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Sample records for raman lidar vertical

  1. Raman Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    While this technique is highly accurate, the retrieval is performed using signals from Raman-scattered light that is a weak scattering process. FEX uses an adaptive smoothing...

  2. ARM - PI Product - Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsRaman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential

  3. Raman Lidar (RL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK

    2009-03-01

    The Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (SGPRL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures height and time resolved profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. The system is a non-commercial custom-built instrument developed by Sandia National Laboratories specifically for the ARM Program. It is fully computer automated, and will run unattended for many days following a brief (~5-minute) startup period. The self-contained system (requiring only external electrical power) is housed in a climate-controlled 8’x8’x20’ standard shipping container.

  4. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ferrare, Richard

    2012-12-14

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  5. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ferrare, Richard

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  6. Sandia Energy - ARM Raman Lidar Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raman lidar was delivered in the fall of 1995. The automated nature of the Raman lidar Raman scattering boxr1 provided multiple-day views of water vapor mixing ratio and...

  7. Sandia Energy - ARM Raman Lidar Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the analysis deriving water vapor flux observations using coincident Raman and Doppler lidar measurements and characterizing entrainment in cumulus clouds using Raman...

  8. Raman Lidar Receives Improvements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the SGP central facility is receiving upgrades to its environmental controls. This ground-based remote sensing instrument uses a laser to measure vertical profiles of water...

  9. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  10. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  11. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  12. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  13. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  14. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  15. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  16. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  17. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  18. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  19. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  20. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  1. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2010-12-15

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  2. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2010-12-15

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  3. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  4. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  5. Raman Lidar Profilesā€“Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

    2012-10-31

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profilesā€“Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

  6. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; Shippert, TR; Riihimaki, LD

    2015-07-01

    fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  7. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  8. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  9. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49 Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  10. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. DOESC-ARMTR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report R Newsom...

  11. Automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties from the ARM Raman lidar, part 1: feature detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-11-01

    A Feature detection and EXtinction retrieval (FEX) algorithm for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programā€™s Raman lidar (RL) has been developed. Presented here is part 1 of the FEX algorithm: the detection of features including both clouds and aerosols. The approach of FEX is to use multiple quantitiesā€” scattering ratios derived using elastic and nitro-gen channel signals from two fields of view, the scattering ratio derived using only the elastic channel, and the total volume depolarization ratioā€” to identify features using range-dependent detection thresholds. FEX is designed to be context-sensitive with thresholds determined for each profile by calculating the expected clear-sky signal and noise. The use of multiple quantities pro-vides complementary depictions of cloud and aerosol locations and allows for consistency checks to improve the accuracy of the feature mask. The depolarization ratio is shown to be particularly effective at detecting optically-thin features containing non-spherical particles such as cirrus clouds. Improve-ments over the existing ARM RL cloud mask are shown. The performance of FEX is validated against a collocated micropulse lidar and observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. While we focus on a specific lidar system, the FEX framework presented here is suitable for other Raman or high spectral resolution lidars.

  12. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Clayton Science Applications International Corporation National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia B. S. Schmid and J. Redemann BAER/NASA Ames Research Institute Moffett Field, California D.

  13. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman SA McFarlane October 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

  14. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-10

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  15. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. RegionalmoreĀ Ā» sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the ƅngstrƶm exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the ƅngstrƶm exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.Ā«Ā less

  16. ARM Raman Lidar Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  17. ARM Raman Lidar Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  18. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

    2009-06-17

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

  19. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  20. Lidar for remote sensing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Berlin, Germany, June 24-26, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becherer, R.J.; Werner, C.

    1992-01-01

    The present volume on lidar for remote sensing discusses lidar system techniques for remote sensing of atmospheric pollution, airborne and surface-based lidar for environmental sensing of water and oceans, Doppler lidar for wind sensing and related measurement, aerosol measurements using lidar, ozone, water vapor, temperature, and density sensing with lidar systems, and new lidar technology systems and concepts. Attention is given to remote sensing of air pollution over large European cities by lidar, differential absorption lidar monitoring of atmospheric atomic mercury, an experimental evaluation of an airborne depth-sounding lidar, and remote sensing of the sea by tunable multichannel lidar. Topics addressed include recent developments in lidar techniques to measure the wind in the middle atmosphere, recent stratospheric aerosol measurements with a combined Raman elastic-backscatter lidar, the development of an eye-safe IR aerosol lidar, and temperature measurement by rotational Raman lidar.

  1. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Protat, A; Young, S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to evaluate the performance of the new Leosphere R-MAN 510 lidar, procured by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, by testing it against the MicroPulse Lidar (MPL) and Raman lidars, at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. This lidar is an eye-safe (355 nm), turn-key mini Raman lidar, which allows for the detection of aerosols and cloud properties, and the retrieval of particulate extinction profiles. To accomplish this evaluation, the R-MAN 510 lidar has been operated at the Darwin ARM site, next to the MPL, Raman lidar, and Vaisala ceilometer (VCEIL) for three months (from 20 January 2013 to 20 April 2013) in order to collect a sufficient sample size for statistical comparisons.

  2. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  3. Lidar techniques for chemical and aerosol air pollution studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardesty, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    At the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL), lidar methods are being applied in several areas of air pollution research. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems for measuring ozone, ethylene, and other pollutants have been recently developed. The ozone instrument profiles ozone concentration in the boundary layer and lower troposphere to study sources, sinks, and transport of ozone. A goal is to combine DIAL and Doppler lidar techniques for measurement of the vertical fluxes of ozone and other pollutants. Doppler lidars have been also used at WPL to study visibility reduction caused by aerosol pollutants at the Grand Canyon, and to investigate dispersion of hazardous emissions near the Rocky Flats nuclear plant.

  4. Raman lidar and MPL Measurements during ALIVE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Petty, Diana Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mendoza, Albert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Clayton, Marian NASA Langley Research Center...

  5. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Protat, Alain; Young, S.

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this IOP was to evaluate the performances of the new Leosphere R-MAN 510 lidar procured by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, by testing it against the MPL and Raman lidars at the Darwin ARM site. This lidar is an eye-safe (355 nm), turn-key mini Raman lidar, which allows for the detection of aerosols and cloud properties, and the retrieval of particulate extinction profiles. To do so, the R-MAN 510 lidar has been operated at the Darwin ARM site, next to the MPL, Raman lidar, and Vaisala ceilometer for three months (from 20 January 2013 to 20 April 2013) in order to collect a good sample for statistical comparisons. The comparisons with the Raman lidar were not performed, since the Raman lidar attenuated backscatter and depolarization ratio product was not available. A new product has just been delivered to the ARM archive as a value-added product, hence this study will continue. Nevertheless we have developed software to match the different space and time resolutions of the other lidars and project the data onto a common grid to permit detailed comparison of the instrumentsā€™ performance and an enhanced analysis of clouds and aerosols through the use of composite data products, like the ratios of attenuated backscatters, attenuated scattering ratios and depolarization ratios. Comparisons between the MPL and R-MAN510 lidar data exhibit large differences in total attenuated backscatter at 355 and 532 nm, attenuated scattering ratios, and aerosol volume depolarization ratios. Differences in attenuated backscatter result mainly from the different relative contributions of scattering from molecules and particles at the different wavelengths, but there are some intriguing differences that will require further investigations. The differences in volume depolarization ratios are due to the much larger contribution of molecular returns to the volume depolarization ratio (5 times larger at 355 nm than at 532 nm). The R-MAN510 lidar is also found to be much less sensitive to daylight solar background illumination, which is greater at the visible wavelength than in the UV.

  6. ARM - Measurement - Lidar polarization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsLidar polarization ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Lidar polarization The temporal and geometric behavior of the electric field vector of an electromagnetic wave transmitted or received by a lidar system, e.g. elliptical polarization, differential reflectivity, phase shift, co-polar correlation coefficient, linear depolarization ratio. Categories Cloud Properties

  7. Doppler lidar for measurement of atmospheric wind fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzies, R.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of wind fields in the earth's troposphere with daily global coverage is widely considered as a significant advance for forecasting and transport studies. For optimal use by NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) models the horizontal and vertical resolutions should be approximately 100 km and 1 km, respectively. For boundary layer studies vertical resolution of a few hundred meters seems essential. Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar has a unique capability to measure global winds in the troposphere with the high vertical resolution required. The lidar approach depends on transmission of pulses with high spectral purity and backscattering from the atmospheric aerosol particles or layered clouds to provide a return signal. Recent field measurement campaigns using NASA research aircraft have resulted in collection of aerosol and cloud data which can be used to optimize the Doppler lidar instrument design and measurement strategy. 5 refs.

  8. Evaluation of three lidar scanning strategies for turbulence measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, J. F.; Klein, P. M.; Wharton, S.; Sathe, A.; Bonin, T. A.; Chilson, P. B.; Muschinski, A.

    2015-11-24

    Several errors occur when a traditional Doppler-beam swinging (DBS) or velocity–azimuth display (VAD) strategy is used to measure turbulence with a lidar. To mitigate some of these errors, a scanning strategy was recently developed which employs six beam positions to independently estimate the u, v, and w velocity variances and covariances. In order to assess the ability of these different scanning techniques to measure turbulence, a Halo scanning lidar, WindCube v2 pulsed lidar and ZephIR continuous wave lidar were deployed at field sites in Oklahoma and Colorado with collocated sonic anemometers. Results indicate that the six-beam strategy mitigates somemore »of the errors caused by VAD and DBS scans, but the strategy is strongly affected by errors in the variance measured at the different beam positions. The ZephIR and WindCube lidars overestimated horizontal variance values by over 60 % under unstable conditions as a result of variance contamination, where additional variance components contaminate the true value of the variance. A correction method was developed for the WindCube lidar that uses variance calculated from the vertical beam position to reduce variance contamination in the u and v variance components. The correction method reduced WindCube variance estimates by over 20 % at both the Oklahoma and Colorado sites under unstable conditions, when variance contamination is largest. This correction method can be easily applied to other lidars that contain a vertical beam position and is a promising method for accurately estimating turbulence with commercially available lidars.« less

  9. emerging-lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emerging LIDAR Based Approaches For 3D Mapping Presentation at Argonne TRACC May 11, 2012 2:00 PM(CDT) TRACC Conference Room: Building 222, Room D-233 Dr. Xin Chen Senior Research Scientist at Nokia Chicago, IL Abstract Modeling real world in the 3D modality is broadly applicable to the surveying, navigation, intelligent vehicle, urban modeling, mapping and augmented reality fields. With the rapid development of LIDAR sensors and global positioning technologies, large scale, geo-referenced and

  10. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 1. Lidar intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowdle, D.A. ); Rothermel, J. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Post, M.J. )

    1991-03-20

    An airborne continuous wave (CW) focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar were used to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than {approximately}50% near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - M-PACE HSR Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HSR Lidar Campaign Links Full Proposal Abstract M-PACE Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : M-PACE HSR Lidar 2004.09.27 - 2004.10.21 Lead Scientist : Edwin Eloranta For data sets, see below. Abstract The HSRL provided calibrated vertical profiles of optical depth, backscatter cross section and depoloarization at a wavelength of 532 nm. Profiles were acquired at 2.5 second intervals with

  12. Raman spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raman spectroscopy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  13. Coplanar Doppler Lidar Retrieval of Rotors from T-REX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Michael; Calhoun, Ron; Fernando, H. J. S.; Wieser, Andreas; Dornbrack, Andreas; Weissmann, Martin; Mayr, G.; Newsom, Rob K.

    2010-03-01

    Two coherent Doppler lidars were deployed during the Terrain-induced Rotor EXperiment (T-REX). Coplanar Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans by the lidars (along the same azimuthal angle) allowed retrieval of two-dimensional velocity vectors on a vertical/cross-barrier plane using the least squares method. Vortices are shown to evolve and advect in the flow field, allowing analysis of their behavior in the mountain-wave-boundary layer system. The locations, magnitudes, and evolution of the vortices can be studied through calculated fields of velocity, vorticity, streamlines, and swirl. Two classes of vortical motions are identified: rotors and sub-rotors, which differ in scale and behavior. The level of coordination of the two lidars and the nature of the output (i.e., in range-gates) creates inherent restrictions on the spatial and temporal resolution of retrieved fields.

  14. Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2008-02-06

    The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

  15. Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general...

  16. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  17. Two-frequency lidar technique for mesospheric Na temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    She, C.Y.; Latifi, H.; Yu, J.R.; Alvarez, R.J. II ); Bills, R.E.; Gardner, C.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors describe a new two-frequency lidar for measuring Na temperature profiles that uses a stabilized cw single-mode dye laser oscillator (rms frequency jitter < 1 MHz) followed by a pulsed-dye power amplifier (140 MHz FWHM linewidth) which is pumped by an injection-locked Nd:YAG laser. The laser oscillator is tuned to the two operating frequencies by observing the Doppler-free structure of the Na D{sub 2} fluorescence spectrum in a vapor cells. The lidar technique and the initial observations of the temperature profile between 82 and 102 km at Ft. Collins, CO (40.6{degree}N,105{degree}W) are described. Absolute temperature accuracies at the Na layer peak of better than {plus minus}3 K with a vertical resolution of 1 km and an integration period of approximately 5 min were achieved.

  18. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G Satyanarayana, M. Krishnakumar, V. Dhaman, Reji k.

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  19. ARM - Campaign Instrument - co2lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Carbon Dioxide Doppler Lidar (CO2LIDAR) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties Campaigns Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 1994.04.01 - 1994.05.31 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM, March 27 - 31, 2006 Figure 2. High resolution water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol scattering ratio derived from Raman lidar measurements on September 13, 2005. The vertical...

  1. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RLPROF : Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles UW-AIR : University of Washington Airborne Aerosol Instruments Value-Added Products AIP : Aerosol Intensive Properties (Process) AIP1OGREN :...

  2. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state-of-the-art instruments such as the Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) for cloud thickness, Doppler lidar for clear and cloudy atmosphere vertical velocity, and Raman lidar for...

  4. Observation of Fair-weather Cumuli over Land Dynamical Factors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state-of-the-art instruments such as the Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) for cloud thickness, Doppler lidar for clear and cloudy atmosphere vertical velocity, and Raman lidar for...

  5. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  6. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30Ā° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of its high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30Ā° and using five to seven azimuth angles.

  7. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30Ā° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of itsmoreĀ Ā» high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30Ā° and using five to seven azimuth angles.Ā«Ā less

  8. Application of lidar to current atmospheric topics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the conference was to address the various applications of lidar to topics of interest in the atmospheric community. Specifically, with the development of frequency-agile, all solid state laser systems, high-quantum-efficiency detectors, increased computational power along with new and more powerful algorithms, and novel detection schemes, the application of lidar to both old and new problems has expanded. This expansion is evidenced by the contributions to the proceedings, which demonstrate the progress made on a variety of atmospheric remote sensing problems, both theoretically and experimentally. The first session focused on aerosol, ozone, and temperature profile measurements from ground-based units. The second session, Chemical Detection, provided applications of lidar to the detection of atmospheric pollutants. Papers in the third session, Wind and Turbulence Measurements, described the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiments, Doppler techniques for ground-based wind profiling and mesopause radial wind and temperature measurements utilizing a frequency-agile lidar system. The papers in the last two sessions, Recent Advanced in Lidar Technology and Techniques and Advanced Operational Lidars, provided insights into novel approaches, materials, and techniques that would be of value to the lidar community. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  10. ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements,

  11. Micropulse Lidar The ARM Program studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Micropulse Lidar The ARM Program studies clouds, sunlight, and their interactions to understand how they affect Earth's climate. One of the many instruments used to look at clouds at the SGP CART site is the micropulse lidar (MPL; "lidar" was coined from "light distance and ranging"). The ARM Program operates five MPLs. One is at the SGP central facility; one is at the North Slope of Alaska CART site in Barrow, Alaska; and three are for use at the Tropical Western Pacific

  12. Vertical Velocity Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically...

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE Campaign Links ALIVE Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below...

  14. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  15. Raman accumulator as a fusion laser driver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.; Swingle, J.C.

    1982-03-31

    Apparatus for simultaneous laser pulse amplification and compression, using multiple pass Raman scattering in one Raman cell and pulse switchout from the optical cavity through use of a dichroic device associated with the Raman cell.

  16. Raman accumulator as a fusion laser driver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Swingle, James C. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus for simultaneous laser pulse amplification and compression, using multiple pass Raman scattering in one Raman cell and pulse switchout from the optical cavity through use of a dichroic device associated with the Raman cell.

  17. ARM - Campaign Instrument - lidar-dial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentslidar-dial Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Dial Lidar (LIDAR-DIAL) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns ARM-FIRE Water Vapor Experiment [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2000.11.01 - 2000.12.31 Water Vapor IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2000.09.18 - 2000.10.08 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrades to Raman Lidar Backup Laser Improve Reliability Bookmark and Share The Raman Lidar is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures vertical profiles of water-vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. In March 2004, upgrades to a second (back-up) laser for the Raman Lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) locale were completed, concluding a complex effort that began more than a year ago. Upgrades

  19. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-03-14

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  20. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Linda Anne (Andersonville, TN); Connatser, Raynella Magdalene (Knoxville, TN); Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur (Andersonville, TN)

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  1. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  2. Phase sensitive Raman process with correlated seeds (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Furthermore, the constructive interference leads to a Raman efficiency larger than other kinds of Raman processes such as stimulated Raman process with Stokes seed injection alone ...

  3. ARM - PI Product - Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsFinnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar Citation DOI: 10.5439/1177194 [ What is this? ] ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar [ research data - External funding ] This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary

  4. Accessing the Energy Department's Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Accessing the Energy Department's Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach Accessing the Energy Department's Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach In December 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Energy Department's floating lidar buoy off of Virginia Beach, Virginia, in less than 30 meters (m) of water, approximately 28 nautical miles offshore (approximate coordinates: 36Ā° 52.00' N, 75Ā° 29.53' W). This buoy is collecting meteorological and

  5. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2005) Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems...

  6. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2004) Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems...

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - M-PACE - Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) Campaign Links M-PACE Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : M-PACE - Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) 2004.09.01 - 2004.10.21 Lead Scientist : Kenneth Sassen For data sets, see below. Abstract In support of M-PACE, a Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL), was deployed to the NSA. Unlike the micro pulses of the MPL (micropulse lidar) present at NSA, the

  8. Advanced Lidars for ARM: What Would We Get?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of downtime due to laser issues - Data (raw and processed) available from lidar.ssec.wisc.edu - Products are cloud optical depth, extinction, backscatter, and depolarization...

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Lidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsLidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland Campaign Links ICECAPS Campaign Summary (PDF) Summit Station Research Highlight New Data from Greenland for Arctic...

  10. A Lidar View of Clouds in Southeastern China

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lidar View of Clouds in Southeastern China For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight From May 2008...

  11. Three-dimensional elastic lidar winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-07-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three- dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  12. Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would

  13. Lidar techniques for search and rescue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Four techniques for using LIDAR in Search and Rescue Operations will be discussed. The topic will include laser retroreflection, laser-induced fluorescence in the visible, laser-induced fluorescence during daylight hours, and laser-induced fluorescence in the uv. These techniques use high-repetition rate lasers at a variety of frequencies to induce either fluorescence in dye markers or retroreflection from plastic corner cubes on life preservers and other emergency markers.

  14. Adaptive Data Processing Technique for Lidar-Assisted Control to Bridge the Gap between Lidar Systems and Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlipf, David; Raach, Steffen; Haizmann, Florian; Cheng, Po Wen; Fleming, Paul; Scholbrock, Andrew, Krishnamurthy, Raghu; Boquet, Mathieu

    2015-12-14

    This paper presents first steps toward an adaptive lidar data processing technique crucial for lidar-assisted control in wind turbines. The prediction time and the quality of the wind preview from lidar measurements depend on several factors and are not constant. If the data processing is not continually adjusted, the benefit of lidar-assisted control cannot be fully exploited, or can even result in harmful control action. An online analysis of the lidar and turbine data are necessary to continually reassess the prediction time and lidar data quality. In this work, a structured process to develop an analysis tool for the prediction time and a new hardware setup for lidar-assisted control are presented. The tool consists of an online estimation of the rotor effective wind speed from lidar and turbine data and the implementation of an online cross correlation to determine the time shift between both signals. Further, initial results from an ongoing campaign in which this system was employed for providing lidar preview for feed-forward pitch control are presented.

  15. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  16. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  17. On the relationship among cloud turbulence, droplet formation and drizzle as viewed by Doppler radar, microwave radiometer and lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, G.; Frisch, A.S.; Cotton, W.R.

    1999-09-01

    Cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and lidar remote sensing data acquired during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) are analyzed to address the relationship between (1) drop number concentration and cloud turbulence as represented by vertical velocity and vertical velocity variance and (2) drizzle formation and cloud turbulence. Six cases, each of about 12 hours duration, are examined; three of these cases are characteristic of nondrizzling boundary layers and three of drizzling boundary layers. In all cases, microphysical retrievals are only performed when drizzle is negligible (radar reflectivity{lt}{minus}17dBZ). It is shown that for the cases examined, there is, in general, no correlation between drop concentration and cloud base updraft strength, although for two of the nondrizzling cases exhibiting more classical stratocumulus features, these two parameters are correlated. On drizzling days, drop concentration and cloud-base vertical velocity were either not correlated or negatively correlated. There is a significant positive correlation between drop concentration and mean in-cloud vertical velocity variance for both nondrizzling boundary layers (correlation coefficient r=0.45) and boundary layers that have experienced drizzle (r=0.38). In general, there is a high correlation (r{gt}0.5) between radar reflectivity and in-cloud vertical velocity variance, although one of the boundary layers that experienced drizzle exhibited a negative correlation between these parameters. However, in the subcloud region, all boundary layers that experienced drizzle exhibit a negative correlation between radar reflectivity and vertical velocity variance. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  18. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO sub 2 Doppler lidar measurements. 1. Algorithm description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J. ); Bowdle, D.A. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Woodfield, A.A. )

    1991-03-20

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kingdom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 {mu}m using an airborne continuous wave focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). The heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: Set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  19. Estimation of the mixing layer height over a high altitude site in Central Himalayan region by using Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Newsom, Rob K.; Kumar, Niranjan; Ratnam, Venkat; Naja, M.; Singh, Narendra

    2014-03-01

    A Doppler lidar was installed at Manora Peak, Nainital (29.4 N; 79.2 E, 1958 amsl) to estimate mixing layer height for the first time by using vertical velocity variance as basic measurement parameter for the period September-November 2011. Mixing layer height is found to be located ~0.57 +/- 0.1and 0.45 +/- 0.05km AGL during day and nighttime, respectively. The estimation of mixing layer height shows good correlation (R>0.8) between different instruments and with different methods. Our results show that wavelet co-variance transform is a robust method for mixing layer height estimation.

  20. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

  1. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

  2. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  3. Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madisonā€™s Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: ā€¢ An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 ā€¢ Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 ā€¢ MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

  4. Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: • An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 • Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 • MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

  5. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  6. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To...

  7. Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    depth. These results will be compared to similar results observed during the first 8-months of our current deployment at Eureka, Canada (80N, 86.2W). http:lidar.ssec.wisc.edu...

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - NASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsNASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

  9. Elastic Scattering LIDAR Data Acquisition Visualization and Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-10-12

    ELASTIC/EVIEW is a software system that controls an elastic scattering atmospheric Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instrument. It can acquire elastic scattering LIDAR data using this system and produce images of one, two, and three-dimensional atmospheric data on particulates and other atmospheric pollutants. The user interface is a modern menu driven syatem with appropriate support for user configuration and printing files.

  10. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  11. An Evaluation of Mesoscale Model Predictions of Down-Valley and Canyon Flows and Their Consequences Using Doppler Lidar Measurements During VTMX 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Darby, Lisa S.

    2004-04-01

    A mesoscale model, a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, and extensive Doppler lidar wind measurements during the VTMX 2000 field campaign were used to examine converging flows over the Salt Lake Valley and their effect on vertical mixing of tracers at night and during the morning transition period. The simulated wind components were transformed into radial velocities to make a direct comparison with about 1.3 million Doppler lidar data points and critically evaluate, using correlation coefficients, the spatial variations in the simulated wind fields aloft. The mesoscale model captured reasonably well the general features of the observed circulations including the daytime up-valley flow, the nighttime slope, canyon, and down-valley flows, and the convergence of the flows over the valley. When there were errors in the simulated wind fields, they were usually associated with the timing, structure, or strength of specific flows. Simulated outflows from canyons along the Wasatch Mountains propagated over the valley and converged with the down-valley flow, but the advance and retreat of these simulated flows was often out of phase with the lidar measurements. While the flow reversal during the evening transition period produced rising motions over much of the valley atmosphere in the absence of significant ambient winds, average vertical velocities became close to zero as the down-valley flow developed. Still, vertical velocities between 5 and 15 cm s-1 occurred where down-slope, canyon and down-valley flows converged and vertical velocities greater than 50 cm s-1 were produced by hydraulic jumps at the base of the canyons. The presence of strong ambient winds resulted in smaller average rising motions during the evening transition period and larger average vertical velocities after that. A fraction of the tracer released at the surface was transported up to the height of the surrounding mountains; however, higher concentrations were produced aloft for evenings characterized by well-developed drainage circulations. Simulations with and without vertical motions in the particle model produced large differences in the tracer concentrations at specific locations and times; however, the overall ventilation of the valley atmosphere differed by only 5% or less. Despite the atmospheric stability, turbulence produced by vertical wind shears mixed particles well above the surface stable layer for the particle model simulation without vertical motions.

  12. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of thesemoreĀ Ā» changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, Ļƒu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of Ļƒu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while Ļƒu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.Ā«Ā less

  13. Raman Thermometry of Microdevices: Comparing Methods to Minimize...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Raman Thermometry of Microdevices: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman Thermometry of Microdevices: Comparing Methods to Minimize...

  14. Raman spectroscopy in hot compressed hydrogen and nitrogen -...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Raman spectroscopy in hot compressed hydrogen and nitrogen - implications for the intramolecular potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman spectroscopy in hot...

  15. Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts Presentation about...

  16. Measuring Thermal Conductivity with Raman:Capability Uncertainty...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measuring Thermal Conductivity with Raman:Capability Uncertainty and Strain Effects. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measuring Thermal Conductivity with Raman:Capability...

  17. Stimulated forward Raman scattering in large scale-length laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Stimulated forward Raman scattering in large scale-length laser-produced plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stimulated forward Raman scattering in...

  18. Inherent Errors Associated with Raman Based Thermal Conductivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inherent Errors Associated with Raman Based Thermal Conductivity Measurements. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inherent Errors Associated with Raman Based Thermal...

  19. Q-Switched Raman laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for use of a Raman or Brillouin switch together with a conventional laser and a saturable absorber that is rapidly bleached at a predetermined frequency .nu.=.nu..sub.0, to ultimately produce a Raman or Brillouin pulse at frequency .nu.=.nu..sub.0 .+-..nu..sub.Stokes.

  20. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  1. LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    aerial Li-DAR survey flown over the project areas, securing over 177,000 square kilometers of <30cm accuracy digital elevation data. LiDAR data were analyzed to characterize...

  2. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Peter; Joyner, Candace C.; Patrick, Sheena T.; Guyer, Dean R.

    2004-06-08

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  3. Estimations of atmospheric boundary layer fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzvi Galchen; Mei Xu ); Eberhard, W.L. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. Here the authors present results on doppler LIDAR measurements used to measure a range of turbulence parameters in the region of the unstable planetary boundary layer (PBL). The parameters include, averaged velocities, cartesian velocities, variances in velocities, parts of the covariance associated with vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum, and third moments of the vertical velocity. They explain their analysis technique, especially as it relates to error reduction of the averaged turbulence parameters from individual measurements with relatively large errors. The scales studied range from 150m to 12km. With this new diagnostic they address questions about the behavior of the convectively unstable PBL, as well as the stable layer which overlies it.

  4. Comparison of Two Independent LIDAR-Based Pitch Control Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Schlipf, D.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Two different lidar-based feedforward controllers have previously been designed for the NREL 5 MW wind turbine model under separate studies. Feedforward controller A uses a finite-impulse-response design, with 5 seconds of preview, and three rotating lidar measurements. Feedforward controller B uses a static-gain design, with the preview time defined by the pitch actuator dynamics, a simulation of a real nacelle-based scanning lidar system, and a lowpass filter defined by the lidar configuration. These controllers are now directly compared under the same lidar configuration, in terms of fatigue load reduction, rotor speed regulation, and power capture. The various differences in design choices are discussed and compared. We also compare frequency plots of individual pitch feedforward and collective pitch feedforward load reductions, and we see that individual pitch feedforward is effective mainly at the once-per-revolution and twice-per-revolution frequencies. We also explain how to determine the required preview time by breaking it down into separate parts, and we then compare it to the expected preview time available.

  5. A Doppler lidar for measuring winds in the middle atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanin, M.L.; Garnier, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Porteneuve, J. )

    1989-11-01

    The possibility of measuring winds in the middle atmosphere with a Doppler lidar has just been demonstrated. It is aimed at studying the wave-mean flow interaction, when used is association with the Rayleigh lidar providing density and temperature profiles and their fluctuations. The new Doppler lidar relies on the Rayleigh scattering from air molecules is designed to cover the height range 25-60 km, a region where radars cannot operate. The Doppler shift to the backscattered echo is measured by inter-comparing the signal detected through each of the two high-resolution, narrow band-pass Fabry-Perot interferometers tuned on either side of the emitted laser line.

  6. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    1996-11-08

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  7. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    1996-11-08

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  8. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  9. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  10. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  11. Vertical tube liquid pollutant separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, W.M.

    1982-06-08

    A plurality of elongated hollow, circular, foraminous substantially vertical tubes contiguously stacked transversely to the direction flowing liquid such as waste water containing foreign matter, I.E., settable solids and free oil, in a coalescer-separator apparatus provide a filter body providing for significant surface area contact by the liquid on both inside and outside surfaces of the tubes to entrap the foreign matter but defining substantially vertical passages permitting the entrapped foreign matter to be gravity separated with the lighter matter coalescing and floating upwardly and the heavier matter settling downwardly so that substantially clarified effluent flows from the apparatus. The stacked tube filter body is contained within an insulated closed container of a sufficient capacity, and the arrays of holes in the tube walls are coordinated with respect to the intended volumetric capacity of the apparatus, so that turbulence in the liquid flowing through the filter body is minimized.

  12. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  13. Analysis of Doppler Lidar Data Acquired During the Pentagon Shield Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.

    2011-04-14

    Observations from two coherent Doppler lidars deployed during the Pentagon Shield field campaign are analyzed in conjunction with other sensors to characterize the overall boundary-layer structure, and identify the dominant flow characteristics during the entire two-week field campaign. Convective boundary layer (CBL) heights and cloud base heights (CBH) are estimated from an analysis of the lidar signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and mean wind profiles are computed using a modified velocity-azimuth-display (VAD) algorithm. Three-dimensional wind field retrievals are computed from coordinated overlapping volume scans, and the results are analyzed by visualizing the flow in horizontal and vertical cross sections. The VAD winds show that southerly flows dominate during the two-week field campaign. Low-level jets (LLJ) were evident on all but two of the nights during the field campaign. The LLJs tended to form a couple hours after sunset and reach maximum strength between 03 and 07 UTC. The surface friction velocities show distinct local maxima during four nights when strong LLJs formed. Estimates of the convective boundary layer height and residual layer height are obtained through an analysis of the vertical gradient of the lidar signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). Strong minimum in the SNR gradient often develops just above the surface after sunrise. This minimum is associated with the developing CBL, and increases rapidly during the early portion of the daytime period. On several days, this minimum continues to increase until about sunset. Secondary minima in the SNR gradient were also observed at higher altitudes, and are believed to be remnants of the CBL height from previous days, i.e. the residual layer height. The dual-Doppler analysis technique used in this study makes use of hourly averaged radial velocity data to produce three-dimensional grids of the horizontal velocity components, and the horizontal velocity variance. Visualization of horizontal and vertical cross sections of the dual-Doppler wind retrievals often indicated a jet-like flow feature over the Potomac River under southerly flow conditions. This linear flow feature is roughly aligned with the Potomac River corridor to the south of the confluence with the Anatostia River, and is most apparent at low levels (i.e. below ~150 m MSL). It is believed that this flow arises due to reduced drag over the water surface and when the large scale flow aligns with the Potomac River corridor. A so-called area-constrained VAD analysis generally confirmed the observations from the dual-Doppler analysis. When the large scale flow is southerly, wind speeds over the Potomac River are consistently larger than the at a site just to the west of the river for altitudes less than 100 m MSL. Above this level, the trend is somewhat less obvious. The data suggest that the depth of the wind speed maximum may be reduced by strong directional shear aloft.

  14. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon, M.; Vercherin, B.; Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.

    2014-05-01

    Turbine-mounted lidars provide preview measurements of the incoming wind field. By reducing loads on critical components and increasing the potential power extracted from the wind, the performance of wind turbine controllers can be improved [2]. As a result, integrating a light detection and ranging (lidar) system has the potential to lower the cost of wind energy. This paper presents an evaluation of turbine-mounted lidar availability. Availability is a metric which measures the proportion of time the lidar is producing controller-usable data, and is essential when a wind turbine controller relies on a lidar. To accomplish this, researchers from Avent Lidar Technology and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory first assessed and modeled the effect of extreme atmospheric events. This shows how a multirange lidar delivers measurements for a wide variety of conditions. Second, by using a theoretical approach and conducting an analysis of field feedback, we investigated the effects of the lidar setup on the wind turbine. This helps determine the optimal lidar mounting position at the back of the nacelle, and establishes a relationship between availability, turbine rpm, and lidar sampling time. Lastly, we considered the role of the wind field reconstruction strategies and the turbine controller on the definition and performance of a lidar's measurement availability.

  15. Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category: Cloud Properties The time series of backscattering coefficients derived from lidar and Doppler millimeter-wave radar returns, as well as from balloon and aircraft...

  16. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA’s High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  17. NASA Lidar system support and MOPA technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughman, L.M.; Capuano, B.; Wayne, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    A series of lidar design and technology demonstration tasks in support of a CO/sub 2/ lidar program is discussed. The first of these tasks is discussed in Section VI of this report under the heading of NASA Optical Lidar Design and it consists of detailed recommendations for the layout of a CO/sub 2/ Doppler lidar incorporating then existing NASA optical components and mounts. The second phase of this work consisted of the design, development, and delivery to NASA of a novel acousto-optic laser frequency stabilization system for use with the existing NASA ring laser transmitter. The second major task in this program encompasses the design and experimental demonstration of a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter utilizing a commercially available laser as the amplifier. The MOPA design including the low chirp master oscillator is discussed in detail. Experimental results are given for one, two and three pass amplification. The report includes operating procedures for the MOPA system.

  18. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  19. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.

    1996-03-18

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured.

  20. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA); Herbst, Richard L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  1. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlprofbe1news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    news Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027250 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 10RLPROFBE1NEWS Raman LIDAR (RL): Best-estimate state of the atmospheric profiles from Raman Lidar Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.21 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles : RLPROF Measurements The measurements

  2. ARM - Instrument - rl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsrl Documentation RL : Handbook ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Raman Lidar (RL) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling Picture of the Raman Lidar (RL) General Overview The Raman Lidar (RL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures vertical profiles of water-vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities.

  3. Category:Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Flowmeter Test page? For detailed information on Vertical Flowmeter Test, click...

  4. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

    2009-06-03

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  5. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  6. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Archer, William B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  7. Proposed ground-based incoherent Doppler lidar with iodine filter discriminator for atmospheric wind profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.S.; Chen, W.B.; Hair, J.W.; She, C.Y.

    1996-12-31

    A new incoherent lidar for measuring atmospheric wind using iodine molecular filter is proposed. A unique feature of the proposed lidar lies in its capability for simultaneous measurement of aerosol mixing ratio, with which the radial wind can be determined uniquely from lidar return. A preliminary laboratory experiment using a dye laser at 589 nm and a rotating wheel has been performed demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed wind measurement.

  8. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

    2014-02-01

    Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

  9. ARM - VAP Process - rlprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsrlprof Documentation & Plots Technical Report Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles (RLPROF) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling, Derived Quantities and Models Rlprof data flow diagram Data flowchart for the RLPROF family. (Larger image available.) The Raman lidar automatically attempts to

  10. LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

  11. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayeshlal, G. S. Satyanarayana, Malladi Dhaman, Reji K. Motty, G. S.

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  12. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and

  13. LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  14. LiDAR At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Single Packaged Vertical Units | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Single Packaged Vertical Units Single Packaged Vertical Units The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STARĀ® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. File Single Packaged Vertical Units -- v2.0 More Documents

  16. ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Convective Vertical Velocity Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by distributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. In particular, vertical air motions associated with these

  17. Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Electrical Sounding...

  18. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report A Protat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report A Protat S Young February 2015 DOE/SC-ARM-15-008 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use

  19. Vertical Flowmeter Logging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vertical Flowmeter Logging Author U.S. Geological Survey Published USGS Groundwater...

  20. Vertical Circuits Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and intellectual property for the manufacture of low cost ultra high-speedhigh-density semiconductor components. References: Vertical Circuits, Inc.1 This article is a...

  1. Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  2. Single Packaged Vertical Units | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    standards. File Single Packaged Vertical Units -- v2.0 More Documents & Publications Room Air Conditioners Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment

  3. First detection of a noctilucent cloud by lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, G.; Serwazi, M.; von Zahn, U. )

    1989-12-01

    During the night of August 5/6, 1989 for the first time a noctilucent cloud (NLC) was detected and measured by a lidar instrument. The observations were made with ground-based narrow-band Na lidar located at Andenes, Norway (69{degree}N, 16{degree}E geographic coordinates). In wavelength the lidar was operated both at the Na D{sub 2} resonance line of 589 nm as well as 5 Doppler widths shifted away. The altitude resolution was 200 m. The NLC developed at about 22:20 UT, reached its maximum backscatter cross section at 23:05 UT and became unobservable at around 00:10 UT. During this period the NLC exhibited the following properties: (a) its altitude ranged between 83.4 and 82.2 km; (b) its full width at half maximum ranged between 1.4 and 0.3 km; (c) the ratio of measured backscatter intensity from the NLC to the calculated Rayleigh signal from 82.6 km reached 450; (d) its volume backscatter cross section maximized at 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m{sup {minus}1} sr{sup {minus}1}.

  4. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Brown, G.

    2015-10-07

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine powermore »performance analysis and annual energy production. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation when arc scans are used for wind resource assessment.« less

  5. Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A device for producing stimulated Raman scattering of CO.sub.2 laser radiation by rotational states in a diatomic molecular gas utilizing a Stokes injection signal. The system utilizes a cryogenically cooled waveguide for extending focal interaction length. The waveguide, in conjunction with the Stokes injection signal, reduces required power density of the CO.sub.2 radiation below the breakdown threshold for the diatomic molecular gas. A Fresnel rhomb is employed to circularly polarize the Stokes injection signal and CO.sub.2 laser radiation in opposite circular directions. The device can be employed either as a regenerative oscillator utilizing optical cavity mirrors or as a single pass amplifier. Additionally, a plurality of Raman gain cells can be staged to increase output power magnitude. Also, in the regenerative oscillator embodiment, the Raman gain cell cavity length and CO.sub.2 cavity length can be matched to provide synchronism between mode locked CO.sub.2 pulses and pulses produced within the Raman gain cell.

  6. Raman laser with controllable suppression of parasitics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Method and apparatus for switching energy out of a Raman laser optical cavity. Coherent radiation at both the pump and first Stokes wave frequencies are introduced into the optical cavity from the same direction, and a second Stokes wave is utilized to switch the energy out of the cavity.

  7. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  8. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmoreĀ Ā» under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g māˆ’2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10ā€“20 g māˆ’2.Ā«Ā less

  9. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmoreĀ Ā» using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10ā€“20 g m-2.Ā«Ā less

  10. ARM: ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    1996-11-08

    ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  11. ARM: ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  12. Combination ring cavity and backward Raman waveguide amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A combination regenerative ring and backward Raman waveguide amplifier and a combination regenerative ring oscillator and backward Raman waveguide amplifier which produce Raman amplification, pulse compression, and efficient energy extraction from the CO.sub.2 laser pump signal for conversion into a Stokes radiation signal. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO.sub.2 laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman waveguide amplifier. The backward Raman waveguide amplifier configuration extracts a major portion of the remaining energy from the CO.sub.2 laser pump signal for conversion to Stokes radiation. Additionally, the backward Raman amplifier configuration produces a Stokes radiation signal which has a high intensity and a short duration. Adjustment of the position of overlap of the Stokes signal and the CO.sub.2 laser pump signal in the backward Raman waveguide amplifiers alters the amount of pulse compression which can be achieved.

  13. Turbine Reliability and Operability Optimization through the use of Direct Detection Lidar Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, David K; Lewis, Matthew J; Pavlich, Jane C; Wright, Alan D; Johnson, Kathryn E; Pace, Andrew M

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this Department of Energy (DOE) project is to increase wind turbine efficiency and reliability with the use of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system. The LIDAR provides wind speed and direction data that can be used to help mitigate the fatigue stress on the turbine blades and internal components caused by wind gusts, sub-optimal pointing and reactionary speed or RPM changes. This effort will have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs of turbines across the industry. During the course of the project, Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) modified and tested a prototype direct detection wind LIDAR instrument; the resulting LIDAR design considered all aspects of wind turbine LIDAR operation from mounting, assembly, and environmental operating conditions to laser safety. Additionally, in co-operation with our partners, the National Renewable Energy Lab and the Colorado School of Mines, progress was made in LIDAR performance modeling as well as LIDAR feed forward control system modeling and simulation. The results of this investigation showed that using LIDAR measurements to change between baseline and extreme event controllers in a switching architecture can reduce damage equivalent loads on blades and tower, and produce higher mean power output due to fewer overspeed events. This DOE project has led to continued venture capital investment and engagement with leading turbine OEMs, wind farm developers, and wind farm owner/operators.

  14. Raman spectroscopic investigations of hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is still very little information about the stoichiometries, structures and stabilities of metal complexes at high temperatures and pressures. Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited to probe and study concentrated electrolyte solutions at the molecular level. This thesis includes the design and construction of a Raman cell operable up to 300C and 15MPa. In order to obtain quantitative thermodynamic information from Raman spectroscopic measurements, a chemically inert internal standard must be used. Perchlorate is commonly used for this purpose at low temperatures, but it may be unstable at high temperatures and its explosive properties make it undesirable. A new preferred internal standard; trifluoromethanesulfonic acid is introduced and its spectra p to 300C discussed. The use of this compound as a high temperature internal standard enabled stepwise stability constants of zinc-bromo complexes to be determined. Although bromide is not an important ligand in geologic systems, its chemical similarity to chloride can provide insights into the study of zinc-chloro species which do not have very informative Raman spectra. The importance of organic ligands in geologic settings such as the Mississippi-Valley Type Pb-Zn sulfide deposits is now being realized. Chapter four presents the first high temperature spectroscopic measurements of lead and zinc acetate aqueous solutions. Not only do these studies verify the stability of lead and zinc acetate complexes up to 250 C but they also show that the type of complex formed is a function of pH, metal-ligand ratio and temperature, thus having important implications for zoning of Pb-Zn sulfide deposits.

  15. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated.

  16. Raman-based system for DNA sequencing-mapping and other separations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-04-26

    DNA sequencing and mapping are performed by using a Raman spectrometer with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to enhance the Raman signal. A SERS label is attached to a DNA fragment and then analyzed with the Raman spectrometer to identify the DNA fragment according to characteristics of the Raman spectrum generated. 11 figures.

  17. Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

  18. Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate Combined computational/Raman

  19. Raman scattering in a whispering mode optical waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A device and method for Raman scattering in a whispering mode optical waveguide. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature .rho. p for confining the beam to increase intensity. A Raman scattering medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Raman scattering is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction path lengths which are achieved in a small volume.

  20. A SERS Method for Handheld Portable Raman - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summary Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has made an initial investment in the research and development of Surface Enhanced Raman hardware capable of being...

  1. Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking: Origin of the Raman modes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking: Origin of the Raman modes in superconducting cuprates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking:...

  2. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal ... Publisher: American Institute of Physics (AIP) Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories ...

  3. NOAA lidar observations during the TMDBCE lethality test at WSMR on 5 February 1993. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, M.J.; Olivier, L.D.

    1996-03-01

    The National Oceanic and Atomospheric Administration`s (NOAA) pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar successfully tracked a cloud of liquid triethyl phosphate (TEP) released from an incoming Storm missile. By concentrating on the lowest portion of the cloud, information about the descent of the TEP cloud was obtained. TEP cloud bottom height and a ground track showing the motion of the cloud relative to the lidar were plotted. In addition, lidar measurements were used to guide an instrumented air craft into the cloud. Improvements for future tests were defined.

  4. User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine performance computer code darter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: User's manual for the vertical axis...

  5. User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine performance computer code darter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine...

  6. Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Specialized company that builds vertical drilling equipment for the development of geothermal resources. References: Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH1 This article is a stub....

  7. Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymm...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymmetric Fields Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in ...

  8. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye...

  9. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At...

  10. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  11. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jay W; Allen, Grahan S; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Sridharan, Arun K; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Barty, Christopher B.J

    2015-11-05

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  12. Ultraviolet high-spectral-resolution Doppler lidar for measuring wind field and aerosol optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imaki, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-10-01

    An ultraviolet incoherent Doppler lidar that incorporates the high-spectral-resolution (HSR) technique has been developed for measuring the wind field and aerosol optical properties in the troposphere. An injection seeded and tripled Nd:YAG laser at an ultraviolet wavelength of 355 nm was used in the lidar system. The HRS technique can resolve the aerosol Mie backscatter and the molecular Rayleigh backscatter to derive the signal components. By detecting the Mie backscatter, a great increase in the Doppler filter sensitivity was realized compared to the conventional incoherent Doppler lidars that detected the Rayleigh backscatter. The wind velocity distribution in a two-dimensional cross section was measured. By using the HSR technique, multifunction and absolute value measurements were realized for aerosol extinction, and volume backscatter coefficients; the laser beam transmittance, the lidar ratio, and the backscatter ratio are derived from these measurements.

  13. 2 micron LIDAR for laser-based remote sensing: Flight demonstration and application survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, T.J.; Demma, N.; Kmetec, J.D.; Kubo, T.S.

    1995-02-01

    A flight test of a diode-pumped solid-state 2 micron Doppler Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) system was conducted on-board the NASA Ames DC-8 Airborne Laboratory. This was the first ever airborne demonstration of a 2 micron diode-pumped solid-state Doppler LIDAR. The LIDAR performance was verified by comparing the true-airspeed (TAS) estimate with that found using the pneumatic air data system; excellent agreement was found. The capabilities of this pulsed 2 micron Doppler LIDAR system include high bandwidth air data determination without the need for extensive forebody calibration, remote wind profiling as far as several kilometers away from the aircraft, eye-safe laser transmission at 2 micron, and diode-pumped solid-state design for compact construction and reliable performance. 7 refs.

  14. Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and characterize young faults, high resolution LiDAR and 1:12,000-scale low-sun-angle (LSA) aerial photography was acquired for the NAS Fallon study area. The LSA photos were...

  15. Novel polarization-sensitive micropulse lidar measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, Connor J.; Mendoza, Albert; Zheng, Yunhui; Mathur, Savyasachee

    2007-03-19

    Polarization-sensitive detection of elastic backscatter is useful for detection of cloud phase and depolarizing aerosols. The U.S. DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program has deployed micropulse lidar (MPL) for over a decade, but without polarized detection. Adding an actively-controlled liquid crystal retarder provides the capability to identify depolarizing particles by alternately transmitting linearly and circularly polarized light. This represents a departure from established techniques which transmit exclusively linear polarization or exclusively circular polarization. Mueller matrix calculations yield simple relationships between the well-known linear depolarization ratio Ī“linear, the circular depolarization ratio Ī“circ, and the hybrid MPL depolarization ratio Ī“MPL. This research was supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program.

  16. Performance of a VME-based parallel processing LIDAR data acquisition system (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, K.; Buttler, B.; Caffrey, M.; Soriano, C.

    1995-05-01

    It may be possible to make accurate real time, autonomous, 2 and 3 dimensional wind measurements remotely with an elastic backscatter Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system by incorporating digital parallel processing hardware into the data acquisition system. In this paper, we report the performance of a commercially available digital parallel processing system in implementing the maximum correlation technique for wind sensing using actual LIDAR data. Timing and numerical accuracy are benchmarked against a standard microprocessor impementation.

  17. Retrieval of Urban Boundary Layer Structures from Doppler Lidar Data. Part I: Accuracy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Quanxin; Lin, Ching Long; Calhoun, Ron; Newsom, Rob K.

    2008-01-01

    Two coherent Doppler lidars from the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Arizona State University (ASU) were deployed in the Joint Urban 2003 atmospheric dispersion field experiment (JU2003) held in Oklahoma City. The dual lidar data are used to evaluate the accuracy of the four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) method and identify the coherent flow structures in the urban boundary layer. The objectives of the study are three-fold. The first objective is to examine the effect of eddy viscosity models on the quality of retrieved velocity data. The second objective is to determine the fidelity of single-lidar 4DVAR and evaluate the difference between single- and dual-lidar retrievals. The third objective is to correlate the retrieved flow structures with the ground building data. It is found that the approach of treating eddy viscosity as part of control variables yields better results than the approach of prescribing viscosity. The ARL single-lidar 4DVAR is able to retrieve radial velocity fields with an accuracy of 98% in the along-beam direction and 80-90% in the cross-beam direction. For the dual-lidar 4DVAR, the accuracy of retrieved radial velocity in the ARL cross-beam direction improves to 90-94%. By using the dual-lidar retrieved data as a reference, the single-lidar 4DVAR is able to recover fluctuating velocity fields with 70-80% accuracy in the along-beam direction and 60-70% accuracy in the cross-beam direction. Large-scale convective roll structures are found in the vicinity of downtown airpark and parks. Vortical structures are identified near the business district. Strong updrafts and downdrafts are also found above a cluster of restaurants.

  18. Cooperation on Lidar for Improved Wind Turbine Performance. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-521

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Paul

    2015-05-12

    Research into the use of lidar for improved wind turbine performance is an area of considerable interest. Lidars have been proposed to analyze and improve wind turbine pitch control performance, yaw alignment and control performance, as well as to improve power curve assessments. In this CRADA, NREL, NRG Systems, Inc. (ā€œNRGā€) and Avent Lidar Technology SAS (ā€œAventā€) will collaborate on testing these concepts.

  19. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  20. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  1. Angular output of hollow, metal-lined, waveguide Raman sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biedrzycki, Stephen; Buric, Michael P.; Falk, Joel; Woodruff, Steven D.

    2012-04-20

    Hollow, metal-lined waveguides used as gas sensors based on spontaneous Raman scattering are capable of large angular collection. The collection of light from a large solid angle implies the collection of a large number of waveguide modes. An accurate estimation of the propagation losses for these modes is required to predict the total collected Raman power. We report a theory/experimental comparison of the Raman power collected as a function of the solid angle and waveguide length. New theoretical observations are compared with previous theory appropriate only for low-order modes. A cutback experiment is demonstrated to verify the validity of either theory. The angular distribution of Raman light is measured using aluminum and silver-lined waveguides of varying lengths.

  2. Development of coherent Raman measurements of temperature in condensed phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Bolme, Cindy A; Moore, David S

    2010-12-08

    We report theoretical considerations and preliminary data on various forms of coherent Raman spectroscopy that have been considered as candidates for measurement of temperature in condensed phase experiments with picosecond time resolution. Due to the inherent broadness and congestion of vibrational features in condensed phase solids, particularly at high temperatures and pressures, only approaches that rely on the ratio of anti-Stokes to Stokes spectral features are considered. Methods that rely on resolution of vibrational progressions, calibration of frequency shifts with temperature and pressure in reference experiments, or detailed comparison to calculation are inappropriate or impossible for our applications. In particular, we consider femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), femtosecond/picosecond hybrid coherent Raman spectroscopy (multiplex CARS), and optical heterodyne detected femtosecond Raman induced Kerr Effect spectroscopy (OHD-FRIKES). We show that only FSRS has the ability to measure temperature via an anti-Stokes to Stokes ratio of peaks.

  3. Lidar-measured winds from space: A key component for weather and climate prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.E.; Emmitt, G.D.; Robertson, F.

    1995-06-01

    The deployment of a space-based Doppler lidar would provide information that is fundamental to advancing the understanding and prediction of weather and climate. This paper reviews the concepts of wind measurement by Doppler lidar, highlights the results of some observing system simulation experiments with lidar winds, and discusses the important advances in earth system science anticipated with lidar winds. Observing system simulation experiments, conducted using two different general circulation models, have shown (1) that there is a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy over the Southern Hemisphere and tropical oceans resulting from the assimilation of simulated satellite wind data, and (2) that wind data are significantly more effective than temperature or moisture data in controlling analysis error. Because accurate wind observations are currently almost entirely unavailable for the vast majority of tropical cyclones worldwide, lidar winds have the potential to substantially improve tropical cyclone forecasts. Similarly, to improve water vapor flux divergence calculations, a direct measure of the ageostrophic wind is needed since the present level of uncertainty cannot be reduced with better temperature and moisture soundings alone. 99 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Raman Thermometry: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Raman Thermometry: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman Thermometry: Comparing Methods to Minimize Error. Abstract not provided. Authors: Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin ; Serrano, Justin Raymond Publication Date: 2011-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1118494 Report Number(s): SAND2011-7538C 481657 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Rio Grand Symposium on Advanced Materials held October

  5. Raman and FTIR Studies on Nanostructure Formation on Silicon Carbide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Raman and FTIR Studies on Nanostructure Formation on Silicon Carbide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman and FTIR Studies on Nanostructure Formation on Silicon Carbide No abstract prepared. Authors: Muntele, Iulia C. [1] ; Muntele, C. I. [1] ; Ila, Dr. Daryush [1] ; Poker, David B [2] ; Hensley, Dale K [2] + Show Author Affiliations Alabama A&M University, Normal ORNL Publication Date: 2003-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 978142 DOE Contract Number:

  6. Inherent Errors Associated with Raman Based Thermal Conductivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Inherent Errors Associated with Raman Based Thermal Conductivity Measurements. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inherent Errors Associated with Raman Based Thermal Conductivity Measurements. Abstract not provided. Authors: Yates, Luke ; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin Publication Date: 2012-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1116452 Report Number(s): SAND2012-7840C 480433 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  7. Measuring Thermal Conductivity with Raman:Capability Uncertainty and Strain

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Measuring Thermal Conductivity with Raman:Capability Uncertainty and Strain Effects. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measuring Thermal Conductivity with Raman:Capability Uncertainty and Strain Effects. Abstract not provided. Authors: Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin ; Yates, Luke Publication Date: 2012-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1116156 Report Number(s): SAND2012-10198C 480178 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  10. Simplifying complex spectra and characterizing raman linewidths with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    time-resolved picosecond rotational CARS. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Simplifying complex spectra and characterizing raman linewidths with time-resolved picosecond rotational CARS. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simplifying complex spectra and characterizing raman linewidths with time-resolved picosecond rotational CARS. No abstract prepared. Authors: Kiefer, J. [1] ; Gao, Y. ; Seeger, T. [2] ; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse ; Patterson, Brian D. ; Farrow, Roger L. ; Settersten,

  11. Strain Effects in Raman Thermal Conductivity Measurements. (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Strain Effects in Raman Thermal Conductivity Measurements. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Strain Effects in Raman Thermal Conductivity Measurements. Abstract not provided. Authors: Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin ; Yates, Luke Publication Date: 2012-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1116178 Report Number(s): SAND2012-10199C 480179 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Society of Engineering Sciences Conference held October

  12. Incoherent Doppler lidar for measurement of atmospheric winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, W.R.; Hays, P.B.

    1994-12-31

    A conceptual space-based incoherent Doppler lidar wind measurement system is described. The system employs a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect the Doppler shift of the backscattered laser line, and uses two channels, one for aerosol and one for molecular backscatter. Previous investigations have considered only the aerosol backscatter as the means to determine the Doppler shift. Several studies have demonstrated that aerosol backscatter, particularly over the oceans and in the southern hemisphere, can be extremely low in the free troposphere. The two channel configuration permits acceptable measurements regardless of the aerosol loading. The system operates in the near UV, which is eye safe and provides a large molecular backscatter. With a 20 Watt laser, 1 meter diameter collecting telescope, and 5 seconds integration time, the horizontal line of sight wind errors would be less than 1 m/s with aerosols typical of a continental loading from the surface to the stratosphere. Areas of low aerosol loading would have errors of about 3 m/s.

  13. ARM - Campaign Instrument - rlprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsrlprof Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles (RLPROF) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling, Derived Quantities and Models Campaigns Aerosol IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2003.05.01 - 2003.05.31 Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2005.09.12 - 2005.09.22 Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP [ Download

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - illinghogan_mar04.html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observations of clouds and radiation at Chilbolton UK to evaluate NWP models. Anthony Illingworth and Robin Hogan University of Reading, UK * Chilbolton 24h/7d vertical profiles of clouds * 94GHz radar and lidar - profiles 30sec/60m resolution. * Infer cloud properties and compare with values held in operational models for Chilbolton grid box. * 35GHz radar, 22/28/38GHz Radiometers, Raman lidar. * 1275 clear air radar - boundary layer + refractivity * 3GHz polarisation radar for precipitation.

  15. Measurements of Wind and Turbulence Profiles with Scanning Doppler Lidar for Wind Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frehlich, R.; Kelley, N.

    2008-03-01

    High-quality profiles of mean and turbulent statistics of the wind field upstream of a wind farm can be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. Careful corrections for the spatial filtering of the wind field by the lidar pulse produce turbulence estimates equivalent to point sensors but with the added advantage of a larger sampling volume to increase the statistical accuracy of the estimates. For a well-designed lidar system, this permits accurate estimates of the key turbulent statistics over various subdomains and with sufficiently short observation times to monitor rapid changes in conditions. These features may be ideally suited for optimal operation of wind farms and also for improved resource assessment of potential sites.

  16. Reduction of the pulse spike-cut error in Fourier-deconvolved lidar profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyanov, D.V.; Gurdev, L.L.; Dreischuh, T.N.

    1996-08-01

    A simple approach is analyzed and applied to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Doppler lidar data to reduce the error in Fourier-deconvolved lidar profiles that is caused by spike-cut uncertainty in the laser pulse shape, i.e., uncertainty of the type of not well-recorded (cut, missed) pulse spikes. Such a type of uncertainty is intrinsic to the case of TE (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser transmitters. This approach requires only an estimate of the spike area to be known. The result from the analytical estimation of error reduction is in agreement with the results from the NOAA lidar data processing and from computer simulation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  17. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8?mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5?mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25?mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  18. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  19. The lidar dark band: An oddity of the radar bright band analogy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassen, K.

    1996-04-01

    Although much has sbeen learned from independent radar and lidar studies of atmospheric precipitations, occasionally supported by aircraft profiling, what has been lacking is combined optical, microwave, and insitu observations of the melting layer. Fortunately, the rainshowers on April 21, 1994, during the Remote Cloud Sensing intensive obervations Period (RCSIOP) at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation Testbed (CART) site provided an opportunity for coordinated dual-wavelength University of Utah Polarization Diversity Lidar, University of Massachusetts Cloud Profiling Radar System Doppler Radar, and the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft measurements.

  20. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    1999-12-07

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  1. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, Robert V. (St. Louis County, MO)

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  2. Effective Higgs vertices in the generic MSSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    In this article we consider chirally enhanced corrections to Higgs vertices in the most general MSSM. We include the contributions stemming from bilinear terms, from the trilinear A terms, and from their nonholomorphic analogues, the A{sup '} terms, which couple squarks to the ''wrong'' Higgs field. We perform a consistent renormalization of the Higgs vertices beyond the decoupling limit (M{sub SUSY{yields}{infinity}}), using a purely diagrammatic approach. The cancellation of the different contributions in and beyond the decoupling limit is discussed and the possible size of decoupling effects which occur if the supersymmetry particles are not much heavier than the electroweak scale are examined. In the decoupling limit we recover the results obtained in the effective-field-theory approach. For the nonholomorphic A{sup '} terms we find the well known tan{beta} enhancement in the down sector similar to the one for terms proportional to {mu}. Because of the a priori generic flavor structure of these trilinear terms large flavor-changing neutral Higgs couplings can be induced. We also discover new tan{beta} enhanced contributions involving the usual holomorphic A terms, which were not discussed before in the literature. These corrections occur only if also flavor-diagonal nonholomorphic corrections to the Higgs couplings are present. This reflects the fact that the A terms, and also the chirality-changing self-energies, are physical quantities and cannot be absorbed into renormalization constants.

  3. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ling, Xi; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attractedmoreĀ Ā» great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.Ā«Ā less

  4. Enhanced Raman Scattering on In-plane Anisotropic Layered Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ling, Xi; Lin, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuqing; Mao, Nannan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on two-dimensional (2D) layered materials has provided a unique platform to study the chemical mechanism (CM) of the enhancement due to its natural separation from electromagnetic enhancement. The CM stems from the basic charge interactions between the substrate and molecules. Despite the extensive studies of the energy alignment between 2D materials and molecules, an understanding of how the electronic properties of the substrate are explicitly involved in the charge interaction is still unclear. Lately, a new group of 2D layered materials with anisotropic structure, including orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and triclinic rhenium disulphide (ReS2), has attracted great interest due to their unique anisotropic electrical and optical properties. Herein, we report a unique anisotropic Raman enhancement on few-layered BP and ReS2 using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules as a Raman probe, which is absent on isotropic graphene and h-BN. According to detailed Raman tensor analysis and density functional theory calculations, anisotropic charge interactions due to the anisotropic carrier mobilities of the 2D materials are responsible for the angular dependence of the Raman enhancement. Our findings not only provide new insights into the CM process in SERS, but also open up new avenues for the exploration and application of the electronic properties of anisotropic 2D layered materials.

  5. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  6. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitatesmoreĀ Ā» specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.Ā«Ā less

  7. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinke, Reinhard Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Department of Organic Chemistry, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, pr. Pobedy 37, 03056 Kiev ; Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the ?-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  8. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kyle, Kevin R. (Brentwood, CA); Brown, Steven B. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  9. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomoreĀ Ā» true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 Ā± 0.24 m and 0.32 Ā± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.Ā«Ā less

  10. Active probing of cloud thickness and optical depth using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60{sup o} full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Section 2 covers the up-to-date evolution of the nighttime WAIL instrument at LANL. Section 3 reports our progress towards daytime capability for WAIL, an important extension to full diurnal cycle monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter. Section 4 describes briefly how the important cloud properties can be inferred from WAIL signals.

  11. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  12. Turbine-scale wind field measurements using dual-Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Fischer, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of micro-scale winds are retrieved using scanning dual-Doppler lidar, and validated against independent in situ wind measurements. Data for this study were obtained during a month-long field campaign conducted at a site in north-central Oklahoma in November of 2010. Observational platforms include one heavily instrumented 60-m meteorological tower and two scanning coherent Doppler lidars. The lidars were configured to perform coordinated dual-Doppler scans surrounding the 60-m tower, and the resulting radial velocity observations were processed to retrieve the 3-component velocity vector field on surfaces defined by the intersecting scan planes. Raw radial velocity measurements from the lidars were calibrated by direct comparison to a sonic anemometer located at the 60 m level on the tower. Wind retrievals were performed using both calibrated and uncalibrated measurements, and validated against the 60-m sonic anemometer observations. Retrievals using uncalibrated radial velocity data show a significant slow bias in the wind speed of about 14%; whereas the retrievals using the calibrated data show a much smaller slow bias of 1.2%. Retrievals using either the calibrated or uncalibrated data exhibit negligible bias in the wind direction (<0.2o), and excellent correlation in the wind speeds (>0.96).

  13. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer to true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.

  14. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

  15. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  16. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  17. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  18. Trace detection of analytes using portable raman systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alam, M. Kathleen; Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Martin, Laura E.; Jones, David Alexander

    2015-11-24

    Apparatuses and methods for in situ detection of a trace amount of an analyte are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the present disclosure provides a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) insert including a passageway therethrough, where the passageway has a SERS surface positioned therein. The SERS surface is configured to adsorb molecules of an analyte of interest. A concentrated sample is caused to flow over the SERS surface. The SERS insert is then provided to a portable Raman spectroscopy system, where it is analyzed for the analyte of interest.

  19. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  20. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifir

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  1. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1983-07-19

    Disclosed is a regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO[sub 2] laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplifier Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO[sub 2] laser pump signal. 6 figs.

  2. Ring cavity for a raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1983-07-19

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO.sub.2 laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplifier Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO.sub.2 laser pump signal.

  3. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  4. Robotic platform for traveling on vertical piping network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A; Vrettos, Nick J; Krementz, Daniel; Marzolf, Athneal D

    2015-02-03

    This invention relates generally to robotic systems and is specifically designed for a robotic system that can navigate vertical pipes within a waste tank or similar environment. The robotic system allows a process for sampling, cleaning, inspecting and removing waste around vertical pipes by supplying a robotic platform that uses the vertical pipes to support and navigate the platform above waste material contained in the tank.

  5. Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Practices in Indian Country | Department of Energy Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best

  6. Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymmetric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fields (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymmetric Fields Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymmetric Fields Vertical instability of a tokamak plasma can be controlled by nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields localized near the plasma edge at the bottom and top of the torus. The required magnetic fields can be produced by a relatively

  7. Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors - Sandia Energy ... Lab Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory PV Regional ... Facility Geomechanics and Drilling Labs National ...

  8. Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

  9. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An ultimate storage ring lattice...

  10. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on assessing cloud spatial and vertical distribution with a recently developed infrared (IR) cloud analyzer, named Nephelo. The experiment took place at the ARM's central facility,...

  11. ARM - VAP Product - 10rlproftemp1news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rlproftemp1news Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095307 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 10RLPROFTEMP1NEWS Temperature Profiles from Raman Lidar at 10-min averaging interval Active Dates 2009.01.01 - 2015.09.29 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles : RLPROF Measurements The measurements

  12. ARM - VAP Product - 10srlprofasr1ferr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    srlprofasr1ferr Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027727 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 10SRLPROFASR1FERR 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.25 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical

  13. ARM - VAP Product - 10srlprofmr1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    srlprofmr1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027724 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 10SRLPROFMR1TURN Raman LIDAR (RL): 10-sec water vapor mixing ratio andrelative humidity profiles , along with PWV Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.23 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles : RLPROF

  14. ARM - VAP Product - 1rlprofasr1ferr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rlprofasr1ferr Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027732 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 1RLPROFASR1FERR 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.25 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical

  15. ARM - VAP Product - 1rlprofext1ferr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rlprofext1ferr Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027733 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 1RLPROFEXT1FERR 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.23 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles :

  16. ARM - VAP Product - 2rlprofasr1ferr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rlprofasr1ferr Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095308 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 2RLPROFASR1FERR 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2010.01.02 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical

  17. ARM - VAP Product - 2rlprofdep1turn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsrlprof2rlprofdep1turn Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027735 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 2RLPROFDEP1TURN 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths Active Dates 2004.10.01 - 2015.09.25 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles :

  18. ARM - VAP Product - 60rlproftemp1news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsrlprof60rlproftemp1news Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095309 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : 60RLPROFTEMP1NEWS Temperature Profiles from Raman Lidar at 60-min averaging interval Active Dates 2009.01.01 - 2015.10.01 Originating VAP Process Raman LIDAR Vertical Profiles : RLPROF Measurements The

  19. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  20. Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Henson, Tammy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumel, Leslie J. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-20

    A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

  1. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruther, Rose E; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes as a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.

  2. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruther, Rose E; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes asmoreĀ Ā» a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.Ā«Ā less

  3. Summary of recent Raman Spectroscopy testing of SRS processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Lascola, R. J.; O'Rourke, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes several scoping projects conducted at SRNL using Raman spectroscopic methods for monitoring different aspects of nuclear waste and materials processing. One project examined the suitability of a Raman telescope for in situ measurement of solid residues in waste tanks. Characteristics evaluated for this equipment included radiation resistance, ease of use, and sensitivity. A second project monitored the nitrate content in liquid filtrate from the testing of a rotary microfilter using a fiber-based insertion probe. The third project made Raman measurements of various gases, including H2 and NOx, in the headspace of a vessel while dissolving aluminum coupons in nitric acid. Measurements followed the evolution of these species in real time. Although the majority of these projects occurred in the laboratory environment, SRNL has substantial experience with implementing other optical techniques into nuclear materials processing environments. The work described in this report shows the potential of the Raman technology to provide real time measurements of species such as nitrate or hydroxide during sludge washing or evolved gases such as hydrogen or NOx during waste processing.

  4. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  5. Vertically aligned crystalline silicon nanowires with controlled diameters for energy conversion applications: Experimental and theoretical insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razek, Sara Abdel; Swillam, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2014-05-21

    Vertically orientated single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with controlled diameters are fabricated via a metal-assisted chemical etching method. The diameter of the fabricated nanowires is controlled by simply varying the etching time in HF/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrolytes. The fabricated SiNWs have diameters ranging from 117 to 650?nm and lengths from 8 to 18??m. The optical measurements showed a significant difference in the reflectance/absorption of the SiNWs with different diameters, where the reflectance increases with increasing the diameter of the SiNWs. The SiNWs showed significant photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra with peaks lying between 380 and 670?nm. The PL intensity increases as the diameter increases and shows red shift for peaks at ?670?nm. The increase or decrease of reflectivity is coincident with PL intensity at wavelength ?660?nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirm the high crystallinity of the fabricated SiNWs. In addition, the Raman spectra showed a shift in the first order transverse band toward lower frequencies compared to that usually seen for c-Si. Finite difference time domain simulations have been performed to confirm the effect of change of diameter on the optical properties of the nanowires. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental results for the SiNWs of different diameters.

  6. Reduced graphene oxide and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes superhydrophilic films for supercapacitors devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanin, H.; Saito, E.; Ceragioli, H.J.; Baranauskas, V.; Corat, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene nanosheets were produced onto wire rods. • RGO and VACNT-O were evaluated and compared as supercapacitor electrode. • RGO and VACNT-O have structural and electrochemical properties quite similars. • The materials present good specific capacitance, energy storage and power delivery. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) superhydrophilic films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques for electrical energy storage investigations. These electrodes were characterized in terms of their material and electrochemical properties by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface wettability, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive and Raman spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge. We observed several physical structural and electrochemical similarities between these carbon-based materials with particular attention to very good specific capacitance, ultra-high energy storage and fast power delivery. Our results showed that the main difference between specific capacitance values is attributed to pseudocapacitive contribution and high density of multiwall nanotubes tips. In this work we have tested a supercapacitor device using the VACNT electrodes.

  7. Additional development of remote sensing techniques for observing morphology, microphysics, and radiative properties of clouds and tests using a new, robust CO{sub 2} lidar. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhard, W.L.; Brewer, W.A.; Intrieri, J.M.

    1998-09-28

    A three-year project with a goal of advancing CO{sub 2} lidar technology and measurement techniques for cloud studies was successfully completed. An eyesafe, infrared lidar with good sensitivity and improved Doppler accuracy was designed, constructed, and demonstrated. Dual-wavelength operation was achieved. A major leap forward in robustness was demonstrated. CO{sub 2} lidars were operated as part of two Intensive Operations Periods at the Southern Great Plains CART site. The first used an older lidar and was intended primarily for measurement technique development. The second used the new lidar and was primarily a demonstration and evaluation of its performance. Progress was demonstrated in the development, evaluation, and application of measurement techniques using CO{sub 2} lidar.

  8. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  9. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-05-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  10. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature profiles - Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theopold, F.A.; Boesenberg, J. )

    1993-04-01

    The method of measuring atmospheric temperature profiles with differential absorption lidar (DIAL), based on the temperature dependence of oxygen absorption lines in the near-IR, is investigated in detail. Particularly, the influence of Doppler broadening on the Rayleigh-backscattered signal is evaluated, and a correction method for this effect is presented which requires an accurate estimate of the molecular and particle backscatter contributions; this is noted not to be achievable by the usual lidar inversion techniques. Under realistic conditions, resulting errors may be as high as 10 K. First range-resolved measurements using this technique are presented, using a slightly modified DIAL system originally constructed for water vapor measurements. While much better resolution can certainly be achieved by technical improvements, the errors introduced by the uncertainty of the backscatter contributions will remain and determine the accuracy that can be obtained with this method. 35 refs.

  11. Linearly Organized Turbulence Structures Observed Over a Suburban Area by Dual-Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron; Ligon, David; Allwine, K Jerry

    2008-04-01

    Dual-Doppler lidar observations are used to investigate the structure and evolution of surface layer flow over a suburban area. The observations were made during the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment in Oklahoma City in the summer of 2003. This study focuses specifically on a 10-hour sequence of scan data beginning shortly after noon local time on July 7, 2003. During this period two coherent Doppler lidars performed overlapping low elevation angle sector scans upwind and south of Oklahoma City’s central business district (CBD). Radial velocity data from the two lidars are processed to reveal the structure and evolution of the horizontal velocity field in the surface layer throughout the afternoon and evening transition periods. The retrieved velocity fields clearly show a tendency for turbulence structures to be elongated in the direction of the mean flow throughout the entire 10-hour study period. As the stratification changed from unstable to weakly stable the turbulence structures became increasingly more linearly organized, and the cross-stream separation between high- and low-speed regoins decreased. The spatially resolved velocity fields are used to estimate streamwise and cross-stream turbulence length scales as functions of stability.

  12. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  13. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  14. ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stratiform Rain ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain The Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain (VERVELSR) value-added product (VAP) uses the unique

  15. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  16. The application of Raman laser in gravity measurement and metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2014-05-27

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter, it is based on the atom interferometry technology by coherently manipulating the cold atoms in a fountain (with a height of 1m) with specific Raman lasers, the cold atom wave packet is splitted, combined, and then re-splitted in the process. Then the atomic wave packet will acquire different phase because of the different evolution path. The precise acceleration can be deduced through the precision measurement of atomic interference fringes phase, and this will be a high precision standard of acceleration. At present, the preparation of Raman laser and the precise control of the laser Frequency have been finished, and they have been proved to meet the requirements of the experiment.

  17. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1991-03-12

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System are disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal. 5 figures.

  18. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for a Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage (SERODS) System is disclosed. A medium which exhibits the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) phenomenon has data written onto its surface of microenvironment by means of a write-on procedure which disturbs the surface or microenvironment of the medium and results in the medium having a changed SERS emission when excited. The write-on procedure is controlled by a signal that corresponds to the data to be stored so that the disturbed regions on the storage device (e.g., disk) represent the data. After the data is written onto the storage device it is read by exciting the surface of the storage device with an appropriate radiation source and detecting changes in the SERS emission to produce a detection signal. The data is then reproduced from the detection signal.

  19. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  20. Direct transfer and Raman characterization of twisted graphene bilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othmen, R.; Ajlani, H.; Oueslati, M.; Cavanna, A.; Madouri, A.

    2015-03-09

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) is constituted of a two-graphene layer with a mismatch angle ? between the two hexagonal structures. It has recently attracted much attention—thanks to its diverse electronic and optical properties. Here, we study the tBLG fabricated by the direct transfer of graphene monolayer prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto another CVD graphene layer remaining attached to the copper foil. We show that high quality and homogeneous tBLG can be obtained by the direct transfer which prevents interface contamination. In this situation, the top graphene layer plays a supporting mechanical role to the bottom graphene layer as confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of annealing tBLG was also investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra exhibit a splitting of the G peak as well as a change in the 2D band shape indicating a possible decoupling of the two monolayers. We attribute these changes to the different interactions of the top and bottom layers with the substrate.

  1. Achieving molecular selectivity in imaging using multiphoton Raman spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtom, Gary R. ); Thrall, Brian D. ); Chin, Beek Yoke ); Wiley, H Steven ); Colson, Steven D. )

    2000-12-01

    In the case of most imaging methods, contrast is generated either by physical properties of the sample (Differential Image Contrast, Phase Contrast), or by fluorescent labels that are localized to a particular protein or organelle. Standard Raman and infrared methods for obtaining images are based upon the intrinsic vibrational properties of molecules, and thus obviate the need for attached flurophores. Unfortunately, they have significant limitations for live-cell imaging. However, an active Raman method, called Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), is well suited for microscopy, and provides a new means for imaging specific molecules. Vibrational imaging techniques, such as CARS, avoid problems associated with photobleaching and photo-induced toxicity often associated with the use of fluorescent labels with live cells. Because the laser configuration needed to implement CARS technology is similar to that used in other multiphoton microscopy methods, such as two -photon fluorescence and harmonic generation, it is possible to combine imaging modalities, thus generating simultaneous CARS and fluorescence images. A particularly powerful aspect of CARS microscopy is its ability to selectively image deuterated compounds, thus allowing the visualization of molecules, such as lipids, that are chemically indistinguishable from the native species.

  2. Raman fiber optic probe assembly for use in hostile environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E.; Falk, Jon C.; Archer, William B.; Blasi, Raymond J.

    2000-01-01

    This invention provides a device for Raman spectroscopic measurement of composition and concentrations in a hostile environment by the use of a first fiber optic as a means of directing high intensity monochromatic light from a laser to the hostile environment and a second fiber optic to receive the lower intensity scattered light for transmittal to a monochromator for analysis. To avoid damage to the fiber optics, they are protected from the hostile environment. A preferred embodiment of the Raman fiber optic probe is able to obtain Raman spectra of corrosive gases and solutions at temperatures up to 600.degree. F. and pressures up to 2000 psi. The incident exciting fiber optic cable makes an angle of substantially 90.degree. with the collecting fiber optic cable. This 90.degree. geometry minimizes the Rayleigh scattering signal picked up by the collecting fiber, because the intensity of Rayleigh scattering is lowest in the direction perpendicular to the beam path of the exciting light and therefore a 90.degree. scattering geometry optimizes the signal to noise ratio.

  3. Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements The main objective of this project was to develop, validate and apply

  4. Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements The main objective of this project was to develop,

  5. Field testing of feedforward collective pitch control on the CART2 using a nacelle-based Lidar scanner

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schlipf, David; Fleming, Paul; Haizmann, Florian; Scholbrock, Andrew; Hofsass, Martin; Wright, Alan; Cheng, Po Wen

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results from a field test of LIDAR assisted collective pitch control using a scanning LIDAR device installed on the nacelle of a mid-scale research turbine. A nonlinear feedforward controller is extended by an adaptive filter to remove all uncorrelated frequencies of the wind speed measurement to avoid unnecessary control action. Positive effects on the rotor speed regulation as well as on tower, blade and shaft loads have been observed in the case that the previous measured correlation and timing between the wind preview and the turbine reaction are accomplish. The feedforward controller had negative impact, whenmoreĀ Ā» the LIDAR measurement was disturbed by obstacles in front of the turbine. This work proves, that LIDAR is valuable tool for wind turbine control not only in simulations but also under real conditions. Moreover, the paper shows that further understanding of the relationship between the wind measurement and the turbine reaction is crucial to improve LIDAR assisted control of wind turbines.Ā«Ā less

  6. Plasmon enhanced Raman scattering effect for an atom near a carbon nanotube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bondarev, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of the resonance Raman scattering is developed for an atom in a close proximity to a carbon nanotube. The theory predicts a dramatic enhancement of the Raman intensity in the strong atomic coupling regime to nanotube plasmon near-fields. This resonance scattering is a manifestation of the general electromagnetic surface enhanced Raman scattering effect, and can be used in designing efficient nanotube based optical sensing substrates for single atom detection, precision spontaneous emission control, and manipulation.

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lidar Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Site D. ... The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman Lidar (CARL), located at the ...

  8. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower symmetry Authors: Feng, Yanqing ; Zhou, Wei ; Wang, Yaojia ; Zhou, Jian ; Liu, Erfu ; Fu, Yajun ; Ni, ...

  9. Frequency agile laser safety & hazard analysis for the Sandia Remote Sensing System LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2009-05-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the Raytheon Frequency Agile Laser (FAL) to be used with the Sandia Remote Sensing System (SRSS) B-70 Trailer based on the 2007 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard 136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2005 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The B-70 SRSS LIDAR system is a portable platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  10. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Vertical Nesting Capability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with vertical nesting capability is an extension of the WRF model, which is available in the public domain, from www.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the nesting procedure, which passes lateral boundary conditions between computational domains in the WRF model. Previously, the same vertical grid was required on all domains, while the new code allows different vertical grids to be used on concurrently run domains. This new functionality improvesmoreĀ Ā» WRF's ability to produce high-resolution simulations of the atmosphere by allowing a wider range of scales to be efficiently resolved and more accurate lateral boundary conditions to be provided through the nesting procedure.Ā«Ā less

  11. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  12. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Awyoung, Adelbert (Albuquerque, NM); Choquette, Kent D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths.

  13. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  14. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  15. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  16. Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-06-28

    An improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage System (SERODS) is disclosed. In the improved system, entities capable of existing in multiple reversible states are present on the storage device. Such entities result in changed Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) when localized state changes are effected in less than all of the entities. Therefore, by changing the state of entities in localized regions of a storage device, the SERS emissions in such regions will be changed. When a write-on device is controlled by a data signal, such a localized regions of changed SERS emissions will correspond to the data written on the device. The data may be read by illuminating the surface of the storage device with electromagnetic radiation of an appropriate frequency and detecting the corresponding SERS emissions. Data may be deleted by reversing the state changes of entities in regions where the data was initially written. In application, entities may be individual molecules which allows for the writing of data at the molecular level. A read/write/delete head utilizing near-field quantum techniques can provide for a write/read/delete device capable of effecting state changes in individual molecules, thus providing for the effective storage of data at the molecular level. 18 figures.

  17. Surface-enhanced raman optical data storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    An improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Optical Data Storage System (SERODS) is disclosed. In the improved system, entities capable of existing in multiple reversible states are present on the storage device. Such entities result in changed Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) when localized state changes are effected in less than all of the entities. Therefore, by changing the state of entities in localized regions of a storage device, the SERS emissions in such regions will be changed. When a write-on device is controlled by a data signal, such a localized regions of changed SERS emissions will correspond to the data written on the device. The data may be read by illuminating the surface of the storage device with electromagnetic radiation of an appropriate frequency and detecting the corresponding SERS emissions. Data may be deleted by reversing the state changes of entities in regions where the data was initially written. In application, entities may be individual molecules which allows for the writing of data at the molecular level. A read/write/delete head utilizing near-field quantum techniques can provide for a write/read/delete device capable of effecting state changes in individual molecules, thus providing for the effective storage of data at the molecular level.

  18. Saturation mechanisms of backward stimulated Raman scattering in a one-dimensional geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friou, A.; BĆ©nisti, D.; Gremillet, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Morice, O.; Siminos, E.; Strozzi, D. J.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the saturation mechanisms of backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) induced by nonlinear kinetic effects. In particular, we stress the importance of accounting for both the nonlinear frequency shift of the electron plasma wave and the growth of sidebands, in order to understand what stops the coherent growth of Raman scattering. Using a Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal approach, we provide an estimate for the maximum amplitude reached by a BSRS-driven plasma wave after the phase of monotonic growth. This estimate is in very good agreement with the results from kinetic simulations of stimulated Raman scattering using both a Vlasov and a Particle in Cell code. Our analysis, which may be generalized to a multidimensional geometry, should provide a means to estimate the limits of backward Raman amplification or the effectiveness of strategies that aim at strongly reducing Raman reflectivity in a fusion plasma.

  19. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology PoliMI, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325?nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  20. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  1. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by space-based Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, D.

    2015-12-03

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere and to the marine low cloud processes. This paper explores MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region with a new 4 year satellite-based dataset. The MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) was used to identify the MBL top (BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH). Results showed that MBL is generally decoupled with MLH / BLH ratio ranging from ? 0.5 to ? 0.8 and the MBL decoupling magnitude ismore »mainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS) that affects the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops, which may relate to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in MBL, also show dependence on EIS. Further analysis indicated that the MBL shows similar decoupled structure for clear sky and cumulus cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.« less

  2. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  3. Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

    2011-03-28

    A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

  4. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-06-27

    The Sayers and Kachanov (1991) crack-influence parametersare shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropyseismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack density issmall enough. These results are then applied to seismic wave propagationin reservoirs having HTI symmetry due to aligned vertical fractures. Theapproach suggests a method of inverting for fracture density from wavespeed data.

  5. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  6. Field Testing of LIDAR-Assisted Feedforward Control Algorithms for Improved Speed Control and Fatigue Load Reduction on a 600-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Avishek A.; Bossanyi, Ervin A.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul; Boquet, Mathieu; Krishnamurthy, Raghu

    2015-12-14

    A severe challenge in controlling wind turbines is ensuring controller performance in the presence of a stochastic and unknown wind field, relying on the response of the turbine to generate control actions. Recent technologies such as LIDAR, allow sensing of the wind field before it reaches the rotor. In this work a field-testing campaign to test LIDAR Assisted Control (LAC) has been undertaken on a 600-kW turbine using a fixed, five-beam LIDAR system. The campaign compared the performance of a baseline controller to four LACs with progressively lower levels of feedback using 35 hours of collected data.

  7. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  8. Lidar sensing of the atmosphere with gigawatt laser pulses of femtosecond duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukin, O A; Golik, S S; Il'in, A A; Kulchin, Yu N; Lisitsa, V V; Shmirko, K A; Babii, M Yu; Kolesnikov, A V; Kabanov, A M; Matvienko, G G; Oshlakov, V K

    2014-06-30

    We present the results of sensing of the atmosphere in the condition of a transition 'continent ā€“ ocean' zone by means of gigawatt femtosecond pulses of the fundamental and second harmonics of a Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of multi-frequency sensing (supercontinuum from the fundamental harmonic) the emission lines of the first positive system of the nitrogen molecule B{sup 3}Ī {sub g} ā€“ A{sup 3}Ī£{sub u}{sup +} have been recorded, while the sensing using of the second harmonic have revealed the possibility of detecting the lines of Raman scattering of nitrogen (Ī» = 441 nm). The intensity ratio of the line of Raman scattering of nitrogen and the line of elastic scattering at the wavelength of Ī» = 400 nm amounts to 5.6 Ɨ 10{sup -4}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in an extended ladder system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu Yingyu; Wang Rong; Qiu Minghui [School of Science, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China)

    2011-08-15

    The rovibrational dynamics of an extended ladder stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) system through permanent dipole moment transitions is investigated theoretically using the time-dependent quantum-wave-packet method for the ground electronic state of the HF molecule. The calculated results show that nearly 100% of the population can be transferred to the target state through (1+2), (1+3), and (2+2) STIRAP schemes. By choosing a suitable excitation pathway, the effects of the background states on the final population of the target state can be removed. For the multiphoton STIRAP process, the one-photon overtone pump scheme is more efficient than the two-photon pump scheme in controlling the population transfer to the target state.

  10. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L.

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods thereof based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  13. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  14. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  15. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  16. Nanosensors based on functionalized nanoparticles and surface enhanced raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Talley, Chad E. (Brentwood, CA); Huser, Thomas R. (Livermore, CA); Hollars, Christopher W. (Brentwood, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Hart, Bradley R. (Brentwood, CA); Laurence, Ted A. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-27

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that utilizes metal surfaces to provide enhanced signals of several orders of magnitude. When molecules of interest are attached to designed metal nanoparticles, a SERS signal is attainable with single molecule detection limits. This provides an ultrasensitive means of detecting the presence of molecules. By using selective chemistries, metal nanoparticles can be functionalized to provide a unique signal upon analyte binding. Moreover, by using measurement techniques, such as, ratiometric received SERS spectra, such metal nanoparticles can be used to monitor dynamic processes in addition to static binding events. Accordingly, such nanoparticles can be used as nanosensors for a wide range of chemicals in fluid, gaseous and solid form, environmental sensors for pH, ion concentration, temperature, etc., and biological sensors for proteins, DNA, RNA, etc.

  17. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  18. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M.

    2015-06-07

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is motivated by the knowledge of the molecular geometry changes that accompany sub-picosecond chemical reactions. The detection of vibrational resonances throughout the entire fingerprint region of the spectrum with sub-100-fs delay precision is fairly straightforward to accomplish with the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS must contend with substantial technical challenges that stem from a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities when all laser pulses are electronically resonant with the equilibrium system. In this work, a geometry based on five incident laser beams is used to eliminate much of this undesired background in experiments conducted on metmyoglobin. Compared to a three-beam FSRS geometry with all electronically resonant laser pulses, the five-beam approach described here offers major improvements in the data acquisition rate, sensitivity, and background suppression. The susceptibility of the five-beam geometry to experimental artifacts is investigated using control experiments and model calculations. Of particular concern are undesired cascades of third-order nonlinearities, which are known to challenge FSRS measurements carried out on electronically off-resonant systems. It is generally understood that “forbidden” steps in the desired nonlinear optical processes are the origin of the problems encountered under off-resonant conditions. In contrast, the present experiments are carried out under electronically resonant conditions, where such unfortunate selection rules do not apply. Nonetheless, control experiments based on spectroscopic line shapes, signal phases, and sample concentrations are conducted to rule out significant contributions from cascades of third-order processes. Theoretical calculations are further used to estimate the relative intensities of the direct and cascaded responses. Overall, the control experiments and model calculations presented in this work suggest promise for multidimensional resonance Raman investigations of heme proteins.

  19. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  20. Nonlinear-optical spectral interferometry of nanostructures using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Mitrokhin, V P; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Smirnova, I V; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A

    2005-01-31

    The spectrum of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from Raman-active vibrations of gas-phase nitrogen molecules in a mesoporous silica aerogel host is experimentally studied. The CARS spectral profile under these conditions is a result of interference of the resonant part of nonlinear susceptibility, originating from nitrogen molecules in aerogel pores, and the nonresonant contribution, related to the mesoporous host. Raman-active modes of gas-phase molecular nitrogen give rise to intense resonances in the CARS spectrum, serving as reference spectral profiles for probing local parameters of a nanocomposite material (nanoCARS). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Depth profiling for the amount of lattice damage using a Confocal Micro-Raman (CMR) spectrometer is demonstrated in this paper. Samples of n-type silicon carbide were implanted with 2 MeV He and O ions at both room temperature and 500 C, and fluences between 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 17}

  2. Third harmonic stimulated Raman backscattering of laser in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paknezhad, Alireza; Dorranian, Davoud

    2013-09-15

    This article studies the nonlinear Raman shifted third harmonic backscattering of an intense extraordinary laser wave through a homogenous transversely magnetized cold plasma. Due to the relativistic nonlinearity, the plasma dynamic is modified in the presence of transversely magnetic field, and this can generate the third harmonic scattered wave and an electrostatic upper hybrid wave via the Raman scattering process. Using the nonlinear wave equation, the mechanism of nonlinear third harmonic Raman scattering is discussed in detail to obtain the maximum growth rate of instability in the mildly relativistic regime. The growth rate decreases as the static magnetic field increases. It also increases with the pump wave amplitude.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of graphite in high magnetic fields: Electron-phonon coupling and magnetophonon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Younghee; Smirnov, Dmitry; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2013-12-04

    The magneto-Raman measurements of graphite were performed in a back-scattering Faraday geometry at temperature 10 K in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental data reveal the rich structure of Raman-active excitations dominated by K-point massive electrons. At high magnetic fields the graphite E{sub 2g} Raman line shows complex multi- component behavior interpreted as magnetophonon resonance coupled electron-phonon modes at graphite’s K-point. Also we found the clear signature of the fundamental, strongly dumped, n=0 magnetophonon resonance associated with H point massless holes.

  4. Vertical stability requirements for ARIES-I reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bathke, C.G.; Jardin, S.C.; Leuer, J.A.; Ward, D.J.; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.; General Atomics, San Diego, CA; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The vertical stability of the ARIES-I reactor design is analyzed with the NOVA-W, PSTAB, and TSC codes. A growth rate of {approximately}5.7 s{sup -1} is predicted for a vacuum vessel positioned behind the scrapeoff, first wall, and blanket (0.7 in inboard and 0.9 in outboard thickness) and acting as a passive stabilizer. A reactive power of {approximately}2 MV A would be required for active feedback coils located outside of the TF coils {approximately}3 m to correct a 50-mm vertical displacement of the magnetic axis. A multipolar expansion technique used in the TSC analysis is also used to examine options that minimize stored energy. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Taxel-addressable matrix of vertical nanowire piezotronic transistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wen, Xiaonan

    2015-05-05

    A tactile sensing matrix includes a substrate, a first plurality of elongated electrode structures, a plurality of vertically aligned piezoelectric members, an insulating layer infused into the piezoelectric members and a second plurality of elongated electrode structures. The first plurality of elongated electrode structures is disposed on the substrate along a first orientation. The vertically aligned piezoelectric members is disposed on the first plurality of elongated electrode structures and form a matrix having columns of piezoelectric members disposed along the first orientation and rows of piezoelectric members disposed along a second orientation that is transverse to the first orientation. The second plurality of elongated electrode structures is disposed on the insulating layer along the second orientation. The elongated electrode structures form a Schottky contact with the piezoelectric members. When pressure is applied to the piezoelectric members, current flow therethrough is modulated.

  6. Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksak, Burak; Sitti, Metin; Cassell, Alan; Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Callen, Phillip [NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77058 (United States)

    2007-08-06

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers partially embedded inside polyurethane (eVACNFs) are proposed as a robust high friction fibrillar material with a compliant backing. Carbon nanofibers with 50-150 nm in diameter and 20-30 {mu}m in length are vertically grown on silicon and transferred completely inside an elastomer by vacuum molding. By using time controlled and selective oxygen plasma etching, fibers are partially released up to 5 {mu}m length. Macroscale friction experiments show that eVACNFs exhibit reproducible effective friction coefficients up to 1. Besides high friction, the proposed fabrication method improves fiber-substrate bond strength, and enables uniform height nanofibers with a compliant backing.

  7. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Awyoung, A.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-05-11

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device is disclosed. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths. 10 figs.

  8. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  9. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Modeling the vertical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    profiles of aerosol characteristics and radiative impacts over the ARM sites Modeling the vertical profiles of aerosol characteristics and radiative impacts over the ARM sites Chuang, Catherine DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chin, Steve DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in mediating the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. A global high-resolution aerosol modeling system developed by the Lawrence Livermore National

  11. Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period

  12. Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  13. Instrument Development Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles C. D. Whiteman J. M. Alzheimer G. A. Anderson M. R. Garnich W. J. Shaw Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 platform is built on a triangular frame identical to the one on the Sky Platform, but the MSP carries no radiometric sensors, control loop, or leveling motors. Rather. the MSP is instrumented to measure the motions to which the Sky Platform will be subjected; the data provide engineering information to be used in

  14. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  15. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  16. Low profile, high load vertical rolling positioning stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Barraza, Juan (Aurora, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A stage or support platform assembly for use in a synchrotron accurately positions equipment to be used in the beam line of the synchrotron. The support platform assembly includes an outer housing in which is disposed a lifting mechanism having a lifting platform or stage at its upper extremity on which the equipment is mounted. A worm gear assembly is located in the housing and is adapted to raise and lower a lifting shaft that is fixed to the lifting platform by an anti-binding connection. The lifting platform is moved vertically as the lifting shaft is moved vertically. The anti-binding connection prevents the shaft from rotating with respect to the platform, but does permit slight canting of the shaft with respect to the lifting platform so as to eliminate binding and wear due to possible tolerance mismatches. In order to ensure that the lifting mechanism does not move in a horizontal direction as it is moved vertically, at least three linear roller bearing assemblies are arranged around the outer-periphery of the lifting mechanism. One of the linear roller bearing assemblies can be adjusted so that the roller bearings apply a loading force against the lifting mechanism. Alternatively, a cam mechanism can be used to provide such a loading force.

  17. Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

  18. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for ARM Radiation Data (QCRAD) ... 13 2.35 Raman Lidar Profiles-Aerosol Scattering Ratio (RLPROFASR) ......

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for ARM Radiation Data (QCRAD) ... 12 2.31 Raman Lidar Profiles-Aerosol Scattering Ratio (RLPROFASR) ......

  20. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : Nephelometer PASS : Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer RL : Raman Lidar TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AMT : Aerosol Modeling...

  1. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  2. Femtosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-stokes raman scattering gas phase diagnostics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond

    2010-12-01

    We discuss recent experiments for the characterization of our femtosecond pure rotational CARS facility for observation of Raman transients in N{sub 2} and atmospheric air. The construction of a simplified femtosecond four-wave mixing system with only a single laser source is presented. Pure-rotational Raman transients reveal well-ordered time-domain recurrence peaks associated with the near-uniform spacing of rotational Raman peaks in the spectral domain. Long-time, 100-ps duration observations of the transient Raman polarization are presented, and the observed transients are compared to simulated results. Fourier transformation of the transients reveals two distinct sets of beat frequencies. Simulation results for temperatures from 300-700 K are used to illustrate the temperature sensitivity of the time-domain transients and their Fourier-transform counterparts. And strategies for diagnostics are briefly discussed. These results are being utilized to develop gas-phase measurement strategies for temperature and species concentration.

  3. Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot. Citation Details...

  4. Decoupling of epitaxial graphene via gold intercalation probed by dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillai, P. B. E-mail: m.desouza@sheffield.ac.uk; DeSouza, M. E-mail: m.desouza@sheffield.ac.uk; Narula, R.; Reich, S.; Wong, L. Y.; Batten, T.; Pokorny, J.

    2015-05-14

    Signatures of a superlattice structure composed of a quasi periodic arrangement of atomic gold clusters below an epitaxied graphene (EG) layer are examined using dispersive Raman spectroscopy. The gold-graphene system exhibits a laser excitation energy dependant red shift of the 2D mode as compared to pristine epitaxial graphene. The phonon dispersions in both the systems are mapped using the experimentally observed Raman signatures and a third-nearest neighbour tight binding electronic band structure model. Our results reveal that the observed excitation dependent Raman red shift in gold EG primarily arise from the modifications of the phonon dispersion in gold-graphene and shows that the extent of decoupling of graphene from the underlying SiC substrate can be monitored from the dispersive nature of the Raman 2D modes. The intercalated gold atoms restore the phonon band structure of epitaxial graphene towards free standing graphene.

  5. Multi-wavelength Raman Spectroscopy Study of Supported Vanadia Catalysts: Structure Identification and Quantification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Zili

    2014-01-01

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In this review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between themoreĀ Ā» oxide clusters and the support. The qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.Ā«Ā less

  6. Summary of raman cone penetrometer probe waste tank radiation and chemical environment test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, F.R.

    1996-09-27

    This report summarizes the results of testing Raman sapphire windows that were braze mounted into a mockup Raman probe head and stainless steel coupons in a simulated tank waste environment. The simulated environment was created by exposing sapphire window components, immersed in a tank simulant, in a gamma pit. This work was completed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM-50) for Technical Task Proposal RL4-6-WT-21.

  7. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  8. Development of time-domain differential Raman for transient thermal probing of materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Shen; Wang, Tianyu; Hurley, David; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-01-01

    A novel transient thermal characterization technology is developed based on the principles of transient optical heating and Raman probing: time-domain differential Raman. It employs a square-wave modulated laser of varying duty cycle to realize controlled heating and transient thermal probing. Very well defined extension of the heating time in each measurement changes the temperature evolution profile and the probed temperature field at ?s resolution. Using this new technique, the transient thermal response of a tipless Si cantilever is investigated along the length direction. A physical model is developed to reconstruct the Raman spectrum considering the temperature evolution, while taking intomore »account the temperature dependence of the Raman emission. By fitting the variation of the normalized Raman peak intensity, wavenumber, and peak area against the heating time, the thermal diffusivity is determined as 9.17 × 10??, 8.14 × 10??, and 9.51 × 10?? m²/s. These results agree well with the reference value of 8.66 × 10?? m²/s considering the 10% fitting uncertainty. The time-domain differential Raman provides a novel way to introduce transient thermal excitation of materials, probe the thermal response, and measure the thermal diffusivity, all with high accuracy.« less

  9. Near IR Scanning Angle Total Internal Reflection Raman Spectroscopy at Smooth Gold Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, Kristopher; Meyer, Matthew; Smith, Emily

    2012-04-13

    Total internal reflection (TIR) Raman and reflectivity spectra were collected for nonresonant analytes as a function of incident angle at sapphire or sapphire/smooth 50 nm gold interfaces using 785 nm excitation. For both interfaces, the Raman signal as a function of incident angle is well-modeled by the calculated interfacial mean square electric field (MSEF) relative to the incident field times the thickness of the layer being probed in the Raman measurement (D{sub RS}). The Raman scatter was reproducibly enhanced at the interface containing a gold film relative to the sapphire interface by a factor of 4.3–4.6 for aqueous pyridine or 2.2–3.7 for neat nitrobenzene, depending on the analyzed vibrational mode. The mechanism for the increased Raman signal is the enhanced MSEF at incident angles where propagating surface plasmons are excited in the metal film. The background from the TIR prism was reduced by 89–95% with the addition of the gold film, and the percent relative uncertainty in peak area was reduced from 15 to 1.7% for the 1347 cm–1 mode of nitrobenzene. Single monolayers of benzenethiol (S/N = 6.8) and 4-mercaptopyridine (S/N = 16.5) on gold films were measured by TIR Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation (210 mW) without resonant enhancement in 1 min.

  10. Development of time-domain differential Raman for transient thermal probing of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Shen; Wang, Tianyu; Hurley, David; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-01-01

    A novel transient thermal characterization technology is developed based on the principles of transient optical heating and Raman probing: time-domain differential Raman. It employs a square-wave modulated laser of varying duty cycle to realize controlled heating and transient thermal probing. Very well defined extension of the heating time in each measurement changes the temperature evolution profile and the probed temperature field at ?s resolution. Using this new technique, the transient thermal response of a tipless Si cantilever is investigated along the length direction. A physical model is developed to reconstruct the Raman spectrum considering the temperature evolution, while taking into account the temperature dependence of the Raman emission. By fitting the variation of the normalized Raman peak intensity, wavenumber, and peak area against the heating time, the thermal diffusivity is determined as 9.17 × 10??, 8.14 × 10??, and 9.51 × 10?? m²/s. These results agree well with the reference value of 8.66 × 10?? m²/s considering the 10% fitting uncertainty. The time-domain differential Raman provides a novel way to introduce transient thermal excitation of materials, probe the thermal response, and measure the thermal diffusivity, all with high accuracy.

  11. Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

  12. Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arizona, Site | Department of Energy Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site PDF icon Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site More Documents & Publications EA-1268: Final Environmental Assessment Diffusion Multilayer

  13. Hanford Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste Hanford Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste February 11, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis This photo illustration of the conceptual view shows the vertical expansion of the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The large area on the right includes the uppermost surface of the vertical expansion, which will be shaped to form a crown and will be covered with a 2 percent grade and

  14. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  15. A compact double-pass Raman backscattering amplifier/compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, J.; Li, S.; Morozov, A.; Suckewer, S.; Yampolsky, N. A.; Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-05-15

    The enhancement of stimulated Raman backscattering (SRBS) amplification was demonstrated by introducing a plasma density gradient along the pump and the seed interaction path and by a novel double-pass design. The energy transfer efficiency was significantly improved to a level of 6.4%. The seed pulse was amplified by a factor of more than 20 000 from the input in a 2 mm long plasma, which also exceeded the intensity of the pump pulse by 2 orders of magnitude. This was accompanied by very effective pulse compression, from 500 fs to 90 fs in the first pass measurements and in the second pass down to approximately 50 fs, as it is indicated by the energy-pulse duration relation. Further improvements to the energy transfer efficiency and the SRBS performance by extending the region of resonance is also discussed where a uniform {approx}4 mm long plasma channel for SRBS was generated by using two subsequent laser pulses in an ethane gas jet.

  16. Numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachimori, M.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells is presented. The model consists of equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, for thermodynamic state of water, for friction losses, for slip velocity relations, and of the criteria for various flow regimes. A new set of correlations and criteria is presented for two-phase flow to improve the accuracy of predictions; bubbly flow - Griffith and Wallis correlation, slug flow - Nicklin et al. one, annular-mist flow - Inoue and Aoki and modified by the author. The simulation method was verified by data from actual wells.

  17. Torque ripple in a Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, R.C. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Interaction between a steady wind and a rotating, Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine produces time periodic aerodynamic loads which cause time dependent torque variations, referred to as torque ripple, to occur in the mechanical link between the turbine and the electrical generator. There is concern for the effect of torque ripple upon fatigue life of drive train components and upon power quality. An analytical solution characterizing the phenomenon of torque ripple has been obtained which is based upon a Fourier expansion of the time dependent features of the problem. Numerical results for torque ripple, some experimental data, determination of acceptable levels and methods of controlling it, are presented and discussed.

  18. VERTICAL RELAXATION OF A MOONLET PROPELLER IN SATURN'S A RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, H.; Seiss, M.; Spahn, F. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Two images, taken by the Cassini spacecraft near Saturn's equinox in 2009 August, show the Earhart propeller casting a 350 km long shadow, offering the opportunity to watch how the ring height, excited by the propeller moonlet, relaxes to an equilibrium state. From the shape of the shadow cast and a model of the azimuthal propeller height relaxation, we determine the exponential cooling constant of this process to be {lambda} = 0.07 {+-} 0.02 km{sup -1}, and thereby determine the collision frequency of the ring particles in the vertically excited region of the propeller to be {omega}{sub c}/{Omega} = 0.9 {+-} 0.2.

  19. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  20. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  1. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the earmoreĀ Ā» averaged 16.3 Ā± 0.40 MJ kgā»Ā¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJā»Ā¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L haā»Ā¹, but it would be only 1000 L haā»Ā¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.Ā«Ā less

  2. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  3. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Novak, Jeff M.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Arriaga, Francisco; Lightle, David T.; Hoover, Amber; Emerson, Rachel; Barbour, Nancy W.

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  4. Vertical dispersion of inertial waves in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenstein, D.M.

    1983-05-20

    A linear model of the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves is developed. A porosity distribution near the bottom of the computational domain minimizes bottom reflections and simulates an ocean of the infinite depth. The model is used to show that the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves in the upper ocean may, under certain conditions, contribute significanlty to the observed rapid decay of inertial oscillations in the surface layer. The kinetic energy of inertial oscillations at mid-latitudes decays with an e folding time scale of 10 days or less, when the parameter lambda(km)/N(cph)d(m) is less than or of the order of unity, where lambda is the wavelength of the wind-generated near-inertial waves, N is the Vaeisaelae frequency in the upper pycnocline, and d is the surface layer thickness. At the top of the pycnocline the model predicts a velocity maximum, which develops as energy propagates downward, out of the surface layer. However, when the upper pycnocline is sufficiently peaked, a resonant frequency interference effect is predicted. This effect modulates the dissipation of surface layer inertial oscillations, and their magnitude after a storm need not decay monotonically. We also make qualitative comparisons with deep-ocean current meter observations taken during the Mixed Layer Experiment (MILE) and with shallow water (105 m) observations taken in the Baltic Sea.

  5. Control system for a vertical-axis windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, R.V.

    1981-09-03

    A vertical-axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90 and 270/sup 0/ to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  6. Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard C.

    1982-01-01

    A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

  7. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  8. A technique for measuring winds in the lower atmosphere using incoherent Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, D.H.; Slaughter, D.R.; Tulloch, W.M.; White, W.E.

    1993-04-14

    Wind speed is useful from a meteorological standpoint, in atmospheric modeling, and assessment of trace gas dispersal. A continuing effort is involved in improving the sensitivity of such measurements, and is exemplified by the literature. The Mobile Atmospheric Research Laboratory (MARL) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently developing a method to improve the sensitivity of wind sounding in the lower through middle atmosphere using a pair of Fabry- Perot interferometers in parallel. This technique, first described by Chanin, et al., for the middle atmosphere using Doppler Rayleigh lidar, can be applied to the lower atmosphere where Mie (aerosol) backscatter is strong. Elastic events, inherent in both Rayleigh and Mie backscatter, dominate the return signal throughout the atmosphere. Both are susceptible to local wind vectors; which will Doppler shift the laser frequency proportional to the wind velocity. A pair of Fabry-Perot interferometers, tuned to either side of the laser frequency, will provide necessary data to determine the shift in frequency of the backscattered signal. Spectral drift and jitter of the laser and a lack of data points to determine the wind vector place limits on the sensitivity of the system. A method to minimize each of these is presented.

  9. A technique for measuring winds in the lower atmosphere using incoherent Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, D.H.; Slaughter, D.R.; Tulloch, W.M.; White, W.E.

    1993-04-14

    Wind speed is useful from a meteorological standpoint, in atmospheric modeling, and assessment of trace gas dispersal. A continuing effort is involved in improving the sensitivity of such measurements, and is exemplified by the literature. The Mobile Atmospheric Research Laboratory (MARL) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently developing a method to improve the sensitivity of wind sounding in the lower through middle atmosphere using a pair of Fabry-Perot interferometers in parallel. This technique, first described by Chanin, et al., for the middle atmosphere using Doppler Rayleigh lidar, can be applied to the lower atmosphere where Mie (aerosol) backscatter is strong. Elastic events, inherent in both Rayleigh and Mie backscatter, dominate the return signal throughout the atmosphere. Both are susceptible to local wind vectors; which will Doppler shift the laser frequency proportional to the wind velocity. A pair of Fabry-Perot interferometers, tuned to either side of the laser frequency, will provide necessary data to determine the shift in frequency of the backscattered signal. Spectral drift and jitter of the laser and a lack of data points to determine the wind vector place limits on the sensitivity of the system. A method to minimize each of these is presented.

  10. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties from AERI Lidar Observations: Algorithm and Results from SHEBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2005-04-01

    A new approach to retrieve microphysical properties from mixed-phase Arctic clouds is presented. This mixed-phase cloud property retrieval algorithm (MIXCRA) retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective radius of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance and lidar cloud boundary observations. The theoretical basis for this technique is that the absorption coefficient of ice is greater than that of liquid water from 10 to 13 ?m, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16 to 25 ?m. MIXCRA retrievals are only valid for optically thin (?visible < 6) single-layer clouds when the precipitable water vapor is less than 1 cm. MIXCRA was applied to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data that were collected during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment from November 1997 to May 1998, where 63% of all of the cloudy scenes above the SHEBA site met this specification. The retrieval determined that approximately 48% of these clouds were mixed phase and that a significant number of clouds (during all 7 months) contained liquid water, even for cloud temperatures as low as 240 K. The retrieved distributions of effective radii for water and ice particles in single-phase clouds are shown to be different than the effective radii in mixed-phase clouds.

  11. Detection of preferential particle orientation in the atmosphere. Development of an alternative polarization lidar system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geier, Manfred; Arienti, Marco

    2014-07-19

    Increasing interest in polarimetric characterization of atmospheric aerosols has led to the development of complete sample-measuring (Mueller) polarimeters that are capable of measuring the entire backscattering phase matrix of a probed volume. The Mueller polarimeters consist of several moving parts, which limit measurement rates and complicate data analysis. In this paper, we present the concept of a less complex polarization lidar setup for detection of preferential orientation of atmospheric particulates. On the basis of theoretical considerations of data inversion stability and propagation of measurement uncertainties, an optimum optical configuration is established for two modes of operation (with either a linearmoreĀ Ā» or a circular polarized incident laser beam). We discovered that the conceptualized setup falls in the category of incomplete sample-measuring polarimeters and uses four detection channels for simultaneous measurement of the backscattered light. Likewise, the expected performance characteristics are discussed through an example of a typical aerosol with a small fraction of particles oriented in a preferred direction. As a result, the theoretical analysis suggests that achievable accuracies in backscatter cross-sections and depolarization ratios are similar to those with conventional two-channel configurations, while in addition preferential orientation can be detected with the proposed four-channel system for a wide range of conditions.Ā«Ā less

  12. Detection of preferential particle orientation in the atmosphere. Development of an alternative polarization lidar system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geier, Manfred; Arienti, Marco

    2014-07-19

    Increasing interest in polarimetric characterization of atmospheric aerosols has led to the development of complete sample-measuring (Mueller) polarimeters that are capable of measuring the entire backscattering phase matrix of a probed volume. The Mueller polarimeters consist of several moving parts, which limit measurement rates and complicate data analysis. In this paper, we present the concept of a less complex polarization lidar setup for detection of preferential orientation of atmospheric particulates. On the basis of theoretical considerations of data inversion stability and propagation of measurement uncertainties, an optimum optical configuration is established for two modes of operation (with either a linear or a circular polarized incident laser beam). We discovered that the conceptualized setup falls in the category of incomplete sample-measuring polarimeters and uses four detection channels for simultaneous measurement of the backscattered light. Likewise, the expected performance characteristics are discussed through an example of a typical aerosol with a small fraction of particles oriented in a preferred direction. As a result, the theoretical analysis suggests that achievable accuracies in backscatter cross-sections and depolarization ratios are similar to those with conventional two-channel configurations, while in addition preferential orientation can be detected with the proposed four-channel system for a wide range of conditions.

  13. The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

  14. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber Based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamun, Khandaker Abdullah Al; Tulip, Fahmida S; Macarthur, Kimberly C; McFarlane, Nicole M; Islam, Syed K

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  15. Test reports for K Basins vertical fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The vertical fuel handling tools, for moving N Reactor fuel elements, were tested in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility (CTF) in the 300 Area. After fabrication was complete, the tools were functionally tested in the CTF using simulated N Reactor fuel rods (inner and outer elements). The tools were successful in picking up the simulated N Reactor fuel rods. These tools were also load tested using a 62 pound dummy to test the structural integrity of each assembly. The tools passed each of these tests, based on the performance objectives. Finally, the tools were subjected to an operations acceptance test where K Basins Operations personnel operated the tool to determine its durability and usefulness. Operations personnel were satisfied with the tools. Identified open items included the absence of a float during testing, and documentation required prior to actual use of the tools in the 100 K fuel storage basin.

  16. 3-D laser patterning process utilizing horizontal and vertical patterning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A process which vastly improves the 3-D patterning capability of laser pantography (computer controlled laser direct-write patterning). The process uses commercially available electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) to pattern 3-D surfaces. The EDPR covers the surface of a metal layer conformally, coating the vertical as well as horizontal surfaces. A laser pantograph then patterns the EDPR, which is subsequently developed in a standard, commercially available developer, leaving patterned trench areas in the EDPR. The metal layer thereunder is now exposed in the trench areas and masked in others, and thereafter can be etched to form the desired pattern (subtractive process), or can be plated with metal (additive process), followed by a resist stripping, and removal of the remaining field metal (additive process). This improved laser pantograph process is simpler, faster, move manufacturable, and requires no micro-machining.

  17. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol extinction coefficient (lidar) and air temperature. Comparison of the vertical profiles obtained from onboard the aircraft and with the lidar show good...

  18. Infrared and Raman spectra, DFT-calculations and spectral assignments of germacyclohexane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksa, V. Ozerenskis, D.; Pucetaite, M.; Sablinskas, V.; Cotter, C.; Guirgis, G. A.

    2015-03-30

    Raman spectra of germacyclohexane in liquid and solid states were recorded and depolarization data obtained. Infrared absorption spectra of the vapor and liquid have been studied. The wavenumbers of the vibrational modes were derived in the harmonic and anharmonic approximation in B3LYP/ccpVTZ calculations. According to the calculations, germacyclohexane exists in the stable chair conformation, whereas a possible twist form should have more than 15?kJ·mol{sup -1} higher enthalpy of formation what makes this conformer experimentally not observable. The 27 A' and 21 A'' fundamentals were assigned on the basis of the calculations and infrared and Raman band intensities, contours of gas phase infrared spectral bands and Raman depolarization measurements. An average discrepancy of ca. 0.77 % was found between the observed and the calculated anharmonic wavenumbers for the 48 modes. Substitution of carbon atom with Ge atom in the cyclohexane ring is reasoning flattening of the ring.

  19. Heterodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by the phase control of its intrinsic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xi; Wang Kai; Welch, George R.; Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond laser pulse shaping for precise control of the interference between the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal and the coherent nonresonant background generated within the same sample volume. Our technique is similar to heterodyne detection with the coherent background playing the role of the local oscillator field. In our experiment, we first apply two ultrashort (near-transform-limited) femtosecond pump and Stokes laser pulses to excite coherent molecular oscillations within a sample. After a short and controllable delay, we then apply a laser pulse that scatters off of these oscillations to produce the CARS signal. By making fine adjustments to the probe field spectral profile, we vary the relative phase between the Raman-resonant signal and the nonresonant background, and we observe a varying spectral interference pattern. These controlled variations of the measured pattern reveal the phase information within the Raman spectrum.

  20. Portable microfluidic raman system for rapid, label-free early disease signature detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Hatch, Anson

    2015-09-01

    In the early stages of infection, patients develop non-specific or no symptoms at all. While waiting for identification of the infectious agent, precious window of opportunity for early intervention is lost. The standard diagnostics require affinity reagents and sufficient pathogen titers to reach the limit of detection. In the event of a disease outbreak, triaging the at-risk population rapidly and reliably for quarantine and countermeasure is more important than the identification of the pathogen by name. To expand Sandia's portfolio of Biological threat management capabilities, we will utilize Raman spectrometry to analyze immune subsets in whole blood to rapidly distinguish infected from non-infected, and bacterial from viral infection, for the purpose of triage during an emergency outbreak. The goal of this one year LDRD is to determine whether Raman spectroscopy can provide label-free detection of early disease signatures, and define a miniaturized Raman detection system meeting requirements for low- resource settings.

  1. Feshbach-resonant Raman photoassociation in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Matt; Phou, Pierre; Shinn, Mannix; Boyce, Heather; Katz, Lev

    2011-10-15

    We model the formation of stable heteronuclear molecules via pulsed Raman photoassociation of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate near a strong Feshbach resonance, for both counterintuitive and intuitive pulse sequencing. Compared to lasers alone, weak Raman photoassociation is enhanced by as much as a factor of ten (five) for a counterintuitive (intuitive) pulse sequence, whereas strong Raman photoassociation is barely enhanced at all--regardless of pulse sequence. Stronger intra-atom, molecule, or atom-molecule collisions lead to an expected decrease in conversion efficiency, but stronger ambient inter-atom collisions lead to an unexpected increase in the efficiency of stable molecule production. Numerical results agree reasonably with an analytical approximation.

  2. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V., E-mail: vr.optics1@gmail.com [Department of Laser Studies, School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, India. (India); Kottaisamy, M. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)

    2014-02-15

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  3. Isotopic hydrogen analysis via conventional and surface-enhanced fiber optic Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LASCOLA, ROBERT

    2004-09-23

    This report describes laboratory development and process plant applications of Raman spectroscopy for detection of hydrogen isotopes in the Tritium Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a U.S. Department of Energy complex. Raman spectroscopy provides a lower-cost, in situ alternative to mass spectrometry techniques currently employed at SRS. Using conventional Raman and fiber optics, we have measured, in the production facility glove boxes, process mixtures of protium and deuterium at various compositions and total pressures ranging from 1000-4000 torr, with detection limits ranging from 1-2 percent for as low as 3-second integration times. We are currently investigating fabrication techniques for SERS surfaces in order to measure trace (0.01-0.1 percent) amounts of one isotope in the presence of the other. These efforts have concentrated on surfaces containing palladium, which promotes hydrogen dissociation and forms metal hydride bonds, essentially providing a chemical enhancement mechanism.

  4. Fiber-optic apparatus and method for measurement of luminescence and raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael L. (Livermore, CA); Angel, Stanley M. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A dual fiber forward scattering optrode for Raman spectroscopy with the remote ends of the fibers in opposed, spaced relationship to each other to form a analyte sampling space therebetween and the method of measuring Raman spectra utilizing same. One optical fiber is for sending an exciting signal to the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter for filtering out background emissions generated in the fiber. The other optical fiber is for collecting the Raman scattering signal at the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter to prevent the exciting signal from the exciting fiber from entering the collection fiber and to thereby prevent the generation of background emissions in the collecting fiber.

  5. Fiber-optic apparatus and method for measurement of luminescence and Raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myrick, M.L.; Angel, S.M.

    1993-03-16

    A dual fiber forward scattering optrode for Raman spectroscopy with the remote ends of the fibers in opposed, spaced relationship to each other to form a analyte sampling space therebetween and the method of measuring Raman spectra utilizing same are described. One optical fiber is for sending an exciting signal to the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter for filtering out background emissions generated in the fiber. The other optical fiber is for collecting the Raman scattering signal at the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter to prevent the exciting signal from the exciting fiber from entering the collection fiber and to thereby prevent the generation of background emissions in the collecting fiber.

  6. Vertical air motions over the Tropical Western Pacific for validating cloud resolving and regional models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Christopher R.

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this project was to estimate the vertical air motion using Doppler velocity spectra from two side-by-side vertically pointing radars. The retrieval technique was applied to two different sets of radars. This first set was 50- and 920-MHz vertically pointing radars near Darwin, Australia. The second set was 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz vertically pointing radars deployed at SGP for MC3E. The retrieval technique uses the longer wavelength radar (50 or 449 MHz) to observe both the vertical air motion and precipitation motion while the shorter wavelength radar (920 MHz or 2.8 GHz) observes just the precipitation motion. By analyzing their Doppler velocity spectra, the precipitation signal in the 920 MHz or 2.8 GHz radar is used to mask-out the precipitation signal in the 50 or 449 MHz radar spectra, leaving just the vertical air motion signal.

  7. Probing inhomogeneous composition in core/shell nanowires by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaduzzi, F.; Alarcón-Lladó, E.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Matteini, F.; Heiß, M.; Tütüncüoglu, G.; Conesa-Boj, S.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Mata, M. de la; Arbiol, J.

    2014-11-14

    Due to its non-destructive and its micro-spatial resolution, Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for a rapid structural and compositional characterization of nanoscale materials. Here, by combining the compositional dependence of the Raman peaks with the existence of photonic modes in the nanowires, we address the composition inhomogeneities of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs core/shell structures. The experimental results are validated with complementary chemical composition maps of the nanowire cross-sections and finite-difference time-domain simulations of the photonic modes.

  8. Enhancement of photoluminescence and raman scattering in one-dimensional photonic crystals based on porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonchar, K. A.; Musabek, G. K.; Taurbayev, T. I.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2011-05-15

    In porous-silicon-based multilayered structures that exhibit the properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals, an increase in the photoluminescence and Raman scattering intensities is observed upon optical excitation at the wavelength 1.064 {mu}m. When the excitation wavelength falls within the edge of the photonic band gap of the structures, a multiple increase (by a factor larger than 400) in the efficiency of Raman scattering is detected. The effect is attributed to partial localization of excitation light and, correspondingly, to the much longer time of interaction of light with the material in the structures.

  9. First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CsSnCl 3 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic CsSnCl 3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic CsSnCl 3 Authors: Huang, Ling-yi ; Lambrecht, Walter R. L. Publication Date: 2015-02-20 OSTI Identifier: 1179977 Grant/Contract Number: ER-46874-SC0008933 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal

  10. First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CsSnCl 3 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic CsSnCl 3 Title: First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic CsSnCl 3 Authors: Huang, Ling-yi ; Lambrecht, Walter R. L. Publication Date: 2015-02-20 OSTI Identifier: 1179977 Grant/Contract Number: ER-46874-SC0008933 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 7;

  11. Stimulated forward Raman scattering in large scale-length laser-produced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasmas (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Stimulated forward Raman scattering in large scale-length laser-produced plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stimulated forward Raman scattering in large scale-length laser-produced plasmas Authors: Niemann, C ; Berger, R L ; Divol, L ; Kirkwood, R K ; Moody, J D ; Sorce, C M ; Glenzer, S H Publication Date: 2011-08-22 OSTI Identifier: 1113524 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-496073 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type:

  12. Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

    2007-12-01

    Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (12700 Indian School Rd. NE., Apt. 604, Albuquerque, NM 87112); Esherick, Peter (1105 Sagebrush Trail SE., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Jewell, Jack L. (12 Timberline Dr., Bridgewater, NJ 08807); Lear, Kevin L. (13713 Vic Rd. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Olbright, Gregory R. (3875 Orange Ct., Boulder, CO 80304)

    1997-01-01

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications.

  14. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Esherick, P.; Jewell, J.L.; Lear, K.L.; Olbright, G.R.

    1997-04-29

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications. 9 figs.

  15. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  16. The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state: TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS AND SHEAR Citation Details ...

  17. ARM - PI Product - Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rate Retrievals ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files

  18. Kink modes and surface currents associated with vertical displacement events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manickam, Janardhan; Boozer, Allen; Gerhardt, Stefan

    2012-08-15

    The fast termination phase of a vertical displacement event (VDE) in a tokamak is modeled as a sequence of shrinking equilibria, where the core current profile remains constant so that the safety-factor at the axis, q{sub axis}, remains fixed and the q{sub edge} systematically decreases. At some point, the n = 1 kink mode is destabilized. Kink modes distort the magnetic field lines outside the plasma, and surface currents are required to nullify the normal component of the B-field at the plasma boundary and maintain equilibrium at finite pressure. If the plasma touches a conductor, the current can be transferred to the conductor, and may be measurable by the halo current monitors. This report describes a practical method to model the plasma as it evolves during a VDE, and determine the surface currents, needed to maintain equilibrium. The main results are that the onset conditions for the disruption are that the growth-rate of the n = 1 kink exceeds half the Alfven time and the associated surface current needed to maintain equilibrium exceeds one half of the core plasma current. This occurs when q{sub edge} drops below a low integer, usually 2. Application to NSTX provides favorable comparison with non-axisymmetric halo-current measurements. The model is also applied to ITER and shows that the 2/1 mode is projected to be the most likely cause of the final disruption.

  19. Prefabricated vertical drains flow resistance under vacuum conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaranta, J.D.; Gabr, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental research are presented and discussed with focus on the internal well resistance of prefabricated vertical drains (PVD) under vacuum-induced water flow. Measured results included fluid flow rates for two different cross-sectional hydraulic profiles (Types 1 and 2 PVDs). Experimental results indicated linear relationship, independent of the PVD widths, between extracted fluid velocity and the applied hydraulic gradient. Data showed a laminar flow regime to predominate for test velocities corresponding to hydraulic gradients {lt}0.5. The larger nominal hydraulic radius of the Type 2 PVD is credited with providing a flow rate equal to approximately 3.2 times that of the Type 1 PVD at approximately the same operating total head. There was no apparent dependency of the transmissivity {theta} on the width or lengths (3, 4, and 5 m) of the PVDs tested. In the case of the 100-mm-wide Type 1 PVD, {theta} = 618 mm{sup 2}/s was estimated from the measured data versus {theta} = 1,996 mm{sup 2}/s for Type 2 PVD with the same dimensions.

  20. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  1. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  2. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-10-24

    Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

  3. Rivulet Flow In Vertical Parallel-Wall Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. Mc Creery; P. Meakin

    2006-04-01

    In comparison with studies of rivulet flow over external surfaces, rivulet flow confined by two surfaces has received almost no attention. Fully-developed rivulet flow in vertical parallel-wall channels was characterized, both experimentally and analytically for flows intermediate between a lower flow limit of drop flow and an upper limit where the rivulets meander. Although this regime is the most simple rivulet flow regime, it does not appear to have been previously investigated in detail. Experiments were performed that measured rivulet widths for aperture spacing ranging from 0.152 mm to 0.914 mm. The results were compared with a simple steadystate analytical model for laminar flow. The model divides the rivulet cross-section into an inner region, which is dominated by viscous and gravitational forces and where essentially all flow is assumed to occur, and an outer region, dominated by capillary forces, where the geometry is determined by the contact angle between the fluid and the wall. Calculations using the model provided excellent agreement with data for inner rivulet widths and good agreement with measurements of outer rivulet widths.

  4. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  5. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Samuel D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  6. Developments in enzyme immobilization and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy with downstream renewable energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupoi, Jason

    2012-08-27

    This dissertation focuses on techniques for (1) increasing ethanol yields from saccharification and fermentation of cellulose using immobilized cellulase, and (2) the characterization and classification of lignocellulosic feedstocks, and quantification of useful parameters such as the syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) lignin monomer content using 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics.

  7. Design Considerations for a Portable Raman Probe Spectrometer for Field Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2012-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable method for explosives detection. Currently most forensic Raman systems are either large, powerful instruments for laboratory experiments or handheld instruments for in situ point detection. We have chosen to examine the performance of certain benchtop Raman probe systems with the goal of developing an inexpensive, portable system that could be used to operate in a field forensics laboratory to examine explosives-related residues or samples. To this end, a rugged, low distortion line imaging dispersive Raman spectrograph was configured to work at 830 nm laser excitation and was used to determine whether the composition of thin films of plastic explosives or small (e.g., ?10 ?m) particles of RDX or other explosives or oxidizers can be detected, identified, and quantified in the field. With 300mW excitation energy, concentrations of RDX and PETN can be detected and reconstructed in the case of thin Semtex smears, but further work is needed to push detection limits of areal dosages to the ?1 ?g/cm2 level.We describe the performance of several probe/spectrograph combinations and show preliminary data for particle detection, calibration and detection linearity for mixed compounds, and so forth.

  8. Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-10-01

    The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  9. Practical substrate and apparatus for static and continuous monitoring by surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01

    A substrate for use in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is disclosed, comprising a support, preferably flexible, coated with roughness-imparting microbodies and a metallized overcoating. Also disclosed is apparatus for using the aforesaid substrate in continuous and static SERS trace analyses, especially of organic compounds.

  10. System and method for linearly amplifying optical analog signals by backward Raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Cheng-Heui (Goleta, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A system for linearly amplifying an optical analog signal by backward stimulated Raman scattering comprises a laser source for generating a pump pulse; and an optic fiber having two opposed apertures, a first aperture for receiving the pump pulse and a second aperture for receiving the optical analog signal, wherein the optical analog signal is linearly amplified to an amplified optical analog signal.

  11. Wind flow in the Fraser Valley as measured by a pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, L.D.; Banta, R.M.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Vancouver, British Columbia metropolitan area, with a population close to 1.5 million people, experiences high levels of tropospheric ozone during the summer months. The transport of pollution, including tropospheric ozone, in the Vancouver area, is influenced by a local land/sea breeze circulation, the valley flows associated with the Lower Fraser River Valley to the east of the city, and the complex terrain to the north and northeast of the city. In July and August of 1993, an experiment was conducted in the Vancouver area to assess the distribution and transport of tropospheric ozone. Wind flow and aerosol measurements were obtained with a pulsed CO(sub 2) Doppler lidar and wind fields and their interactions with the complex terrain were mapped. The combination of Doppler lidar measurements of wind velocity and backscattered signal intensity, obtained simultaneously, will help identify wind flow patterns that enhanced the transport of urban pollution from the city of Vancouver to the Lower Fraser River Valley, and the possible recirculation of these pollutants back into Vancouver.

  12. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM)

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  13. Multidimensional resonance raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing in the deep UV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Giokas, Paul G.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M.

    2014-09-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) resonance Raman spectroscopies hold great potential for uncovering photoinduced relaxation processes in molecules but are not yet widely applied because of technical challenges. Here, we describe a newly developed 2D resonance Raman experiment operational at the third-harmonic of a Titanium-Sapphire laser. High-sensitivity and rapid data acquisition are achieved by combining spectral interferometry with a background-free (six-pulse) laser beam geometry. The third-harmonic laser pulses are generated in a filament produced by the fundamental and second-harmonic pulses in neon gas at pressures up to 35 atm. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by probing ground-state wavepacket motions in triiodide. The information provided by the experiment is explored with two different representations of the signal. In one representation, Fourier transforms are carried out with respect to the two experimentally controlled delay times to obtain a 2D Raman spectrum. Further insights are derived in a second representation by dispersing the signal pulse in a spectrometer. It is shown that, as in traditional pump-probe experiments, the six-wave mixing signal spectrum encodes the wavepacket's position by way of the (time-evolving) emission frequency. Anharmonicity additionally induces dynamics in the vibrational resonance frequency. In all cases, the experimental signals are compared to model calculations based on a cumulant expansion approach. This study suggests that multi-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopies conducted on systems with Franck-Condon active modes are fairly immune to many of the technical issues that challenge off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies (e.g., third-order cascades) and photon-echo experiments in the deep UV (e.g., coherence spikes). The development of higher-order nonlinear spectroscopies operational in the deep UV is motivated by studies of biological systems and elementary organic photochemistries.

  14. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hye-Young Park

    2005-12-17

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed the potential importance of structural defects.

  15. The probability of laser caused ocular injury to the aircrew of undetected aircraft violating the exclusion zone about the airborne aura LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-12-01

    The probability of a laser caused ocular injury, to the aircrew of an undetected aircraft entering the exclusion zone about the AURA LIDAR airborne platform with the possible violation of the Laser Hazard Zone boundary, was investigated and quantified for risk analysis and management.

  16. Section 32

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 CART Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the ARM 1996 Water Vapor IOP D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J.E.M. Goldsmith Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California Introduction Raman Lidar Calibration The first in a series of water vapor intensive operating periods Raman lidar systems detect selected species by measuring the (IOPs) was held during September 1996. These IOPs are wavelength shifted molecular return produced by Raman designed

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 6, 2010 [Facility News] New Raman Lidar En Route to Australia Bookmark and Share Since 1996, the ARM Southern Great Plains site has maintained one of the few operational Raman lidars in the world. Now, thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the ARM Tropical Western Pacific site is about to join that exclusive group. A new Raman lidar, built by Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, is on its way to Darwin, Australia. Optics contained inside the Raman

  18. ARM - Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 6, 2010 [Facility News] New Raman Lidar En Route to Australia Bookmark and Share Since 1996, the ARM Southern Great Plains site has maintained one of the few operational Raman lidars in the world. Now, thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the ARM Tropical Western Pacific site is about to join that exclusive group. A new Raman lidar, built by Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, is on its way to Darwin, Australia. Optics contained inside the Raman

  19. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

  20. Design and Analysis of the ITER Vertical Stability Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter H. Titus, et. al.

    2012-09-06

    The ITER vertical stability (VS) coils have been developed through the preliminary design phase by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Final design, prototyping and construction will be carried out by the Chinese Participant Team contributing lab, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The VS coils are a part of the in-vessel coil systems which include edge localized mode (ELM) coils as well as the VS coils. An overview of the ELM coils is provided in another paper at this conference. 15 The VS design employs four turns of stainless steel jacketed mineral insulated copper (SSMIC) conductors The mineral insulation is Magnesium Oxide (MgO). Joule and nuclear heat is removed by water flowing at 3 m/s through the hollow copper conductor. A key element in the design is that slightly elevated temperatures in the conductor and its support spine during operation impose compressive stresses that mitigate fatigue damage. Away from joints, and break-outs, conductor thermal stresses are low because of the axisymmetry of the winding (there are no corner bends as in the ELM coils).The 120 degree segment joint, and break-out or terminal regions are designed with similar but imperfect constraint compared with the ring coil portion of the VS. The support for the break-out region is made from a high strength copper alloy, CuCrZr. This is needed to conduct nuclear heat to the actively cooled conductor and to the vessel wall. The support "spine" for the ring coil portion of the VS is 316 stainless steel, held to the vessel with preloaded 718 bolts. Lorentz loads resulting from normal operating loads, disruption loads and loads from disruption currents in the support spine shared with vessel, are applied to the VS coil. The transmission of the Lorentz and thermal expansion loads from the "spine" to the vessel rails is via friction augmented with a restraining "lip" to ensure the coil frictional slip is minimal and acceptable. Stresses in the coil, joints, and break-outs are presented. These are compared with static and fatigue allowables. Design for fatigue is much less demanding than for the ELM coils. A total of 30,000 cycles is required for VS design. Loads on the vessel due to the thermal expansion of the coil and spine are significant. Efforts to reduce these by reducing the cross section of the spine have been made but the vessel still must support loads resulting from restraint of thermal expansion.

  1. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Sanuel M; Barefield, James E; Humphries, Seth D; Wiens, Roger C; Vaniman, D. T.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2010-12-13

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to quantitatively determine the major elemental abundance of the remaining samples. PLS analysis suggests that the major element compositions can be determined with root mean square errors ca. 5% (absolute) for SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(total), MgO, and CaO, and ca. 2% or less for TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO, K{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}O. Finally, the Raman experiments have been conducted under supercritical CO{sub 2} involving single-mineral and mixed-mineral samples containing talc, olivine, pyroxenes, feldspars, anhydrite, barite, and siderite. The Raman data have shown that the individual minerals can easily be identified individually or in mixtures.

  2. Rapid and Nondestructive Identification of Polytypism and Stacking Sequences in Few-Layer Molybdenum Diselenide by Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Xin; Utama, M. Iqbal Bakti; Lin, Junhao; Luo, Xin; Zhao, Yanyuan; Zhang, Jun; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Quek, Su Ying; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-07-02

    Various combinations of interlayer shear modes emerge in few-layer molybdenum diselenide grown by chemical vapor deposition depending on the stacking configuration of the sample. Raman measurements may also reveal polytypism and stacking faults, as supported by first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in probing stacking-dependent properties in few-layer 2D materials.

  3. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser dye mixtures dissolved in multiple scattering media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, V P; Komyshan, A O; Tikhonov, E A; Olkhovyk, L A

    2014-10-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of a mixture of rhodamine 6G and pyrromethene 605 laser dyes in vesicular films is studied. It is shown that a peculiar interaction of dyes occurs under conditions of multiple scattering of light from vesicles. This interaction manifests itself as SRS excitation of one of the dyes by random lasing of the other dye, provided that the random lasing spectrum overlaps the Stokes lines of the first dye. In addition, there is energy transfer between molecules of these dyes if their luminescence and absorption spectra overlap. The results obtained confirm that the mechanism of SRS from laser dyes in multiple scattering media is similar to that in coherent-active Raman spectroscopy. These results extend the possibility of determining the vibrational spectrum of dye molecules from their secondary radiation in these media. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Transient effects and pump depletion in stimulated Raman scattering. [Para-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsten, J.L.; Wenzel, R.G.; Druehl, K.

    1983-01-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering in a 300-K multipass cell filled with para-H/sub 2/ with a single-mode CO/sub 2/-pumped laser is studied using a frequency-narrowed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a probe laser at the Stokes frequency for the S/sub 0/(O) transition. Amplification and pump depletion are examined as a function of incident pump energy. The pump depletion shows clear evidence of transient behavior. A theoretical treatment of transient stimulated Raman scattering, including effects of both pump depletion and medium saturation is presented. In a first approximation, diffraction effects are neglected, and only plane-wave interactions are considered. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental pulse shapes.

  5. Studies of ground-state dynamics in isolated species by ionization-detected stimulated Raman techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    First, the author aims to develop methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. Second, the author wishes to apply such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species (molecules, complexes, and clusters) in supersonic molecular beams. In the past year, the author has made progress in several areas. The first pertains to the application of mass-selective ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS) to the size-specific vibrational spectroscopy of solute-solvent{sub n} clusters. The second involves the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The third pertains to the use of IDSRS methods in the study of intermolecular vibrational transitions in van der Waals complexes.

  6. Electronic Raman scattering as an ultra-sensitive probe of strain effects in semiconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fluegel., Brian; Mialitsin, Aleksej V.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Reno, John L.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-05-28

    Semiconductor strain engineering has become a critical feature of high-performance electronics because of the significant device performance enhancements that it enables. These improvements, which emerge from strain-induced modifications to the electronic band structure, necessitate new ultra-sensitive tools to probe the strain in semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate that minute amounts of strain in thin semiconductor epilayers can be measured using electronic Raman scattering. We also applied this strain measurement technique to two different semiconductor alloy systems using coherently strained epitaxial thin films specifically designed to produce lattice-mismatch strains as small as 10-4. Thus, comparing our strain sensitivity and signal strength inmoreĀ Ā» AlxGa 1-x As with those obtained using the industry-standard technique of phonon Raman scattering, we found that there was a sensitivity improvement of 200-fold and a signal enhancement of 4 Ɨ 103, thus obviating key constraints in semiconductor strain metrology.Ā«Ā less

  7. Application of Raman spectroscopy to identification and sorting of post-consumer plastics for recycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Edward J. (Nashville, TN); Rich, John T. (Lebanon, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A high accuracy rapid system for sorting a plurality of waste products by polymer type. The invention involves the application of Raman spectroscopy and complex identification techniques to identify and sort post-consumer plastics for recycling. The invention reads information unique to the molecular structure of the materials to be sorted to identify their chemical compositions and uses rapid high volume sorting techniques to sort them into product streams at commercially viable throughput rates. The system employs a laser diode (20) for irradiating the material sample (10), a spectrograph (50) is used to determine the Raman spectrum of the material sample (10) and a microprocessor based controller (70) is employed to identify the polymer type of the material sample (10).

  8. Surface-enhanced raman medical probes and system for disease diagnosis and drug testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A probe for a surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrometer includes a member of optically transmissive material for receiving the excitation radiation from a laser and for carrying the radiation emitted from a specimen to a detector. An end of the member for placing against the specimen has a coating that produces surface enhancement of the specimen during Raman scattering spectroscopic analysis. Specifically the coating is formed by a first layer of microparticles on the member and a metal layer over the first layer. The first layer may form a microstructure surface over which a metal layer is applied. Alternatively the coating may be a material containing microparticles of a metal. An optional layer of a material may be applied to the metal layer to concentrate onto the probe compounds of analytical interest onto the probe.

  9. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  10. Synthesis and Raman spectrum of crystalline indium oxide micro-rods with rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Kavita Mehta, B. R. Singh, J. P.

    2014-04-24

    Indium oxide (IO) micro-rods with rectangular cross section were synthesized without catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system by carbothermal reduction of indium oxide at 900 °C. The rectangular micro-rods (RMRs) were grown on Si substrate in presence of water vapors and Ar atmosphere. Water was used as oxidizing reagent which controls the In/O stoichiometry in RMRs. The IO RMRs have dimensions of about 20 ?m in length and about 1 ?m width. The growth process involved in formation of RMRs is vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. Raman analysis was performed to obtain the phonon modes of the RMRs and the peaks of Raman spectrum were indexed to the modes being associated with bcc?In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman medical probes and system for disease diagnosis and drug testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-01-26

    A probe for a surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrometer includes a member of optically transmissive material for receiving the excitation radiation from a laser and for carrying the radiation emitted from a specimen to a detector. An end of the member for placing against the specimen has a coating that produces surface enhancement of the specimen during Raman scattering spectroscopic analysis. Specifically the coating is formed by a first layer of microparticles on the member and a metal layer over the first layer. The first layer may form a microstructure surface over which a metal layer is applied. Alternatively the coating may be a material containing microparticles of a metal. An optional layer of a material may be applied to the metal layer to concentrate onto the probe compounds of analytical interest onto the probe. 39 figs.

  12. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkhasova, Polina; Chen, Hui; Du, Henry; Kanka, Jiri; Mergo, Pawel

    2015-02-16

    Core-shell nanotags that are active in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and entrapped with thiocyanate (SCN) label molecules were immobilized in the air channels of suspended-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to impart quantitative capacity to SERS-based PCF optofluidic sensing platform. The Raman intensity of Rhodamine 6G increases with concentration, whereas the intensity of SCN remains constant when measured using this platform. The signal from the SCN label can be used as an internal reference to establish calibration for quantitative measurements of analytes of unknown concentrations. The long optical path-length PCF optofluidic platform integrated with SERS-active core-shell nanotags holds significant promise for sensitive quantitative chem/bio measurements with the added benefit of small sampling volume. The dependence of SERS intensity on the nanotag coverage density and PCF length was interpreted based on numerical-analytical simulations.

  13. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1988-11-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  14. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1987-11-30

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the adsorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  15. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-07-09

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal.

  16. Gulf Stream Locale R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8208 Introduction Clouds have long been recognized as having a major impact on the radiation budget in the earth's climate system. One of the preferred areas for the production of clouds is off the east coast of the United States. The formation of clouds in this region, particularly during the winter months, is caused predominately by the presence of the Gulf Stream,

  17. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation X. Hong, M. J. Leach, and S. Raman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X. Hong, M. J. Leach, and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences .North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8208 Surface inhomogeneities, including boundaries between different types of vegetations and land use patterns, have important effects on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. Changes in the surface roughness, temperature and wetness make the planetary boundary layer (PBL) nonhomogeneous and produce substantial horizontal gradients of boundary

  18. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30am SSRL Third Floor Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as

  19. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs.

  20. Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Combustion Environments. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Combustion Environments. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Combustion Environments. Abstract not provided. Authors: Kliewer, Christopher Jesse ; Settersten, Thomas B. ; Patterson, Brian D. ; Seeger, Thomas ; Kiefer, Johannes ; Leipertz, Alfred

  1. Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Flames. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Flames. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Flames. Abstract not provided. Authors: Kliewer, Christopher Jesse ; Farrow, Roger L. ; Settersten, Thomas B. ; Patterson, Brian D. ; Kiefer, Johannes ; Seeger, Thomas ; Gao, Yi Publication Date: 2009-12-01 OSTI

  2. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saint-Amans, C.; HĆ©bert, P. Doucet, M.; Resseguier, T. de

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30ā€‰GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30ā€‰ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9ā€‰GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9ā€‰GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  3. Vertically-tapered optical waveguide and optical spot transformer formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakke, Thor; Sullivan, Charles T.

    2004-07-27

    An optical waveguide is disclosed in which a section of the waveguide core is vertically tapered during formation by spin coating by controlling the width of an underlying mesa structure. The optical waveguide can be formed from spin-coatable materials such as polymers, sol-gels and spin-on glasses. The vertically-tapered waveguide section can be used to provide a vertical expansion of an optical mode of light within the optical waveguide. A laterally-tapered section can be added adjacent to the vertically-tapered section to provide for a lateral expansion of the optical mode, thereby forming an optical spot-size transformer for efficient coupling of light between the optical waveguide and a single-mode optical fiber. Such a spot-size transformer can also be added to a III-V semiconductor device by post processing.

  4. Sandia Energy - Sandia and Partners Complete Phase I of a Vertical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Texas A&M University have completed the first phase of a project to explore the feasibility of large-scale vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) for deep-water offshore...

  5. Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lasers. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. No abstract prepared. Authors: Fish, M. A. [1] ; Serkland, Darwin Keith ; Guilfoyle, Peter S. [1] ; Stone, Richard V. [1] ; Klem, John Frederick ; Louderback, Duane A. [1] ; Choquette, Kent D. [2] ; Pickrell, G. W. [1] + Show Author

  6. "Covalent functionalization and electron-transfer properties of vertically

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aligned carbon nanofibers: The importance of edge-plane sites" (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect "Covalent functionalization and electron-transfer properties of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers: The importance of edge-plane sites" Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Covalent functionalization and electron-transfer properties of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers: The importance of edge-plane sites" The use of covalently bonded molecular layers

  7. Design and analysis of a vertical axis ocean current power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, C.C.; Hartzog, J.R.; Sorge, R.V.; Quigley, J.V.; Adams, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a calculation of the power generated by a vertical axis ocean current power plant. An analytical model is presented and a computer solution described. Results of the calculation show the optimum angles of the blades about the vertical axis to maximize power output, as well as the total extractable power of the plant for various ocean current velocities. Tow tank tests are described for a scale model of the plant.

  8. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its

  9. Electric characteristics of germanium Vertical Multijunction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells under high intensity illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unishkov, V.A.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the performance evaluation of Vertical Multijunction (VMJ) germanium (Ge) photovoltaic (PV) cells. Vertical Multijunction Germanium Photovoltaic cells offer several advantages for Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications such as high intensity light conversion, low series resistance, more efficient coupling to lower temperature sources, high output voltage, simplified heat rejection system as well as potentially simple fabrication technology and low cost photovoltaic converter device. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  11. Pore-fluid effects on seismic waves in vertically fractured earth with orthotropic symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-15

    For elastically noninteracting vertical-fracture sets at arbitrary orientation angles to each other, a detailed model is presented in which the resulting anisotropic fractured medium generally has orthorhombic symmetry overall. Some of the analysis methods and ideas of Schoenberg are emphasized, together with their connections to other similarly motivated and conceptually related methods by Sayers and Kachanov, among others. Examples show how parallel vertical-fracture sets having HTI (horizontal transversely isotropic) symmetry transform into orthotropic fractured media if some subsets of the vertical fractures are misaligned with the others, and then the fractured system can have VTI (vertical transversely isotropic) symmetry if all of the fractures are aligned randomly or half parallel and half perpendicular to a given vertical plane. An orthotropic example having vertical fractures in an otherwise VTI earth system (studied previously by Schoenberg and Helbig) is compared with the other examples treated and it is finally shown how fluids in the fractures affect the orthotropic poroelastic system response to seismic waves. The key result is that fracture-influence parameters are multiplied by a factor of (1-B), where 0 {le} B < 1 is Skempton's second coefficient for poroelastic media. Skempton's B coefficient is itself a measurable characteristic of fluid-saturated porous rocks, depending on porosity, solid moduli, and the pore-fluid bulk modulus. For heterogeneous porous media, connections between the present work and earlier related results of Brown and Korringa are also established.

  12. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular imaging based on endogenous contrast of haemoglobin. For all these applications, sensitivity is orders of magnitude higher than for spontaneous emission or absorption contrast, permitting nonfluorescent reporters for molecular imaging. Although we did not accomplish the original goal of detecting single-molecule by CARS, our quest for high sensitivity of nonlinear optical microscopy paid off in providing the two brand new enabling technologies. Both techniques were greatly benefited from the use of high frequency modulation for microscopy, which led to orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity. Extensive efforts have been made on optics and electronics to accomplish these breakthroughs.

  13. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stations (3) * MF soil moisture (1-3) * MF UHF prof., sodar * UNIBAS Raman lidar * UK Doppler lidar * UK radiometer * UHH cloud radar * TARA * UK Radiosondes * UK sodar R 5...

  14. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  15. Note: Deep ultraviolet Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shaoqing; University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Fan, Fengtao; Guo, Meiling; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Zhaochi E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Can E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Deep UV Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm was developed in this laboratory. An ellipsoidal mirror and a dispersed-subtractive triple monochromator were used to collect and disperse Raman light, respectively. The triple monochromator was arranged in a triangular configuration with only six mirrors used. 177.3 nm laser excited Raman spectrum with cut-off wavenumber down to 200 cm{sup ?1} and spectral resolution of 8.0 cm{sup ?1} can be obtained under the condition of high purity N{sub 2} purging. With the C–C ? bond in Teflon selectively excited by the 177.3 nm laser, resonance Raman spectrum of Teflon with good quality was recorded on the home-built instrument and the ?-?{sup *} transition of C–C bond was studied. The result demonstrates that deep UV Raman spectrograph is powerful for studying the systems with electronic transition located in the deep UV region.

  16. Bandwidth optimization of femtosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by pump/Stokes spectral focusing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2014-07-01

    A simple spectral focusing scheme for bandwidth optimization of gas-phase rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra is presented. The method is useful when femtosecond pump/Stokes preparation of the Raman coherence is utilized. The approach is of practical utility when working with laser pulses that are not strictly transform limited, or when windows or other sources of pulse chirp may be present in the experiment. A delay between the femtosecond preparation pulses is introduced to shift the maximum Raman preparation away from zero frequency and toward the Stokes or anti-Stokes side of the spectrum with no loss in total preparation bandwidth. Shifts of 100 cm-1 or more are attainable and allow for enhanced detection of high-energy (150-300 cm-1) rotational Raman transitions at near transform-limited optimum sensitivity. A simple theoretical treatment for the case of identical pump and Stokes pulses with linear frequency chirp is presented. The approach is then demonstrated experimentally for typical levels of transform-limited laser performance obtained our laboratory with nonresonant CARS in argon and Raman-resonant spectra from a lean H2/air flat flame.

  17. Bandwidth optimization of femtosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by pump/Stokes spectral focusing.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2014-07-01

    A simple spectral focusing scheme for bandwidth optimization of gas-phase rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra is presented. The method is useful when femtosecond pump/Stokes preparation of the Raman coherence is utilized. The approach is of practical utility when working with laser pulses that are not strictly transform limited, or when windows or other sources of pulse chirp may be present in the experiment. A delay between the femtosecond preparation pulses is introduced to shift the maximum Raman preparation away from zero frequency and toward the Stokes or anti-Stokes side of the spectrum with no loss in total preparationmoreĀ Ā» bandwidth. Shifts of 100 cm-1 or more are attainable and allow for enhanced detection of high-energy (150-300 cm-1) rotational Raman transitions at near transform-limited optimum sensitivity. A simple theoretical treatment for the case of identical pump and Stokes pulses with linear frequency chirp is presented. The approach is then demonstrated experimentally for typical levels of transform-limited laser performance obtained our laboratory with nonresonant CARS in argon and Raman-resonant spectra from a lean H2/air flat flame.Ā«Ā less

  18. Study of structure of the TiO{sub 2}–MoO{sub 3} bilayer films by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Elias de Barros; Sigoli, Fernando Aparecido; Mazali, Italo Odone

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}–MoO{sub 3} bilayer thin films were easily prepared by dip-coating technique. • Ti and Mo metallo-organic compounds were used as source of its respective oxide. • TiO{sub 2} in anatase phase and orthorhombic phase of ?-MoO{sub 3} were identified. • The bilayer structure was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. - Abstract: In this work, TiO{sub 2}–MoO{sub 3} films were easily prepared by dip-coating technique and metallo-organic decomposition process (MOD). Raman analyses indicate the formation of TiO{sub 2} in anatase phase and orthorhombic phase of ?-MoO{sub 3}. It was observed that the Raman bands intensities attributed to TiO{sub 2} and MoO{sub 3} oxides were dependent on the number of decomposition–deposition cycles (DDC). The different number of DDC generates films with different thicknesses and the Raman signal was sensitive to this variation. Raman analyses provided qualitative information about the bilayer structure of the bi-component TiO{sub 2}–MoO{sub 3} films, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In this direction, the dip-coating technique and MOD process can be an efficient strategy to facile preparation of many samples to be used in applications.

  19. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  20. Functional Mn–Mg{sub k} cation complexes in GaN featured by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devillers, T. Bonanni, A.; Leite, D. M. G.; Department of Physics, Sćo Paulo State University, Bauru–SP ; Dias da Silva, J. H.

    2013-11-18

    The evolution of the optical branch in the Raman spectra of (Ga,Mn)N:Mg epitaxial layers as a function of the Mn and Mg concentrations, reveals the interplay between the two dopants. We demonstrate that the various Mn-Mg-induced vibrational modes can be understood in the picture of functional Mn–Mg{sub k} complexes formed when substitutional Mn cations are bound to k substitutional Mg through nitrogen atoms, the number of ligands k being driven by the ratio between the Mg and the Mn concentrations.

  1. Polarized micro Raman scattering spectroscopy for curved edges of epitaxial graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Md. Sherajul Makino, T.; Hashimoto, A.; Bhuiyan, A. G.; Tanaka, S.

    2014-12-15

    This letter performed polarized microscopic laser Raman scattering spectroscopy on the curved edges of transferred epitaxial graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si. The intensity ratio between the parallel and perpendicular polarized D band is evolved, providing a spectroscopy-based technique to probe the atomic-scale edge structures in graphene. A detailed analysis procedure for non-ideal disordered curved edges of graphene is developed combining the atomic-scale zigzag and armchair edge structures along with some point defects. These results could provide valuable information of the realistic edges of graphene at the atomic-scale that can strongly influence the performance of graphene-based nanodevices.

  2. Single-pulse phase-control interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, S.-H.; Caster, Allison G.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-10-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy experiments, usually the amplitude of the signal is measured and the phase information is lost. With a polarization- and phase-controlled pulse shaping technique, the relative phase between the resonant and nonresonant CARS signals is controlled, and spectral interferometry is performed without an interferometer. Both the real and imaginary parts of the background-free resonant CARS spectrum are measured via spectral interferometry between the resonant and nonresonant signals from the same sample. The resonant signal is amplified significantly by homodyne mixing with the nonresonant signal as a local oscillator, greatly improving the detection limit.

  3. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  4. Single pulse phase-control interferometric coherent anti-StokesRaman scattering spectroscopy (CARS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Sang-Hyun; Caster, Allison G.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-09-28

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) experiments, usually the amplitude of the signal is measured and the phase information is lost. With a polarization- and phase-controlled pulse shaping technique, the relative phase between the resonant and non-resonant CARS signals is controlled, and spectral interferometry is performed without an interferometer. Both the real and imaginary parts of the background-free resonant CARS spectrum are measured via spectral interferometry between the resonant and non-resonant signals from the same sample. The resonant signal is amplified significantly by homodyne mixing with the non-resonant signal as a local oscillator, greatly improving the detection limit.

  5. Methods and systems for Raman and optical cross-interrogation in flow-through silicon membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2014-09-09

    Cross-interrogating photonic detection systems and methods are shown. A flow through photonic crystal membrane with a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is provided with pores which are distributed along multiple regions. The pores of one region have walls to which a first type of target specific anchor can be attached, while pores of another region have walls to which a second type of target specific anchor can be attached. An optical arrangement out-of-plane to the SERS substrate is also provided for enhanced sensitivity and identification of target organisms.

  6. Raman Scattering Sensor for On-Line Monitoring of Amines and Acid Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uibel, Rory; Smith, Lee

    2010-05-20

    Sulfur and CO2 removal from hydrocarbon streams and power plant effluents are a major problem. The sulfur is normally in the form of H2S. These two acid gases are scrubbed using aqueous amine solutions that are difficult to control with conventional technology. Process Instruments Inc. developed Raman scattering technology for on-line, real-time monitoring of amine streams to improve their efficiency in scrubbing H2S and CO2 from hydrocarbon streams and power plant effluents. Improved control of amine and acid gas concentrations will allow refineries, natural gas processes and power plants to more efficiently scrub Sulfur and CO2, saving energy, time and financial resources.

  7. Surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy substrate for arsenic sensing in groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Mulvihill, Martin; Tao, Andrea R.; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Arnold, John

    2015-06-16

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate formed from a plurality of monolayers of polyhedral silver nanocrystals, wherein at least one of the monolayers has polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP) on its surface, and thereby configured for sensing arsenic is described. Highly active SERS substrates are formed by assembling high density monolayers of differently shaped silver nanocrystals onto a solid support. SERS detection is performed directly on this substrate by placing a droplet of the analyte solution onto the nanocrystal monolayer. Adsorbed polymer, polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP), on the surface of the nanoparticles facilitates the binding of both arsenate and arsenite near the silver surface, allowing for highly accurate and sensitive detection capabilities.

  8. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  9. Large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Hu, Youfan; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Chen; Zhu, Guang

    2014-09-09

    A generator includes a substrate, a first electrode layer, a dense plurality of vertically-aligned piezoelectric elongated nanostructures, an insulating layer and a second electrode layer. The substrate has a top surface and the first electrode layer is disposed on the top surface of the substrate. The dense plurality of vertically-aligned piezoelectric elongated nanostructures extends from the first electrode layer. Each of the nanostructures has a top end. The insulating layer is disposed on the top ends of the nanostructures. The second electrode layer is disposed on the non-conductive layer and is spaced apart from the nanostructures.

  10. Vertical dispersion methods in x-ray spectroscopy of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, O.; Missalla, T.; Foerster, E.

    1995-12-31

    General formulae for the applying the vertical dispersion principle in x-ray spectroscopy of multiple charged ions are summarized, the characteristics of the experimental schemes based on flat and bent crystals are discussed. The unique properties of the novel spectroscopic methods, i.e., their extremely high dispersion, high spectral and 1-D spatial resolution and good collection efficiency, make them very attractive for ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. The examples of successful use of the vertical dispersion modifications of the double-crystal and the Johann spectrometer in diagnostics of several types of laser-generated plasma are presented.

  11. Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging CO2 storage in a 30-minute period in a tall forest canopy often makes significant

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Submitter: Ferrare, R. A., NASA LaRC Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Ferrare, R., et al., Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor Made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05S08, doi:10.1029/2005JD005836, 2006. Relative humidity profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol

  13. Comparison of Raman Scattering Measurements and Modeling in NIF Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Town, R J; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Moody, J D

    2011-11-04

    Recent NIF indirect-drive experiments have shown significant Raman scattering from the inner beams. NIF data has motivated improvements to rad-hydro modeling, leading to the 'high flux model' [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)]. Cross-beam energy transfer [P. A. Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010] in the laser entrance hole is an important tool for achieving round implosions, and is uniformly distributed across the laser spot in rad-hydro simulations (but not necessarily in experiments). We find the Raman linear gain spectra computed with these plasma conditions agree well in time-dependent peak wavelength with the measured data, especially when overlapping laser-beam intensities are used. More detailed, spatially non-uniform modeling of the cross-beam transfer has been performed. The resulting gains better follow the time history of the measured backscatter. We shall present the impact of spatially non-uniform energy transfer on SRS gain. This metric is valid when amplification is in a linear regime, and so we shall also present an assessment of whether electron trapping in Langmuir waves can play a role in these shots.

  14. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+Ī“. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast,moreĀ Ā» the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.Ā«Ā less

  16. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55?GPa at 300?K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0}?=?174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, ?{sub G}{sup TO?}=?1.26 and ?{sub G}{sup LO?}=?1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which ?{sub G}{sup TO?}>??{sub G}{sup LO?}??1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant ? is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???0.25 at 0.1?MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???2.5 at 45?GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  17. Electronic Raman scattering as an ultra-sensitive probe of strain effects in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluegel., Brian; Mialitsin, Aleksej V.; Beaton, Daniel A.; Reno, John L.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-05-28

    Semiconductor strain engineering has become a critical feature of high-performance electronics because of the significant device performance enhancements that it enables. These improvements, which emerge from strain-induced modifications to the electronic band structure, necessitate new ultra-sensitive tools to probe the strain in semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate that minute amounts of strain in thin semiconductor epilayers can be measured using electronic Raman scattering. We also applied this strain measurement technique to two different semiconductor alloy systems using coherently strained epitaxial thin films specifically designed to produce lattice-mismatch strains as small as 10-4. Thus, comparing our strain sensitivity and signal strength in AlxGa 1-x As with those obtained using the industry-standard technique of phonon Raman scattering, we found that there was a sensitivity improvement of 200-fold and a signal enhancement of 4 × 103, thus obviating key constraints in semiconductor strain metrology.

  18. Accelerated Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing Gallium using Raman Spectroscopy and XPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Henager, Charles H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2009-12-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the evolution of composition of oxide films in the presence of zirconia coatings on miniature HT-9 alloy specimens subjected to elevated temperature in air. The experiments expanded on previous efforts to develop a quick-screening technique for candidate alloys for cladding materials (HT-9) and actinide-based mixed oxide fuel mixtures (represented by the zirconia coating) by investigating the effect of both coating composition and alloy pretreatment conditions on the high temperature reactions. In particular, the presence of the element Ga (a potential impurity in mixed oxide fuel) in the initial zirconia coating was found to accelerate the rate of oxide growth relative to that of yttria-stabilized zirconia studied previously. In addition, HT-9 samples that were subjected to different thermal pretreatments gave different results. The results suggest that the presence of Ga in a mixed oxide fuel will enhance the corrosion of HT-9 cladding under the conditions of this study, although the extent of enhancement is influenced by thermal pretreatment of the cladding material. The results also demonstrate the need to combine Raman spectroscopy with other techniques, particularly photoelectron spectroscopy, for optimizing composition and/or fabrication conditions of both cladding and oxide fuels for advanced nuclear reactors.

  19. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Stanley M. (Livermore, CA); Sharma, Shiv K. (Honolulu, HI)

    1988-01-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber (13, 13a to 13e) having a metal coating (22, 22a to 22e) on at least a portion of a light transmissive core (17, 17a to 17d). The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector (16, 16d, 16e) analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode (13e) may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell (53) while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface.

  20. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Research Facility located near Lamont, Oklahoma. Measurements from ARM Raman lidar and Doppler radar instruments were used to both initialize and evaluate the model. A...

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Aerial Facility Mission 1. Retrievals of particle size distribution from radar Doppler moments and Raman Lidar (solid curves) are very uncertain (envelope created by...

  2. An Improved Cloud Classification Algorithm Based on the SGP CART...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the world. The millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) provides radar reflectivity and mean Doppler velocity profiles for most of clouds in the troposphere. Raman lidar provide not...

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Engineering Services, Inc. of Burtonsville, Maryland, has studied the feasibility of constructing a Micropulse Raman Lidar for measuring boundary layer water vapor...

  4. revercomb-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    figure, please see http:www.arm.govdocsdocumentstechnicalconf9803revercomb-98.pdf.) with the CF instrument (day and night), and the GSFC scanning Raman lidar (with new...

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hourly observations of 6.7 micron water vapor radiances from geostationary satellites are combined with radiosonde observations and Raman lidar measurements to document the diurnal...

  6. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refurbishment and Upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Raman Lidar D.D. Turner ... California Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Climate ...

  7. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael (El Sobrante, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

  8. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  9. Method to estimate the vertical dispersion parameter in a 10 Km range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoen, L.; Xinyuan, J.; Jinte, Y.

    1983-12-01

    Based on the Monin-Batchelor Similarity Theory and the concept of effective roughness length, this paper presented an empirical vertical dispersion model in a 10 kilometer range. It could be used under a flat and homogeneous, as well as complex, topographical condition.

  10. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  11. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  12. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  13. Report (Vertical)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    death. It is the responsibility of each Eligible Survivor (or the Eligible Survivor's guardian) to keep the LANL Benefits Office advised of any change of address and to...

  14. Report (Vertical)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANS 401(k) Savings Plan Summary Plan Description December 1, 2009 This Summary Plan Description (SPD) is intended to provide a summary of the principal features of the LANS 401(k) Savings Plan ("Plan") and is not meant to interpret, extend or change the Plan in any way. This SPD will continue to be updated. Please check back on a regular basis for the most recent version and check with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Benefits Office for any changes to the Plan that may not

  15. Report (Vertical)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANS HR-Benefits Group September 1, 2012 918425-3 LANS 401(k) Retirement Plan Summary Plan Description This Summary Plan Description (SPD) is intended to provide a summary of the principal features of the LANS 401(k) Retirement Plan ("Plan") and is not meant to interpret, extend or change the Plan in any way. This SPD will continue to be updated. Please check back on a regular basis for the most recent version and check with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Benefits Office for

  16. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  17. Theoretical study of collinear optical frequency comb generation under multi-wave, transient stimulated Raman scattering in crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanin, S N [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Using mathematical modelling we have studied the conditions of low-threshold collinear optical frequency comb generation under transient (picosecond) stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and parametric four-wave coupling of SRS components in crystals. It is shown that Raman-parametric generation of an octave-spanning optical frequency comb occurs most effectively under intermediate, transient SRS at a pump pulse duration exceeding the dephasing time by five-to-twenty times. We have found the optimal values of not only the laser pump pulse duration, but also of the Raman crystal lengths corresponding to highly efficient generation of an optical frequency comb from the second anti-Stokes to the fourth Stokes Raman components. For the KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (high dispersion) and Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (low dispersion) crystals pumped at a wavelength of 1.064 ?m and a pulse duration five or more times greater than the dephasing time, the optimum length of the crystal was 0.3 and 0.6 cm, respectively, which is consistent with the condition of the most effective Stokes – anti-Stokes coupling ?kL ? 15, where ?k is the wave detuning from phase matching of Stokes – anti-Stokes coupling, determined by the refractive index dispersion of the SRS medium. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for determining the location of buried polymer interfaces with tens of nanometer precision

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Damin, Craig A.; Nguyen, Vy H. T.; Niyibizi, Auguste S.; Smith, Emily A.

    2015-02-11

    Near-infrared scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy was utilized to determine the interface location in bilayer films (a stack of two polymer layers) of polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC). Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the sum square electric field (SSEF) for films with total bilayer thicknesses of 1200ā€“3600 nm were used to construct models for simultaneously measuring the film thickness and the location of the buried interface between the PS and PC layers. Samples with total thicknesses of 1320, 1890, 2300, and 2750 nm and varying PS/PC interface locations were analyzed using SA Raman spectroscopy. Comparing SA Raman spectroscopy and optical profilometrymoreĀ Ā» measurements, the average percent difference in the total bilayer thickness was 2.0% for films less than ~2300 nm thick. The average percent difference in the thickness of the PS layer, which reflects the interface location, was 2.5% when the PS layer was less than ~1800 nm. The SA Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable, non-destructive method capable of determining the total bilayer thickness and buried interface location for bilayer samples consisting of thin polymer films with comparable indices of refraction.Ā«Ā less

  19. Raman and far ir spectroscopic study of quaternary ammonium polybromide fused salt phases for zinc bromine circulating electrolyte batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larrabee, J.A.; Graf, K.R.; Grimes, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    The circulating electrolyte zinc bromine battery is an attractive advanced battery system. The electrolyte is a solution of zinc bromide, quaternary ammonium bromides for bromine complexation and added salts to enhance properties. Laser Raman spectroscopy and far infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the liquid quaternary ammonium polybromide fused salt phases.

  20. A frequency-agile lidar for simultaneous measurement of temperature and radial wind in the mesopause region without sodium density contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.; Golias, D.; Krueger, D.A.; She, C.Y.

    1996-12-31

    With early and ongoing climatological surveys established, continuing observations of the mesopause region over Fort Collins, Colorado are discussed, emphasizing the modification of Colorado State University`s two frequency lidar for simultaneous measurement of temperature vis Doppler Broadening and radial wind via Doppler shift. The application of a frequency-agile, tandem acousto-optical modulator system for three-frequency temperature/wind measurements free of contamination from atmospheric Na density fluctuations, as well as frequency characterization of this new apparatus, and future applications are considered.