Sample records for railroad railroad railroad

  1. Federal Railroad Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mandated the study. Federal Railroad Administration DOT Reorganization DOT is in the process of looking at reorganizing the Department to try to achieve even greater...

  2. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

  3. Intermodal Railroad Daniel Brock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    of Railroad: Shipments First rail completed in 1830 - Minerals, timber, and agriculture Boxcar 1830s to 1960 made on rail infrastructure are done by owning company. Highways are public and must be funded publicly Southern CSX #12;Who? Revenue by Intermodal BNSF:37% UP: 19% CSX: 14% NS: 20% Rail companies should

  4. Evaluating flexibility in railroad construction projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Choong Ryun, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to valuate flexibilities in a large-scale railroad construction project. In general, a railroad construction project involves a large amount of flexibilities due to its long construction period and conflicts ...

  5. Railroad and locomotive technology roadmap.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Railroads are important to the U.S. economy. They transport freight efficiently, requiring less energy and emitting fewer pollutants than other modes of surface transportation. While the railroad industry has steadily improved its fuel efficiency--by 16% over the last decade--more can, and needs to, be done. The ability of locomotive manufacturers to conduct research into fuel efficiency and emissions reduction is limited by the small number of locomotives manufactured annually. Each year for the last five years, the two North American locomotive manufacturers--General Electric Transportation Systems and the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors--have together sold about 800 locomotives in the United States. With such a small number of units over which research costs can be spread, outside help is needed to investigate all possible ways to reduce fuel usage and emissions. Because fuel costs represent a significant portion of the total operating costs of a railroad, fuel efficiency has always been an important factor in the design of locomotives and in the operations of a railroad. However, fuel efficiency has recently become even more critical with the introduction of strict emission standards by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to be implemented in stages (Tiers 0, 1, and 2) between 2000 and 2005. Some of the technologies that could be employed to meet the emission standards may negatively affect fuel economy--by as much as 10-15% when emissions are reduced to Tier 1 levels. Lowering fuel economy by that magnitude would have a serious impact on the cost to the consumer of goods shipped by rail, on the competitiveness of the railroad industry, and on this country's dependence on foreign oil. Clearly, a joint government/industry R&D program is needed to help catalyze the development of advanced technologies that will substantially reduce locomotive engine emissions while also improving train system energy efficiency. DOE convened an industry-government workshop in January 2001 to gauge industry interest. As a result, the railroads, their suppliers, and the federal government5 have embarked on a cooperative effort to further improve railroad fuel efficiency--by 25% between now and 2010 and by 50% by 2020, on an equivalent gallon per revenue ton-mile basis, while meeting emission standards, all in a cost-effective, safe manner. This effort aims to bring the collaborative approaches of other joint industry-government efforts, such as FreedomCAR and the 21st Century Truck partnership, to the problem of increasing rail fuel efficiency. Under these other programs, DOE's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies has supported research on technologies to reduce fuel use and air emissions by light- and heavy-duty vehicles. DOE plans to bring similar efforts to bear on improving locomotives. The Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration will also be a major participant in this new effort, primarily by supporting research on railroad safety. Like FreedomCAR and the 21st Century Truck program, a joint industry-government research effort devoted to locomotives and railroad technology could be a 'win' for the public and a 'win' for industry. Industry's expertise and in-kind contributions, coupled with federal funding and the resources of the DOE's national laboratories, could make for an efficient, effective program with measurable energy efficiency targets and realistic deployment schedules. This document provides the necessary background for developing such a program. Potential R&D pathways to greatly improve the efficiency of freight transportation by rail, while meeting future emission standards in a cost-effective, safe manner, were developed jointly by an industry-government team as a result of DOE's January 2001 Workshop on Locomotive Emissions and System Efficiency and are presented here. The status of technology, technical targets, barriers, and technical approaches for engine, locomotive, rail systems, and advanced power plants and fuels are presented.

  6. SO, YOU WANT TO BUILD A RAILROAD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Public/private benefit issues Competitive issues Political issues #12;Building A New Railroad is Tough Discount Rate · BNSF Cost Inflation (Except Fuel) · BNSF Fuel Price and Escalation Rate Year 2011 2012 2013 railroad ­ roughly 12 miles a year! At that rate, it would take over 200 years to build a transcontinental

  7. Union Pacific Railroad`s LNG locomotive test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimaila, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Union Pacific Railroad is testing LNG in six locomotives through 1997 to determine if the liquefied natural gas technology is right for them. Two of the six LNG test locomotives are switch, or yard, locomotives. These 1,350 horsepower locomotives are the industry`s first locomotives totally fueled by natural gas. They`re being tested in the yard in the Los Angeles area. The other four locomotives are long-haul locomotives fueled by two tenders. These units are duel-fueled, operating on a mixture of LNG and diesel and are being tested primarily on the Los Angeles to North Platte, Nebraska corridor. All the information concerning locomotive emissions, locomotive performance, maintenance requirements, the overall LNG system design and the economic feasibility of the project will be analyzed to determine if UPR should expand, or abandon, the LNG technology.

  8. Final Report 527 Economic Impact Analysis of Short Line Railroads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    railroads. First described is the scope and presence of the eleven short line railroads currently operatingFinal Report 527 Economic Impact Analysis of Short Line Railroads by Jared J. Llorens, Ph.D. James's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Economic Impact Analysis of Short Line Railroads 5. Report Date October

  9. William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Transportation Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Transportation Energy Analysis and Modal Comparisons;Transportation Energy Analysis and Modal Comparisons William W Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar September 27 (Energy Efficiency and Air Emissions Intensity) 2. Intercity Passenger Rail Comparison (Air Emissions

  10. Locomotive Fuelling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations Bodhibrata Nag1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    on electric traction to a large extent, US railroads rely mostly on diesel fuel (100% of US freight is hauled is the cost of fuel. This case study deals with minimizing the cost of fuel and the cost of contracting trucks About 75% of the world's railroads operate with diesel fuel. Even though European railroads rely

  11. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the benefit of rail grinding on service life of railroad rails, focusing on failures due to rolling contact fatigue (RCF) at the rail head. Assuming a tangent rail with one-point contact at the running surface, a...

  12. Multispectral Machine Vision for Improved Undercarriage Inspection of Railroad Rolling Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahuja, Narendra

    Multispectral Machine Vision for Improved Undercarriage Inspection of Railroad Rolling Stock Railroad Engineering Program - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering *Computer Vision monitoring, safety, electrical, component 1. INTRODUCTION Current practices for inspection of railroad

  13. Train derailment and railroad barrier interaction simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Heping

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; and (4) impact force between cars. The properties of these forces are discussed below: 11 1. Coupling force and coupling moment a) Coupling force: Figure 3. 4 shows the force-displacement relation which was used in the simulation for coupler action... or eliminate the risk of the passenger track intrusion by derailing cars on adjacent track is of concern to the railroad authorities. The purpose of this study is through computer simulation to investigate the behavior of the train derailment and to determine...

  14. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous g Materials

  15. Optimal Fueling Strategies for Locomotive Fleets in Railroad Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    · Fuel (diesel) price influenced by: ­ Crude oil price ­ Refining ­ Distribution and marketing ­ Others 4 Price 3 · Railroad fuel consumption remains steady · Crude oil price sharply increases in recent years · Fuel-related expenditure is one of the biggest cost items in the railroad industry #12;Fuel Price

  16. Diesel Locomotive Fueling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    Chapter 2 Diesel Locomotive Fueling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations Bodhibrata Nag Katta G their operating costs low. About 75% of transport by railroads in the world is based on diesel locomotives by diesel locomotives. One of the major compo- nents in the operating cost of diesel powered rail transport

  17. Predicting violations at gated active highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Jonathan Alan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -railroad grade crossing. It also was recommended that constant warning time devices be used whenever feasible with priority given to crossings with multiple tracks and/or average train speeds below 35 km/hr....

  18. An analysis of railroad accident dynamics in College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Hart Stefan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intersection between the Union Pacific Railroad (UP) Valley Junction line and Texas A&M University (TAMU) poses a significant potential or risk to the people who utilize the campus. The line carried over I 1,000 loads ...

  19. Assessing the level of service for shipments originating or terminating on short line railroads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpert, Steven M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis measures railroad freight trip time and trip time reliability for freight rail shipments involving short lines in 2006. It is based on an underlying MIT study commissioned by members of the short line railroading ...

  20. The Nevada railroad system: Physical, operational, and accident characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of the operational and physical characteristics of the Nevada railroad system. To understand the dynamics of the rail system, one must consider the system`s physical characteristics, routing, uses, interactions with other systems, and unique operational characteristics, if any. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is a narrative description of all mainlines and major branchlines of the Nevada railroad system. Each Nevada rail route is described, including the route`s physical characteristics, traffic type and volume, track conditions, and history. The second part of this study provides a more detailed analysis of Nevada railroad accident characteristics than was presented in the Preliminary Nevada Transportation Accident Characterization Study (DOE, 1990).

  1. Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction modification to improve energy efficiency.

  2. Occupational safety regulation and economic efficiency: the railroad industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, M.T.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a cost-benefit model for the railroad industry to estimate the efficient level of disabling injuries across class 1 carriers. The neoclassical cost function and the hedonic wage function serve as the estimating equations for the cost and benefit estimation, respectively. The cost function is fitted to a sample of thirty-five class 1 railroads in 1980. The hedonic wage function is fitted to a sample of 481 railroad industry employees for the same year. The efficient level of 1980 disabling injuries for each railroad is determined by setting the marginal cost (MC) of injury reduction equal to its marginal benefit (MB). In addition, the cost savings accruing to efficient regulatory reform are calculated for each firm as well as the entire industry. A second-best cost-minimizing regulatory policy is also introduced. The cost-minimizing level of injuries and resulting cost savings for individual firms and the total industry are estimated. The results support the prior hypothesis that MC exceeds MB for the vast majority of firms. Substantial cost savings are possible under reformed regulatory policy.

  3. Fatigue tests of under-strenghth timber railroad bridge stringers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Christopher Ryan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , experimentally, the fatigue behavior of under-strength timber railroad bridge stringers. The sample group that was tested included nineteen southern pine solid-sawn stringers that were 178 mm (7 in.) wide by 356 mm (14 in.) deep by 4.8 m (16 ft) long...

  4. Paper No. 01-0238 Railroads in Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Paper No. 01-0238 Railroads in Greece: History, Characteristics and Forecasts John A. Paravantis Piraeus, Greece (jparav@unipi.gr) Panos D. Prevedouros, Ph.D.1 Department of Civil Engineering, University;2 Abstract Greece was relatively tardy in implementing a national rail network. The Greek Railways

  5. PROLONGING THE USEFUL LIFE OF RAILROAD TIMBER BRIDGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and maintenance, categorized into preventive, early remedial, and major are discussed. The paper concludes on maintenance practices which will prolong the useful life of existing railroad bridges. This paper outlines the various factors which play a role in the deterioration of timber bridges and the maintenance required

  6. Evaluation of passive railroad grade crossing warning devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lillo, Sarah Marie

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONTROL AT PASSIVELY CONTROLLED CROSSINGS . MOTORIST UNDERSTANDING OF RAILROAD WARNING DEVICES EVALUATION TECHNIQUES FOR TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES MEASURES OF DRIVER PERFORMANCE EFFECTIVENESS OF ICON SIGNS 12 16 19 III STUDY DESIGN SIGN SYSTEMS... a longer stopping distance, and 3 to 7 percent believed that a heavy truck required as much or more distance to stop (14, 15, 16, 17). The ramifications of this lack of knowledge about train stopping distance are multiplied when one considers...

  7. The potential for LNG as a railroad fuel in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, S.G.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freight railroad operations in the US represent a substantial opportunity for liquefied natural gas (LNG) to displace diesel fuel. With the promise of achieving an overwhelming economic advantage over diesel fuel, this paper presents some discussion to the question, ``Why is the application of LNG for railroad use in the US moving so slowly?'' A brief overview of the freight railroad operations in the US is given, along with a summary of several railroad LNG demonstration projects. US Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board exhaust emission regulations may cause the railroad industry to move from small-scale LNG demonstration projects to using LNG as a primary freight railroad transportation fuel in selected regions or route-specific applications.

  8. Joint Sandhouse Gang Meeting & Transportation Center Seminar........ "Recent Railroad Research at Northwestern"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    of transportation -- with particular emphasis on the trucking and railroad industries. David Kosnik David Kosnik monitoring, monitoring data management and visualization, and acoustic emission testing, to help bring

  9. 16 TAC 3.30 - Memorandum of Understanding between the Railroad...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Understanding between the Railroad Commission and the Commission on Environmental Quality Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: 16 TAC...

  10. James Pon Memorial Award Scholarship Opportunity 2014 Foundation to Commemorate Chinese Railroad Workers in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Workers in Canada The Foundation to Commemorate the Chinese Railroad Workers in Canada (FCCRWC and awareness of the contribution to Canada by the Chinese Railroad Workers who participated in the construction of the first transcontinental railway (the CPR) that united Canada geographically and politically

  11. Analysis of improvements in system efficiency and safety at highway-railroad-pedestrian grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tydlacka, Jonathan Michael

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to perform micro-simulation analyses on intersections near Highway-Railroad Grade Crossings to determine if controlling mean train speed and train speed variability would improve safety and reduce delays. The first...

  12. Crew resource management training's effect on railroad crews' perceptions of task interdependence and teamwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Tobin Bruce

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    (Helmreich & Foushee, 1993), healthcare (Cooper, Newbower, & Kitz, 1984), military (Anderson & Sandza, 1987), oil and gas (Cullen, 1990), and railroad (FRA, 1999) industries have also been caused by breakdowns in coordination (assertiveness, 3...

  13. Preemption strategy for traffic signals at intersections near highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Hanseon

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the operational characteristics of signalized intersections near highway-railroad grade crossings (IHRGCs) are different from those of signalized intersections located elsewhere in the traffic system, standard operational strategies do...

  14. An evaluation of modifications to the advance warning sign at passive highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Bridgette DeWees

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , driver behavior at highway-railroad grade crossings, and effectiveness of traffic control devices that have supplemented the standard signing system with strobe lights. The objective of this research was to determine if the addition of a strobe light...

  15. Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oar, D.L.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0.

  16. Communication and Interpretation of Results of Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Route Risk Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    practices to reduce the likelihood or severity of accidents (1), improved training of personnel (2 Risk Analyses Athaphon Kawprasert (Corresponding Author) Graduate Research Assistant Railroad Engineering Program Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana

  17. A field evaluation of experimental passive railroad-highway grade crossing warning systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beitler, Michael Morgan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A FIELD EVALUATION OF EKPERIMENTAL PASSIVE RAILROAD-HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSING WARNING SYSTEMS A Thesis MICHAEL MORGAN BEITLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering )~~I ABSTRACT A Field Evaluation of Experimental Passive Railroad- Highway Grade Crossing Warning Systems. (August 1993) Michael Morgan Beitler, B. S. , University...

  18. Railroad competition and rate making: the implications for industrial coal prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the railroad industry, which is the primary transportation mode for coal, enters the 1980s, two factors are significantly altering the way in which railroads do business, particularly in relationship to shippers who must rely solely on rail. The first factor, railroad deregulation, is embodied in the provisions of the Staggers Rail Act of 1980 (PL96-448). The second factor affecting rail transportation for industrial coal users is the trend toward rail mergers and consolidations, in some cases due to financial problems. This trend, coupled with the willingness of government to allow major bankrupt carriers such as the Rock Island and the Milwaukee Road to be liquidated in whole or in part, is resulting in fewer railraods with increased market power. Discussed in this report are: the impacts of railroad deregulation on industrial coal users; the effects of railroad consolidations on the bargaining power of coal producers, receivers and railroads; and finally, strategy and tactics for industrial coal users to maximize their leverage weight in obtaining efficient coal transportation at reasonable rates. (DMC)

  19. Railroad electrification in America's future: an assessment of prospects and impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.K.; Yabroff, I.W.; Dickson, E.M.; Zink, R.A.; Gray, M.E.; Moon, A.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Such considerations as the level of traffic, the relative financial health of individual railroads, the capacity of the associated supply and engineering/construction industries, and the logical connecting points at classifying yards, as well as the national interest value of creating a continuous system, continental in scope, were used to construct a scenario for railroad electrification that closely approximates how an electrification program might be implemented. For the economic reasons cited, much of the US railroad system would remain conventionally powered. This scenario provides for an electrified network involving 14 mainlines operated by 10 companies that could transport much of the nation's rail-borne freight. Five years of planning and engineering work would be required for each link before construction could begin. With 1000 miles or less of electrified route per year, 14 years would be needed to construct the 9000-mile network of our scenario. (The scenario constructed runs from 1980 to 1998.) The analysis was aided with the construction of the SRI Railroad Industry Model. Basically a model of industry operations and finances, the model produces income statements and balance sheets at yearly intervals. Railroad energy costs, railroad freight levels, maintenance costs, purchases and leases of rooling stock, electrification facility investments, future inflation, rate setting practices, annual depreciation, taxes, and profits were calculated.

  20. Ferrocarriles nacionales de Mexico: the existing rate structure for grain/soybean shipments and likely effect on freight rates as a result of railroad privatization in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyer, David McAlister

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The government owned railway monopoly in Mexico, Ferrocarriles Nacionales de Mexico (FNM), is undergoing a series of reforms designed to create a market orientated railroad company. Railroad freight rates are being deregulated ...

  1. LNG as a fuel for railroads: Assessment of technology status and economics. Topical report, June-September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pera, C.J.; Moyer, C.B.

    1993-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research was to investigate the feasibility of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a fuel for railroads. The investigation included assessment of the status of relevant technologies (i.e., LNG-fueled locomotive engines, tender cars, refueling equipment), a review of current demonstration projects, and an analytical evaluation of LNG railroad economics.

  2. RAILROAD STRATEGY FOR CRUDE OIL TRANSPORT: Considering Public Policy and Pipeline Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    of crude oil transportation by rail from the Alberta oil sands has been slower than the growth, stakeholders, and objectives for the bitumen transport system from the Alberta oil sands, and reviews: Existing railroad network: Some products shipped: Fig. 1: Predicted oil sands production growth

  3. EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH for Laboratory StudyFouling Mechanism / Need for Laboratory Study Mechanical Properties of Coal DustMechanical Properties of Coal Dust Grain Size AnalysisGrain Size Analysis AtterbergAtterberg LimitsLimits Specific

  4. A technique for classifying and evaluating railroad-highway grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Thomas Monroe

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Track View of Research Annex Boring Site 50 33. Locations for Test Holes at Research Annex Boring Site 52 34. Goodyear Rubber Crossing Installation at FM Highway 1960 and Rock Island Railroad 57 35. Cross Section Through Rubber Panel Crossing 57 36...

  5. Toward a State of Good Repair for Railroad Bridges through Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Toward a State of Good Repair for Railroad Bridges through Structural Health Monitoring NUTC of this research is to add a new tool to the asset management toolbox: structural health monitoring, particularly is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM)? SHM is process of intelligently collecting data from sensors on critical

  6. Sawadisavi et al. 09-1369 1 Machine-Vision Inspection of Railroad Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Assistant Computer Vision and Robotics Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1614 Beckman. Sawadisavi Graduate Research Assistant Railroad Engineering Program Department of Civil and Environmental and Robotics Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 3021 Beckman Institute for Advanced Science

  7. A Simulation Tool for Combined Rail-Road Transport in Intermodal Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambardella, Luca Maria

    A Simulation Tool for Combined Rail-Road Transport in Intermodal Terminals Andrea E. Rizzoli. A simulation tool to model the flow of Intermodal Terminal Units (ITUs) among intermodal terminals is presented. This terminal simulator tool is part of the DGVII EC-funded PLATFORM project. The terminal model is composed

  8. A Nanofluidic Railroad Switch for DNA Robert Riehn,*,,, Robert H. Austin, and James C. Sturm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Nanofluidic Railroad Switch for DNA Robert Riehn,*,,,§ Robert H. Austin, and James C. Sturm of electric fields in such structures, and the impact of ac fields on DNA in a complex nanofluidic environment by a 200 µm long and 120 µm wide nanofluidic region. (b) Enlarged schematic of the nanofluidic region

  9. Current Trends and Future Challenges in the Freight Railroad Industry: Balancing Private Industry Interests and the Public Welfare 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Sarah; Kelson, Kendra; Migl, Hayden; Schmidt, Rodney; Shoemaker, David; Thomson, Heather

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (ICC). The Staggers Act is based on the premise that while the railroad industry once constituted a monopoly, requiring ICC regulation , this is no longer true (Keeler). It is held that competition is generally adequate to constrain any... shippers and to limit rates from falling below variable costs. Maximum rates are identified through specified revenue to variable cost ratios but apply only if the railroad is earning an "adequate" return on investment (Keeler). In addition...

  10. Report on audit of the use of Hanford site railroad system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE in partnership with its contractors, strives to operate, maintain, and use existing physical assets to meet mission needs. Field offices have first line responsibility to ensure stewardship of the assets. Part of stewardship responsibility involves ensuring assets are fully evaluated for use in meeting the DOE`s mission. One of Richland`s oldest, yet well-maintained multi-million dollar physical assets, is the Hanford railroad system. This system, constructed in the 1940s, includes tracks, railcars, and locomotives and provides sitewide transportation. Because of the availability of this asset, the objective of the audit was to determine if Richland ensured that Hanford contractors were fully utilizing the railroad system.

  11. A microsimulation analysis of highway intersections near highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tydlacka, Jonathan Michael

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A MICROSIMULATION ANALYSIS OF HIGHWAY INTERSECTIONS NEAR HIGHWAY-RAILROAD GRADE CROSSINGS A Thesis by JONATHAN MICHAEL TYDLACKA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... A Thesis by JONATHAN MICHAEL TYDLACKA Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...

  12. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  13. Market effects of environmental regulation: coal, railroads, and the 1990 Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busse, M.R.; Keohane, N.O. [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many environmental regulations encourage the use of 'clean' inputs. When the suppliers of such an input have market power, environmental regulation will affect not only the quantity of the input used but also its price. We investigate the effect of the Title IV emissions trading program for sulfur dioxide on the market for low-sulfur coal. We find that the two railroads transporting coal were able to price discriminate on the basis of environmental regulation and geographic location. Delivered prices rose for plants in the trading program relative to other plants, and by more at plants near a low-sulfur coal source.

  14. INTERLINE 5. 0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  15. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

  16. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

  17. http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

  18. Ferrocarriles nacionales de Mexico: the existing rate structure for grain/soybean shipments and likely effect on freight rates as a result of railroad privatization in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyer, David McAlister

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's existing rate structure and, based on collected FNM Waybill data, regression models were estimated. Projected costs in the privatized railroad system were estimated to provide a lower bound estimate of rates. An upper bound estimate of rates was based...

  19. Current Trends and Future Challenges in the Freight Railroad Industry: Balancing Private Industry Interests and the Public Welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Sarah; Kelson, Kendra; Migl, Hayden; Schmidt, Rodney; Shoemaker, David; Thomson, Heather

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?dimensional?impact?on?the?public?welfare,?local,?state,?and?federal?government?entities?play?a? significant?role?in?ensuring?the?industry?operates?efficiently?and?safely.?In?October?2006,?the?Government? Accountability?Office?(GAO)?released?a?report?on...? ? Current?Trends?and?Future?Challenges?in? the?Freight?Railroad?Industry Balancing?Private?Industry?Interests?and?the?Public?Welfare? ? ? ? Sarah?Allen? Kendra?Kelson? Hayden?Migl? Rodney?Schmidt? David?Shoemaker? Heather?Thomson? ? ? A?Report...

  20. An Analysis of Stream Culvert Fish Passage on the Navy Railroad Line between Bremerton and Shelton, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; Miller, Martin C.; Southard, John A.

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy railroad service line runs between Shelton, Bremerton, and Silverdale, and is used by the Navy to transfer freight to its facilities. It is also used by commercial clients to ship service items and bulk cargo for municipalities along portions of the route. Culverts of various size and construction convey streams and stormwater runoff under the railroad line. These allow transfer of water and, in some cases allow for passage of juvenile and adult salmon into waters upstream of the culverts. As part of this project, 21 culverts along a 34-mile reach (Shelton to Bremerton) of this railroad were surveyed to evaluate their function and ability to allow salmon to utilize the streams. The culverts and attached watersheds were evaluated using criteria developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to assign a Priority Index (PI) to barriers present on each fish-bearing stream. The PI is a relative numeric rating indicator, assigned using consistent criteria related to the degree of potential habitat gained by removing barriers and improving the function of the watershed. Of the 21 culverts evaluated, five were found to be complete fish-passage barriers and six were found to be partial barriers, primarily to juvenile salmon. Three of these culverts had PI ratings above 10 and five others had ratings between 7 and 10. Corrective action can be taken based on any PI rating, but the WDFW normally assigns lower priority to projects with PI scores lower than 15. Several of the stream and culverts had previously been evaluated for structural integrity and function and have been scheduled for repair. A narrative indicating the condition of the culvert has been prepared as well as a table indicating the PI scores and a summary of recommendations for action for each culvert.

  1. INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  2. Improved ultrasonic testing of railroad rail for transverse discontinuities in the rail head using higher order Rayleigh (M{sub 21}) waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grewal, D.S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Railroads are a very efficient and economical way of moving bulk commodities over large distances. However, like any other mode of transportation, this mode has its fair share of problems. It can be seen from the data (AAR, 1993) that over a period of time the average carload and trainload tonnage has gone up substantially. The average length of haul has also increased. However, the amount of new rail laid has actually decreased significantly. This presents a challenging opportunity to research better and more efficient ways of keeping the current railroad rail track in service and to find better ways of testing those rails to pre-empt any causes for accidents. An important factor to be considered here is the testing of the railroad rail for the amount of cold work in the top layer and the presence of microcracks in that layer. This article describes a surface guided acoustic mode with several inherent characteristics that make it particularly useful for detecting subsurface transverse flaws in railroad rail. These flaws have been previously in the blind spot of other ultrasonic NDT techniques.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Area 25 and Area 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539, Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A modification to the FFACOwas approved in May 2010 to transfer the two Railroad Tracks corrective action sites (CASs) from CAU 114 into CAU539. The two CASs are located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of the CAU 539 Railroad Tracks CASs using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation should support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 14, 2009, by representatives of U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Navarro Nevada Environmental Services, LLC (NNES); and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each Railroad Tracks CAS in CAU 539. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 539: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect in situ dose measurements. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., lead bricks) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, NNES will consult NDEP to determine the path forward, then either: • Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or • Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions.

  4. Fuel efficient train operations: A preliminary investigation with the locomotive data acquisition package on the Union Pacific Railroad. Interim report Jun-Nov 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, K.W.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Locomotive Data Acquisition Package (LDAP) is a research data acquisition system designed for use on board diesel locomotives. Between June 1980 and November 1980, a fuel efficient train operations experiment was conducted in cooperation with the Union Pacific Railroad using the LDAP. The experiment served both as a checkout of the LDAP unit, and as a preliminary study of the relationship between train handling and fuel consumption. The LDAP unit was operated on a Union Pacific Locomotive for 127 days during which data were collected for 53,936 miles of locomotive operation.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: • At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. • At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO prov

  6. Federal Railroad Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    accident. FRA is forgoing an official position on the use of dedicated trains pending the process of evaluating the results of the study and the required costbenefit analysis in...

  7. Federal Railroad Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    very similar to this bill in regard to the core provisions Core provisions: Review and reform the Federal hours of service requirements Establish a new risk reduction program...

  8. William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Freight Railroad Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    fuel & alternatives (Btu's per gallon) Biodiesel, Fischer-Tropsch syn fuel & DME Liquefied natural.2008 Billion US gallons = 27.258 Billion liters of diesel fuel equivalent * Ton-mile statistics from US DOT (importance v difficulties) North American freight RRs (defining characteristics) Energy density of diesel

  9. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    or induction methods, 6 must be used to detect the subsurface cracks instead with some limitations on resolution and reliability. Focusing on subsurface crack nucleation in the head of a thermite welded rail, Fry et al. [12] determine an approximated...

  10. Field tests of timber railroad bridge piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Kendra Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    with crane??????????? 29 2.8 Plan view of load cells and string pot arrangement beneath bent cap??.. 29 3.1 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 1?????????????. 30 3.2 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 2?????????????. 31 3.3 Plot... of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 3?????????????. 32 3.4 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 4?????????????..33 3.5 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 5?????????????. 34 3.6 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 6...

  11. SECURING AND PROTECTING AMERICA'S RAILROAD SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    , HARRISBURG JEREMY F. PLANT, PH. D SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS RICHARD R. YOUNG, PH. D SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ©2007 The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5

  12. Railroads and shippers clash over coal dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to reduce coal spillage from railcars, mines in the Powder River Basin (PRB) now load coal with a loaf profile but, reportedly, beginning in 2008, Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) will announce guidelines requiring all PRB coal loads to be sprayed with a chemical surfactant. If this does not fix the problem, greater measures will be taken. At the time of going to press, the details of how this would be implemented and regulated were unresolved. 1 photo.

  13. ILLINOIS RAILROAD ENGINEERING A Quantitative Decision Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    between capital investment and delay cost Link (sub) properties Alternatives generator Capacity expansion alternatives (cost & additional capacity) Estimated future traffic (trains/day/OD) Budget Investment Selection: ­ Infrastructure ­ Equipment ­ Train dispatching, traffic mix ­ Human resources Network Capacity must be increased

  14. Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Railroad Use

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127 1,710,513 1,751,162

  15. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced Reduceof Energy

  16. Federal Railroad Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6Awards »Facilities |Federal

  17. Railroad Commission of Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGSRadium HotRail Splitter Wind

  18. Railroad Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGSRadium HotRail Splitter

  19. Sponsored by William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Expenditures (In Billions) 4 #12;5 Network Planning's role is critical to company success Service Growth Capital Network Planning... -- Identifies where to add capacity to accommodate future growth -- Ensures Planning makes sure that the network is in the right place, with the right capabilities, to serve the right

  20. Railroad Environmental Conference University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    for Ethanol 2% - 5% Natural Gasoline (Low octane) Contains BTEX which are the regulated compounds Geology Elevated track bed with perched water Below track bed is a 35 foot clay later about 10 feet below grade Affected D.O. in Surface Water Impacted Sediment in Drainage Ditches #12;Typical methods=3 weeks

  1. Performance and alertness of railroad engineers on long duration trips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnali, Leona D., 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study investigated the performance and alertness of 8 healthy male participants between the age of 31 years and 65 years old in nighttime, long duration simulated train operation. Participants completed the ...

  2. Remote Sensing of Railroad Locomotive Emissions: A Feasibility Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    of General Motors (EMD) or General Electric Transportation Systems (GETS). A diesel- electric locomotive and Donald H. Stedman Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Denver Denver, CO 80208 July. Carbon monoxide (CO) levels become elevated primarily due to direct emission of the gas. Ground

  3. ONE WAY ONE WAY KB&S Railroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    VAWT SHLY WOOD DUHM DMNT FWLR HNLY MRRT VLAB DOYL LCC MATH BRNG REC ME KCTR YONG UPSB BCHM NUCL KNOY

  4. William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Union Pacific's Next

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Cluster VTI System #12;1010 Mid Chord Offset (10') Exception · 10' Mid Chord Offset (MCO) ­ Axle and calculate MCO. ­ 10' chord recommended and detection added to VTI's. ­ MCO initially developed to find the short profile exceptions in concrete tie track 5 ft 5 ft +MCO Y+5 Y=0 y-5 Rail Surface #12;1111 Mid

  5. An analysis of railroad accident dynamics in College Station, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Hart Stefan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and requires a management decision. A contingency plan for the release of hazardous materials along the track appears warranted in an attempt to reduce the effects of a hazardous release of flammable or toxic materials. Based on the analysis presented herein...

  6. U.S. Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    injuries with no days away from work. Includes fatal injuries. Data for Sweden & Norway (1993-96) and for U.S. (all years) is per 200,000 hours actually worked, hence higher....

  7. Train Resistance and Railroad Emissions and Efficiency Mark Stehly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    with respect to the wind. R is in lbs force or lbs force per ton of train weight. Train Resistance #12 lbs force per bearing at a typical wheel size. This is 0.6 lbs force per ton of train weight. Removal by 30% or more. Wheel/rail friction on tangent track without lubrication typically is 2 lbs force per

  8. Driver comprehension of railroad-highway grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messick, Jennifer

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each year; however, collisions at grade crossings are still a major concern. In order to continue improving safety at grade crossings, driver comprehension and driver attitudes must be investigated. This research investigated driver comprehension...

  9. ILLINOIS -RAILROAD ENGINEERING Understanding the Transition Behavior of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    at Level Crossings on US High Speed Rail Shared Corridors Francesco Bedini Jacobini PhD Student Rail

  10. american railroads mechanical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    company's series. It seems more... Levine, Stuart 1976-01-01 4 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Center for Financial ResearchAsset Salability and Debt Maturity: Evidence...

  11. APPLICATION OF CAST AND STPA TO RAILROAD SAFETY IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    The accident analysis method called STAMP (System-Theoretic Accident Model), developed by Prof. Nancy Leveson

  12. Application of CAST and STPA to railroad safety in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Airong, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accident analysis method called STAMP (System-Theoretic Accident Model), developed by Prof. Nancy Leveson from MIT, was used here to re-analyze a High Speed Train accident in China. On July 23rd, 2011, 40 people were ...

  13. Permeability, Resistivity and Strength of Fouled Railroad Ballast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, A. J.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    particles between the ballast particles; therefore, permeability and resistivity were also correlated. The strength properties of clean and fouled ballast were also evaluated using large direct shear box and modified direct shear box (extension in height...

  14. Optimal Location of Railroad Wayside Defect Detection Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    reduce inspection costs (e.g., labor) Examples of new technologies Wheel impact load detector (WILD systems #12;6 6 Wheel Impact Load Detectors (WILD) 1.5 x 5 in. Shell, 106 k1.5 x 5 in. Shell, 106 k. #12;10 10 Newer Technologies Image-Based (e.g. FactISTM) Wheel Profile Missing, Worn or Damaged

  15. Effect of Railroad Deregulation on Export - Grain Transportation Rate Structures.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen; MacDonald, James; Bessler, David; Wohlgenant, Michael

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs. A stratified ran dom sample of rail waybills drawn from the ICC Waybill Statistics show unit train use spread rapidly on the Plains region export routes in the early 1980s, especially be tween 1982 and 1984. In particular, in the 1981...

  16. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced Reduce

  17. Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product:Anatolia JumpRSE

  18. Alaska Administrative Code - Title 17, Chapter 15 - Utility and Railroad

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda County,90 -Definitions

  19. Name: Lisa Anderson Organization: Tri-City Railroad Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593 LECTIJHES ONThe Role9085023 Name:

  20. Texas Railroad Commission - Pollution Discharge Regulations | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar JumpTennessee/WindPetroleum Storage Tanks Webpage Jump

  1. Historic Railroad Building Goes Net Zero | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a aHilton

  2. Optimized Train Control The William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    86 Home Power #50 · December 1995 / January 1996 Code Corner Designing PV Systems to Meet's going on? Thinking about upgrading the safety of the system for those times when the non- technical that these components have passed rigorous electrical compatibility, electrical shock, and fire safety tests. The use

  3. Understanding government and railroad strategy for crude oil transportation in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, S. Joel (Stephen Joel)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 6, 2013, an oil-laden unit train derailed and exploded in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, Canada, killing 47 people, shocking and saddening many, and leading to significantly increased public scrutiny of crude oil transported ...

  4. Development of an Ontology to Assist the Modeling of Accident Scenarii "Application on Railroad Transport "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maalel, Ahmed; Mejri, Lassad; Ghezela, Henda Hajjami Ben

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a world where communication and information sharing are at the heart of our business, the terminology needs are most pressing. It has become imperative to identify the terms used and defined in a consensual and coherent way while preserving linguistic diversity. To streamline and strengthen the process of acquisition, representation and exploitation of scenarii of train accidents, it is necessary to harmonize and standardize the terminology used by players in the security field. The research aims to significantly improve analytical activities and operations of the various safety studies, by tracking the error in system, hardware, software and human. This paper presents the contribution of ontology to modeling scenarii for rail accidents through a knowledge model based on a generic ontology and domain ontology. After a detailed presentation of the state of the art material, this article presents the first results of the developed model.

  5. Guidelines for storage distance between highway-highway and highway-railroad intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, Scott Raymond

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    movemenLs are subject to progression, and/or for design volume-to-capacity ratios less than one. The following two equations were selected to evaluate the queuing probability model: Arrival, X = 1. 1 x V/3600 where X = an ival rate in equivalent...). The an ival rate and service rate can be expressed m any unit of time as long as the units are the same for both rate. TABLE I Queuing Performance Equations for Random Arrival-Random Service Single Channel Systems Queuing Characteristics M/M/1 (, FIFO...

  6. Applications of Engineering and Financial Analysis to the Valuation of Investments in Railroad Infrastructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roco, Craig E.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to legislative proposals to relocate hazardous materials transported by rail around metropolitan areas. A risk analysis model was developed to predict the risk of exposure from the release of a hazardous material following a train derailment so that changes...

  7. Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous...

  8. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons on the vegetation of a railroad right-of-way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, James Leonard

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the epicuticular leaf waxes of selected plant species growing along a railrcad right-of-way was conduct:ed near Bryan, Texas from October 1967 to February 1969, The objectives of the study were to correlate diesel... locomotive exhaust emissions to PAH on Lhe vege tation of the righL- of way and to compar'e PAH levels on right of way piants to levels on similar species growing in an area isolated from locomotive emissions, The PAH were isolated from leaf wax extracts...

  9. An investigation of driver behavior at highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Lee Anne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crossing results, in that the presence of a crossing (rather than the presence of a train) is indicated by the location of the crossbucks. The driver is ultimately responsible for achieving safe passage across a passive crossing because no warning devices...

  10. Column generation heuristic for a rich arc routing Application to railroad track inspection routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingrand, François

    /LAAS) Optimising maintenance routing ATMOS 2010 7 / 24 #12;Literature review Industrial arc routing problems Hasle

  11. Applications of Engineering and Financial Analysis to the Valuation of Investments in Railroad Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roco, Craig E.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1.1 Configuration of Waddell ?A? Truss Bridge ............................................. 2 1.2 Detroit-Superior Bridge over Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio ........... 3 1.3 Colorado Street Bridge over Arroyo-Seco in Pasadena....S. and M.S. degrees from McGill University. The firm of Waddell & Harrington designed landmark bridges during its seven years of existence, including the Detroit-Superior Bridge over the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio (Figure 1.2) and the Colorado...

  12. Enhancements to passive warning devices for use at railroad-highway grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynier, Charles Leroy

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the same photographs. A preliminary public survey was conducted in Bryan, Texas at the State Department of Public Safety (DPS) Office. Sixty motorists were surveyed with approximately thirty people answering each of the two styles of portfolio questions... locations within Midland, Texas from January 7-10, 1992. The first location was in the common area of Midland Park Mall and the second location was the State DPS license office. The survey was administered to 260 participants who were selected at random...

  13. Fatigue behavior of full-size soild-sawn timber railroad stringers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maingot, Martin Rex

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 . . . . . . . 1 5 , . . . 16 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 21 . . . 21 23 . . . . . . . 24 3. EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM Page 3. 1 General Specimen Details . . 3. 2 Experimental Setup 3. 2. 1 Static Loading System. 3. 2. 2 Fatigue Loading System.... . 3. 3 Non-Destructive Evaluation of Timber Specimens. . . . . 3. 3. 1 Grouping of Timber Specimens. 3. 3. 2 Specimen Strength vs. Specimen Stiffness. 3. 4 Testing Procedure 3. 4. 1 Data Acquisition. . 3. 4. 2 Static Testing. 3. 4. 3 Fatigue...

  14. An investigation into the use of highway traffic signals at highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frieslaar, Andre Henry

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Highway Speed Limit Classification 3 Light Condition Classification 4 Presence of Drunk Driver Classification 5 Driver Age Group Classification . . 43 50 52 57 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Fatal Accidents Based on FARS Traffic Control... Device 2 Traffic Control Comparison between FARS and DOT/AAR Databases. . . 3 Fatal Accident Rates Based on DOT/AAR Traffic Control Device . 4 Driver Related Factor Results 5 FARS Variables Used in Analysis . 6 Driver Related Factor Classification...

  15. Evaluation of enhanced traffic control devices for use at highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, Randy W.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    train volumes. The majority of grade crossings will continue to have only signs and markings that provide passive warning to drivers because it is not economically feasible to provide active control at each grade crossing. Thus, enhanced traffic control...

  16. Formal Safety analysis of a radiobased railroad crossing using Deductive CauseConsequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Wolfgang

    #ects analysis (FMEA) and fault tree analysis (FTA). We apply the method to a real world case study: a radio (DCCA). This technique is a formal generalization of well­known safety analysis methods like FMEA [10 by analyzed) than traditional FMEA. We show, that the results of DCCA have the same semantics as those

  17. Formal Safety analysis of a radio-based railroad crossing using Deductive Cause-Consequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Wolfgang

    and effects analysis (FMEA) and fault tree analysis (FTA). We apply the method to a real world case study like FMEA [10], FMECA [4] and FTA [3]. The logical framework of DCCA may be used to rigorously verify of what can by analyzed) than traditional FMEA. We show, that the results of DCCA have the same semantics

  18. Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt | Department ofEvaluation Report:Returns

  19. Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof1-SCORECARD-09-21-11 Page5-03 EvaluationStorage

  20. 16 TAC 3.30 - Memorandum of Understanding between the Railroad Commission

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource HistorykV remotea Responsible00260H2STAC

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1,D O E / E I AU.S.14,

  2. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Railroad Valley Area (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,Energy Information

  3. Ultrasonic guided waves for structural health monitoring and application to rail inspection prototype for the Federal Railroad Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coccia, Stefano

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, July, 5th-7th,Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Granada, Spain. P.2004). ?Automated structural health monitoring system using

  4. Fatigue analysis of stringer to floor beam connections in through plate girder and through truss railroad bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Leslie Virginia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Line Diagram C. 1 TT Bridge Model. C. 2 TT Bridge Members: Plan View. . C. 3 TT Bridge Members: Bottom View. C. 4 TT Bridge Members: Profile C. 5 TT Bridge Members: Portal . C. 6 TT Bridge Cross-Section. . D. 1 TPG Bridge Model: Member Names... to be calculated for each built-up cross- section. These properties included cross-sectional area, moments of inertia about both axes in the cross-section, section moduli about both axes in the cross section, and torsional moment of inertia, Once...

  5. Ultrasonic guided waves for structural health monitoring and application to rail inspection prototype for the Federal Railroad Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coccia, Stefano

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Office of Safety and Analysis track failure data for yearsOffice of Safety and Analysis track failure data for yearOffice of Safety and Analysis track failure data for years

  6. Agent-based Planning and Simulation of Combined Rail/Road Luca Maria Gambardella, Andrea E. Rizzoli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambardella, Luca Maria

    on trains and assigns trucks to deliver them to the source terminal and to pick them up in the destination and promote intermodal transport as a vi- able alternative to long-haul road transport [1]. The PLATFORM in the terminals throughput might reduce the per- centage of long-haul transports on the road. Be- cause

  7. Contribution of Case Based Reasoning (CBR) in the Exploitation of Return of Experience. Application to Accident Scenarii in Railroad Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maalel, Ahmed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study is from a base of accident scenarii in rail transport (feedback) in order to develop a tool to share build and sustain knowledge and safety and secondly to exploit the knowledge stored to prevent the reproduction of accidents / incidents. This tool should ultimately lead to the proposal of prevention and protection measures to minimize the risk level of a new transport system and thus to improve safety. The approach to achieving this goal largely depends on the use of artificial intelligence techniques and rarely the use of a method of automatic learning in order to develop a feasibility model of a software tool based on case based reasoning (CBR) to exploit stored knowledge in order to create know-how that can help stimulate domain experts in the task of analysis, evaluation and certification of a new system.

  8. Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt | Department ofEvaluation Report:ReturnsTransportation

  9. *Transport and Mobility Laboratory, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, Station 18, Lausanne, CH 1015, Email: {prem.viswanathan, michel.bierlaire}@epfl.ch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    to a fixed contracting fee over the entire planning horizon. In addition, the railroad company must also bear's railroads operate with diesel fuel. Even though most of the railroad network in Europe is electrified, US railroads depend almost entirely on diesel fuel. Association of American Railroads has calculated

  10. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last two decades, the railroad industry has experienced a significant increase in heavy axle loads acting on railroad rails. In addition, railroad operations have been consolidated resulting in the elimination of ...

  11. The Political History of Federal Land Exchanges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagia, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    speculative) interests of timber companies appropriated someas the railroads or timber companies (Gates, 1968, p. 570).time railroad and timber companies had already significantly

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    elements including Union Pacific Railroad, gas and electric utilities, and high-voltage transmission lines

  13. Nevada's Noxious Weed Program Nevada Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    Partnership *Lincoln County *Lower Truckee *Newark/Long Valley *N. Nye & Esmeralda *Pershing County *Railroad

  14. Using Flue Gas Huff 'n Puff Technology and Surfactants to Increase Oil Production from the Antelope Shale Formation of the Railroad Gap Oil Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Michael

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to test cyclic injection of exhaust flue gas from compressors located in the field to stimulate production from Antelope Shale zone producers. Approximately 17,000 m{sup 3} ({+-}600 MCF) of flue gas was to be injected into each of three wells over a three-week period, followed by close monitoring of production for response. Flue gas injection on one of the wells would be supplemented with a surfactant.

  15. Unity, Justice and Protection: The Colored Trainmen of America's Struggle to End Jim Crow in the American Railroad Industry [and Elsewhere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Ervin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colored Trainmen of America (CTA) actively challenged Jim Crow policies on the job and in the public sphere between the 1930s and 1950s. In response to lingering questions concerning the relationship between early black labor activism and civil...

  16. John Topham and Susan Redd Butler Off-Campus Faculty Research Awards James Ayres, University of Arizona, "The Manufacturing and Marketing of Railroad Ties in the Uinta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Idaho Phosphate Mining and Fertilizer Industry" Clyde Milner, Arkansas State University, "The West-War Intermountain West" Stephanie Capaldo, University of Arizona, "Smoke and Mirrors: Smelter Pollution and the Cultural Construction of Environmental Justice in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands" Thomas Evans, Montana State

  17. Fatigue analysis of single-span and two-span solid-sawn, creosote-treated southern pine railroad bridge stringers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comardo, Angelique France

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be the preferred method of construction and rehabilitation of timber bridges. To properly assess the fatigue resistance of timber bridge stringers, it was necessary to conduct full-scale fatigue tests on stringer specimens. As part of the Timber Bridge Life...

  18. Determination of a strength parameter for In Situ evaluation of timber railroad bridge piles subject to decay and fatigue damage accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sculley, Peter Jonathan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;iin , itc t(. &n?fcf fee[ Iror&& thi. & ?I c &;i tie [&[. &Ic~ &nii& tf&c t?n[&e&' t)ei . ir?f Lliicc i [i &i&t(i rfic ?tine'Li? t[1 it sL&f&f?? I &11c t&e&. f [1c itf'ff&(cc&'. ') &est oii I)('iii c'&[&? I11&it i&L' c&if) f?lite'Ll f&c [)&lee, I i...) rce p)rci )s uf wlc&c")s&t&" &?1f)ott'wtci' [. -f f'rcs ious 'f'in&h( r I'ilc l&csc'&re[1 "[&use;&&eh &n A or&(l I;it) ui elicit&) els he, rn rn thi I')-ft) i;rs, r )('ir)lt o[ tf&c rric &)f A'r&r&if ?1 iw&'f<itlc (r)nstt?et??1, If?weir. 'I. I...

  19. Unity, Justice and Protection: The Colored Trainmen of America's Struggle to End Jim Crow in the American Railroad Industry [and Elsewhere] 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Ervin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colored Trainmen of America (CTA) actively challenged Jim Crow policies on the job and in the public sphere between the 1930s and 1950s. In response to lingering questions concerning the relationship between early black ...

  20. Optimizing the aerodynamic efficiency of intermodal freight trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    and energy efficiency of railroad intermodal trains. Several recommendations regarding railway equipment use efficiency; Aerodynamics; Fuel use; Railroad intermodal transportation; Loading assignment; Urban freight 1 practices on train make-up and energy efficiency. They found that aerodynamic characteristics significantly

  1. Click to edit Master subtitle style Beijing Traffic Jam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    , coal trucks, construction · Solutions: Railroad, Straddle bus, Transport energy #12;12/10/10 Questions · Foreign investment increase · GDP · Development · Challenge: environment · Goal: energy #12;12/10/10 Potential Solutions #12;12/10/10 Solution: Railroads "Specialrailwayshouldbebuilttotransportcoalfrom Inner

  2. Presenters: Peter Wasko, Mn/DOT Metro District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    . · Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) · The FAA has source regulations for commercial jet engines. All projects. · Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) · Regulation of railroad related noise commercial jet engines must meet noise emission criteria prior to being certified for flight. · Federal

  3. Propagation of nonlinear waves in waveguides and application to nondestructive stress measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.D. ,  1975.   Lateral  buckling  of  railroad  tracks Kerr, A.D. , 1978a.  Lateral buckling or railroad tracks buckling  collapse  mechanisms  characterized  by  sudden  and  rapid  lateral 

  4. U N I V E R S I T Y O F C O L O R A D O B O U L D E R C ATA L O G Explore more online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    to heavy industry like railroad switch yards, smelters, and mills. Today it is a green, lovely place

  5. Auxiliary Material Table S1 Description of five emission categories of NEI.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    estimate from NONROADb model for internal combustion engine emissions railroad equipment, construction Washington International Airport. Figure S7. Case studie

  6. A Molecular Railroad with Large Pores: Synthesis and Structure of Ni(4,4-bpy)2.5(H2O)2(ClO4)2,1.5(4,4-bpy),2H2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    and the study of their framework stability.3 Third, uncovering their unusual molecular sieving and ion network, where large pores of 11 × 11 Ĺ dimensions exist despite the tendency of such networks to self.; Washizu, S.; Ogura, K. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1994, 116, 1151. (i) MacGillivray, L. R.; Subramanian, S

  7. The GIS Revolution in Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Glen

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Aviation ? Railroads ? Waterways ? Motor Carrier ? Private automobile ? Government Applications ? State and Local government ? Federal government ? Future Trends 5 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GIS-T Defined ? GIS... Commercial Applications - Railroads Rail yard management. 13 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Commercial Applications - Railroads Intermodal rail operations at the Port of Tacoma, Washington. 14 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S...

  8. aluminum dust explosion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dust are investigated in order to study their potential Aste, Andreas 369 EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH...

  9. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plants. Only one coal slurry pipeline is currently operatinggenerally agreed that new coal slurry pipelines may have amade in railroad capacity, coal-slurry pipelines or expanded

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-efficient modes, automobiles and airplanes, while the passenger- kIDs per capita for the more efficient ones, railroads and

  11. DIGITAL VISION & PHOTODISC Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeone, Osvaldo

    of scalability and energy efficiency and offers new opportunities through the interplay with specific distributed, to the advances in telegraphy and, later, wireless transmission. Railroad transportation, geodesy (measurement

  12. EECBG Success Story: Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    city hall: a historic railroad depot. There was just one problem: it was built before central heating or air-conditioning. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Metal halide...

  13. Precision requirements for space-based X CO 2 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cloud data. References Abdou, W. A. , C. J. Bruegge, M. C.and Railroad Valley, CA [Abdou et al. , 2002] for vicarious

  14. Draft

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Board WIEB), Adam Levin (Exelon Generation Company), Jim Reed (NCSL), Conrad Smith (CSG-East), Steve Sullivan (American Shortline Railroad Association),Ruth Weiner...

  15. CX-008876: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Railroad Island Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    diesel engines, such as those in trucks and automobiles, as well as off-highway engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known...

  17. The roller coaster formerly known as the PRB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medine, E.S.; Schwartz, S. [Energy Ventures Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The article examines the reason for the recent spike in prices of Powder River Basin coal. Ultimately this is tied to railroad performance. 4 figs.

  18. Optimization Online - Shunting Minimal Rail Car Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco E. Luebbecke

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 30, 2003 ... Abstract: We consider the rail car management at industrial in-plant railroads. Demands for materials or empty cars are characterized by a track, ...

  19. Location Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map file package containing shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, major roads, railroads, and rivers. The inset map shows regional Paleozoic structural elements.

  20. Microsoft Word - Crude by rail July 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    other spill response tools and equipment. Railroads have comprehensive "standard of care" protocols that ensure that impacts to the community - such as evacuations - are...

  1. Electric Transmission Lines (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission has jurisdiction over all electricity transmission lines crossing over or under railroad tracks at public highway crossings. This section contains general regulations...

  2. Location Map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Map file package containing shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, major roads, railroads, and rivers. The inset map shows regional Paleozoic structural elements.

  3. Undergraduate Civil Engineering Our recent graduates hold jobs in a wide spectrum of areas such as infrastructure engineering consulting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    of areas such as infrastructure engineering consulting (buildings, bridges, railroads, power plants, water include Amazon, Boeing, Accenture, ARCADIS, Mass Electric Construction, General Dynamics' Electric Boat

  4. A History of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Coal, Iron & Railroad Textile Dye House - Raleigh Hosiery, F&H Fries, P.H. Hanes #12;Winston Hall ­ Ch China BS 1931 Manuel Urquiza Mexico MS 1933

  5. rail regulatory matrix

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from railroad operations. 6 The state role in highway regulations related to substance abuse is confined to a limited discretion available to states in excepting certain persons...

  6. Watco Companies Sandhouse Gang -Northwestern University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    / Last Mile while maximizing Class 1 network efficiencies #12;1313 Case Study: Autauga Northern Railroad Structures A New Shortline Model / Energy by Rail - Allan New frontier Reinventing the oil train Questions with a car repair facility. This expanded into what is now the SKOL railroad which was the first shortline

  7. 1 Copyright 2006 by ASME Proceedings of JRC2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    , GA, USA JRC2006-94047 A COMPUTER VISION SYSTEM FOR MONITORING THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF INTERMODAL TRAINS Yung-Cheng Lai, Narendra Ahuja*, Christopher P.L. Barkan, Joseph Drapa, John M. Hart*, Railroad by North American freight railroads. It is thus ironic that these trains tend to have the poorest

  8. Lithographically Patterned Channels Spatially Segregate Kinesin Motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    as an intracellular railroad systemsa railroad with nano- meter-scale engines and tracks that transport vesicles long. Kinesins bind to microtubules and use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to walk unidirectionally along), cumulative forces on the order of nN per µm2 are theoretically possible. The size, efficiency, and potential

  9. Lai & Barkan 1 AN ENHANCED PARAMETRIC RAILWAY CAPACITY EVALUATION TOOL (RCET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    as safer and more efficient in terms of land-use and energy efficiency. Therefore, public officials-2-2363-9990 Email: yclai@ntu.edu.tw Christopher P.L. Barkan Associate Professor Director ­ Railroad Engineering and Tables) = 7,311 words * Corresponding author #12;Lai & Barkan 2 ABSTRACT Many railroad lines

  10. Transportation Institute Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as positive train control, high-speed rail, more energy-efficient locomo- tives, and increased security Railroad have provided the foundation to the development of the RTP. However, their contribution addresses railroad community to follow on that path and "rejuvenate" the once tight relation- ship between academia

  11. Conversations for a Smarter Planet: 18 in a Series IBM, the IBM logo and ibm.com are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at "Copyri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25 years. And that demand is a good thing. Rail is two to five times more energy efficient than road increasing demands on railroads to ensure safety. Quite simply, today's aging infrastructure and technology the railroad's infrastructure and passenger demand, to assemble and schedule more than 5,000 passenger trains

  12. CEE Illinois Newsletter http://universityofillinois.createsend1.com/...wEmail/r/F1F139E4F55756B12540EF23F30FEDED/92D33BD48E5F948444D0DD5392A9C75A[9/10/2013 3:17:11 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    Infrastructure Systems, Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency, Risk Management and Resilience, and Safe monitoring promises safer railroad bridges As interest gains in implementing high-speed rail in North America, CEE researchers are developing innovative ways to monitor existing railroad infrastructure to ensure

  13. Multicriteria Network Equilibrium Modeling with Variable Weights for Decision-Making in the Information Age with Applications to Telecommuting and Teleshopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    ." Related transformations have occurred in history through such technological innovations as the telegraph and telephone, railroads, electricity, the mass production of the automobile, and/or the introduction of air, such as in the case of roads for automobiles and other vehicles, or tracks as in the case of railroads

  14. materials so as to avoid populated areas (13). Furthermore, the inevitable transferal of risk from one community to another raises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    and Christopher P. L. Barkan 65 Hazardous materials traffic originates and terminates at numerous locations of security concerns and several fatal railroad hazardous materials accidents, railroads' interest in all possible means of reduc- ing hazardous materials transportation risk has intensified in recent years

  15. Effect of Rail Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports from the South Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen; Shanmugham, C. V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I line-haul railroads. The railroad freight rate index, constructed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, was used to update estimated rail cost parameters to 1977. To facilitate the estimation of the variable cost parameters, a rail cost algorithm... Country Elevator, Inland Terminal, and Port Terminal Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Commercial Truck Transportation Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Barge...

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    currently has 41 short line railroads that operate on more than 2,600 miles of track, which represents for many rural agriculture communities. Texas currently has 41 short line railroads that operate on more No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 2006 4. Title and Subtitle IMPORTANCE OF SHORT

  17. US EPA SmartWay Transport Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Way Partner Results 2, 700 Partners ­ Most of the top 100 carriers in the US (700,000 trucks) ­ All the Class 1 railroads; several short haul railroads ­ 25% of the Fortune 100 shipper partners ­ In addition - logistics companies, technology manufacturers, trucks stops, ports, banks, vehicle and equipment dealer

  18. Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When trees or portions of trees usable as firewood are removed from property under the control of a public utility, pipeline company, railroad, state agency or department, or a political...

  19. Hiroyuki Sugiyama Associate Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    hiroyukisugiyama@uiowa.edu Supported by NSF Iowa EPSCoR: Wind Energy Platform Accurate and efficient multibody/rail contact formulations for multibody railroad vehicle dynamics simulation are developed for the vehicle

  20. MUSEUM OF THE ROCKIES MSUENGR_MOR MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    manufacture. Performance (life and energy efficiency) shall be comparable to the specified GE product - 1 ADDENDUM NO. 1 April 2, 2014 ARCHITECT: CTA ARCHITECTS ENGINEERS 306 W RAILROAD AVENUE, SUITE 104

  1. Network Economics Anna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to a Variety of Network Systems · Transportation Network with transportation as the unifying application. #12;Subway Network Railroad Network Iridium Satellite Constellation Network Satellite and Undersea Cable Networks Duke Energy Gas Pipeline Network Transportation

  2. CEE Illinois Newsletter http://universityofillinois.cmail4.com/t/ViewEmail/r/33C7E979AC670E19[7/18/2012 1:21:01 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    to improve railroad safety, efficiency and reliability. A particular focus will be corridors in which high of the CEE magazine features a special section on department research related to energy, water

  3. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Perfect Circle Renewable Energy Railroads Resource Mgmt/Research Shaw Group South Shore YMCA SunTrust Bank desire to "make a difference" when it comes to wise, efficient, and productive management of public

  4. Transportation Science and the Dynamics of Critical Infrastructure Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Inequalities · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical Infrastructure, and Energy Networks #12;Components of Common Physical Networks Network System Nodes Links Flows Transportation Intersections, Homes, Workplaces, Airports, Railyards Roads, Airline Routes, Railroad Track

  5. Operations Research and the Captivating Study of Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Paradox and Evolutionary Variational Inequalities · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure;Subway Network Railroad Network Iridium Satellite Constellation Network Satellite and Undersea Cable Networks Duke Energy Gas Pipeline Network Transportation, Communication, and Energy Networks #12;Components

  6. Operations Research and the Captivating Study of Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Variational Inequalities · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical;Subway Network Railroad Network Iridium Satellite Constellation Network Satellite and Undersea Cable Networks Duke Energy Gas Pipeline Network Transportation, Communication, and Energy Networks #12;Components

  7. 1. Report No. SWUTC/11/476660-00076-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in displacing less energy-efficient and higher pollutant-emitting air and automobile modes while generating and population. The state boasts a large and well-developed network of roads, freight railroads, and air

  8. Chicago, Illinois

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Chicago, Illinois August 8, 2014 ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS SLIDE 2 Coal 5,769,626 40% Grain 936,098 6% Chemicals 1,238,773 8% Steel & other metal 534,849 4%...

  9. Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates all surface mining activities for the extraction of coal. The Commission acts with the authority of the Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act,...

  10. EIA Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of two railroad systems that are primary sources for delivering the coal from the mining location in Wyoming. On the gas side, the industry continued the accelerated rate of...

  11. Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners...

  12. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Detroit, Toledo, and Ironton (DT&I) railroads. Several major north-south and east- west roads were also present (Canal Society of Ohio 1975; Drury 1985; Huntington and...

  13. CALL FOR PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS Abstracts due by September 15, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Railroad Engineering Technology ­ Learning from the Past, Building for the Future JRC 2015 is the major and questions regarding the scholarship program, please contact Monique Stewart, FRA-RSEC.PMO@dot.gov Joint Rail

  14. The EP-4(0) shielding kits: a new approach to protection from induced voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorob'ev, A. Yu.; Otmorskii, S. G.; Smekalov, V. V.; Gorozhankina, E. N.; Sosunov, N. N.; Bol'shunov, A. M.

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems of safety in work on overhead power lines and the overhead railroad ac contact network under induced voltages are considered. The use of additional individual protection systems is proposed to provide protection from electric shock during such work.

  15. Assessing the impact of regulation and deregulation on the rail and trucking industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowtan, Donavan M. (Donavan Mahees), 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) Many Class I railroads disappeared and severe competition bankrupted many small carriers in the trucking industry. Larger trucking carriers gained market dominance. Real wages in the trucking industry fell. The ...

  16. Viscoelastic behavior of the cell wall of exfoliated graphite Po-Hsiu Chen, D.D.L. Chung *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    14260-4400, USA A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 6 March 2013 Accepted 7 May 2013 the civil infrastructure, railroad, aircraft, satellites, automobiles, wind turbines, skis, washing machines

  17. Dynamic Networks: Recent Results and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    . #12;Duke Energy Gas Pipeline Network #12;Components of Common Physical Networks Network System Nodes, Railroad Track Automobiles, Trains, and Planes, Manufacturing and logistics Workstations, Distribution Exchanges Fiber Optic Cables Radio Links Voice, Data, Video Energy Pumping Stations, Plants Pipelines

  18. The area of North King County was once forested with deep woods and braided with creeks, where wild-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    occurring. Explorers, logging companies, railroads and specu- lators awaited the United States government's okay to claim the timber, shores and rich land. Surveyors laid the framework, and the 1860's brought

  19. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

  20. Union Station, Tacoma, Washington : a design study for a surplus rail site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, Jeffrey David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological changes in railroads, mergers, major shifts in urban land use patterns, and declining rail passenger travel has resulted in a surplus of urban rail lands. These lands represent a significant resource ...

  1. audible warning devices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Munson, 1933). Whereas frequency and intensity Maher, Robert C. 2 Enhancements to passive warning devices for use at railroad-highway grade crossings Texas A&M University -...

  2. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known...

  3. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known...

  4. Glossary API Gravity: An

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known...

  5. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known...

  6. Trucking country : food politics and the transformation of rural life in Postwar America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Shane, 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trucking replaced railroads as the primary link between rural producers and urban consumers in the mid-twentieth century. With this technological change came a fundamental transformation of the defining features of rural ...

  7. Gravity Train Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dec 7, 2013 ... As soon as the brakes of a railroad car in West Lafayette are released, the car will roll down under the force of gravity. It will accelerate, then ...

  8. Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Districts and USDA NRCS Agricultural Land Use Information Soil Surveys Erosion Control Information and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections TNRIS Data from State Agencies Railroad Commission US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Census Data USDA Natural Resources Conservation

  9. Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Districts and USDA NRCS Agricultural Land Use Information Soil Surveys Erosion Control Information Water and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections Railroad Commission (RRC) Oil Agencies US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Census Data USDA Natural Resources Conservation

  10. An analysis of factors contributing to train-involved crashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooner, Scott Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed for the contributing factors. The contributing factors were classified into four categories: railroad factors, environmental factors, roadway factors, and driver/passenger factors. The accident data was analyzed using one and two-way classification...

  11. Contracting Rail Freight Services for Country Elevators in the Texas Panhandle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Upgrading Country Elevators to Handle Multicar Grain Shipments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5 Annual Fixed Costs Associated with Upgrading Country Elevators .............. 7 Grain... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 7 Railroad Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Grain Inspection and Grading Costs at Upgraded Elevators .................... 9 RESULTS...

  12. The use of Ansys to calculate sandwich Vincent Manet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the industry, and especially in the field of transport (automotive, aeronautics, shipbuilding and railroads skin and the core and located at x1 = L/4) when different parameters vary. Skins are made of aluminum

  13. Stefan Schmid @ T-Labs, 2011 Network Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    . Nervous system. Google+ users. Smart grid. 2Stefan Schmid @ T-Labs Berlin, 2013/4 #12;Good Topologies the cities of a country with an efficient railroad or telecommunication infrastructure? (Expensive?) - How

  14. Verification, Monitoring, and Certification of Clean Energy Project (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Railroad Commission of Texas has the authority to certify a project as a clean energy project. An applicant is responsible for contracting with the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University...

  15. Ownership of Carbon Dioxide Captured by Clean Coal Project (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation stipulates that the Railroad Commission of Texas automatically acquires the title to any carbon dioxide captured by a clean coal project in the state. The Bureau of Economic...

  16. WiFi Meet FuFi: Research Topics in SCM and DSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disruptive innovation catalysed by energy (carbon footprint) may reshape supply chain and logistics. The continents of Europe, Asia and Africa may evolve as a connected value network through railroad logistics.

  17. Estimating commuter rail demand to Kendall Square along the Grand Junction Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelie, Adam

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since acquiring the Grand Junction Railroad in June 2010 from CSX, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) has explored the possibility of using the line for commuter rail service. In addition the Grand Junction ...

  18. Reducing the Risk of Rail Transport of Hazardous Materials by Route Rationalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Kawprasert (Corresponding Author) Graduate Research Assistant Railroad Engineering Program Department practices intended to reduce the likelihood or severity of accidents involving trains transporting certain Engineering Program Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana

  19. A systems approach for developing, designing, and transitioning moving map technology in U.S. rail applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelbel, Kathleen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety, efficiency and productivity are top priorities for rail industries, but technology implementation faces many barriers. While the demands of locomotive engineers and railroads are increasing, the industry lacks a ...

  20. UNITED, STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMlSSldN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    at the site where the dump is being extended eastward at the rate of 50 railroad care .of slag per day. , ?Mr."Mercer was-requested to.remove an additional foot of slag...

  1. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  2. EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

  3. & science Service Feature Released on receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $eep complete f i l e s of climatologicn data, and a largo percentage of claims f o r damaged goods are now s e AND THE RAILROADS "In the building of rai1roads;flseys E. L. Wells, of the U. S. Weather Bureau, m a y phases, etc. length of railroad l i n e i n one of the western states was found t o be practically

  4. QER- Comment of Steve Sharp

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Steve Sharp Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2014 2:53 PM To: Richards, John Cc: Steve Sharp; Scott McAdory Subject: Freight rail "Quote a Rate" issue John: Attached is a map we often use to help explain the "Quote a Rate" problem that we have with the freight railroads in the United States. There are many other similar situations but this one is a good example. The Rodemacher Plant near Alexandria, Louisiana primarily burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal from near Gillette, Wyoming. This power plant is less than 20 miles from Alexandria, Louisiana. The distance from Gillette, Wyoming to Alexandria, Louisiana is about 1,500 miles. As you can see from the map, you could deliver coal from the PRB to Alexandria by using only the Union Pacific (UP) or you could (it would appear) use the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) and the Kansas City Southern (KCS). From Alexandria the only one of the rail lines that actually goes to the plant is UP. So it would appear that the only portion of the route that doesn't have rail competition is the last portion from Alexandria to the plant which is less than 20 miles. Even though all these railroads are Common Carrier railroads, the STB practices and administrative decisions over the years allow railroads to refuse to quote customers a rate in this situation. In other words, UP will only give the owner of the plant a rate to haul PRB coal from Wyoming to the plant. They will not quote a rate from Alexandria to the plant, Kansas City to the plant, etc. Other traffic is interchanged between these same railroads at these locations. Decisions like these were originally intended to help boost the finances of railroads that were on the verge of bankruptcy. Now that the railroads are financially healthy, these past decisions need to be reviewed and reversed. Steve Sharp CURE President

  5. Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Garretson, Justin (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Wetmore, CO); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

  6. A Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in an uncertain world. Robert Johns (CTS director), Rebecca Jasper (Council of Supply Chain ManagementA Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host, transportation infrastructure, ports, railroads, biofuels and agricultural byproducts, and transportation

  7. Travel directions to the Sterrekundig Instituut Utrecht (SIU) Street Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    Travel directions to the Sterrekundig Instituut Utrecht (SIU) Street Address Sterrekundig Instituut Utrecht Buijs Ballotlaboratorium Princetonplein 5 De Uithof Utrecht Telephone: 030­2535200 within Holland, a grocery store ("food market"), a large 24-hour Burger King, etc. Buy a paper railroad ticket to Utrecht

  8. An Evolutionary Approach For Blind Deconvolution Of Barcode Images With Nonuniform Illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Laurent

    in industrial applications (supermarket checkout sys- tem, labelling railroad cars, ...). Nowadays, every comparison, allergen database (gluten, peanut ...). Unfortunately, it is not usual to have its own personal blurred and distorted by various factors, including speckle noise, ambient light. Then, a way, to decode

  9. Lateral Load Path Analysis FRA Concrete Tie and Fastener BAA Industry Partners Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    concrete crossties are in use on North American heavy haul freight railroads · Industry trends: ­ ManyLateral Load Path Analysis FRA Concrete Tie and Fastener BAA ­ Industry Partners Meeting Incline Standards Current Industry Practices AREMA Chapter 30 Finite Element Model Laboratory Experimentation Field

  10. Benefit-Cost Analysis of Heavy Haul Railway Track Upgrade for Safety and Efficiency X. Liu, M.R. Saat, C.P.L. Barkan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Heavy Haul Railway Track Upgrade for Safety and Efficiency X. Liu, M of train accident on North American heavy-haul railroads and reducing their occurrence and severity is an ongoing objective of both industry and government. Upgrading track quality is one possible derailment

  11. Transportation Outlook 2035: Creating a Blueprint for the Sherman-Denison Region's Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman-Denison Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................................................................... 61 7.1 Freight Transportation ....................................................................................................................................... 65 8.1 North Texas Regional Airport Share of Aircraft... days as small settlements in the Texoma region the cities of Sherman-Denison- VanAlstyne-Howe-Pottsboro fortunes have been tied to transportation. From historical roads, followed by railroads followed by, highways, and a county airport have all shaped...

  12. The Savannah River Site is a 803 km2 (310 square mile) industrial complex operated by the Department of Energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    clearing and frequent burning for agriculture were extensive. European settlement subjected streams to cattle grazing followed by timber harvest, and intensive agriculture. Effects of the latter are evidenced was a monumental task. Networks of roads and railroads, power plants, five nuclear reactors as well as production

  13. A Vision System for Monitoring Intermodal Freight Trains Avinash Kumar, Narendra Ahuja, John M Hart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahuja, Narendra

    of gaps between the loads of the IM train is esti- mated and is used to analyze the aerodynamic efficiency the most widespread and fastest growing portion of the North Amer- ican Freight Railroads. Their traffic between IM loads, thus resulting in high energy cost. This is a timely issue because of the fuel crisis

  14. Beijing Traffic Jam Daniel Barry, Jennifer Corriveau, Michael Lecomte, Johanna Zuber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    that railway would be the most efficient and environmentally friendly way for energy transportation" · 42,000km; efficient; high capacity · Can reduce up to 25-30% of traffic jams · Safety precautions #12;Solution: Energy, construction · Solutions: Railroad, Straddle bus, Transport energy #12;Questions? · Thank you! #12;

  15. Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (RailTEC) The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Effects and Interaction of Terminal and Mainline Delay Rail Operational and Energy Efficiency -Passenger ! RESEARCHAREAS Advanced Track Engineering -Integration of Railroad Vehicle-Track Interaction and Dynamics Models Rail Energy Consumption and Emissions Relative to Competing Modes -Economic and Operating Impacts

  16. Dynamic NetworksDynamic Networks ApplicationsApplications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    of today. #12;The study of the efficient operation on transportation networks dates to ancient Rome telecommunication networks and energy networks. No longer are networks independent of one another but critically. #12;MBTA Network #12;Major Highway and Railroad Networks in the US #12;Water Freight Transport Routes

  17. Aerodynamic Analysis of Intermodal Freight Trains Using Machine Vision World Congress on Railway Research, May 22-26, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    train loading can be more energy efficient. #12; 2 1.0 Introduction One of the largest sources for North American freight railroads and has experienced considerable growth over the past few decades developed to automatically monitor and analyze an intermodal train's aerodynamic efficiency based

  18. Integrated StochasticIntegrated Stochastic Network Model for aNetwork Model for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Wells Coal Mines ... ... ... Raw Energy Supplies Water Hydraulic System Gas Pipelines Coal Railroads infrastructure sector. Deregulation has forced the energy system toDeregulation has forced the energy system to use the existing resources more efficiently.use the existing resources more efficiently. Congestion

  19. Highly Compliant and Self-Tightening Docking Modules for Precise and Fast Connection of Self-Reconfigurable Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Wei-Min

    -And-Self-Tightening (CAST) developed as an effective and efficient connector for joining and releasing modules of self using no additional energy for docking and negligible amount of energy for undocking. Development in order to make the process feasible and reliable. For example, docking among locomotives and railroad

  20. Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Railroads already own millions of environmental, analytical, and other records across a portfolio of sites to efficiently mine data for actionable information And, you can't manage what you can't measure 2014© Locus-based environmental data management software used by many organizations in Energy, Chemical, Mining, Agriculture

  1. 15th Annual Freight & Logistics Steven Elmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of freight #12;Railroad expansion helped the metro region develop its industrial and commercial base impact freight transportation in Twin Cities Funding uncertainties Energy shortages/Regional Freight Issues #12;A robust, efficient freight transportation system is critical to the region's economic

  2. A stable finite difference method for the elastic wave equation on complex geometries with free surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelö, Daniel

    and periodic boundary conditions. The fully discrete version of the method conserves a discrete energy; curvilinear grids ; finite differences; stability; energy estimate; seismic wave propagation 1 Introduction, such as gas pipes, wave guides, railroad rails and disc brakes. In the vast majority of wave propagation

  3. Louisiana Tech University Continuing Education & Distance Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    1 Louisiana Tech University Continuing Education & Distance Learning 720 West Railroad Avenue, PO training. ENERGY CONSERVATION - BASIC ELECTRICAL CONCEPTS - 8 Hours - $119 The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the basic concepts of electricity and how to use those concepts to maximize efficiency

  4. MARITIME ADMINISTRATION U.S. Department of Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    to be determined One-on-one Interviews Key stakeholders at ports, railroads, shippers, logistics service Logistics and market issues Agricultural Production and Exports Energy extraction equipment and bulk of agricultural trade Consider more efficient uses of existing transportation infrastructure that might defer

  5. Supply Chain Logistics Post Recovery Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    #12;6 Rail Rebirth.... ....Key Realities · More Energy Efficient · Lower Emissions · Lower Cost Changes · Green Logistics · Green measures, Certifications, Urban Heat Island, Stormwater, Energy 2,267$ Other Carriers Railroads 63 210$ Water 39 130$ Oil Pipeline 10 33$ Air 40 133$ Forwarders 32

  6. ARandomizedCoordinateDescentMethodfor Large-ScaleTrussTopologyDesign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    forces acting at the free nodes, caus- ing deformation of the truss compliance - potential energy stored, construct a truss of a given total weight of minimum compliance. Applications of TTD: Railroad bridges.: Efficiency of coordinate descent methods on huge-scale optimization problems, CORE Discussion Paper #2010

  7. AFrameworkforAssessingthe InterdependenciesBetweenthe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    System CoalPilesGasStorage GasWellsCoalMines ...... Primary Energy Supplies Gas Pipeline Coal Railroad©AnaQuelhas,20054 SharesofElectricityGeneration Source:EIA,Annual EnergyReview2002 FossilFuels=Coal+Petroleum+Gas66% Petroleum 2% NG 17% Nuclear 19% Hydro 6% Others 9% Coal 47% #12;Copyright©AnaQuelhas,20055 TheIntegratedEnergy

  8. Monitoring the Aerodynamic Efficiency of Intermodal Train Loading Using Machine Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    - Champaign is developing a machine vision system to evaluate intermodal train energy efficiency based account for a large percentage of revenue for freight railroads, they are generally the least efficient train type in terms of energy consumption. Improving the energy efficiency of intermodal trains can

  9. NETWORKS FOR FUN Anna NagurneyAnna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    ;Copyright 2000 Anna Nagurney Major Highway and Railroad Networks in the United States #12;Copyright 2000;Copyright 2000 Anna Nagurney Satellite and Undersea Cable Networks #12;Copyright 2000 Anna Nagurney Energy NetworksEnergy Networks provide the energy for ourprovide the energy for our homes, schools, and businesses

  10. 50388 Federal Register' I Vol. 54, No. 233 I' Wednesday, December 6, 1989 I Rules and Regulations significantly affect either the quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    significantly affect either the quality of the human environment or conservation of energy resources. Regulatory efficiency, our action should indirectly benefit small entities. Ist of Subjects in 49 CFR Part 1011 established under 49 US.C. 10905 and at the railroad's request: (i) in application proceedings, immediately

  11. Rail Focused US DOTRITA Tier I University Transportation Center University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    .S. freight railroad system is one of the transportation success stories of the latter 20th and early 21st centuries. The efficiency of North American freight rail transport is a world leader, providing the nation with substantial economic, energy, and environmental benefits. Meanwhile, increasingly congested highway and air

  12. Information House Committee on Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The energy efficiency and environmental advantage of rail over trucks are well established in terms Transportation Institute Page 2 MULTIMODAL FREIGHT Texas has a well developed and efficient multimodal, or more than $690 billion. Railroads transport more than a third of the tonmiles for freight valued

  13. Transportation Science and the Dynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Infrastructure Networks · The Time-Dependent (Demand-Varying) Braess Paradox · A New Network Performance/Efficiency, Airports, Railyards Roads, Airline Routes, Railroad Track Automobiles, Trains, and Planes, Manufacturing Computers, Satellites, Telephone Exchanges Fiber Optic Cables Radio Links Voice, Data, Video Energy Pumping

  14. This project is associated with the LouisianaTransportation Research Center (LTRC) partnership with the National Center for IntermodalTransportation for Economic Competiveness (NCITEC).The NCITEC is a UniversityTransportation Center housed at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    , and decreasing energy consumption. 4. Direct Cost Efficiency: The objectives include developing cost- efficient attention since the enactments of the Intermodal SurfaceTransportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA, and port availability), and the U.S. Class I railroads use three measures: cars on line, train speed

  15. NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;· NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate Modeling · ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh- Efficiency and the Transcontinental Railroad, less because of their function than the unprecedented level of political and operational stories of the Department of Energy. Ironically, the political and operational discipline that made

  16. An Actor's Tribute to Thurgood Marshall Good evening. You all look very familiar and maybe I do too. It's nice to be among so

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 An Actor's Tribute to Thurgood Marshall Good evening. You all look very familiar and maybe I do Thomas now occupies the so-called Thurgood Marshall seat on the Supreme Court. This entire evening could Marshall was a railroad porter and he pushed me to love the Constitution of the United States. Ironically

  17. Laboratory Testing to Address the Potential for Damaging Hydraulic Pressure in the Concrete Tie Rail Seat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Laboratory Testing to Address the Potential for Damaging Hydraulic Pressure in the Concrete Tie of different combinations of concrete ties and fastening system components to RSD (1). TTC's tests resulted) is the most critical problem with concrete tie performance on North American freight railroads. Currently

  18. Supernetworks: Management Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    , schools, and businesses, and to run our vehicles. #12;Duke Energy Gas Pipeline Network #12;Components Stations, Plants Pipelines, Transmission Lines Water, Gas, Oil, Electricity #12;US Railroad Freight Flows and logistics Workstations, Distribution Points Processing, Shipment Components, Finished Goods Communication

  19. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  20. Worker termite Winged termite Winged Ant Termites in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    timbers, railroad ties, or other infested wood. Once they get established, they slowly spread and can by pest control companies. The over-the-counter baits people find in stores are not as reliable. Baiting have a problem take time to call two or more companies to get a price and opinion. Termite damage

  1. Gutierrez et al 1 Advancements in Fastening System Design for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    -haul railroads. Reducing life cycle costs of concrete crosstie fastening systems is of paramount importance the development of high-speed passenger rail systems; the need for improved concrete crossties and fasteningGutierrez et al 1 Advancements in Fastening System Design for North American Concrete Crossties

  2. Rail costs and capital adjustments in a quasi-regulated environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlaender, Ann Fetter

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on results obtained from estimation of a rail cost function using a pooled time-series cross section of Class I U.S. railroads for the period 1973-1986. Based on the results of this cost function, an ...

  3. Strategy Development Company Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, David B.

    in the electric power generation, coal production, oil refining, railroad, chemical, and other industries. Our in the industry, legislation, and new competitive entrants require strategic adjustments. The project will entail industry analysis of current trends and new methods of finding clients. Furthermore, it will be necessary

  4. ESD Working Paper Series ESD-WP-2014-03 March 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    to the same amount of GHG being emitted from the production and refining of oil sands bitumen (e.g. Krugel capacity investment for the railroad industry as a whole to transport bitumen from the Alberta oil sandsESD Working Paper Series ESD-WP-2014-03 March 2014 Understanding Crude Oil Transport Strategies

  5. SBIR/STTR ALERTING SERVICE --October 14, 2011 The SBIR/STTR Alerting Service is a free service that provides bi-weekly notification of SBIR and STTR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II: $700K Federal Railroad Administration 12.1-FR3 Advanced Locomotive Energy Storage System Administrations are: Federal Highway Administration 12.1-FH1 Coating Existing Concrete Barriers to Reduce Rollover II: $1M Federal Highway Administration 12.1-FH2 Fast Real Time Positioning using GNSS Anticipated

  6. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME FLAMMABLE LIQUID FIRE CONSEQUENCE MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    . The consequence modeling based on the US DOT Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) or ALOHA (Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres), a popular atmospheric dispersion model used for evaluating releases of hazardous, North American railroads are considered one of the safest modes of transportation for hazardous

  7. Investigating the Effects of Corrosion on the Fatigue Life of Welded Steel Attachments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soape, Jack

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of dollars each year for the railroad industry in terms of maintenance and inspection. Since a large number of these bridges are steel and their service life is typically governed by fatigue of welded details, it is important to determine the interactions...

  8. The Unsolvable Privacy Problem and its Implications for Security Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odlyzko, Andrew M.

    argues that there are strong incentives for decreasing privacy, rooted in the economic benefits of price incentives to price discriminate, as is well established in the economics literature. Railroads were discrimination. As a result, the privacy problem is unsolvable. The conflict between incentives to price

  9. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2374, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    step in a systematic process of quantitative risk analysis, with the ultimate goal of optimizing the integration of risk reduction strategies. A generic framework for railroad hazmat transportation risk analysis. Then quantitative models are developed to estimate the effectiveness of various risk reduction strategies

  10. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2289, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    the first step in a systematic process of quantitative risk analysis of railroad freight train safety statistical results representing the first step in a systematic process of quantitative risk analysis and risk.3141/2289-20 Analysis of the causes of train accidents is critical for rational allocation of resources to reduce

  11. Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) SISTA Technical report 96-69

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K.U.Leuven Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) SISTA Technical report 96-69 Matrix," in Proceedings of the 1997 Ameri- can Control Conference (ACC'97), Albuquerque, New Mexico, pp. 3136{3140, June manufacturing systems, telecommunication net- works, parallel processing systems and railroad traĆc net- works

  12. BORON--2002 13.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Regina R. Coleman, international data project teams will share about $14.2 million in Federal funding, to be matched by $7.1 million locally Railroad Administration, 2001§1 ). A public-private partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE

  13. Polystyrene foams for thermal insulation. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Asociation database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of polystyrene foam as a thermal insulator. References discuss applications in railroad tracks, masonry walls, foundations for shallow buildings, and commercial roofing. Use as a vibration medium is referenced. Topics include designing with foam and self-extinguishing foams. (Contains a minimum of 77 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.E

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses how, in a reversal of the usual pattern, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) turned this year to equipment dating back 20 years while several U.S. railroads and transit authorities invested in new designs. Also, the aviation industry adopted a new maintenance philosophy in the wake of several aircraft accidents attributed to the effects of aging.

  15. Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrow, Brendan Eugene

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC), ????over 250 billion gallons of produced water is taken out of Texas Soil every year, and more than 35% of this water is not currently fit to use.?? Therefore, it can be assumed that domestically...

  16. Lessons for NASA A Message from the New Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calyam, Prasad

    Safer Shift Changes at Hospitals Hospitals might prevent worker fatigue and ensure patient safety Emily Patterson, a visiting researcher at Ohio State's Institute for Ergonomics. "But there are other Canadian nuclear power plants, a railroad dispatch center in the United States and an ambulance dispatch

  17. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  18. Integrating Deer, Quail and Turkey Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . Other sug- gestions: n Restrict grazing in the exclo- sures to July and August. Use moderate grazing intensity on the remaining areas. n Leave vegetation 18 to 24 inch- es tall with adequate inter- spaces. n Roadside or railroad rights-of- way can...

  19. Improving Transportation Safety Through Accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ;10! Investigative Groups ·" Highway Factors & Bridge Construction ·" Bridge Design ·" Witness ·" Survival accidents. ·" Major Railroad accidents. ·" Major Pipeline accidents. ·" Major marine accidents of the U10 gusset plates, due to a design error by the bridge design firm . . . Contributing to the design

  20. Investigating the Effects of Corrosion on the Fatigue Life of Welded Steel Attachments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soape, Jack

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of dollars each year for the railroad industry in terms of maintenance and inspection. Since a large number of these bridges are steel and their service life is typically governed by fatigue of welded details, it is important to determine the interactions...

  1. Tools for Easier Gardening By Margaret Hagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Road Elk Grove Village IL 60007 1-800-334-3675 Access to Recreation, Inc. 8 Sandra Court Newbury Park Idea PO Box 955 Vail CO 81658 1-800-538-6690 Ames True Temper 465 Railroad Avenue Camp Hill PA 17001

  2. P LY M O U T H R a c h e l

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Samantha

    University of Michigan property City of Ann Arbor property University of Michigan road City of Ann Arbor road UNIVERSITY PLANNER'S OFFICE 1.20.12 Bicycling Guide: East Medical Campus Legend Bike parking spaces Covered out for sewer grates, slippery manhole covers, oily pavement, snow and ice. Cross railroad tracks

  3. Methods Note/ NAPL Source Zone Depletion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    to evaluate groundwater contamination and cleanup times for four complex mixtures of concern in the railroad industry. Among the petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures considered, the cleanup time of diesel fuel was much LNAPLs adequately represent the economic risk of chemical spills. To assess the environmental risk

  4. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):224234, Fall 2007 Efficacy of CPTH-treated egg baits for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), lambing sites (Larsen and Dietrich 1970), rangelands (Knight 1984), and linear right-of-ways of electric. 2004). Ravens often use electrical transmission towers, highway overpasses, and railroad trestles power transmission lines (Knight and Kawashima 1993). Raven abundance has tripled in the past 40 years

  5. Schrepel, Eric From: Jenkins, Kris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :10:46 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- fname: Jeremy lname: Smithson affiliation: Solar Washington Association address_2: 5308 Baker Ave NW except for coal companies in Montana. How then is their proposal featured so prominently in the draft of railroaded agenda. I must also ask why is there no mention of increased solar generation? The potential

  6. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 54th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. As noted in articles on recently issued DOE EISs (Complex Transformation, Yucca Mountain Repository and Railroad, and Western Energy Corridors), DOE has received and is responding to extensive public comment. This issue also pays tribute to two women who have made extraordinary contributions to NEPA implementation.

  7. Stefan Schmid @ T-Labs, 2011 Foundations of Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    or Gnutella) sometimes it can be designed (e.g., smart grid network, overlay p2p network), - sometimes nodes. Smart grid. Stefan Schmid @ T-Labs Berlin, 2012 4 #12;Shared Memory vs Message Passing? Similarities is a ,,good topology"? It depends... - How to interconnect the cities of a country with an efficient railroad

  8. A ROUTING SYSTEM BASED ON SPACEFILLING CURVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholdi III, John J.

    . It is cheapest to ship long distance by train and so railroads are capturing an in- creasing amount of long-haul, and all local freight, is handled by truck. The basic problem faced by a distribution manager, then among the vehicles so that not too many trucks are required. Copyright c 1995,6 John J. Bartholdi, III

  9. Alex Linares UPP 502, Planning Skills, Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    and brickyards. In 1852, the opening of the Rock Island railroad also contributed to Blue Island's growth. Blue to block traffic on the Rock Island rail line. On June 30th , 1894, two workers blocked the Rock Island. Source: 2005 Land Use Inventory, Version 1.0, CMAP #12;Alex Linares UPP 502, Planning Skills, Fall 2012

  10. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  11. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

  12. Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Field Trip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    22, 2003 8:00 Buses depart Ramada Inn at Kearney; travel on I-80 and secondary road to Ft. Mc Ft. McPherson National Cemetery; travel on secondary roads, I-80 and US-83 to Dancing Leaf Lodge near habitation and landscape recovery after Union Pacific Railroad cut cedar trees for construction

  13. The reconstruction of the Lake Champlain sidewheel steamer Champlain II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Elizabeth Robinson

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steamship Champlain II, ex-Oakes Ames, was built as a railroad car transfer ferry in 1868 at Marks Bay, Burlington, Vermont in the private shipyard of Napoleon B. Proctor. The vessel was later converted to a passenger line boat in 1873...

  14. Annual Report of the Feed Control Service, 1952-53.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holleman, M. P.; Brock, F. D.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; namf town from which shipment was made; name of firm from wnlcn feed was purchased; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in cases...

  15. Annual Report of the Feed Control Service, 1951-52.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holleman, M. P.; Brock, F. D.

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of truck in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information...

  16. Annual Report of the Feed Control Service, 1953-54.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shipment; number and initials of car (or license number of truck in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from rrhich shipment was made; name of firm from ' i~hich feed was purchased...

  17. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1938, to August 31, 1939.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; number and initials of car in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date of original waybill; date shipment...

  18. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 49:709718 (2006) Smoking Imputation and Lung Cancer in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 49:709­718 (2006) Smoking Imputation and Lung Cancer exhaust exposure and lung cancer mortality in a large retrospective cohort study of US railroad workers­1996. Mortality analyses incorporated the effect of smoking on lung cancer risk. Results The smoking adjusted

  19. Essentials of Energy Key concepts for the day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Natural monopolies · Disruption: · long supply chains, transportation bottlenecks (railroads and coal, Suez and Panama canals for oil and gas); long electrical transmission lines are vulnerable Incentives:-tax credits, subsidies-when needed Regulation of rates if natural monopoly or public ownership II

  20. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    ... ... Primary Energy Supplies Gas Coal Railroad, Barge ... ... Storage & Transportation Systems Energy Transportation Networks #12;Structural Model: Energy Flows GAS COAL ELECTRIC Case A: 2002, and the amount of electricity generated #12;Structural Model: Effects of Katrina Average natural gas nodal price

  1. Port of Houston Intermodal Grain Transfer System and Market Area, 1976 - 1977. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Paggi, Mechel S.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Railroads ................................................. 4 Trucks .................................................. 7 Ships ................................................... 7 Grain Elevators ........................................... 10 Port... of the receipts were from Oklahoma. lowa, raska, and Kansas shipped 15, 1 1, and 10 percent of e Port's respective grain and soybean inflow. Texas ranked first as an originator of grain sorghum (59%) and second as a source of wheat (3 1%) and soybeans (35...

  2. 53164 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 170 / Friday, August 31, 2012 / Proposed Rules Federal Communications Commission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communications Commission. Bulah P. Wheeler, Deputy Manager, Office of the Secretary, Office of Managing Director53164 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 170 / Friday, August 31, 2012 / Proposed Rules Federal Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 214 [Docket No. FRA­2008­0059, Notice No. 6] RIN 2130­AC37

  3. Microsoft Word - Northern Pass Amended Application - FINAL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    67 4.7 Railroad ROW 69 4.8 New England-Based Renewable Energy Projects 71 4.9 Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency 73 4.10 Natural Gas-Fired Generation 75 4.11...

  4. Department of Industrial Engineering Fall 2012 Laser Non-Contact Measurement of Moving Product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    With a non-contact measurement system improvements can be made in the inspection area ultimately eliminating Product Overview ArcelorMittal produces steel rails for railroads, cranes, transit agencies companies The team visited the factory again to conduct more measurements for the prototype and CAD models

  5. accident excursion occurring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident excursion occurring First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Annual Report of Railroad...

  6. University of Heidelberg Institute of Environmental Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Kurt

    ?!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! construction ·urban facilities (houses,...) ·roads and railways 3 nd-water-level declines caused by pump was disrupted, causing differential thawing that warped the roadbed. The railroad was abandoned in 1938?!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! construction ·urban facilities (houses,...) ·roads and railways 1985-90: 78 M$ maintenance cost for Qinghai

  7. Current Status and Potential Impacts Regarding the Proposed Development of a Rail Line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanthrum, G. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Gunnerson, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a description of the current status regarding the proposed development of a rail line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Nye County, Southern Nevada, which includes potential impacts analyzed during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and the subsequent creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the rail line. Potential impacts are addressed within the context of impacts to natural and human environmental resources found within the geographic area of the proposed federal project. Potential impacts to these resources have been fully analyzed in the Rail Alignment Draft EIS (DEIS). This paper includes a summary of the potential impacts analyzed in the DEIS. Examples of potential impacts include land use conflicts, air quality, water use, and impacts to biological and cultural resources, among others. In conclusion: Based on its obligations under the NWPA and its decision to select the mostly rail scenario for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, DOE needs to ship these materials by rail in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE prepared the Rail Alignment EIS to provide the background, data, information, and analyses to help decision makers and the public understand the potential environmental impacts that could result from constructing and operating a railroad for shipment of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing rail line in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. This railroad would consist of a rail line, railroad operations support facilities, and other related infrastructure. DOE will use the Rail Alignment EIS to decide whether to construct and operate the proposed railroad, and if so, to: - Select a rail alignment (Caliente rail alignment or Mina rail alignment) in which to construct the railroad; - Select the common segments and alternative segments within either a Caliente rail alignment or a Mina rail alignment. The Department would use the selected common segments and alternative segments to identify the public lands to be included in right-of-way applications; - Decide where to construct proposed railroad operations support facilities; - Decide whether to restrict use of the rail line to DOE trains, or whether to allow commercial shippers to operate over the rail line; and - Determine what mitigation measures to implement. (authors)

  8. Stray current control in rehabilitating rail transit facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III; Bosma, R.; Paladines, F.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An old Chicago direct current electrified railway yard and shop are being rehabilitated. Modern stray current control techniques are being introduced. Efficient rail operation and safety for the public and operating personnel are paramount. Metra is Chicago's commuter railroad, serving six counties in the metropolitan area. The Electric District, which was electrified in 1926, is a heavy rail system from downtown, serving the south side and suburbs. Operating on the same tracks from Randolph St., to Kensington is America's last electric interurban line, the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad. All trains operate on 1,500-V direct current (DC) propulsion from an overhead catenary system, with the running rails as the negative return.

  9. The Normal/Bloomington Amtrak passenger station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.E. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Normal/Bloomington, Illinois Amtrak railroad passenger station was completed in 1990. A number of energy conservation technologies have been combined to provide for efficient railroad operations, passenger comfort, and a pleasing atmosphere. Passive solar heating, shading, and the building`s thermal efficiency have substantially reduced the amount of energy required for space conditions. The use of daylighting high efficiency fluorescent and high pressure sodium lighting as well as electronic load management have reduced energy requirements for lighting more than 70%. A stand-alone PV system provides energy for a portion of the building`s electrical requirement. An average monthly output of 147 kWh accounts for approximately 7.5% of the total electrical load. Overall, this station requires less than 25% of the energy required by a recently built `typical` station of similar size in a similar climate.

  10. Transporation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Transportation Energy Project is comprised of four unique tasks which work within the railroad industry to provide solutions in various areas of energy conservation. These tasks addressed: energy reducing yard related decision issues; alternate fuels; energy education, and energy storage for railroad applications. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team examined these areas and provided current solutions which can be used to both provide important reduction in energy usage and system efficiency in the given industry. This project also sought a mode in which rural and long-distance education could be provided. The information developed in each of the project tasks can be applied to all of the rail companies to assist in developing efficiencies.

  11. Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

  12. The Cherokee and Crawford County Coal Field With Analyses of the Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, C.B.; Brown, H.R.

    1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at $59.25 2370.00 One car 20# rails and spikes 921.22 1 #3 brass fitted pump 73.75 Railroad switch complete about 3 /4 mi, - 7450.00 Six 20# switches complete 135.00 Railroad right of way to line track - 1000,00 One well 856 ft . deep complete... and piped to engine - - - - - - - - - - 1400.00 Drain ditch 333.63 35 ft . of 24" tiling for ditch 32.00 86 tons of coal 129.75 Teaming 36.50 One 6f by 12" locomotive 25oo.00 1500 pit ties 4x6x5 275.00 50 white oak ties 6-6-8 22.50 One s±x$ engine...

  13. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

  14. Lubbock Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubbock Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and its predecessors, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, specified the transportation systems on which certain federal funds can... in Chapter 5 ? Streets and Highways; Chapter 6 ? Public Transportation; Chapter 7 ? Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan; Chapter 8 ? Lubbock International Airport and Chapter 9 ? Railroads and Trucking. Federally funded transit projects were developed...

  15. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: Quarterly Technical Status Report 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lembit Salasoo; Jennifer Topinka; Anthony H Furman; Paul K Houpt

    2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and analytical work has continued on advanced fuel injection. Experimental trends continue to agree with modeling predictions. Based on rub tests, polymeric abradable coating compositions were downselected and evaluated in the turbocharger, to give encouraging performance gains. The detailed hybrid battery duty cycle was studied and battery life testing procedure required adjustments. Optimizer algorithm robustness has been improved, and a real-time optimizer simulation system was constructed and demonstrated at a railroad suppliers trade meeting.

  16. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception through February 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; James Francfort

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. The primary Program partners are the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and Ford. The other Program partners providing funding and other support include the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Metro North Railroad, Long Island Railroad, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Long Island Power Authority, New York State Department of Transportation, New York City Department of Transportation, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). The data in this report is being collected via an internet-based questionnaire system by the AVTA through its subcontractor Electric Transportation Applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK cities is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Eighty-seven commuters are using the TH!NK city vehicles, with 80% actively providing data to the AVTA. The participants have driven the vehicles nearly 150,000 miles since Program inception, avoiding the use of almost 7,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through February 2003.

  17. A Magazine of Nature: "Garden and Forest" and the Rise of American Environmental Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Shen

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ; in 1890, 164,000 miles; and in 1900, 193,000 miles. The spreading railroad system made the transportation of raw materials and products go farther and faster. The major triumph of the second industrial revolution?the wide application of electric power... the same income and getting along in harmony. Science and technology progressed to meet human needs and enhance their happiness, and individual freedom was secured by improvement in the power of production. Looking backward, however, West clearly...

  18. Application of Homopolar Pulsed Power to Metals Joining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, R. E.; Aanstoos, T. A.; Weldon, W. F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -20, 1983 In 1977, the Energy Storage Group was upgraded to its present status of a full research center (CEM-UT). Since 1978, we have conducted pulse resistance welding research sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National... Corporation, was concerned with welding railroad rails and vehicle components. The EPRI project [2,7,8J involved welding -in. (10-em) schedule 80 type 304 stainless steel p pe. The objective was to determine the feasibility of joining boiling water...

  19. Breaking the grant cycle: on the rational allocation of public resources to scientific research projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avin, Shahar

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Rockefeller family (mainly from the oil industry) to support science and health research and medical education, and the Carnegie Corporation, founded by a railroad industrialist for “the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding”. Early public... and dynamic nature of epistemic fitness. The sceptical argument is further refined using computer simulations of different funding mechanisms and their effect on the accumulation of epistemic fitness over time. Based on the sceptical argument and the results...

  20. An implicit centered finite-difference simulation for free surface flows in a rocking tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jobst, William Edward

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    include the liquid movement in closed containers such as tank trucks on highways and railroads, liquid fuel tanks in space vehicles' and contained liquid cargo in oceangoing vessels. Interest in this particular fluid phenomenon has grown consider...AN IMPLICIT CENTERED FINITE-DIFFERENCE SIMULATION FOR FREE SURFACE FLOWS IN A ROCKING TANK A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD JOBST Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  1. Chemicals and campesinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Roland Hunter

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enterprise (Adams, 1914; Kepner, 1935; Wilson, 1947; Hay and Plaza, 1958). In 1905, to meet the growing demand for bananas in the United States and Europe, Samuel Zemurray traveled to Honduras. In partnezship with United Fruit Company, the offspring... of Boston Fruit Company, Zemurray bought land . He acquired control of a minor railroad line and began to develop banana plantations in Honduras (Kepner, 1935; Wilson, 19471 Hay and Plaza, 1958). By 1910, Niqad Higuel Davila, the Honduran President...

  2. Geology of the Chriesman-Milano Area, Burleson and Milam Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Robert Andrew

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the completion of this problem. A B S T R A C T The Chriesman-Milano Area i s located i n the Gulf Coastal Plain physiographic province. Formations cropping out i n the mapped area are the Carrizo, Reklaw, Queen City and Wechesj lower Clairborne group... Boyd Eanes 98 27 ? Cathy Oil Corp. railroad loading dock, Chriesman, Burleson County, Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Plate 1. Location map of thesis area 2 2. Major topographic features 12 3 . Columnar section...

  3. Does the lack of trade matter?: the endowment effect and the Coase Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Cynthia Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    will be allocated efficiently regardless of the initial assignment of property rights, started a revolution of thought in the economic profession in the areas of transaction costs and exchange theory. I use the railroad-and-farmer example made famous by Coase... Worker: Editorial and Research Assistant, May 2001 ? present Cook Children 's Physicians Network, Denton, Texas Receptionist: May 1999 ? present Good Samaritan Nursing Home, Denton, Texas Ward Clerk: Summer 2000 Law Office of Michael R. Lipscomb...

  4. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased... the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1...

  5. Electronic Compliance and Approval Project (ECAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Hope; Varela, Richard A.; LaHood, Deborah; Cisco, Susan; Benavides, Mary Ann; Burks, Donna

    2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Railroad Commission (RRC), working in partnership with the United States Department of Energy and the oil and gas industry it regulates, implemented a strategy for improving efficiency in regulations and significantly reducing administrative operating costs through the Electronic Compliance and Approval Process (ECAP). This project streamlined regulatory compliance and reporting by providing the ability to electronically submit, process, and query oil and gas applications and reports through the Internet-based ECAP system.

  6. Doctor of Engineering internship at Dow Chemical U.S.A.: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snowden, James Derwood, 1945-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    assignment was at Polyethylene Number 4 plant, and the second assignment was at Toluenediisocyanate plant, each located within the Plant B area. Mr. William J. Hughes, the Polyethylene Number 4 Owner's Represen? tative, acted as a supervisor and exercised.... A pre-work conference was held on February 4, 1975 by Mr. William J. Hughes, Polyethylene Number 4 Owner's Representative. The conference was attended by Mr. Hughes; representatives from Site Construction, Incorpo? rated, the railroad roadbed...

  7. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  8. Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

  9. Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

  10. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

  11. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  12. Subterranean Termites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Roger E.; Howell Jr., Harry N.; Glenn, Grady J.; Engler, Kimberly

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    in landscape timbers, railroad cross-timbers, mulch and wooden pallets. Isolated infestations of Formosan termites have been reported in many areas of the state (See E- 367, ?Formosan Subterranean Termites?). Identification Subterranean termites are social... and around foundations during and after construction. Stainless steel mesh or plastic sheeting impregnated with a termiticide is available for long-term termite proofing of new homes. These are normally installed on top of the soil and around plumbing...

  13. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1934 to August 31, 1935.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lots should always have available for use of the inspector the fol- lowing information: the total number of tons in the shipment; number and initials of car in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill...; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date of original waybill; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases involving...

  14. The potential use of biogeochemistry in the detection of petroleum microseepage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusman, R.W.; Saeed, M.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States)); Abu-Ali, M.A. (Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry was applied to the indirect detection of petroleum microseepage in the vicinity of Eagle Springs oil field, Railroad Valley, Nevada, and Cave Canyon field, Paradox basin, Utah. Trace elements were measured in native vegetation over and surrounding areas of production at the test sites. The oxidation of microseepage in the upper part of the soil column is postulated to cause an increase in plant uptake of transition trace elements such as iron, manganese, and vanadium, and a decrease in plant uptake of alkaline earth elements such as calcium, strontium, and barium. Compared to nonproductive areas, an increase in uptake of transition trace elements and a decrease in alkaline earth elements was observed in Fourwing salt-bush over Eagle Springs field. The postulated increase in uptake of transition trace elements and decrease in alkaline earth elements was not as apparent in Big sage-brush nor in Utah juniper over the Cave Canyon field. The observation of the postulated effects on vegetation at Eagle Springs may be due to the relatively large rates of microseepage independently observed using other methods, and the extensive faulting in Railroad Valley. The weaker response observed at Cave Canyon may reflect the lack of faulting and the retention of light hydrocarbons in the reservoir. Another possible reason for weal response is that the available plant species at Cave Canyon do not exhibit the effect at the lower soil pH measured in the area. At low pH and low Eh, the solubility of transition elements in soil pore waters and plant uptake is increased. Due to the high soil pH of the Railroad Valley area, the uptake of alkaline earth elements should be decreased where microseepage is occurring because of crystallization of carbonate minerals.

  15. Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1994-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.

  16. A History of Manufactures in the Kansas Fuel District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Richard L.

    1910-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are thus the great coal-producing formations that are found in this section, and produce by far the largest share of the coal mined in Kansas . 2 8 The only other coal-bearing shale of any importance in the state, and it does not extend into any except... Kansas, so far as known, is the Osage shale, 2000 feet above the Cherokee shale, which has been important in that it has both supplied a local demand, and has furnished a great deal of coal to the Santa Fe railroad. 2 9 The output of the mines...

  17. Ultrasonic Rayleigh wave inspection of unit train rotary couplers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salkowski, Charles Leo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) fleet of 90, 718 kg. high side, rotary dump gondolas. The cars travel 5205 knr round trip from La Grange to the Decker Mines near Gillete, wyoming in approximately ten days. The annual rate of service accumulation.... There are several designs ol' rotary couplers in use, one of which has experienced extraordinarily high failure rates. Car maintenance occurs at the LCRA shop in Smithville, Texas and at other railroad shops along coal train routes. These shops perform...

  18. The politics of food production: a comparative study of the agricultural development policies of five African nations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, Leslie Jean

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and tra- ditional areas by presence or lack of roads is not nearly as sharp as in zambia. The number of roads connecting the Ivory Coast with neighboring nations are few: three going to Ghana~ three to Upper Volta, three to 4 West Africa Annual 1972...-1973 (Lagos: John West Publications, Ltd , 1973), pp 147-148 5 Berg, p. 217. 30 Map 1. Roads and the Railroad in the Ivory Coast "" . I Sr eeo BO IROUI. AS e fN lor +v 0 de Nl ndiel FerkeMddoupo GUINEE KORHOGO Boone e+ e + o + rouen e Ole...

  19. Kansas Labor Unions: Past, Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shulenburger, David E.; Johnson, Nancy Brown

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Labor Unions: Past, Present and Future,” Kansas Business Review, with N.B. Johnson, Volume 6 (May-June, 1983), pp. 13-17. Terms of Use: http://www2.ku.edu/~scholar/docs/license.shtml and N. B. Johnson Kansas Labor Unions: Past, Present, and Future... that the strikers were " . . . sober, in­ telligent, orderly men" and encouraged the railroad to "arrange terms for an amicable settlement."6 Governor Martin's stalwart stand not to intervene with troops represented one of the earliest occasions in which a state...

  20. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  1. Economics of Grade Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Paul J.

    1914-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. C - Curves of Moan Effective Pressure.... —Follows Page No. 201 Fig. D - Speed Factor Curves --Follows Pago No. 203 Fig. E - Curves of M.E.P. Compound Engines.... --Follows page Ho. 208 Fig. G - Typical Profile Showing Velocity Grades... #84 of A. R. E. A. Mr* A* M. Wellington-Book-"Railway Location.* Mr. G. R. Henderson-Book-"Locomotive Operation." Prof. &* Webb-Book-"Economics of Railroad Con- struction* Mr. Edward C. SchmIdt~"FreIght Train Resistance*" Published as University...

  2. "Pretty plutocrats": a feminist reading of the works of Charles Dudley Warner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibbe, Kristi Kay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    railroad surveyor in Missouri, which enabled him to travel throughout the West (Lounsbury viii). These travels would later be exploited by Warner when he created the character of Philip Sterling in The Gilded A e. Still drawn to the legal profession... as the cucumbers which lay sliced in ice before her, and when she began to dispense the fresh dishes, I saw at once that the day of my destiny was over (93). After trying to convince Polly that it was he who had in fact done all the work, the gardener finally...

  3. A transient study on the dynamic coupling of a fluid-tank system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, Pui Chun

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the liquid has an alarming propensity to undergo relatively large excursions for even very small motions of the container. This is particularly true for tank trucks on highways, tank cars on railroads, and sloshing of liquid cargo in ocean-going vessels... system and the equivalent non-shifting cargo system. Figures 4 and 5 show the responses of the fluid-tank system and the equivalent rigid-cargo system which undergo an oscilla- tory type of motion. It is noticed from the response curves tha...

  4. Progress Report of Substation No. 12, Chillicothe, Texas, 1905- 1914.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, R.W.

    1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Chillicothe. In 1911 a new location of thirty acres was secured adjoining the townsite on the uorthmest and along the Fort Worth RT Denver City Railroad. This land was used until 1915, when a tract of one hundred acres, situated five miles southwest... it or acl- vocating its adoption by farmers. Some new plants, of course, show up so poorly that thej map be discarded after one trial, while it is difficult to place others even after growing them several Fears. In addition to the sorghums, a large...

  5. An analysis of Texas cargo vehicle registration taxes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Cadwell L

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the assault on the di. stance problem on land, in the water and in the sir. The development of these modern methods of transportation gave rise to the construction of complex railroad systems? hard surfaced highways, air terminals, pipelines, canals... transportati. on unt. il the development of highway, air, pipeline and inland canal transpoxtation. Since then, competition between modes ~N i L. F 1 i E tW. Will|, Z*. , E k f~X tation (Revised Edition; New York: Harper and Brothers, 1959), 7. TIbi6. , 3...

  6. The application of the fusion method of thermit welding to small diameter tubing: An analysis of mold design and powder quantity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Frank Charles

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of thermit welding to the joining of small diameter steel tubing. This research was done in cooperation with Thomas M. Glynn (7), who investigated another basic aspect of this problem, Thermit welding is one of the oldest welding processes. It makes use... in the joining of ferrous metals of large cross sectional area, usually castings or f'orgings in the railroad and shipping industries. During this period, thermit welding was also applied to the joining of pipe by a process called the plastic method. This iv...

  7. SWRI notes synthetic fuels capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is given of the test facilities developed by the Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio, Texas. Briefly described are a combustion bomb system for the study of the ignition quality of fuels for diesel engines; a variable compression ratio, direct injection, small cylinder engine allowing photography and monitoring of fuel combustion; a mathematical model which predicts cetane number from NMR measurements; another model for blending alcohols and gasoline to specified fuel properties; and a single cylinder, four stroke diesel engine representative of railroad and marine engines, the only engine of this size and speed range available for research in the US.

  8. Locomotive emission study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work for the report involved the estimation of the air pollution emissions arising from the operation of railroad locomotives in six non-attainment air management basins within California. The six air basins are the Bay Area, the Central Coast (which includes the North Central Coast and the South Central Coast basins), the South Coast, San Diego, San Joaquin, and the Sacramento Valley basins. In addition, the effort involved the development of information about the efficacy and cost of feasible control strategies for locomotive-generated air pollution emissions, for both long and short term implementation.

  9. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  10. Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64% of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12% of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12%) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9%).

  11. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1936 to August 31, 1937.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - lowing information: the total number of tons in the shipment; number and initials of car in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which... feed was purchased; date of original waybill; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases involving the shipment of feed from other States, as it will assist in proving the sale...

  12. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, from September 1, 1948 to August 31, 1949.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holleman, M. P.; Brock, F. D.

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the inspector the following information: freight bills and invoices covering each shipment; or, the total number of tons in each shipment; number and initials of car or license number of truck in which shipment is recei~red; number and date of waybill; name... of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases involving the shipment...

  13. Commercial Feeding Stuffs from September 1, 1939 to August 31, 1940.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, James; Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs)

    1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    number of tons in the shipment; number and initials of car in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date... of original waybill; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases involving the shipment of feed from other States, as it will assist in proving the sale and protecting Texas purchasers...

  14. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1935 to August 31, 1936.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for use of the inspector the fol- lowing information: the total number of tons in the shipment; number and initials of car in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment... was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date of original waybill; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases involving the shipment of feed from other States...

  15. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1937 to August 31, 1938.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Sullivan, James

    1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that purchasers of feed in car lots should always have available for use of the inspector the fol- lowing information: the total number of tons in the shipment; number and initials of car in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name... of railroad issuing waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; dat of original waybill; date shipment was received, and price per ton. Thi information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases...

  16. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, from September 1, 1949 to August 31, 1950.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holleman, M. P.; Brock, F. D.

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information : freight bills and invoices covering each shipment; or, the total number of tons in each shipment; number and initials of car or license number of truck in which shipment is received; number and date of waybill; name of railroad issuing... waybill; name of town from which shipment was made; name of firm from which feed was purchased; date shipment was received, and price per ton. This information is especially valuable to the Service in all cases involving the shipment of feed from other...

  17. Passed on traditions: Reclaiming ethnic heritage through magical realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouse, Linda Anne

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . was isolated from the community simply by his association with her; it did not matter that he knew nothing of the child's murder. In order for the community to accept Paul D. , Stamp Paid, the former Underground Railroad conductor, must convince one... baby. Morrison provides a list of the strange behavior in and around 124 Bluestone. Locals ride at a gallop when they pass the house; Paul D. , a newcomer to the house and to town, feels the presence of the baby as soon as he sets foot in the house...

  18. Enron Documents 2000 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous g Materials0

  19. Enron Documents 2001 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous g Materials01

  20. Ensuring a Reliable Bulk Electric System | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous g

  1. Enter Report Title Here

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  2. Entering Invoices Through the Vendor Inquiry Payment Electronic Reporting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  3. Enterprise Assessments - Operational Awareness Record of the Observation of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous gthe Waste

  4. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low-Activity Facility Wide Draft Hazard Analysis Report Â… June 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous gthe Waste Office

  5. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High-Level Waste Facility Concentrate Receipt/Melter Feed/Glass Formers Reagent Hazards Analysis Event Tables Â… June 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous gthe Waste Office

  6. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record of the Follow-up Review of Engineeing Configuration Management Processes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - June 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  7. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous gthe Waste

  8. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous gthe

  9. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Hazardous

  10. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  11. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  12. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad

  13. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -Railroad Review of the Hanford Site

  14. Enterprise Assessments Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - September 2014 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  15. Enterprise Assessments Review, Sandia National Laboratories - March 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  16. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site-Level Exercise

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  17. Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  18. Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  19. Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  20. Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  1. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control at the Hanford Central Plateau Environmental Remediation Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  2. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  3. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Idaho National Laboratory -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  4. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Idaho Site AMWTP Report - January

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  5. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Lawrence Livermore National

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  6. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  7. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review,Y-12 National Security Complex -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  8. Enterprise Assessments, Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews, Radiological

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  9. Enterprise SRS Article | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  10. Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  11. Environmental Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  12. Environmental Assessment Checklist | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  13. Environmental Assessment Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  14. Environmental Assessment and Corrective Measures Study Report for Remediating Contamination at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  15. Environmental Assessment for U-233 Stabilization, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession0-02 -RailroadEnvironmentalAssessment574

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery:Kovis PlutoniumPFPPlutonium2 MillionPublicRailroad

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotential of liquefied natural gas use as a railroad

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotential of liquefied natural gas use as a railroadU.S.

  19. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables8,"Annual",2014,"1973/06/30"Monthly","4/2015","1997/01/15"Industrial UseOilRailroad

  20. Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation: technical section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen different alternative fuels were considered in the preliminary screening, from three basic resource bases. Coal can be used to provide 13 of the fuels; oil shale was the source for three of the fuels; and biomass provided the resource base for two fuels not provided from coal. In the case of biomass, six different fuels were considered. Nuclear power and direct solar radiation were also considered. The eight prime movers that were considered in the preliminary screening are boiler/steam turbine; open and closed cycle gas turbines; low and medium speed diesels; spark ignited and stratified charge Otto cycles; electric motor; Stirling engine; free piston; and fuel cell/electric motor. Modes of transport considered are pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft. Section 2 gives the overall summary and conclusions, the future outlook for each mode of transportation, and the R and D suggestions by mode of transportation. Section 3 covers the preliminary screening phase and includes a summary of the data base used. Section 4 presents the methodology used to select the fuels and prime movers for the detailed study. Sections 5 through 8 cover the detailed evaluation of the pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft modes of transportation. Section 9 covers the demand related issues.

  1. Economic assessment of coal-burning locomotives: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Electric Company embarked upon a study to evaluate various alternatives for the design and manufacture a coal fired locomotive considering various prime movers, but retaining the electric drive transmission. The initial study was supported by the Burlington-Northern and Norfolk-Southern railroads, and included the following alternatives: coal fired diesel locomotive; direct fired gas turbine locomotives; direct fired gas turbine locomotive with steam injection; raw coal gasifier gas turbine locomotive; and raw coal fluid bed steam turbine locomotive. All alternatives use the electric drive transmission and were selected for final evaluation. The first three would use a coal water slurry as a fuel, which must be produced by new processing plants. Therefore, use of a slurry would require a significant plant capital investment. The last two would use classified run-of-the-mine (ROM) coal with much less capital expenditure. Coal fueling stations would be required but are significantly lower in capital cost than a coal slurry plant. For any coal fired locomotive to be commercially viable, it must pass the following criteria: be technically feasible and environmentally acceptable; meet railroads' financial expectations; and offer an attractive return to the locomotive manufacturer. These three criteria are reviewed in the report.

  2. Route selection issues for NWPA shipments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, C.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Questions surrounding the designation of routes for the movement of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) have broad implications. Federal regulations prescribe rules to be applied in the selection of highway routes. In most cases, these rules will lead to a clear selection of one route between an origin and destination point. However, in other cases, strict application of the regulations does not result in a clear choice of a preferred route. The regulations also provide discretion to State governments and carriers to select alternative routes to enhance the safety of the shipment. Railroad shipments of radioactive materials are not subject to Federal routing regulations. Since the railroads operate on private property, it has been assumed that they know the best way to move freight on their system. This discretion, while desirable for addressing unique local safety concerns or for responding to temporary safety concerns such as road problems, weather conditions, or construction areas, leads to significant opportunity for misunderstandings and uneasiness on the part of local residents.

  3. Northeast corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. To Boston, MA. Volume 1. Final report, September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 X 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. This volume considers impacts on the Human and Natural Environment utilizing guidance as outlined in CFR Part 1500, Council on Environmental Quality, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA as amended and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) regulations (301 CMR 11:00). Impacts analyzed include changes in the natural environment (air quality, noise and vibration, energy, electromagnetic fields, natural resources, hazardous materials and visual/aesthetics), changes in the social environment (land use and recreation, transportation and traffic), impacts on historic and archaeological sites, changes in transit service and patronage, associated changes in highway and airport congestion, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and financial implications. Impacts are identified both for the proposed construction period and for the long-term operation of the alternatives.

  4. Coal-fueled diesel engines for locomotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, B.D.; Najewicz, D.J.; Cook, C.S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GE Transportation Systems (GE/TS) completed a two and one half year study into the economic viability of a coal fueled locomotive. The coal fueled diesel engine was deemed to be one of the most attractive options. Building on the BN-NS study, a proposal was submitted to DOE to continue researching economic and technical feasibility of a coal fueled diesel engine for locomotives. The contract DE-AC21-85MC22181 was awarded to GE Corporate Research and Development (GE/CRD) for a three year program that began in March 1985. This program included an economic assessment and a technical feasibility study. The economic assessment study examined seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal fueled diesels. These areas included impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The results of the study indicated the merits for development of a coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. The technical feasibility study examined the combustion of CWS through lab and bench scale experiments. The major accomplishments from this study have been the development of CWS injection hardware, the successful testing of CWS fuel in a full size, single cylinder, medium speed diesel engine, evaluation of full scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions.

  5. Evaluation of aftermarket LPG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, E.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SwRI was contracted by NREL to evaluate three LPG conversion kits on a Chevrolet Lumina. The objective of the project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of these kits, and compare their performance to gasoline-fueled operation and to each other. Varying LPG fuel blends allowed a preliminary look at the potential for fuel system disturbance. The project required kit installation and adjustment according to manufacturer`s instructions. A limited amount of trouble diagnosis was also performed on the fuel systems. A simultaneous contract from the Texas Railroad Commission, in cooperation with NREL, provided funds for additional testing with market fuels (HD5 propane and industry average gasoline) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions speciation to determine the ozone-forming potential of LPG HC emissions. This report documents the procurement, installation, and testing of these LPG conversion kits.

  6. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES AT THE POWELL STAGE STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Julie B. Braun; Brenda R. Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the boundaries of the Idaho National Laboratory, an ongoing archaeological investigation of a late 19th century stage station was expanded with the use of Electro-Magnetic and Magnetic geophysical surveying. The station known as the Powell Stage Station was a primary transportation hub on the Snake River Plain, bridging the gap between railroad supply depots in Blackfoot, Idaho and booming mining camps throughout Central Idaho. Initial investigations have shown a strong magnetic signature from a buried road and previously unknown features that were not detected by visual surface surveys. Data gained from this project aids in federally directed cultural resource and land management and use requirements and has contributed additional information for archeological interpretation and cultural resource preservation.

  7. Repowering a small coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miell, R.

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arkansas River Power Authority (ARPA) Lamar Repowering Project is moving forward. The new generator, capable of producing 18 MW of electricity, is scheduled to be online in June 2008 bringing the total generation to 43 MW. New coal handling equipment, with infrared fire detectors, is almost complete. The new 18 MW steam turbine will be cooled by an air-cooled condenser. Coal will be delivered in a railroad spur to an unloading site then be unloaded onto a conveyor under the tracks and conveyed to two storage domes each holding 6000 tons of coal. It will be drawn out of these through an underground conveyor system, brought into a crusher, conveyed through overhead conveyors and fed into the new coal- fired fluidized bed boilers. 1 photo.

  8. Gaining more access is focus on West Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B.

    1988-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Beaufort Sea wildcat off the tantalizing Arctic National Wildlife Refuge highlights U.S. West Coast exploration/development action this year. Targeting the same structure tapped by the only wildcat drilled on ANWR's coastal Plain, the Tenneco Oil Exploration and Production offshore well may give more clues as to the potential of North America's most prospective and most controversial untapped petroleum province. Elsewhere in Alaska, firming oil prices have spurred a modest revival in wildcatting. But a steep decline in Alaskan oil production will likely begin in the early 1990s. Burgeoning production from new platforms and expanded steamflood projects will boost California output in the next few years. Longer term prospects for Offshore California, however, remain clouded by environmental opposition to development and leasing. Elsewhere in the Far West, Shell Oil Co. has returned to Washington, ARCO is stepping up action in Oregon and independents' discovery of new pay in the Railroad Valley area is spurring renewed interest in Nevada.

  9. Geophysical investigation of the ``Thimble,`` 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the geophysical investigations conducted as part of the characterization of the buried ``Thimble`` site. The site is located just south of the 116-H-2 Crib and is in the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit. Available documentation has it located between, and at the convergence of, two railroad spurs that run north-south. A concrete monument is believed to mark the site. The burial ground is suspected of containing a vertical safety rod thimble that is reportedly 40 ft long. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other similar investigations on the Hanford Site. The objective of the investigation was to locate the buried thimble.

  10. Sealing abandoned mines with treated flyash kills two birds with one stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacinto, J.F.; Rafalko, L.G.; Petzrick, P. [Environmental Resources Management Inc. (United States)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign disposal of coal combustion products/by-products (CCPs) such as flyash and bottom ash has been a problem since the first coal-fired power plant went on-line. In recent years, ways have been developed to recycle CCPs into useful commercial products like bricks and roadbase. This article describes an innovative State of Maryland program that is putting CCPs to yet another use: stabilizing abandoned mines to permanently sequester acids and harmful metals. As engineering consultants to the State's Power Plant Research Project (PPRP), Environmental Resources Management (ERM) Inc. has conducted several projects to evaluate and demonstrate the beneficial use of CCPs for deep mine stabilization. These are several hundred abandoned underground mines in western Maryland and several thousand across the Mid-Atlantic Highlands and their proximity to coal-fired plants makes it cost-effective to transport CCPs via existing railroads and highways. 8 figs.

  11. Update on PRB coal transportation: still a hot issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Gaalaas

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is growing rapidly. Over 60% of the increase in production during 2000-2005 came from mines located on the Burlington Northern Santa Fe/Union Pacific (BNSF/UP) joint line at the southern end of the PRB. BNSF and UP are to make capacity expansions on the line during 2007 and 2008 which will increase capacity to 400 mtpa. However, there is not likely to be much excess capacity and utilities are advised to develop contingency plans to deal with possible disruptions of deliveries such as occurred in 1997 and 1998 and again in 2005 which caused severe effects on coal markets. One option under consideration is the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad's project to build a third line into the PRB. 3 figs.

  12. Combustion of waste fuels in a fluidized-bed boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylkowski, J.; Ehrlich, S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a project whose objectives are to determine the impact of the waste fuels on Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) operating procedures, boiler performance, and emissions and to assess the potential for fuel-specific operating problems. The low-grade waste fuels investigated are hogged railroad ties, shredded rubber tires, peat, refuse-derived fuel, and one or more agricultiral wastes. The Northern States Power (NSP) Company converted their French Island Unit No. 2 stoker-fired boiler to a fluidized-bed combustor designed to burn wood waste. NSP and EPRI are investigating cofiring other waste fuels with wood waste. Topics considered include fluidized-bed boiler conversion, fuel resources, economic justification, environmental considerations, the wood-handling system, an auxiliary fuel system, the air quality control system, ash handling and disposal, and the alternate fuels test program.

  13. Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

  14. Freight Shuttle System: Cross-Border Movement of Goods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Freight Shuttle System (FSS) is designed to provide freight transportation services between those short and intermediate distance locations (within 600 miles) that are currently handling large volumes of freight traffic. Much like trucks, the FSS's transporters are autonomous: each transporter has its own propulsion and travels independently of other transporters. Inspired by railroads, each FSS transporter has steel wheels operating on a steel running surface and can carry either a standardsize freight container or an over-the-road truck trailer. However, unlike either rail or trucks, the FSS runs on an elevated, dedicated guideway to avoid the interference of other transportation systems. The objective of this report is to examine the potential viability for an alternative transportation system for trailers and containers in a multi-national, cross-border setting. The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez region serves as the environment of this analysis.

  15. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yde, Chris A.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

  16. Great Lakes ports coal handling capacity and export coal potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, A.H. Jr.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was developed to determine the competitive position of the Great Lakes Region coal-loading ports in relation to other US coastal ranges. Due to the congestion at some US Atlantic coastal ports US coal producers have indicated a need for alternative export routes, including the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System. The study assesses the regions coal handling capacity and price competitiveness along with the opportunity for increased US flag vessel service. A number of appendices are included showing major coal producers, railroad marketing representatives, US vessel operators, and port handling capacities and throughput. A rate analysis is provided including coal price at the mine, rail rate to port, port handling charges, water transportation rates to western Europe, Great Lakes route versus the US Atlantic Coast ports.

  17. Muckraking elements in Frank Norris's "The Octopus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitz, Robert Charles

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~. eauirement f' or tne o-gree oi' l'?SASH OZ J~DTS liUCiQiriKIRG 'LEREi&TS IiV EH. INK IlGRRIS' S TRE GCT01?US A Thesis by RGBERT CEP. RLES LEITZ & III Approved as to sty1e and content by: ~Vir, "i r. 'roan o~ Coizraitte' q ( r Read. . Depanl, !a nt... prooi or examples to support his statement. He says: "I y~ks Qoto s, y'o or tl d J Valley, Norri. s became quit;= emphatically, a. muck-raker, a commentator in fictional form on the "cts of the Southern pacific Railroad which w re so to arouse...

  18. Transfer stations and long-haul transport systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; Pferdehirt, W.; O'Leary, P. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfer stations can be an important link between pickup at the curb and ultimate disposal, often allowing significant savings in the total costs to move wastes from the generator to the disposal site. A transfer station is simply a facility where collection trucks bring collected materials for loading into larger vehicles and subsequent shipment, usually to a landfill, waste-to-energy plant, or composting facility. Transferred wastes are typically shipped out in large trailers, but barges and railroad cars are also transport options. Although modern transfer stations usually include some provisions for handling recyclables, solid waste transfer dominates the operation of most facilities. Some communities have begun experimenting with transferring commingled, source-separated recyclables to regional processing centers. Transfer facilities can be as simple as a pavement slab and a front-end loader. Alternatively, transfer stations can cost millions of dollars and move thousands of tons of waste each day.

  19. Rail Access to Yucca Mountain: Critical Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.; Moore, R. C.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository site currently lacks rail access. The nearest mainline railroad is almost 100 miles away. Absence of rail access could result in many thousands of truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Direct rail access to the repository could significantly reduce the number of truck shipments and total shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified five potential rail access corridors, ranging in length from 98 miles to 323 miles, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain. The FEIS also considers an alternative to rail spur construction, heavy-haul truck (HHT) delivery of rail casks from one of three potential intermodal transfer stations. The authors examine the feasibility and cost of the five rail corridors, and DOE's alternative proposal for HHT transport. The authors also address the potential for rail shipments through the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

  20. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Final Report - Inception through December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Don Karner

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased at total of 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month. First Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May, 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for leaving the Program include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles were returned to Ford when the lease was completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Mileage accumulation dropped in the last quarter of the program as vehicle leases were returned to Ford. The impact of the program overall was significant as participants in the Clean Commute Program drove their vehicles over 406,074 miles, avoiding the use of over 18,887 gallons of gasoline. During the active portion of the program, the TH!NK city vehicles were driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month. Over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replaced trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through December 2004.

  1. NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report – Inception Through May 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; James Francfort; Randall Solomon

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Commute Program uses TH!NK city electric vehicles from Ford Motor Company’s electric vehicle group, TH!NK Mobility, to demonstrate the feasibility of using electric vehicles for transportation in urban applications. Suburban New York City railroad commuters use the TH!NK city vehicles to commute from their private residences to railroad stations, where they catch commuter trains into New York City. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure for the TH!NK city vehicles is located at the commuters’ private residences as well as seven train stations. Ford leased 97 TH!NK city electric vehicles to commuters from Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Queens, Nassau, and Suffolk counties for $199 per month per vehicle. The first Clean Commute Program vehicle deliveries occurred late in 2001, with data collection commencing in February 2002. Through May 2004, 24 of the lessees have returned their vehicles to Ford and no longer participate in the Clean Commute Program. Reasons given for returning the vehicles include relocation out of the Program area, change in employment status, change in commuting status, and, in a few cases, dissatisfaction with the vehicle. Additionally, 13 vehicles have been returned to Ford as their leases have completed. In August 2002, Ford announced that it was ceasing production of the TH!NK city and would not extend any TH!NK city leases. Through May 2004, participants in the Clean Commute Program have driven their vehicles over 370,000 miles, avoiding the use of over 17,000 gallons of gasoline. The TH!NK city vehicles are driven an average of between 180 and 230 miles per month, and over 95% of all trips taken with the TH!NK city vehicles replace trips previously taken in gasoline vehicles. This report covers the period from Program inception through May 2004.

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and surrounding area, Tucson, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey, which was conducted from March 1 to 13, 1995, covered a 51-square-mile (132-square-kilometer) area centered on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB) in Tucson, Arizona. The results of the survey are reported as contours of bismuth-214 ({sup 214}Bi) soil concentrations, which are characteristic of natural uranium and its progeny, and as contours of the total terrestrial exposure rates extrapolated to one meter above ground level. All data were scaled and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the DMAFB area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 9 to 20 microroentgens per hour at one meter above the ground. Elevated levels of terrestrial radiation due to increased concentrations of {sup 214}Bi (natural uranium) were observed over the Southern Pacific railroad yard and along portions of the railroad track bed areas residing both within and outside the base boundaries. No man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was observed by the aerial survey. High-purity germanium spectrometer and pressurized ionization chamber measurements at eight locations within the base boundaries were used to verify the integrity of the aerial results. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to be in agreement. However, the ground-based measurements were able to detect minute quantities of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) at six of the eight locations examined. The presence of {sup 137}Cs is a remnant of fallout from foreign and domestic atmospheric nuclear weapons testing that occurred in the 1950s and early 1960s. Cesium-137 concentrations varied from 0.1 to 0.3 picocuries per gram, which is below the minimum detectable activity of the aerial system.

  3. Potential for the use of biogeochemistry in the detection of petroleum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusman, R.W.; Saeed, M.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States)); Abu-Ali, M.A. (ARAMCO, Golden, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry was applied to the indirect detection of petroleum microseepage in the vicinity of the Eagle Springs oil field, Railroad Valley, Nevada and Cave Canyon field, Paradox basin, Utah. Trace elements were measured in native vegetation over and surrounding areas of production at the test sites. The oxidation of microseepage in the upper part of the soil column is postulated to cause an increase in plant uptake of transition trace elements such as iron, manganese, vanadium, and a decrease in plant uptake of alkaline earth elements such as calcium, strontium, and barium. An increase in uptake of transition trace elements and a decrease in alkaline earth elements was observed in Fourwing saltbush over the Eagle Springs field. The postulated increase in uptake of transition trace elements and decrease in alkaline earth elements was not observed in Big Sagebrush nor in Utah juniper over the Cave Canyon field. The observation of the postulated effects at Eagle Springs may be due to the relatively large rates of microseepage independently observed using other methods, or the loss of the light hydrocarbons and extensive faulting in Railroad Valley. The apparent failure to observed the same effect at Cave Canyon may reflect the lack of faulting and the retention of light hydrocarbons in the reservoir. Another possibility is that the available plant species at Cave Canyon do not exhibit the effect at the lower soil pH measured in the area. The theory predicts that the increased uptake of transition elements and decreased uptake of alkaline earth elements will be enhanced at high soil pH.

  4. Exploring for hydrocarbons in geothermally and hydrothermally complex areas -- a southern Nevada example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, A.G.; Repetski, J.E. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Grow, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-based isograd maps using conodont color alteration indices (CAI) have been compiled and interpreted for a large area in southern Nevada that includes Yucca Mountain, the Nevada Test Site, and the Nellis Air Force Bombing and Gunnery Range. These maps were produced to evaluate the controversy about possible important mineral and (or) energy resources near Yucca Mountain, the potential burial site for high-level nuclear waste. The hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain area has been likened to that of the Railroad and Pine Valley areas, 200 km to the northeast where 35 million barrels of oil have been produced from Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata. In 1991, two companies with no previous drilling experience in Nevada drilled three oil exploration wells within 20 km of Yucca Mountain and within or close to the Timber Mountain caldera system. No shows of oil or gas were found in these wells. The deepest well was drilled to 5,000 feet and penetrated 2,200 feet of upper Tertiary valley-fill deposits and volcanic rocks overlying an overturned sequence of Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician rocks having conodonts with CAI values of 5. Our new conodont sampling, however, has targeted some thermally favorable areas for hydrocarbons east of Yucca mountain, but their maturation history suggests that the potential for oil is substantially lower than in the Railroad and Pine Valley areas. Cambrian through Triassic rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain have experienced temperatures too high for oil to be preserved, except for a narrow zone (20 x 100 km) northeast of Yucca Mountain, where Mississippian through Triassic rocks are just within the upper limit of the oil generating window. Most of this zone, however, lies on Federal lands that are, for now, inaccessible for a variety of security and environmental reasons.

  5. Agenda of critical issues: coal price and availability. Final report. [Includes effect of legislation, sulfur content and rail transport costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennican, M.L.; Wayland, R.E.; Weinstein, D.M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temple, Barker, and Sloane, Inc. developed an agenda of critical issues regarding future coal prices and coal availability for EPRI. TBS interviewed nearly 50 utility, coal company, and railroad officials, academic experts, and coal consultants; held a one-day participatory workshop; and conducted a literature review and follow-up interviews with selected utilities. TBS found four causes of uncertainty in the utility industry over future coal prices. First, the acid deposition proposals in Congress vary in terms of the structure of the legislation, the costs of compliance, and the impact on coal prices; in turn these uncertainties impede utility fuel planning and decision making. Second, powerplant-specific factors will have a major impact on whether utilities switch or scrub in response to acid deposition legislation; existing analyses do not capture these factors. The most important powerplant-specific factors are matching unit characteristics with coal specifications, retrofit scrubber costs, and differing state regulatory environments. Third, TBS found that utility fuel managers have great uncertainty over the availability and future cost of compliance coal. TBS estimated that the existing production capacity of eastern compliance coal is at least twice as high as current production. Fourth, TBS concluded that uncertainty over future coal transportation rates was a major reason for utilities' uncertainty over future delivered prices of coal. Critical transportation-related issues are the strategic and tactical response of eastern coal producers to the Staggers Act; the impact on rail rates of the sale of Conrail, of possible transcontinental mergers, and of multi-modal mergers; and the future pricing policies that eastern railroads will adopt in response to imports of Colombian coal. 21 references.

  6. Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, S.M.

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Traffic congestion and its impacts significantly affect the nation's economic performance and the public's quality of life. In most urban areas, travel demand routinely exceeds highway capacity during peak periods. In addition, events such as crashes, vehicle breakdowns, work zones, adverse weather, railroad crossings, large trucks loading/unloading in urban areas, and other factors such as toll collection facilities and sub-optimal signal timing cause temporary capacity losses, often worsening the conditions on already congested highway networks. The impacts of these temporary capacity losses include delay, reduced mobility, and reduced reliability of the highway system. They can also cause drivers to re-route or reschedule trips. Such information is vital to formulating sound public policies for the highway infrastructure and its operation. In response to this need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), made an initial attempt to provide nationwide estimates of the capacity losses and delay caused by temporary capacity-reducing events (Chin et al. 2002). This study, called the Temporary Loss of Capacity (TLC) study, estimated capacity loss and delay on freeways and principal arterials resulting from fatal and non-fatal crashes, vehicle breakdowns, and adverse weather, including snow, ice, and fog. In addition, it estimated capacity loss and delay caused by sub-optimal signal timing at intersections on principal arterials. It also included rough estimates of capacity loss and delay on Interstates due to highway construction and maintenance work zones. Capacity loss and delay were estimated for calendar year 1999, except for work zone estimates, which were estimated for May 2001 to May 2002 due to data availability limitations. Prior to the first phase of this study, which was completed in May of 2002, no nationwide estimates of temporary losses of highway capacity by type of capacity-reducing event had been made. This report describes the second phase of the TLC study (TLC2). TLC2 improves upon the first study by expanding the scope to include delays from rain, toll collection facilities, railroad crossings, and commercial truck pickup and delivery (PUD) activities in urban areas. It includes estimates of work zone capacity loss and delay for all freeways and principal arterials, rather than for Interstates only. It also includes improved estimates of delays caused by fog, snow, and ice, which are based on data not available during the initial phase of the study. Finally, computational errors involving crash and breakdown delay in the original TLC report are corrected.

  7. Spent Fuel Transportation Package Response to the Baltimore Tunnel Fire Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Bajwa, Christopher S.

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 18, 2001, a freight train carrying hazardous (non-nuclear) materials derailed and caught fire while passing through the Howard Street railroad tunnel in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook an investigation of the train derailment and fire to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by railroad. Shortly after the accident occurred, the USNRC met with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB, the U.S. agency responsible for determining the cause of transportation accidents), to discuss the details of the accident and the ensuing fire. Following these discussions, the USNRC assembled a team of experts from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine the thermal conditions that existed in the Howard Street tunnel fire and analyze the effects of this fire on various spent fuel transportation package designs. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code, developed by NIST, was used to determine the thermal environment present in the Howard Street tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used as boundary conditions in the COBRA-SFS and ANSYS® computer codes to evaluate the thermal performance of different package designs. The staff concluded that larger transportation packages resembling the HOLTEC Model No. HI STAR 100 and TransNuclear Model No. TN-68 would withstand a fire with thermal conditions similar to those that existed in the Baltimore tunnel fire event with only minor damage to peripheral components. This is due to their sizable thermal inertia and design specifications in compliance with currently imposed regulatory requirements. The staff also concluded that some components of smaller transportation packages resembling the NAC Model No. LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the package responses to the Baltimore tunnel fire. Though components in some packages heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant dose as a result of the fire for any of these and similar packages.

  8. Coal slurry pipeline based midwest fuel hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huettenhain, H. [Bechtel Technology & Consulting San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is a sought after fuel to comply with the year 2000 emission regulation for utility boilers. PRB coal is presently not competitive East of the Mississippi mainly because of railroad switching requirements and boiler designs not compatible with the PRB fuel characteristics. The use of the Lakes for transportation is an exception. The Lakes shipping lanes however, are only open part of the year. It is proposed to construct a coal slurry pipeline from the center of Wyoming coalfields to a hub near Detroit with access to low cost waste energy from power generation stations. The coal slurry pipeline will transport up to 25 million tons per year of fine PRB coal which has been removed from the conventionally transported coal, namely coal transported by rail. The rail delivered coal will have less dust. The system fits the DOE Vision 21 concept to mine and utilize coal in highly efficient systems and with the least environmental impact. The PRB coal is of subbituminous rank and not directly compatible with the boilers in Michigan/Indiana/Ohio area, which are designed to burn bituminous coal. Upgrading of the PRB coal using the hydrothermal slurry upgrading process can transform the PRB coal into a higher Btu content fuel by removing a large portion of the inherent moisture. Such upgraded PRB coal has proven an excellent reactive fuel when burned conventionally as PC fuel, or even when burned in slurry form as Coal Water Fuel (CWF). The cost of the process can be recovered when the process is combined with a coal slurry pipeline transport system. The result is an upgraded competitive fuel or fuels, which can be used for co-firing or re-burning applications to reduce SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions of utility boilers. The fuels can be powdered for direct fuel injection into boilers or blast furnaces as well as CWF. Depending on the stability of the upgraded PRB coal, the pipeline product could also be dewatered and prepared for export. This paper describes the concept and preliminary cost information. It also reports on reactions of the industries, which could be involved in the complex system, namely, coal mining companies, railroads, pipeline operators, fuel suppliers, and utilities.

  9. Consortium for coal log pipeline research and development. Final technical progress report, August 10, 1993--August 9, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrero, T.R.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project was to conduct intensive research and development of the Coal Log Pipeline (CLP). Specifically, the R & D was to concentrate on previously neglected and insufficiently studied aspects of CLP which were deemed significant. With improvements in these areas, CLP could be implemented for commercial use within five years. CLP technology is capable of transporting coal logs for long distances. The many potential advantages of CLP over truck and railroad transportation include: lower freight costs, less energy consumption, less air pollution, decreased environmental problems, increased safety, and improved reliability. Previous studies have shown that CLP is advantageous over slurry pipeline technology. First, CLP uses one-third the water required by a coal slurry pipeline. Second, CLP provides easier coal dewatering. Third, the CLP conveying capacity of coal is twice as much as a slurry transport line of equal diameter. In many situations, the cost for transporting each ton of coal is expected to be less expensive by CLP as compared to other competing modes of transportation such as: truck, unit train and slurry pipeline.

  10. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  11. Detectors for the Gamma-Ray Resonant Absorption (GRA) Method of Explosives Detection in Cargo: A Comparative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Vartsky; Mark B. Goldberg; Gideon Engler; Asher Shor; Aharon Goldschmidt; Gennady Feldman; Doron Bar; Itzhak Orion; Lucian Wielopolski

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-Ray Resonant Absorption (GRA) is an automatic-decision radiographic screening technique that combines high radiation penetration with very good sensitivity and specificity to nitrogenous explosives. The method is particularly well-suited to inspection of large, massive objects (since the incident gamma-ray probe is at 9.17 MeV) such as aviation and marine containers, heavy vehicles and railroad cars. Two kinds of gamma-ray detectors have been employed to date in GRA systems: 1) Resonant-response nitrogen-rich liquid scintillators and 2) BGO detectors. This paper analyses and compares the response of these detector-types to the resonant radiation, in terms of single-pixel figures of merit. The latter are sensitive not only to detector response, but also to accelerator-beam quality, via the properties of the nuclear reaction that produces the resonant gamma-rays. Generally, resonant detectors give rise to much higher nitrogen-contrast sensitivity in the radiographic image than their non-resonant detector counterparts and furthermore, do not require proton beams of high energy-resolution. By comparison, the non-resonant detectors have higher gamma-detection efficiency, but their contrast sensitivity is very sensitive to the quality of the accelerator beam. Implications of these detector/accelerator characteristics for eventual GRA field systems are discussed.

  12. Action builds on the road to CAA compliance. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most basic of CAA compliance actions taken by many power plants involves fuel switching. This paper provides an overview of coal transportation issues arising from coal switching. One of the findings that the data suggest is that eastern railroad costs are dropping significantly; and, if competition exists, eastern rail rates also should decline, according to Jeremy Platt, EPRI project manager. A utility that switches form a nearby coal source to a low sulfur coal from another state risks inflicting grim consequences on its own service area. For example, reports on potential local job losses range up to 6000 with economic costs of more than $1.5 million in certain areas, including Illinois, western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Kentucky. There are reports that other states are considering subsidizing scrubber installations at power plants as an investment toward preserving local economies. This is one reason that scrubbers continue to grow in their attraction to meet Phase I of the CAA. Another reason is the expected lower cost of operation for second-generation scrubber technology.

  13. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and non-destructive testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Migliori, A.; Darling, T.W.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of mechanical resonances to test properties of materials is perhaps older than the industrial revolution. Early documented cases of British railroad engineers tapping the wheels of a train and using the sound to detect cracks perhaps mark the first real use of resonances to test the integrity of high-performance alloys. Attempts were made in the following years to understand the resonances of solids mathematically, based on the shape and composition. But Nobel Laureate Lord Rayleigh best summarized the state of affairs in 1894, stating {open_quotes}the problem has, for the most part, resisted attack{close_quotes}. More recently, modern computers and electronics have enabled Anderson and co-workers with their work on minerals, and our work at Los Alamos on new materials and manufactured components to advance the use of resonances to a precision non-destructive testing tool that makes anisotropic modulus measurements, defect detection and geometry error detection routine. The result is that resonances can achieve the highest absolute accuracy for any dynamic modulus measurement technique, can be used on the smallest samples, and can also enable detection of errors in certain classes of precision manufactured components faster and more accurately than any other technique.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Washington. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washinton State Constitution grants authority to the legislature to regulate railroads and other common carriers as well as telegraph and telephone companies in the state. No section of the constitution expressly provides for the regulation of electric, gas, water, or heating utilities. The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Utilities and Transportation Commission, formerly designated at the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the governor, with the consent of the senate. The term of office for commissioners is six years. Recently enacted legislation provides for the implementation of tax incentives to encourage the development of cogeneration facilities in the state. This plan is to be administered by the Department of Revenue in conjunction with the Energy Office. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. Long Term Stewardship Challenges at the St. Louis District FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell'Orco, L.; Chambers, D.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-Federally owned radioactively contaminated sites in St. Louis, Missouri are currently being remediated by the St. Louis District Corps of Engineers under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). When FUSRAP remediation is complete, inaccessible soils which have levels of contamination greater than unrestricted use standards, will remain. The purpose of this paper is to document the initial challenges facing the project team during its development of the Long Term Stewardship plan for the management of these soils. These soils are located under buildings, roads, railroads and bridges. The Long Term Stewardship plan for the majority of the sites is being developed simultaneously with the remedy selection process. A living document, it will ultimately document the remedial action end state and location of inaccessible soils and implement the plan for ensuring these soils are not a threat to human health and the environment. Although these soils are protective in their current configuration, at some point in time, when activities such as maintenance, utility or property improvement occur, the soils will become accessible and need to be addressed by the federal government. Up until that point in time they will need to be effectively managed to ensure they remain protective. The St. Louis District is in the process of collaboratively developing this plan with its regulators, affected stakeholders and interested parties.

  16. Repowering with clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freier, M.D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Buchanan, T.L.; DeLallo, M.L.; Goldstein, H.N. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repowering with clean coal technology can offer significant advantages, including lower heat rates and production costs, environmental compliance, incremental capacity increases, and life extension of existing facilities. Significant savings of capital costs can result by refurbishing and reusing existing sites and infrastructure relative to a greenfield siting approach. This paper summarizes some key results of a study performed by Parsons Power Group, Inc., under a contract with DOE/METC, which investigates many of the promising advanced power generation technologies in a repowering application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and economic results of applying each of a menu of Clean Coal Technologies in a repowering of a hypothetical representative fossil fueled power station. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal is used as the fuel for most of the cases evaluated herein, as well as serving as the fuel for the original unrepowered station. The steam turbine-generator, condenser, and circulating water system are refurbished and reused in this study, as is most of the existing site infrastructure such as transmission lines, railroad, coal yard and coal handling equipment, etc. The technologies evaluated in this study consisted of an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor, several varieties of pressurized fluid bed combustors, several types of gasifiers, a refueling with a process derived fuel, and, for reference, a natural gas fired combustion turbine-combined cycle.

  17. Technology Transfer Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    BPF developed the concept of a mobile, on-site NORM remediation and disposal process in late 1993. Working with Conoco and receiving encouragement born the Department of Energy, Metarie Office, and the Texas Railroad Commission the corporation conducted extensive feasibility studies on an on-site disposal concept. In May 1994, the Department of Energy issued a solicitation for cooperative agreement proposal for, "Development and Testing of a Method for Treatment and Underground Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)". BPF submitted a proposal to the solicitation in July 1994, and was awarded a cooperative agreement in September 1995. BPF proposed and believed that proven equipment and technology could be incorporated in to a mobile system. The system would allow BPF to demonstrate an environmentally sound and commercially affordable method for treatment and underground disposal of NORM. The key stop in the BPF process incorporates injection of the dissolved radioactive materials into a water injection or disposal well. Disposal costs in the BPF proposal of July 1995 were projected to range from $1000 to $5000 per cubic yard. The process included four separate steps. (1) De-oiling (2) Volume Reduction (3) Chemical Dissolution of the Radium (4) Injection

  18. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  19. Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dec, John Edward (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

  20. LNG infrastructure and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forgash, D.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound engineering principals have been used by every company involved in the development of the LNG infrastructure, but there is very little that is new. The same cryogenic technology that is used in the manufacture and sale of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen infrastructure is used in LNG infrastructure. The key component of the refueling infrastructure is the LNG tank which should have a capacity of at least 15,000 gallons. These stainless steel tanks are actually a tank within a tank separated by an annular space that is void of air creating a vacuum between the inner and outer tank where superinsulation is applied. Dispensing can be accomplished by pressure or pump. Either works well and has been demonstrated in the field. Until work is complete on NFPA 57 or The Texas Railroad Commission Rules for LNG are complete, the industry is setting the standards for the safe installation of refueling infrastructure. As a new industry, the safety record to date has been outstanding.

  1. LNG -- A paradox of propulsion potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, D.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been demonstrating its viability as a clean-burning alternative fuel for buses and medium- and heavy-duty trucks for the past 30 years. The first known LNG vehicle project began in San Diego in 1965, When San Diego Gas and Electric converted 22 utility trucks and three passenger vehicles to dedicated LNG. A surge in LNG vehicle project activity over the past five years has led to a fairly robust variety of vehicles testing the fuel, from Class 8 tractors, refuse haulers and transit buses to railroad locomotives and ferry boats. Recent technology improvements in engine design, cryogenic tanks, fuel nozzles and other related equipment have made LNG more practical to use than in the 1960s. LNG delivers more than twice the driving range from the same-sized fuel tank as a vehicle powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). Although technical and economic hurdles must be overcome before this fuel can achieve widespread use, various ongoing demonstration projects are showing LNG`s practicality, while serving the vital role of pinpointing those areas of performance that are the prime candidates for improvement.

  2. Office of Inspector General audit report on Hanford Site contractors` use of site services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (Richland) is to safely manage legacy wastes, develop and deploy science and technology, and provide stewardship of the Hanford Site (Site). To accomplish its mission, Richland employs five prime contractors: Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (Fluor Daniel); Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (Bechtel); Battelle-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Battelle); Hanford Environmental Health Foundation; and BNFL, Inc. Some of these contractors, in turn, have multiple subcontractors. To operate the Site, contractors need to use numerous services, such as telecommunications, copying, and photography. Richland directed certain contractors to provide these and other services, called site services, for the benefit of all contractors and assigned responsibility for optimal utilization of these services to its Site Infrastructure Division (SID). In the past, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) audited several site services, including groundwater monitoring, protective forces, personnel security clearances, railroad services, and fleet management. These audits disclosed that the services were not always efficiently and effectively coordinated. Therefore, the objective of this audit was to examine other site services, principally those provided at least in part by Fluor Daniel, to determine if contractors were acquiring services already available.

  3. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  4. Radiological verification survey results at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ001V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W. R. Grace facility. The property at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 14 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives.

  5. Radiological verification survey results at 7 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ003V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 7 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 7 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives.

  6. Historic, enthnohistoric and prehistoric cultural resource inventory. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to provide a literature search and write a historical narrative of the cultural significance of the study area for the proposed WyCoalGas Inc., pipeline, railroad, well fields, and coal gasification plant. The request for a cultural resource investigation states at a minimum the study shall be a literature search on the narrow one mile corridor along the proposed pipelines, areas included within the various facilities plus a one mile buffer surrounding these facilities. In addition, the study must be tied into appropriate local, state, and national history. The writer of this history has felt a responsibility for providing a realistic assessment of the themes of the study area's historical development. Several ideas have been concentrated upon: its American Indian heritage; the Euro-American's exploitive relationship with the region; and the overriding fragile, arid nature of its land. It is hoped that the government agencies and ultimately the energy company will feel a similiar responsibility toward the study area's historical integrity.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 2 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each corrective action site (CAS) within CAU 168. The corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted in accordance with the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', as developed under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 168 is located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada and is comprised of the following 12 CASs: CAS 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; CAS 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; CAS 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; CAS 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; CAS 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-99-16, USW G3; CAS 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; CAS 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; and CAS 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs) for CASs within CAU 168. Radiological measurements of railroad cars and test equipment were compared to unrestricted (free) release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from the CAI activities revealed the following: (1) Corrective Action Site 25-16-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (2) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-16-03. Buried construction waste is present in at least two disposal cells contained within the landfill boundaries. (3) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-19-02. (4) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-23-02 identified 13 railroad cars that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. Six railroad cars were below these limits and therefore met the free-release criteria. (5) An In-Situ Object Counting System survey taken at CAS 25-23-02 identified two railroad cars possibly containing fuel fragments; both exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual free release criteria. (6) Corrective Action Site 25-23-18 contains total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics, Aroclor-1260, uranium-234, uranium-235, strontium-90, and cesium-137 that exceed PALs. (7) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-34-01 indicate that there were no total contamination readings that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. (8) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-34-02 indicate that there were no total contamination readings that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. (9) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-23-13 identified six pieces of equipment that exceed the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. (10) Corrective Action Site 25-99-16 was not investigated. A review of historical documentation and current site conditions showed that no further characterization was required to select the appropriate corrective action. (11) Corrective Action Site 26-08-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (12) Corrective Action Site 26-17-01 contains total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics and Aroclor-1260 exceeding the PALs. (13) Radiological surveys at CAS 26-19-02 identified metallic debris that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. Concentrations of radiological or chemical constituents in soil did not exceed PALs.

  8. Geodatabase of the South Texas Uranium District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Beaman; William Wade Mcgee

    Uranium and its associated trace elements and radionuclides are ubiquitous in the South Texas Tertiary environment. Surface mining of this resource from the 1960s through the early 1980s at over sixty locations has left an extensive anthropological footprint (Fig. 1) in the lower Nueces and San Antonio river basins. Reclamation of mining initiated after 1975 has been under the regulatory authority of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RCT). However, mines that were active before the Texas Surface Mining Act of 1975 was enacted, and never reclaimed, are now considered abandoned. The Abandoned Mine Land Section of the RCT is currently reclaiming these pre-regulation uranium mines with funding from the federal government. The RCT monitors the overall effectiveness of this process through post-reclamation radiation and vegetative cover surveys, water quality testing, slope stability and erosion control monitoring. Presently a number of graduate and postgraduate students are completing research on the watershed and reservoir distribution of trace elements and radionuclides downstream of the South Texas Uranium District. The question remains as to whether the elevated levels of uranium, its associated trace elements and radiation levels in the South Texas environment are due to mining

  9. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation.

  10. Plowshare Program - American Atomic Bomb Tests For Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Plowshare Program as a research and development activity to explore the technical and economic feasibility of using nuclear explosives for industrial applications. The reasoning was that the relatively inexpensive energy available from nuclear explosions could prove useful for a wide variety of peaceful purposes. The Plowshare Program began in 1958 and continued through 1975. Between December 1961 and May 1973, the United States conducted 27 Plowshare nuclear explosive tests comprising 35 individual detonations. Conceptually, industrial applications resulting from the use of nuclear explosives could be divided into two broad categories: 1) large-scale excavation and quarrying, where the energy from the explosion was used to break up and/or move rock; and 2) underground engineering, where the energy released from deeply buried nuclear explosives increased the permeability and porosity of the rock by massive breaking and fracturing. Possible excavation applications included: canals, harbors, highway and railroad cuts through mountains, open pit mining, construction of dams, and other quarry and construction-related projects. Underground nuclear explosion applications included: stimulation of natural gas production, preparation of leachable ore bodies for in situ leaching, creation of underground zones of fractured oil shale for in situ retorting, and formation of underground natural gas and petroleum storage reservoirs.

  11. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Comparison of magnetic and electric fields of conventional and advanced electrified transportation systems. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Jacobs, W.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns exist regarding the potential safety, environmental and health effects on the public and on transportation workers due to electrification along new or existing rail corridors, and to proposed maglev and high speed rail operations. Therefore, the characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz) is of interest. The report summarizes and compares the results of a survey of EMF characteristics (spatial, temporal and frequency bands) for representative conventional railroad and transit and advanced high-speed systems including: the German TR-07 maglev system; the Amtrak Northeast Corridor (NEC) and North Jersey Transit (NJT) trains; the Washington, DC Metrorail (WMATA) and the Boston, MA (MBTA) transit systems; and the French TGV-A high speed rail system. This comprehensive comparative EMF survey produced both detailed data and statistical summaries of EMF profiles, and their variability in time and space. EMF ELF levels for WMATA are also compared to those produced by common environmental sources at home, work, and under power lines, but have specific frequency signatures.

  12. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

  13. Coal data: A reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

  16. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

  17. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

  18. Nuclear Industry Input to the Development of Concepts for the Consolidated Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel - 13411

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Chris; Thomas, Ivan; McNiven, Steven [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)] [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Lanthrum, Gary [NAC International, 3930 East Jones Bridge Road, Norcross, GA, 30092 (United States)] [NAC International, 3930 East Jones Bridge Road, Norcross, GA, 30092 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EnergySolutions and its team partners, NAC International, Exelon Nuclear Partners, Talisman International, TerranearPMC, Booz Allen Hamilton and Sargent and Lundy, have carried out a study to develop concepts for a Consolidated Storage Facility (CSF) for the USA's stocks of commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF), and the packaging and transport provisions required to move the UNF to the CSF. The UNF is currently stored at all 65 operating nuclear reactor sites in the US, and at 10 shutdown sites. The study was funded by the US Department of Energy and followed the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC), one of which was that the US should make prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities for commercial UNF. The study showed that viable schemes can be devised to move all UNF and store it at a CSF, but that a range of schemes is required to accommodate the present widely varying UNF storage arrangements. Although most UNF that is currently stored at operating reactor sites is in water-filled pools, a significant amount is now dry stored in concrete casks. At the shutdown sites, the UNF is dry stored at all but two of the ten sites. Various types of UNF dry storage configurations are used at the operating sites and shutdown sites that include vertical storage casks that are also licensed for transportation, vertical casks that are licensed for storage only, and horizontally orientated storage modules. The shutdown sites have limited to nonexistent UNF handling infrastructure and several no longer have railroad connections, complicating UNF handling and transport off the site. However four methods were identified that will satisfactorily retrieve the UNF canisters within the storage casks and transport them to the CSF. The study showed that all of the issues associated with the transportation and storage of UNF from all sites in the US can be accommodated by adopting a staged approach to the construction of the CSF. Stage 1 requires only a cask storage pad and railroad interface to be constructed, and the CSF can then receive the UNF that is in transportable storage casks. Stage 2 adds a canister handling facility, a storage cask fabrication facility and an expanded storage pad, and enables the receipt of all canistered UNF from both operating and shutdown sites. Stage 3 provides a repackaging facility with a water-filled pool that provides flexibility for a range of repackaging scenarios. This includes receiving and repackaging 'bare' UNF into suitable canisters that can be placed into interim storage at the CSF, and enables UNF that is being received, or already in storage onsite, to be repackaged into canisters that are suitable for disposal at a geologic repository. The study used the 'Total System Model' (TSM) to analyze a range of CSF capacities and operating scenarios with differing parameters covering UNF pickup orders, one or more CSF sites, CSF start dates, CSF receipt rates and geologic repository start dates. The TSM was originally developed to model movement of UNF to the Yucca Mountain repository and was modified for this study to enable the CSF to become the 'gateway' to a future geologic repository. The TSM analysis enabled costs to be estimated for each scenario and showed how these are influenced by each of the parameters. This information will provide essential underpinning for a future Conceptual Design preparation. (authors)

  19. Environmental Assessment: geothermal direct heat project, Marlin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal action addressed by this Environmental Assessment (EA) is joint funding the retrofitting of a heating and hot water system in a hospital at Marlin, Texas, with a geothermal preheat system. The project will be located within the existing hospital boiler room. One supply well was drilled in an existing adjacent parking lot. It was necessary to drill the well prior to completion of this environmental assessment in order to confirm the reservoir and to obtain fluids for analysis in order to assess the environmental effects of fluid disposal. Fluid from operation will be disposed of by discharging it directly into existing street drains, which will carry the fluid to Park Lake and eventually the Brazos River. Fluid disposal activities are regulated by the Texas Railroad Commission. The local geology is determined by past displacements in the East Texas Basin. Boundaries are marked by the Balcones and the Mexia-Talco fault systems. All important water-bearing formations are in the cretaceous sedimentary rocks and are slightly to highly saline. Geothermal fluids are produced from the Trinity Group; they range from approximately 3600 to 4000 ppM TDS. Temperatures are expected to be above 64/sup 0/C (147/sup 0/F). Surface water flows southeastward as a part of the Brazos River Basin. The nearest perennial stream is the Brazos River 5.6 km (3.5 miles) away, to which surface fluids will eventually discharge. Environmental impacts of construction were small because of the existing structures and paved areas. Construction run-off and geothermal flow-test fluid passed through a small pond in the city park, lowering its water quality, at least temporarily. Construction noise was not out of character with existing noises around the hospital.

  20. High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

  1. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

  2. The polyphase resonant converter modulator for pulse power and plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, W. A. (William A.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gribble, R. (Robert F.); North, W. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new technique to generate high voltage pulses (100 kV and up) with high peak power (10 MW and up) and high average power (1 MW and up) from a low voltage input source (e.g. +/- 1.2 kV). This technology is presently being used to provide cathode pulse modulation for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator klystron RF amplifiers, which operate to 140 kV 11 MW peak power and 1.1 MW average power. The design of the modulator, referred to as the Polyphase Resonant Converter-Modulator takes advantage of high-power component advances, in response to the needs of the traction motor industry (in particular, railroad locomotives), such as Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT's) and self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene capacitors. In addition, the use of amorphous nanocrystalline transformer core alloy permits high frequency voltage and current transformation with low loss and small size. Other unique concepts embodied in the converter-modulator topology are polyphase resonant voltage multiplication and resonant rectification. These techniques further reduce size and improve electrical efficiency. Because of the resonant conversion techniques, electronic 'crowbars' and other load protective networks are not required. A shorted load detunes the circuit resonance and little power transfer can occur. This yields a high-power, high-voltage system that is inherently self-protective. To provide regulated output voltages, Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) of the individual IGBT pulses is used. A Digital signal Processor (DSP) is used to control the IGBT's, with adaptive feed forward and feedback control algorithms that improve pulse fidelity. The converter-modulator has many attributes that make it attractive to various pulse power and plasma applications such as high power RF sources, neutral beam modulators, and various plasma applications. This paper will review the design as used for the SNS accelerator and speculate on related plasma applications.

  3. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2 facility.

  4. Exposure and effects of oilfield brine discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J. [National Biological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States); Capizzi, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); LeCaptain, L.J. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharge of oilfield brines into fresh and estuarine waters is a common disposal practice in Texas. Petroleum crude oil (PCO) extraction from underground stores includes the removal of a significant amount of water along with the oil. Several methods may be used to separate the oil and water fractions, including tank batteries, heat separation, and skimming ponds. Disposal of the resultant produced water (oilfield brine) may be accomplished by deep-well injection or discharge to surface waters. In Texas, an estimated 766,000 barrels of oilfield brine were discharged daily into tidal waters in 1979. The maximum concentration for oil and grease in these discharges permitted by the Texas Railroad Commission is 25 ppm. Several studies have shown that oilfield brines are toxic to a wide range of marine life, yet little is known about their effects on birds and mammals. Exposure to petroleum in oilfield wastes could evoke toxicological effects in some waterbird species. Avian responses to PCO exposure are highly variable, including cessation of growth, osmoregulatory impairment, endocrine dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, altered blood chemistry, cytochrome P450 induction, reduced reproductive success, and mortality. Oilfield brine discharges may soon be the largest and most pervasive source of contaminants entering Texas estuaries. Migratory and resident birds feeding in the vicinity of discharge sites may be ingesting food items contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals and salts in sufficient quantities to evoke toxicity. The present study of wintering western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) that feed and roost near discharge sites sought to examine oilfield brine exposure and effects through quantification of contaminant burdens, morphological characteristics, and cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase activities. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. The Planning, Licensing, Modifications, and Use of a Russian Vessel for Shipping Spent Nuclear Fuel by Sea in Support of the DOE RRRFR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Wlodzimierz Tomczak; Sergey Naletov; Oleg Pichugin

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program, under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative, began returning Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia in January 2006. During the first years of making HEU SNF shipments, it became clear that the modes of transportation needed to be expanded from highway and railroad to include sea and air to meet the extremely aggressive commitment of completing the first series of shipments by the end of 2010. The first shipment using sea transport was made in October 2008 and used a non-Russian flagged vessel. The Russian government reluctantly allowed a one-time use of the foreign-owned vessel into their highly secured seaport, with the understanding that any future shipments would be made using a vessel owned and operated by a Russian company. ASPOL-Baltic of St. Petersburg, Russia, owns and operates a small fleet of vessels and has a history of shipping nuclear materials. ASPOL-Baltic’s vessels were licensed for shipping nuclear materials; however, they were not licensed to transport SNF materials. After a thorough review of ASPOL Baltic’s capabilities and detailed negotiations, it was agreed that a contract would be let with ASPOL-Baltic to license and refit their MCL Trader vessel for hauling SNF in support of the RRRFR Program. This effort was funded through a contract between the RRRFR Program, Idaho National Laboratory, and Radioactive Waste Management Plant of Swierk, Poland. This paper discusses planning, Russian and international maritime regulations and requirements, Russian authorities’ reviews and approvals, licensing, design, and modifications made to the vessel in preparation for SNF shipments. A brief summary of actual shipments using this vessel, experiences, and lessons learned also are described.

  6. Preliminary analysis of the postulated changes needed to achieve rail cask handling capabilities at selected light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor-specific railroad and crane information for all LWRs in the US was extracted from current sources of information. Based on this information, reactors were separated into two basic groups consisting of reactors with existing, usable rail cask capabilities and those without these capabilities. The latter group is the main focus of this study. The group of reactors without present rail cask handling capabilities was further separated into two subgroups consisting of reactors considered essentially incapable of handling a large rail cask of about 100 tons and reactors where postulated facility changes could result in rail cask handling capabilities. Based on a selected population of 127 reactors, the results of this assessment indicate that usable rail cask capabilities exist at 83 (65%) of the reactors. Twelve (27%) of the remaining 44 reactors are deemed incapable of handling a large rail cask without major changes, and 32 reactors are considered likely candidates for potentially achieving rail cask handling capabilities. In the latter group, facility changes were postulated that would conceptually enable these reactors to handle large rail casks. The estimated cost per plant of required facility changes varied widely from a high of about $35 million to a low of <$0.3 million. Only 11 of the 32 plants would require crane upgrades. Spur track and right-of-way costs would apparently vary widely among sites. These results are based on preliminary analyses using available generic cost data. They represent lower bound values that are useful for developing an initial assessment of the viability of the postulated changes on a system-wide basis, but are not intended to be absolute values for specific reactors or sites.

  7. Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

  8. Results of the mobile gamma scanning activities in Wayne and Pequannock Townships, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.A.; Roberts, D.A.; Patania, V.P.; Foley, R.D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the early 1980s the W. R. Grace site and the adjacent area were the focus of several radiological investigations. Radiological surveys revealed surface radionuclide concentrations greater than those acceptable under US Department of Energy (DOE) remedial action guidelines. In 1984, Congress assigned responsibility for cleanup of the W.R. Grace site to the Department of Energy. The property was redesignated as the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and in 1985 DOE began plans for survey/monitoring, and remedial action of nearby vicinity properties and the interim storage site. Evaluations of the radiological survey data in 1986 indicated radioactive contamination above current DOE guidelines at the off-site areas of parts of Township Park southwest of WISS, and parts of the Sheffield Brook area and railroad siding in Pequannock Township. Remedial action was conducted over several years of most of these areas and independent verification of remedial action was performed. A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a mobile radiological scanning survey of a stretch of public roadway in the immediate vicinity south of the WISS, extending northwest to the Pompton turnpike. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify at least 24 anomalous areas, some attributable to the naturally elevated levels in concrete, asphalt, and natural granite found in streets, driveways and landscaping materials in the area. Analyses of the biased soil samples taken in the ballpark also revealed slightly elevated thorium concentrations. However, soil concentration measurements when averaged over 100 m{sup 2} fall below the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines established for this site. The anomalies may result from a wide range of sources, such as ash, granite, and fertilizer as well as materials from the former Grace facility.

  9. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  10. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  11. Publications on maglev technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, J.L.; Coffey, H.T.; Rote, D.M.; Wang, Z.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically levitated passenger-transportation vehicles, using attractive and repulsive magnetic forces, are currently in the development or prototype-revenue stages in Japan and Germany. The basic principles of these technologies have been understood for several decades, but their practical applications awaited advances in high-power electronic devices, modern controls, superconducting magnets, and improvements in our transportation infrastructures. A considerable amount of work was devoted to magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation system in the late 1960s and the 1970s. Detailed development was sustained primarily in Germany and Japan. This listing of publications was begun as the initial phase of a design study for a maglev development facility sponsored by the State of Illinois. The listing has been continually updated under programs sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration and the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the National Maglev Initiative issued 27 contracts for the study of technical issues related to maglev and four contracts for the definition of maglev systems. In December 1991, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act was enacted, mandating the development of a US-designed maglev system in a six-year period. This listing is offered as an aid to those working on these projects, to help them locate technical papers on relevant technologies. The design and installation of a maglev transportation system will require the efforts of workers in many disciplines, from electronics to economics to safety. Accordingly, the references have been grouped in 14 different sections to expedite review of the listing. In many case, the references are annotated to indicate the general content of the papers. Abstracts are not available. A list of information services from which the listed documents might be obtained and an author index are provided.

  12. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada test site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D. (Field Test Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. In particular we have assumed that the program goal will be to certify a full engine system design as flight test ready. All nuclear and non-nuclear components will be individually certified as ready for such a test at sites remote from the NRDA facilities, the components transported to NRDA, and the engine assembled. We also assume that engines of 25,000--100,000 lb thrust levels will be tested with burn times of 1 hour or longer. After a test, the engine will be disassembled, time critical inspections will be executed, and a selection of components will be transported to remote inspection sites. The majority of the components will be stored for future inspection at Jackass Flats. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad.

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 146 W. Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ034)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and reining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from OaK Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. These surveys typically include direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, a private property at 146 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ034), was conducted during 1987 and 1988. While some measurements at this property were greater than background levels typically encountered in the New jersey area, no radiation levels nor radionuclide concentrations exceeded the guidelines established by the DOE for the Maywood, New Jersey, area remedial action plan. However, because of the proximity of the railroad property, which will be remediated, and the DOE's ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) policy, concurrent removal of the slightly elevated soil layers at 146 W. Central Avenue may be justified. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Norfolk Southern boxcar blocking/bracing plan for the mixed waste disposal initiative project. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seigler, R.S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs will dispose of mixed waste no longer deemed useful. This project is one of the initial activities used to help meet this goal. The project will transport the {approximately}46,000 drums of existing stabilized mixed waste located at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and presently stored in the K-31 and K-33 buildings to an off-site commercially licensed and permitted mixed waste disposal facility. Shipping and disposal of all {approximately}46,000 pond waste drums ({approximately}1,000,000 ft{sup 3} or 55,000 tons) is scheduled to occur over a period of {approximately}5--10 years. The first shipment of stabilized pond waste should transpire some time during the second quarter of FY 1994. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., proposes to line each of the Norfolk Southem boxcars with a prefabricated, white, 15-mm low-density polyethylene (LDPE) liner material. To avoid damaging the bottom of the polyethylene floor liner, a minimum .5 in. plywood will be nailed to the boxcars` nailable metal floor. At the end of the Mixed Waste Disposal Initiative (MWDI) Project workers at the Envirocare facility will dismantle and dispose of all the polyethylene liner and plywood materials. Envirocare of Utah, Inc., located in Clive, Utah, will perform a health physic survey and chemically and radiologically decontaminate, if necessary, each of the rail boxcars prior to them being released back to Energy Systems. Energy Systems will also perform a health physic survey and chemically and radiologically decontaminate, if necessary, each of the rail boxcars prior to them being released back to Norfolk Southem Railroad.

  15. IEC International Standards Under Development For Radiation-Generating Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voytchev, M; Radev, R; Chiaro, P; Thomson, I; Dray, C; Li, J

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is the leading and oldest global organization with over 100 years history of developing and publishing international standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies, including radiation detection instrumentation. Subcommittee 45B 'Radiation Protection Instrumentation' of the IEC has recently started the development of two standards on radiation-generating devices. IEC 62463 'Radiation protection instrumentation--X-ray Systems for the Screening of Persons for Security and the Carrying of Illicit Items' is applicable to X-ray systems designed for screening people to detect if they are carrying objects such as weapons, explosives, chemical and biological agents and other concealed items that could be used for criminal purposes, e.g. terrorist use, drug smuggling, etc. IEC 62523 'Radiation protection instrumentation--Cargo/Vehicle radiographic inspection systems' applies to cargo/vehicle imaging inspection systems using accelerator produced X-ray or gamma radiation to obtain images of the screened objects (e.g. cargo containers, transport and passenger vehicles and railroad cars). The objective of both standards is to specify standard requirements and general characteristics and test procedures, as well as, radiation, electrical, environmental, mechanical, and safety requirements and to provide examples of acceptable methods to test these requirements. In particular the standards address the design requirements as they relate to the radiation protection of the people being screened, people who are in the vicinity of the equipment and the operators. The standard IEC 62463 does not deal with the performance requirements for the quality of the object detection. Compliance with the standards requirements will provide the manufacturers with internationally acceptable specifications and the device users with assurance of the rigorous quality and accuracy of the measurements in relation to the radiological safety of the equipment. The main characteristics of IEC 62463 and IEC 62523 standards are presented and as well as the IEC methodology of standard development and approval.

  16. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

  17. ELECTRONIC COMPLIANCE AND APPROVAL PROJECT (ECAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope Morgan; Richard A. Varela; Deborah LaHood; Susan Cisco; Mary Ann Benavides; Donna Burks

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Railroad Commission (RRC), working in partnership with the United States Department of Energy and the oil and gas industry it regulates, is implementing a strategy for improving efficiency in regulations and significantly reducing administrative operating costs through the Electronic Compliance and Approval Process (ECAP). The project will streamline regulatory compliance and reporting by providing the ability to electronically submit, process, and query oil and gas applications and reports through the Internet-based ECAP system. Implementation of an ECAP drilling permit pilot project began September 1999 after funding resources were secured--a $700,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy and an appropriation of $1.4 million from the Texas Legislature. The pilot project involves creating the ability to file, review, and approve a well's drilling permit application through a completely electronic process. The pilot project solution will ultimately provide the infrastructure, technology, and electronic modules to enable the filing of all compliance permits and performance reports through the internet from a desktop computer. The pilot project was conducted in three phases. The first phase, implemented May 2000, provided the infrastructure that allows the electronic filing and approval of simple drilling permit applications, associated fees, and attachments. The official ''roll-out'' of ECAP and the first electronically filed drilling permit application occurred on May 11, 2000 in Dallas in conjunction with an Internet Workshop sponsored by the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council. After the completion of Phase I, the ECAP team conducted an extensive review of progress to date and analyzed requirements and opportunities for future steps. The technical team identified core infrastructure modifications that would facilitate and better support future development and expansion of the ECAP system and work began on database structure modifications. The second phase of the pilot project was implemented in October 2002. Phase II was the complete rewrite of the ECAP core system and included internal workflow processing capabilities and the ability to process more complex new drill permits such as horizontal, directional, pooled acreage and non-concurrent production restrictions all with additional attachments and reports. Phase III, completed in August 2003, concluded the ECAP pilot project. It allowed the processing of all types of drilling permits and completed the integration with existing geographic information systems, mainframe and electronic document management systems as well as the state payment portal. This report contains detailed information documenting accomplishments and problems encountered during the ECAP pilot project and plans for future steps.

  18. TEXAS LPG FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Full-Text - Submission contains both citation data and full-text of the journal article. Full-text can be either a pre-print or post-print, but not the copyrighted article.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SOUTHWEST RESEARCH LABORATORY SUBMITTED BY SUBCONTRACTOR, RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS

    2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix?s LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power?s residential-scale GenSys? 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program?s primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation?s TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units. For further information please contact Mary-Jo Rowan at mary-jo.rowan@cpa.state.tx.us

  19. Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

  20. Recent Developments in the Management of Cameco Corporation's Fuel Services Division Waste - 13144

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Thomas P. [Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cameco Corporation is a world leader in uranium production. Headquartered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan our operations provide 16% of the world uranium mine production and we have approximately 435 million pounds of proven and probable uranium reserves. Cameco mining operations are located in Saskatchewan, Wyoming, Nebraska and Kazakhstan. Cameco is also a major supplier of uranium processing services required to produce fuel for the generation of clean energy. These operations are based in Blind River, Cobourg and Port Hope, Ontario and are collectively referred to as the Fuel Services Division. The Fuel Services Division produces uranium trioxide from uranium ore concentrate at the Blind River Refinery. Cameco produces uranium hexafluoride and uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Conversion Facility. Cameco operates a fuel manufacturing facility in Port Hope, Ontario and a metal fabrication facility located in Cobourg, Ontario. The company manufactures fuel bundles utilized in the Candu reactors. Cameco's Fuel Services Division produces several types of low-level radioactively contaminated wastes. Internal processing capabilities at both the Blind River Refinery and Port Hope Conversion Facility are extensive and allow for the recycling of several types of waste. Notwithstanding these capabilities there are certain wastes that are not amenable to the internal processing capabilities and must be disposed of appropriately. Disposal options for low-level radioactively contaminated wastes in Canada are limited primarily due to cost considerations. In recent years, Cameco has started to ship marginally contaminated wastes (<500 ppm uranium) to the United States for disposal in an appropriate landfill. The landfill is owned by US Ecology Incorporated and is located near Grand View, Idaho 70 miles southeast of Boise in the Owyhee Desert. The facility treats and disposes hazardous waste, non-hazardous industrial waste and low-activity radioactive material. The site's arid climate, deep groundwater and favourable geology help ensure permanent waste isolation. Combined with a state of the art multi-layer landfill liner system, the Grand View facility represents an ideal choice to minimize environmental liability. Marginally contaminated wastes from operations within the Fuel Services Division are typically loaded into PacTec IP-2 rated Intermediary Bulk Containers and then transported by road to a nearby rail siding. The Intermediary Bulk Containers are then loaded in US Ecology owned gondola rail-cars. The gondolas are then transported via Canadian Pacific and Union Pacific railroads to the US Ecology Rail Transfer facility located in Mayfield, Idaho. The Intermediary Bulk Containers are unloaded into trucks for transport to the disposal facility located approximately 32 miles away. (authors)

  1. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100 centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  2. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  3. AN ELECTROMAGNETIC PNEUMO CAPSULE SYSTEM FOR CONVEYING MINERALS AND MINE WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Liu; Charles W. Lenau

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of using a new and advanced pneumatic capsule pipeline (PCP) system for transporting minerals and mine wastes. The new system is different from conventional PCPs in two main respects: (1) it uses linear induction motors (LIMs) instead of blowers (fans) at the inlet of the pipeline to drive (pump) the capsules and the air through the pipeline; and (2) the capsules in the PCP have steel wheels running on steel rails as opposed to capsules in conventional systems, which use wheels with rubber tires running inside a pipe without rail. The advantage of using LIM pump instead of blower is that the former is non-intrusive and hence does not block the passage of capsules, enabling the system to run continuously without having to make the capsules bypass the pump. This not only simplifies the system but also enables the system to achieve much larger cargo throughput than that of PCPs using blowers, and use of LIMs as booster pumps which enables the system to have any length or to be used for transporting cargoes over practically any distance, say even one thousand kilometers or miles. An advantage of using steel wheels rolling on steel rails instead of using rubber tires rolling inside a pipeline is that the rolling friction coefficient and hence the use of energy is greatly reduced from that of conventional PCP systems. Moreover, rails enable easy control of capsule motion, such as switching capsules to a branch line by using railroad switching equipment. The advanced PCP system studied under this project uses rectangular conduits instead of circular pipe, having cross-sectional areas of 1 m by 1 m approximately. The system can be used for various transportation distances, and it can transport up to 50 million tonnes (metric tons) of cargo annually--the throughput of the largest mines in the world. Both an aboveground and an underground system were investigated and compared. The technical feasibility of this new PCP system was determined by designing the details of the system and conducting a detail analysis of the system--both steady and unsteady analyses. Through the detailed design and analyses, it was found that no technical problem or hurdle exist that would otherwise prevent commercial use of the system today. Still, since it is a new technology, it will be prudent and advantageous to run a demonstration project before this technology is used.

  4. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No Further Investigation (NFI) determination made on land that adjoins ED-4 to the east (DOE 1997a) and to the south (DOE 1997b).

  5. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in groundwater only at well GW01. No evidence of contamination was found in other monitoring wells and piezometers. This pattern is consistent with findings of previous investigations. The findings of the 2007 targeted investigation clearly demonstrate that the former CCC/USDA facility at Hilton was not the source of the carbon tetrachloride contamination persistently detected in well GW01. Well GW01 is approximately 300 ft upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. This well is the only sampling location at Hilton where carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater has ever been identified. The CCC/USDA never operated grain storage facilities on the property on which well GW01 is located.

  6. Environmental Impacts of Transportation to the Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Sweeney; R. Best; P. Bolton; P. Adams

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada analyzes a Proposed Action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. As part of the Proposed Action, the EIS analyzes the potential impacts of transporting commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain from 77 sites across the United States. The analysis includes information on the comparative impacts of transporting these materials by truck and rail and discusses the impacts of building a rail line or using heavy-haul trucks to move rail casks from a mainline railroad in Nevada to the site. This paper provides an overview of the analyses and the potential impacts of these transportation activities. The potential transportation impacts were looked at from two perspectives: transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste by legal-weight truck or by rail on a national scale and impacts specific to Nevada from the transportation of these materials from the State borders to the Yucca Mountain site. In order to address the range of impacts that could result from the most likely modes, legal-weight truck and rail, the EIS employed two analytical scenarios--mostly legal-weight truck and mostly rail. Estimated national transportation impacts were based on 24 years of transportation activities. Approximately 8 fatalities could occur from all causes in the nationwide general population from incident-free transportation activities of the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 4 from the mostly rail scenario. The analysis examined the radiological consequences under the maximum foreseeable accident scenario and also overall accident risk. The overall accident risk over the 24 year period would be about 0.0002 latent cancer fatality for the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 0.0005 latent cancer fatality for the mostly rail scenario. The maximum reasonably foreseeable accident scenario resulted in 0.55 latent cancer fatality for the legal-weight truck case and 5 latent cancer fatalities in the case of mostly rail. The EIS also analyzed the impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the State of Nevada. This included: constructing a branch rail line and using it to ship waste to the repository; upgrading highways in Nevada for use by heavy-haul trucks; constructing and operating an intermodal transfer station; and transporting personnel and materials to support construction and operation of the repository.

  7. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of Westinghouse WE 17×17 pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies with a discharge burnup range of 30-58 GWd/MTU (assembly average), loaded in a representative high-capacity (?32 fuel rod assemblies) transportation package. Evaluations will be performed for representative normal conditions of rail transport involving a rail conveyance capable of meeting the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-2043 specification. UNF modeling is anticipated to be defined to the pellet-cladding level and take in to account influences associated with spacer grids, intermediate fluid mixers, and control components. The influence of common degradation issues such as ductile-to-brittle-transition will also be accounted for. All model development and analysis will be performed with commercially available software packages exclusively. Inputs and analyses will be completely documented, all supporting information will be traceable, and bases will be defendable so as to be most useful to the U.S. Department of Energy community and mission. The expected completion date is the end of fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  8. QER- Comment of Jeff Cobb 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Please also see the letter after my signature at the bottom. I was at the unitization hearing for the Helis Oil planned fracking operation in St. Tammany Parish. I refrained from speaking, because I do not live in St. Tammany. I wish to affirm my support for everything said at that hearing in opposition to the unitization permit, and everything relayed to the Army Corps of Engineers regarding the wetlands permit opposing it. As well as opposition to fracking not only in St Tammany, but anywhere in the world, for the multiple reasons I outline below. Primarily I'm opposed because the Texas Railroad Commission has conducted a study that shows conclusively that water wells located near fracking operations in the Barnett Shale have been contaminated with hyropcarbons that could ONLY have come from the Barnett Shale. Given that the Southern Hills Aquifer is the sole source aquifer for Baton Rouge as well as hundreds of thousands of other people in southeastern Louisiana including much if not all of St Tammany Parish, and the recent Legislative Auditors report showing DNR's regulation of thousands of oil and gas wells is negligent, allowing any drilling in ANY sole source aquifer is an accident waiting to happen, with repercussions lasting centuries. The World Bank is in agreement with other global experts such as PricewaterhouseCoopers that only 20% of the known fossil fuel reserves can be burned (http://blogs.worldbank.org/climatechange/carbon-bubbles-stranded-assets.) This means the remaining 80% of reserves are stranded assets, resulting in a carbon bubble in the investment market. The biggest of the Big Five global accounting firms, PricewaterhouseCoopers agrees with this in their report, 'Too Late for Two Degrees?' (http://www.pwc.co.uk/sustainability-climate-change/publications/low-carb...). ExxonMobil has recognized this carbon bubble risk, and then dismissed it (http://corporate.exxonmobil.com/en/environment/climate-change/managing-c...). Which is like an alcoholic admitting their addiction, and then saying 'but my continued drinking of alcohol is necessary'. Denial is the most seductive whore in the human psyche. All nations in the UN agreed to keep global warming driven mostly by the burning of fossil fuels below 2 degrees C in 2009. We are currently on track for 3-4 degrees C warming, perhaps higher. We have already identified fossil fuel reserves containing 2,795 gigatons of carbon (www.carbontracker.org), while we can only burn 565 gigatons of carbon to stay below the agreed upon 2 degrees C target (https://www.pik-potsdam.de/news/press-releases/archive/2009/on-the-way-t...). As we have five times more identified reserves than we can burn, the search for more is an exercise in futility. Although EPA has conducted two major studies linking well water contamination to fracking in both Pavilion, Wyoming and Dimock, Pennsylvania, this study by the Texas Railroad Commission is the most definitive to date (http://www.earthworksaction.org/media/detail/scientists_fracking_pollute...). Lower level EPA employees were told to discontinue and/or bury the results of those two studies, no doubt because higher level EPA employees were paid by the fossil fuel industry to hide the ugly truth that fossil fuels knew from the beginning. Louisiana already has some of the most polluted water in the US (http://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2014/06/louisiana_waterways_among...), as described in "Wasting Our Waterways: Toxic Industrial Pollution and Restoring the Promise of the Clean Water Act" (http://environmentamericacenter.org/sites/environment/files/reports/US_w...). Continued oil and gas activities, and particularly fracking which requires millions of gallons of water, and the 'produced' water that results which is too polluted and poisoned with benzenes, brine, and radioactive materials to be purified, must be stopped ASAP. The entire energy infrastructure for the planet needs to be upgraded to the supergrid and moved to renewables. Needless to say, after the Legislative Auditors Report it is clear that Louisiana can't be

  9. The Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement: An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sweeney

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 23,2002, the President of the United States signed into law a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating the Yucca Mountain site in Nye County, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If the US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission authorizes construction of the repository and receipt and possession of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive at Yucca Mountain, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would be responsible for transporting these materials to the Yucca Mountain repository as part of its obligation under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Part of the site recommendation decision included the analysis of a nation-wide shipping campaign to the proposed repository site. The ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada'' (February 2002) (Repository EIS) evaluated the potential impacts of the transportation of 70,000 Metric Tons of Heavy Metal spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 locations around the nation to the potential repository in Nevada over a 24 year shipping campaign. In the Repository EIS, DOE identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. In December 2003, based on public comments and the environmental analyses in the Repository EIS, DOE identified a preference for the Caliente rail corridor in Nevada. On April 8, 2004, DOE issued a Record of Decision (ROD) on the Mode of Transportation and Nevada Rail Corridor for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. In this ROD, the DOE announced that it had decided to select the mostly rail scenario analyzed in the Repository EIS as the transportation mode both on a national basis and in the State of Nevada. Under the mostly rail scenario, the DOE would rely on a combination of rail, truck and possibly barge to transport to the repository site at Yucca Mountain up to 70,000 MTHM of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, with most of the spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste being transported by rail. This will ultimately require construction of a rail line in Nevada to the repository. In addition, the DOE has decided to select the Caliente rail corridor in which to examine potential alignments within which to construct that rail line. A corridor is a strip of land, approximately 400 meters (0.25 miles) wide, that encompasses one of several possible routes through which DOE could build a rail line. An alignment is the specific location of a rail line in a corridor, and would likely be 60 meters [200 feet] or less in width. Also on April 8, 2004, DOE issued a Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV. In the Notice of Intent, the Department announced its intent to prepare a Rail Alignment EIS to assist in selecting a possible alignment for construction of a rail line that would connect the repository at Yucca Mountain to an existing main rail line in Nevada. The Rail Alignment EIS also would consider the potential construction and operation of a rail-to-truck intermodal transfer facility, proposed to be located at the confluence of an existing mainline railroad and a highway, to support legal-weight truck transportation until the rail system is fully operational. This corridor is approximately 513 kilometers (319 miles) long and would cost an estimated $880 million (2001 dollars). Should DOE decide to build the Caliente corridor, it may be the longest rail line built in the United States since the Transcontinental Railroad was constructed in 1869. Some of the challenges in building this rail corridor are steep grades (the corridor crosses over 7 mountain ranges), isolated terrain, possible tunnels, and stakeholder acceptance.

  10. The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floerke, J.P.; Borschel, Th.F.; Rhodes, L.K. [CH2M-WG Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 2006, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The 30-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, as well as worker safety issues associated with the removal of the reactor's domed structure. The LOFT facility was located at the west end of Test Area North (TAN), built in the 1950's to support the government's aircraft nuclear propulsion program. When President Kennedy cancelled the nuclear propulsion program in 1961, TAN began to host various other activities. The LOFT reactor became part of the new mission. The LOFT facility, constructed between 1965 and 1975, was a scaled-down version of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Its design allowed engineers, scientists, and operators to create or re-create loss-of-fluid accidents (reactor fuel meltdowns) under controlled conditions. The LOFT dome provided containment for a relatively small, mobile test reactor that was moved into and out of the facility on a railroad car. The dome was roughly 21 meters (70 feet) in diameter and 30 meters (98 feet) in height. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission received the results from the accident tests and incorporated the data into commercial reactor operating codes. The facility conducted 38 experiments, including several small loss-of-coolant experiments designed to simulate events such as the accident that occurred at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, before the LOFT facility was closed. Through formal survey and research, the LOFT facility was determined to be a DOE Signature Property, as defined by the 'INEEL Cultural Resource Management Plan', and thus eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the facility constituted an adverse effect on the historic property that required resolution through the contractor (CH2M-WG Idaho), the U.S. Department of Energy, the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. The project team identified multiple hazards that would result if conventional techniques were used to demolish the dome. The physical structure of the vessel containment facility reached 30 meters (98 feet) above grade, presenting significant worker safety hazards created by hoisting and rigging activities. The dome also included a polar crane, 19 meters (62 feet) above grade, that posed similar hazards to workers. The need to work on significantly elevated surfaces, and the thickness of the dome walls - 30 millimeters (1-3/16 inches) of carbon steel - would prove difficult with traditional arc plasma cutting tools. The dome's proximity to operating facilities with equipment sensitive to vibration added to the demolition challenges. To address cultural resource issues, the project team engaged all parties in negotiations and in mapping a path foreword. Open and frequent communication resulted in a Memorandum of Agreement, with stipulations that mitigated the adverse affects of the intended demolition action. The unique mitigating actions resulted in a favorable agreement being signed and issued. To mitigate hazards posed by the height of the facility, the project team had to abandon traditional D and D techniques and employ other methods to complete demolition safely. A different approach and a change in demolition sequence resulted in the safe and efficient removal of the one-of-a-kind containment facility. The approach reduced the use of aerial lifts, aboveground size reduction, and dangerous hoisting and rigging activities that could pose significant hazards to workers. (authors)

  11. A stable finite difference method for the elastic wave equation on complex geometries with free surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelo, D; Petersson, N A

    2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotropic elastic wave equation governs the propagation of seismic waves caused by earthquakes and other seismic events. It also governs the propagation of waves in solid material structures and devices, such as gas pipes, wave guides, railroad rails and disc brakes. In the vast majority of wave propagation problems arising in seismology and solid mechanics there are free surfaces. These free surfaces have, in general, complicated shapes and are rarely flat. Another feature, characterizing problems arising in these areas, is the strong heterogeneity of the media, in which the problems are posed. For example, on the characteristic length scales of seismological problems, the geological structures of the earth can be considered piecewise constant, leading to models where the values of the elastic properties are also piecewise constant. Large spatial contrasts are also found in solid mechanics devices composed of different materials welded together. The presence of curved free surfaces, together with the typical strong material heterogeneity, makes the design of stable, efficient and accurate numerical methods for the elastic wave equation challenging. Today, many different classes of numerical methods are used for the simulation of elastic waves. Early on, most of the methods were based on finite difference approximations of space and time derivatives of the equations in second order differential form (displacement formulation), see for example [1, 2]. The main problem with these early discretizations were their inability to approximate free surface boundary conditions in a stable and fully explicit manner, see e.g. [10, 11, 18, 20]. The instabilities of these early methods were especially bad for problems with materials with high ratios between the P-wave (C{sub p}) and S-wave (C{sub s}) velocities. For rectangular domains, a stable and explicit discretization of the free surface boundary conditions is presented in the paper [17] by Nilsson et al. In summary, they introduce a discretization, that use boundary-modified difference operators for the mixed derivatives in the governing equations. Nilsson et al. show that the method is second order accurate for problems with smoothly varying material properties and stable under standard CFL constraints, for arbitrarily varying material properties. In this paper we generalize the results of Nilsson et al. to curvilinear coordinate systems, allowing for simulations on non-rectangular domains. Using summation by parts techniques, we show that there exists a corresponding stable discretization of the free surface boundary condition on curvilinear grids. We also prove that the discretization is stable and energy conserving both in semi-discrete and fully discrete form. As for the Cartesian method in, [17], the stability and conservation results holds for arbitrarily varying material properties. By numerical experiments it is established that the method is second order accurate.

  12. Constraint-Based Routing Models for the Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steven K [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a historic programmatic interest in the safe and secure routing, tracking, and transportation risk analysis of radiological materials in the United States. In order to address these program goals, DOE has funded the development of several tools and related systems designed to provide insight to planners and other professionals handling radioactive materials shipments. These systems include the WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System) platform. WebTRAGIS is a browser-based routing application developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focused primarily on the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel from US nuclear reactors via railway, highway, or waterway. It is also used for the transport planning of low-level radiological waste to depositories such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. One particular feature of WebTRAGIS is its coupling with high-resolution population data from ORNL s LandScan project. This allows users to obtain highly accurate population count and density information for use in route planning and risk analysis. To perform the routing and risk analysis WebTRAGIS incorporates a basic routing model methodology, with the additional application of various constraints designed to mimic US Department of Transportation (DOT), DOE, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Aside from the routing models available in WebTRAGIS, the system relies on detailed or specialized modal networks for the route solutions. These include a highly detailed network model of the US railroad system, the inland and coastal waterways, and a specialized highway network that focuses on the US interstate system and the designated hazardous materials and Highway Route Controlled Quantity (HRCQ) -designated roadways. The route constraints in WebTRAGIS rely upon a series of attributes assigned to the various components of the different modal networks. Routes are determined via a constrained shortest-path Dijkstra algorithm that has an assigned impedance factor. The route constraints modify the various impedance weights to bias or prefer particular network characteristics as desired by the user. Both the basic route model and the constrained impedance function calculations are determined by a series of network characteristics and shipment types. The study examines solutions under various constraints modeled by WebTRAGIS including possible routes from select shut-down reactor sites in the US to specific locations in the US. For purposes of illustration, the designated destinations are Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. To the degree that routes express sameness or variety under constraints serves to illustrate either a) the determinism of particular transport modes by either configuration or regulatory compliance, and/or b) the variety of constrained routes that are regulation compliant but may not be operationally feasible.

  13. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

  14. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.; Massaro, Lawrence M.; Jensen, Philip J.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel (UNF) from 12 shutdown nuclear power plant sites. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites are Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. The evaluation was divided into four components: • characterization of the UNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory • a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of UNF and GTCC waste • an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing UNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information • an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove UNF and GTCC waste. The primary sources for the inventory of UNF and GTCC waste are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) RW-859 used nuclear fuel inventory database, industry sources such as StoreFUEL and SpentFUEL, and government sources such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The primary sources for information on the conditions of site and near-site transportation infrastructure and experience included observations and information collected during visits to the Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion sites; information provided by managers at the shutdown sites; Facility Interface Data Sheets compiled for DOE in 2005; Services Planning Documents prepared for DOE in 1993 and 1994; industry publications such as Radwaste Solutions; and Google Earth. State and Regional Group representatives, a Tribal representative, and a Federal Railroad Administration representative participated in six of the shutdown site visits. Every site was found to have at least one off-site transportation mode option for removing its UNF and GTCC waste; some have multiple options. Experience removing large components during reactor decommissioning provided an important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. Additional conclusions from this evaluation include: • The 12 shutdown sites use designs from 4 different suppliers involving 9 different (horizontal and vertical) dry storage systems that would require the use of 8 different transportation cask designs to remove the UNF and GTCC waste from the shutdown sites. • Although there are common aspects, each site has some unique features and/or conditions. • Although some regulatory actions will be required, all UNF at the initial 9 shutdown sites (Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion) is in licensed systems that can be transported, including a small amount of high-burnup fuel. • Each site indicated that 2-3 years of advance time would be required for its preparations before shipments could begin. • Most sites have more than one transportation option, e.g., rail, barge, or heavy haul truck, as well as constraints and preferences. It is expected that additional site visits will be conducted to add to the information presented in the evaluation.

  15. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end of the casting opposite the gate. (3) It is recommended that lost foam castings in steel be gated for a quiescent fill in an empty cavity mold to prevent foam occlusion defects from the collapse mode. The energy benefit is primarily in yield savings and lower casting weight per function due to elimination of draft and parting lines for the larger lost foam castings. For the smaller investment casting, scrap losses due to shell cracking will be reduced. Both of these effects will reduce the metal melted per good ton of castings. There will also be less machine stock required per casting which is a yield savings and a small additional energy savings in machining. Downstream savings will come from heavy truck and railroad applications. Application of these processes to heavy truck castings will lighten the heavy truck fleet by about ten pounds per truck. Using ten years to achieve full penetration of the truck fleet at linear rate this will result in a fuel savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  16. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuels at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consists of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal at up to 30% on a Btu basis, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing prior art with respect to high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. Activities and results thus far include the following. Several potential alternative fuels have been obtained for evaluation and testing as potential feedstocks, including sewage sludge, used railroad ties, urban wood waste, municipal solid waste, and used waste tires/tire-derived fuel. Only fuels with potential tipping fees were considered; potential energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge has been selected as one of the primary feedstocks for consideration at the Wabash plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary. High-temperature drop-tube furnace tests were conducted to determine if explosive fragmentation of high-moisture sludge droplets could be expected, but showed that these droplets underwent a shrinking and densification process that implies that the sludge will have to be well dispersed when injected into the gasifier. Fuel dispersion nozzles have been obtained for measuring how well the sludge can be dispersed in the second stage of the gasifier. Future work will include leasing a Schwing America pump to test pumping sewage sludge against 400 psig. In addition, sludge dispersion testing will be completed using two different dispersion nozzles to determine their ability to generate sludge particles small enough to be entrained out of the E-Gas entrained-flow gasifier.

  17. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal, cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  18. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Prepared various materials to describe the project for promotional purposes and to attract potential industry partners. Materials included slides for DOE's displays at the SPE Eastern Regional and Annual Technical Conference, and a project description prospectus and accompanying presentation. (2) Identified the significant stripper gas plays in the Mid-Continent region. In Texas, where most Mid-Continent stripper gas wells and production exist, we obtained this information from the Railroad Commission. We identified three high-priority plays--the Canyon sands of West Texas, the Bend Conglomerate in North Texas, and the Hugoton field in the Panhandle area (the field also extends into Oklahoma and Kansas). (3) Solicited industry research partners in these areas to provide test sites. We had originally reached an agreement with Union Pacific Resources to utilize their Ozona (Canyon) field in West Texas, but that arrangement eventually fell through in December as a result of their merger with Anadarko. In the meantime, we have contacted the following people or organizations in an attempt to secure test sites: (A) Phillips Petroleum (largest operator in the Texas Hugoton field), never received a call back after two attempts. (B) Made a presentation to Mitchell Energy in Fort Worth (the largest operator in the Bend Conglomerate). They declined to participate--already performing similar studies. (C) Anadarko in the Kansas Hugoton. Similar to the West Texas team, they declined to become involved. (D) St. Mary Operating and Cheasapeake Energy, both of whom showed an interest in such studies at the GTI workshop on restimulation (held on Oct 25 in Houston). Never received call backs. Also contacted Ocean Energy based on a similar lead, but they do not have enough wells for the project. (E) Oneok, who have indicated an interest in participating using the Mocane-Laverne field in Oklahoma. Discussions are ongoing. (F) Harrison Interests, one of the second-tier operators in the Ozona Canyon play, but who have shown some interest in participating. Discussions are ongoing. (4) We have also contacted the Mid-Continent representative of the PTTC, and the Stripper Well Consortium contact at the University of Tulsa, to request their assistance in our partner acquisition process. (5) We have begun developing