence phenomenon on the basis of : i) the absence of such effect in the anti-Stokes domain, ii) its dependence on the excitation laser wavelength, iii) other relevant photoluminescence experiments. This luminescence is attributed to pollutants at ultra-low concentration coming from the different containers.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman medical probes and system for disease diagnosis and drug testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A probe for a surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrometer includes a member of optically transmissive material for receiving the excitation radiation from a laser and for carrying the radiation emitted from a specimen to a detector. An end of the member for placing against the specimen has a coating that produces surface enhancement of the specimen during Raman scattering spectroscopic analysis. Specifically the coating is formed by a first layer of microparticles on the member and a metal layer over the first layer. The first layer may form a microstructure surface over which a metal layer is applied. Alternatively the coating may be a material containing microparticles of a metal. An optional layer of a material may be applied to the metal layer to concentrate onto the probe compounds of analytical interest onto the probe. 39 figs.

  2. The effect of external magnetic field on the Raman peaks in manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, A. K., E-mail: ajitsahu@seemantaengg.ac.in [Seemanta Engineering College, Jharpokharia, Mayurbhanj-757086, Odisha (India); Rout, G. C. [School of Applied Sciences (Physics), KIIT University, Bhubaneswar-7561024 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here a microscopic theoretical model study exhibiting the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman excitation peaks in the CMR manganite system. The Hamiltonian consists of Jahn-Teller (J-T) distortion in e{sub g} band, the double exchange interaction and the Heisenberg spin-spin interaction. Further the phonons are coupled to e{sub g} band electrons, J-T distorted e{sub g} band and the double exchange interaction. The Raman spectral intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green function. The spectra exhibits three peaks besides a very weak high energy peak. The magnetic field effect on these peaks are reported.

  3. Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

  4. Application of Raman spectroscopy to identification and sorting of post-consumer plastics for recycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Edward J. (Nashville, TN); Rich, John T. (Lebanon, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high accuracy rapid system for sorting a plurality of waste products by polymer type. The invention involves the application of Raman spectroscopy and complex identification techniques to identify and sort post-consumer plastics for recycling. The invention reads information unique to the molecular structure of the materials to be sorted to identify their chemical compositions and uses rapid high volume sorting techniques to sort them into product streams at commercially viable throughput rates. The system employs a laser diode (20) for irradiating the material sample (10), a spectrograph (50) is used to determine the Raman spectrum of the material sample (10) and a microprocessor based controller (70) is employed to identify the polymer type of the material sample (10).

  5. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  6. UV-Raman spectroscopy on nanotubes@zeolite Wavelength dependence Ab initio calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    UV-Raman spectroscopy on nanotubes@zeolite June, 2005 Wavelength dependence Ab initio calculations 4 Energy (eV) 0 2 4 Energy (eV) (arb.units) (2,1) (4,1) (5,0) (3,3) (4,2)(4,0) (2,2) (3,0) 1Institut involving the peak at 650 cm-1. Nanotubes grown inside the channels of zeolite crystals are constrained

  7. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  8. Understanding the application of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of traces of life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Craig P.; Edwards, Howell G.M.; Jehlicka, Jan

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    may be translational, rotational, vibrational, or electronic in nature. For a vibrational mode to be Raman active, a change in po- larizability as the molecule vibrates is needed. Molecules consist of a nuclear structure surrounded by a complex field... to struc- tural changes that perturb translational symmetry in car- bonaceous materials, which thus makes this a powerful method by which to characterize carbon structure (e.g., Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1982 and references therein). 230 MARSHALL ET AL...

  9. Femtosecond Raman induced polarization spectroscopy studies of coherent rotational dynamics in molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgen, M.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a polarization-sensitive femtosecond pump probe technique, Raman induced polarization spectroscopy (RIPS), to study coherent rotation in molecular fluids. By observing the collisional dephasing of the coherently prepared rotational states, we are able to extract information concerning the effects of molecular interactions on the rotational motion. The technique is quite sensitive because of the zero background detection method, and is also versatile due to its nonresonant nature.

  10. Molecular cavity optomechanics: a theory of plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Roelli; Christophe Galland; Nicolas Piro; Tobias J. Kippenberg

    2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The exceptional enhancement of Raman scattering cross-section by localized plasmonic resonances in the near-field of metallic surfaces, nanoparticles or tips has enabled spectrocopic fingerprinting of single-molecules and is widely used in material, chemical and biomedical analysis. Contrasting with this overwhelming practical success, conventional theories based on electromagnetic "hot spots" and electronic or chemical effects cannot account for all experimental observations. Here we present a novel theory of plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering by mapping the problem to cavity optomechanics. Using FEM and DFT simulations we calculate the optomechanical vacuum coupling rate between individual molecules and hot spots of metallic dimers. We find that dynamical backaction of the plasmon on the vibrational mode can lead to amplification of molecular vibrations under blue-detuned laser excitation, thereby revealing an enhancement mechanism not contemplated be- fore. The optomechanical theory provides a quantitative framework for the calculation of enhanced cross-sections, recovers known results, and enables the design of novel systems that leverage dynamical backaction to achieve additional, mode-selective enhancement. It yields a new understanding of plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering and opens a route to molecular quantum optomechanics.

  11. CuAl{sub 2} revisited: Composition, crystal structure, chemical bonding, compressibility and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, Yuri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: grin@cpfs.mpg.de; Wagner, Frank R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Armbruester, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kohout, Miroslav [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Leithe-Jasper, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Schwarz, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Wedig, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Georg von Schnering, Hans [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of CuAl{sub 2} is usually described as a framework of base condensed tetragonal antiprisms [CuAl{sub 8/4}]. The appropriate symmetry governed periodic nodal surface (PNS) divides the space of the structure into two labyrinths. All atoms are located in one labyrinth, whereas the second labyrinth seems to be 'empty'. The bonding of the CuAl{sub 2} structure was analyzed by the electron localization function (ELF), crystal orbital Hamiltonian population (COHP) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. From the ELF representation it is seen, that the 'empty' labyrinth is in fact the place of important covalent interactions. ELF, COHP in combination with high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy show that the CuAl{sub 2} structure is described best as a network built of interpenetrating graphite-like nets of three-bonded aluminum atoms with the copper atoms inside the tetragonal-antiprismatic cavities. - Graphical abstract: Atomic interactions in the crystal structure of the intermetallic compound CuAl{sub 2}: Three-bonded aluminum atoms form interpenetrating graphite-like nets. The copper atoms are located in the channels of aluminum network by means of three-center bonds. The bonding model is in agreement with the result of polarized Raman spectroscopy and high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction.

  12. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha, S. Smolentsev, M. Abdou, and R. Moreau Citation in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha,1 S. Smolentsev,1,a) M. Abdou,1 and R. Moreau2 1 Mechanical

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol main physical Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND INTEGRAL AEROSOL PROPERTIES RETRIEVAL FROM RAMAN LIDAR DATA USING PRINCIPLE COMPONENT ANALYSIS Summary: retrievals of physical aerosol parameters from ground-based and...

  14. Design and Test of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine with Pitch Control J. J. Miau1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Design and Test of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine with Pitch Control J. J. Miau1,a , S. Y. Liang2 , R, USA a jjmiau@mail.ncku.edu.tw Keywords: vertical-axis wind turbine, pitch control, wind of a small vertical-axis wind turbine. Benefits gained can be shown by the experimental and numerical results

  15. FSI Modeling of Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines Y. Bazilevs, A. Korobenko, X. Deng, and J. Yan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    FSI Modeling of Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines Y. Bazilevs, A. Korobenko, X. Deng, and J. Yan-dependent aerodynamics and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simula- tions of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine compared to the vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) designs. However, smaller-size VAWTs are more suitable

  16. French vertical flow constructed wetlands: reed bed behaviour and limits due to hydraulic overloading on first stage filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    French vertical flow constructed wetlands: reed bed behaviour and limits due to hydraulic with the European standards. Keywords: Vertical flow constructed wetlands; hydraulic overload; hydraulic behaviour. INTRODUCTION Vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) have been very successful in France over the last five

  17. Accepted Manuscript Bound on vertical heat transport at large Prandtl number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoming

    is the ratio of kinematic viscosity over thermal diffusivity, and the fluids occupy the (non this article as: X. Wang, Bound on vertical heat transport at large Prandtl number, Physica D (2007), doi:10

  18. Vertical Phasing as a Corporate Real Estate Strategy and Development Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guma, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential value of significant vertical phasing – that is, the addition of five or more stories to an existing building – as a valuable real option in real estate ...

  19. A Simple Model of Climatological Rainfall and Vertical Motion Patterns over the Tropical Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Back, Larissa E.

    A simple model is developed that predicts climatological rainfall, vertical motion, and diabatic heating profiles over the tropical oceans given the sea surface temperature (SST), using statistical relationships deduced ...

  20. Macro scale physical model of nanoindentation on vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebeling, Geoffrey F. (Geoffrey Foster), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the process of nanoindentation is being explored as a reliable means of determining the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the constituent tubes of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) ...