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  1. Federal Railroad Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration PDF icon Federal Railroad Administration More Documents & Publications Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNFHLW Rail...

  2. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials Program Manager. PDF icon Enhancing Railroad Hazardous...

  3. Railroad and locomotive technology roadmap.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

    2003-02-24

    Railroads are important to the U.S. economy. They transport freight efficiently, requiring less energy and emitting fewer pollutants than other modes of surface transportation. While the railroad industry has steadily improved its fuel efficiency--by 16% over the last decade--more can, and needs to, be done. The ability of locomotive manufacturers to conduct research into fuel efficiency and emissions reduction is limited by the small number of locomotives manufactured annually. Each year for the last five years, the two North American locomotive manufacturers--General Electric Transportation Systems and the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors--have together sold about 800 locomotives in the United States. With such a small number of units over which research costs can be spread, outside help is needed to investigate all possible ways to reduce fuel usage and emissions. Because fuel costs represent a significant portion of the total operating costs of a railroad, fuel efficiency has always been an important factor in the design of locomotives and in the operations of a railroad. However, fuel efficiency has recently become even more critical with the introduction of strict emission standards by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to be implemented in stages (Tiers 0, 1, and 2) between 2000 and 2005. Some of the technologies that could be employed to meet the emission standards may negatively affect fuel economy--by as much as 10-15% when emissions are reduced to Tier 1 levels. Lowering fuel economy by that magnitude would have a serious impact on the cost to the consumer of goods shipped by rail, on the competitiveness of the railroad industry, and on this country's dependence on foreign oil. Clearly, a joint government/industry R&D program is needed to help catalyze the development of advanced technologies that will substantially reduce locomotive engine emissions while also improving train system energy efficiency. DOE convened an industry-government workshop in January 2001 to gauge industry interest. As a result, the railroads, their suppliers, and the federal government5 have embarked on a cooperative effort to further improve railroad fuel efficiency--by 25% between now and 2010 and by 50% by 2020, on an equivalent gallon per revenue ton-mile basis, while meeting emission standards, all in a cost-effective, safe manner. This effort aims to bring the collaborative approaches of other joint industry-government efforts, such as FreedomCAR and the 21st Century Truck partnership, to the problem of increasing rail fuel efficiency. Under these other programs, DOE's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies has supported research on technologies to reduce fuel use and air emissions by light- and heavy-duty vehicles. DOE plans to bring similar efforts to bear on improving locomotives. The Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration will also be a major participant in this new effort, primarily by supporting research on railroad safety. Like FreedomCAR and the 21st Century Truck program, a joint industry-government research effort devoted to locomotives and railroad technology could be a 'win' for the public and a 'win' for industry. Industry's expertise and in-kind contributions, coupled with federal funding and the resources of the DOE's national laboratories, could make for an efficient, effective program with measurable energy efficiency targets and realistic deployment schedules. This document provides the necessary background for developing such a program. Potential R&D pathways to greatly improve the efficiency of freight transportation by rail, while meeting future emission standards in a cost-effective, safe manner, were developed jointly by an industry-government team as a result of DOE's January 2001 Workshop on Locomotive Emissions and System Efficiency and are presented here. The status of technology, technical targets, barriers, and technical approaches for engine, locomotive, rail systems, and advanced power plants and fuels are presented.

  4. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated

  5. Railroad Commission of Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    was established in 1891 under a constitutional and legislative mandate to prevent discrimination in railroad charges and establish reasonable tariffs. It is the oldest regulatory...

  6. Texas Railroad Commission - Pollution Discharge Regulations ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Texas Railroad Commission - Pollution Discharge Regulations Citation...

  7. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

  8. Union Pacific Railroad`s LNG locomotive test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimaila, B.

    1995-12-31

    Union Pacific Railroad is testing LNG in six locomotives through 1997 to determine if the liquefied natural gas technology is right for them. Two of the six LNG test locomotives are switch, or yard, locomotives. These 1,350 horsepower locomotives are the industry`s first locomotives totally fueled by natural gas. They`re being tested in the yard in the Los Angeles area. The other four locomotives are long-haul locomotives fueled by two tenders. These units are duel-fueled, operating on a mixture of LNG and diesel and are being tested primarily on the Los Angeles to North Platte, Nebraska corridor. All the information concerning locomotive emissions, locomotive performance, maintenance requirements, the overall LNG system design and the economic feasibility of the project will be analyzed to determine if UPR should expand, or abandon, the LNG technology.

  9. Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Task: Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants Establish Contact Information with Railroads Officials Field Review of each...

  10. Upgrading railroad test track, Pueblo, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, K. III; Chamberlain, K.

    1997-01-01

    The railroad test track (RTT) at the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) in Pueblo, Colo., was constructed in the early 1970s to support high-speed testing of new railroad rolling stock. Through the years it has been used to test a wide range of railroad passenger and freight cars and locomotives. Now, 20 years later, a new high-speed train set is being procured by Amtrak for service in the improved Northeast Corridor. The test facilities at Pueblo will play an important role in acceptance and safety testing of new high-speed train sets in the US. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) commissioned a study to review the existing condition of the test track and to make recommendations as to possible improvement options so that the facility would be able to test current and future generations of high-speed rail equipment. This paper describes the condition of the test track and explores ways in which it may be modified to accommodate the testing of high-speed train technologies in the near future and into the next century.

  11. Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas, Oil and Gas Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Railroad Commission, Oil and Gas Division Address: 1701 N. Congress Place: Texas Zip: 78711-2967 Website:...

  12. Name: Lisa Anderson Organization: Tri-City Railroad Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9085023 Name: Lisa Anderson Organization: Tri-City Railroad Company Address: P. O. Box 1700 Richland, WA 99352 Country: United States Reasonably Describe Records Description: The...

  13. Philippine Islands: a tectonic railroad siding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, J.J. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    In 1976, significant quantities of oil were discovered offshore northwest of Palawan Island by a Philippine-American consortium led by Philippines-Cities Service Inc. This was the first commercial oil found in the Philippine Islands. Other exploration companies had decided that there was no commercial oil in the Philippines. They fell prey to a situation Wallace E. Pratt, who began his career in 1909 in the Philippines, later described: There are many instances where our knowledge, supported in some cases by elaborate and detailed studies has convinced us that no petroleum resources were present in areas which subsequently became sites of important oil fields. Some explorers are blinded by the negative implications of the same knowledge that successful explorers use to find important oil fields. The Palawan discoveries are examples of successful use of knowledge. Recognition that the Philippine Islands are a tectonic railroad siding may be the key to future exploration success. These islands are continental fragments, each with its own individual geologic characteristics, that have moved from elsewhere to their present positions along a major strike-slip zone. Play concepts can be developed in the Philippines for continental fragments in each of the three major present-day tectono-stratigraphic systems that are dominated by strike-slip, but include subduction and extension tectonics, with both carbonate and clastic sediments.

  14. The Nevada railroad system: Physical, operational, and accident characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a description of the operational and physical characteristics of the Nevada railroad system. To understand the dynamics of the rail system, one must consider the system`s physical characteristics, routing, uses, interactions with other systems, and unique operational characteristics, if any. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is a narrative description of all mainlines and major branchlines of the Nevada railroad system. Each Nevada rail route is described, including the route`s physical characteristics, traffic type and volume, track conditions, and history. The second part of this study provides a more detailed analysis of Nevada railroad accident characteristics than was presented in the Preliminary Nevada Transportation Accident Characterization Study (DOE, 1990).

  15. Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2009-12-31

    The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction modification to improve energy efficiency.

  16. The potential for LNG as a railroad fuel in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Freight railroad operations in the US represent a substantial opportunity for liquefied natural gas (LNG) to displace diesel fuel. With the promise of achieving an overwhelming economic advantage over diesel fuel, this paper presents some discussion to the question, ``Why is the application of LNG for railroad use in the US moving so slowly?'' A brief overview of the freight railroad operations in the US is given, along with a summary of several railroad LNG demonstration projects. US Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board exhaust emission regulations may cause the railroad industry to move from small-scale LNG demonstration projects to using LNG as a primary freight railroad transportation fuel in selected regions or route-specific applications.

  17. 16 TAC 3.30 - Memorandum of Understanding between the Railroad...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    30 - Memorandum of Understanding between the Railroad Commission and the Commission on Environmental Quality Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Railroad electrification in America's future: an assessment of prospects and impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.K.; Yabroff, I.W.; Dickson, E.M.; Zink, R.A.; Gray, M.E.; Moon, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Such considerations as the level of traffic, the relative financial health of individual railroads, the capacity of the associated supply and engineering/construction industries, and the logical connecting points at classifying yards, as well as the national interest value of creating a continuous system, continental in scope, were used to construct a scenario for railroad electrification that closely approximates how an electrification program might be implemented. For the economic reasons cited, much of the US railroad system would remain conventionally powered. This scenario provides for an electrified network involving 14 mainlines operated by 10 companies that could transport much of the nation's rail-borne freight. Five years of planning and engineering work would be required for each link before construction could begin. With 1000 miles or less of electrified route per year, 14 years would be needed to construct the 9000-mile network of our scenario. (The scenario constructed runs from 1980 to 1998.) The analysis was aided with the construction of the SRI Railroad Industry Model. Basically a model of industry operations and finances, the model produces income statements and balance sheets at yearly intervals. Railroad energy costs, railroad freight levels, maintenance costs, purchases and leases of rooling stock, electrification facility investments, future inflation, rate setting practices, annual depreciation, taxes, and profits were calculated.

  19. History of transcontinental railroads and coal mining on the Northern Plains to 1920

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryans, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    This history examines the symbiotic relationship between three transcontinental railroads-the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern-and coal mining in Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming through 1920. Throughout their dual existence, American railroads and the coal industry enjoyed a mutually beneficial association. On the Northern Plains, however, this partnership assumed new dimensions. There, the coal and rails exerted unique influences upon one another. The location of deposits determined many of the transcontinentals' early decisions, especially route selection. The native fuel also was used to promote settlement on railroad lands. Two of the roads, the Union Pacific and Northern Pacific, held land grants containing valuable deposits. The Great Northern, having no such subsidy, acquired coal lands in northern Montana. On these properties, the three railroads pioneered the region's commercial coal mining industry. Eventually, each formed subsidiaries to direct their coal operations. While much of their production supplied steam locomotives, some was sold to the public. Furthermore, the policies of the Northern Pacific and Great Northern especially enabled their coal to stimulate non-railroad enterprises. In addition, all three provided the transportation which made exploitation by others economically feasible.

  20. Prospects of development of the power industry in the zone of influence of the transcontinental railroad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fel`dman, B.N.; Luk`yanov, V.A.

    1994-02-01

    The authors examine the possibilities of developing a power industry in the zone of influence of the transcontinental railroad (TCR). Two aspects of development are studied in particular: (1) the electric power supply for construction and subsequently for the operating railroad in coordination with simultaneous provision for the needs of adjacent regions; (2) the construction of a transcontinental transmission line with the use of a tunnel and railroad for its construction and with the creation of a unified transport--power corridor. Of great interest are the possibilities of constructing hydrostations in regions of the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Chukchi Peninsula, and in the southern part of the Magadan region. The route of the proposed main line is located in the zone of influence of a number of prospective hydropower installations. 2 tabs.

  1. LNG as a fuel for railroads: Assessment of technology status and economics. Topical report, June-September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pera, C.J.; Moyer, C.B.

    1993-01-06

    The objective of the research was to investigate the feasibility of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a fuel for railroads. The investigation included assessment of the status of relevant technologies (i.e., LNG-fueled locomotive engines, tender cars, refueling equipment), a review of current demonstration projects, and an analytical evaluation of LNG railroad economics.

  2. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    14, 2014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 foresees growth of LNG as a fuel for railroads The U.S. Energy Information Administration expects liquefied natural gas, or LNG, to play an increasing role in powering freight locomotives in the coming years. EIA's Reference case, in its recently released Annual Energy Outlook 2014 indicates that growing natural gas production and lower natural gas spot prices compared to crude oil prices could provide significant cost savings for locomotives that use LNG as a

  3. Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Forum 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting May 11, 2011 May 11, 2011 Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & & & & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Tasked for the

  4. Market effects of environmental regulation: coal, railroads, and the 1990 Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busse, M.R.; Keohane, N.O.

    2007-01-01

    Many environmental regulations encourage the use of 'clean' inputs. When the suppliers of such an input have market power, environmental regulation will affect not only the quantity of the input used but also its price. We investigate the effect of the Title IV emissions trading program for sulfur dioxide on the market for low-sulfur coal. We find that the two railroads transporting coal were able to price discriminate on the basis of environmental regulation and geographic location. Delivered prices rose for plants in the trading program relative to other plants, and by more at plants near a low-sulfur coal source.

  5. Dr. Googin and his early days at Y-12, part 5 „ Beside the railroad tracks with John Googin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - Beside the railroad tracks with John Googin In our last installment of the saga of John Googin's arrival at Y-12 in late May, 1944, John had just fin- ished his tour of Building 9202 and had gone to a warehouse near where Building 9720-6 was later built to pick up his clothes. He had walked from one building to the other along the railroad tracks with his new supervisor, Ed Vitalla. As they walked along, John and Ed had shared conversation regarding the work to be done at Y-12 and the

  6. Petroleum geology of Kate Spring field, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, D.E.

    1991-06-01

    Kate Spring field was opened by Marathon Oil Company at the 1 Kate Spring well in December 1985. Because of poor market conditions and production problems, the well was not produced and the field was not confirmed until the Evans 1 Taylor well was completed in October 1987. As of August 1990, five wells have produced over 575,000 bbl of oil and have the capacity to flow at rates of several hundred to several thousand barrels per day. The oil is 10-12{degrees} API and is saturated with gas. The oil is used for road asphalt which limits its marketability. Production is from landslide blocks of Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata that were emplaced in Miocene-Pliocene time, during the structural development of the Railroad Valley basin. The slide blocks are overlain by valley fill and probably correspond to similar blocks encountered within the valley fill at Eagle Springs field, adjacent to the north. The pay is at a depth of 4,500 ft. Kate Spring is a part of the fault-block bench that contains Eagle Springs field and is situated on the east flank of the Railroad Valley graben. There is east-west closure on the structure of the field, but the north end of the field has not been defined. The accumulation is sealed by the unconformity at the slide block-valley fill contact. The nature of the reservoir implies that the production is controlled by fractures and precludes useful extrapolation of any measurable matrix porosity. Based on volumetric calculations, the field will probably produce 2-3 million bbl of oil.

  7. Railroad accident report: Head-on collision between Iowa Interstate Railroad Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East with release of hazardous materials near Altoona, Iowa, on July 30, 1988. Irregular report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-06

    About 11:40 a.m. central daylight saving time on July 30, 1988, Iowa Interstate Railroad Ltd. (IAIS) freight trains Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East collided head on within the yard limits of Altoona, Iowa, about 10 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa. All 5 locomotive units from both trains; 11 cars of Extra 406 East; and 3 cars, including two tank cars containing denatured alcohol, of Extra 470 West derailed. The denatured alcohol, which was released through the pressure relief valves and the manway domes of the two derailed tank cars, was ignited by the fire resulting from the collision of the locomotives. Both crew members of Extra 470 West were fatally injured; the two crew members of Extra 406 East were only slightly injured. The estimated damage (including lading) as a result of this accident exceeded $1 million. The major safety issues in the accident include operational methods employed by the IAIS, training and selection of train and engine personnel, supervisory oversight by the IAIS, design of closure fittings on hazardous materials rail tanks, and oversight of regional railroads by the Federal Railroad Administration.

  8. An Analysis of Stream Culvert Fish Passage on the Navy Railroad Line between Bremerton and Shelton, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; Miller, Martin C.; Southard, John A.

    2004-10-25

    The Navy railroad service line runs between Shelton, Bremerton, and Silverdale, and is used by the Navy to transfer freight to its facilities. It is also used by commercial clients to ship service items and bulk cargo for municipalities along portions of the route. Culverts of various size and construction convey streams and stormwater runoff under the railroad line. These allow transfer of water and, in some cases allow for passage of juvenile and adult salmon into waters upstream of the culverts. As part of this project, 21 culverts along a 34-mile reach (Shelton to Bremerton) of this railroad were surveyed to evaluate their function and ability to allow salmon to utilize the streams. The culverts and attached watersheds were evaluated using criteria developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to assign a Priority Index (PI) to barriers present on each fish-bearing stream. The PI is a relative numeric rating indicator, assigned using consistent criteria related to the degree of potential habitat gained by removing barriers and improving the function of the watershed. Of the 21 culverts evaluated, five were found to be complete fish-passage barriers and six were found to be partial barriers, primarily to juvenile salmon. Three of these culverts had PI ratings above 10 and five others had ratings between 7 and 10. Corrective action can be taken based on any PI rating, but the WDFW normally assigns lower priority to projects with PI scores lower than 15. Several of the stream and culverts had previously been evaluated for structural integrity and function and have been scheduled for repair. A narrative indicating the condition of the culvert has been prepared as well as a table indicating the PI scores and a summary of recommendations for action for each culvert.

  9. Design of a smart, survivable sensor system for enhancing the safe and secure transportation of hazardous or high-value cargo on railroads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, J.R.; Rey, D.; Faas, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    An application of smart sensor technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use in the safe and secure transportation of high value of hazardous materials is proposed for a railroad application. The Green Box would be capable of surviving most typical railroad accidents. In an accident, the system would send a distress signal notifying authorities of the location and condition of the cargo; permitting them to respond in the most effective manner. The concept proposes a strap-on sensor package, the Green Box, that could be attached to any railroad car or cargo container. Its primary purpose is to minimize the number, severity and consequences of accidents and to reduce losses due to theft. The system would also be capable of recognizing component failure conditions, notifying the operators and logging sensor data for use in directing preventative maintenance. The modular implementation, which facilitates system integration in a number of applications including the Advanced Train Control System (ACTS), is discussed. The methodology for determining the environmental specification for accident survivability is presented. A test plan for evaluating hardware performance in both normal operating and accident conditions is described.

  10. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Area 25 and Area 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539, Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A modification to the FFACOwas approved in May 2010 to transfer the two Railroad Tracks corrective action sites (CASs) from CAU 114 into CAU539. The two CASs are located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of the CAU 539 Railroad Tracks CASs using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation should support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 14, 2009, by representatives of U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Navarro Nevada Environmental Services, LLC (NNES); and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each Railroad Tracks CAS in CAU 539. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 539: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect in situ dose measurements. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., lead bricks) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, NNES will consult NDEP to determine the path forward, then either: • Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or • Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions.

  11. Railroad Routing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-05

    INTERLINE/PC is an interactive program designed to simulate the routing practices of the United States rail system. The rail industry is divided into a large number of independent competing companies. The INTERLINE data base represents these rail companies as 94 separate subnetworks. An additional two subnetworks represent navigable inland/intracoastal and deep draft marine routes. Interchange points between individual rail systems and waterway systems are also identified.

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: • At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. • At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • Clean closure is required at CAS 26-99-05. • Closure in place is required at CAS 25-99-21. • A UR is required at CAS 25-99-21. • A Notice of Completion to the NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 539. • Corrective Action Unit 539 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  13. Railroads and shippers clash over coal dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-11-15

    In an effort to reduce coal spillage from railcars, mines in the Powder River Basin (PRB) now load coal with a loaf profile but, reportedly, beginning in 2008, Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) will announce guidelines requiring all PRB coal loads to be sprayed with a chemical surfactant. If this does not fix the problem, greater measures will be taken. At the time of going to press, the details of how this would be implemented and regulated were unresolved. 1 photo.

  14. Railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooden, D.G.

    1986-03-01

    This report documents a detailed analysis of rail operations that are important for assessing the risk of transporting high-level nuclear waste. The major emphasis of the discussion is towards ''general freight'' shipments of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for selecting models and parameters that are appropriate for assessing the risk of rail transportation of nuclear waste.

  15. Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Railroad Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,759,140 2,974,641 3,121,150 3,118,150 3,369,781 3,670,338 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 459,324 482,929 514,418 492,156 460,066 480,024 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 43,763...

  16. Railroad Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Environmental Issues Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Exploration History First Discovery Well Completion Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow...

  17. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

  18. Historic Railroad Building Goes Net Zero | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In addition to its net-zero power consumption and geothermal technology, the building itself is made from sustainable materials. The floors on the first level of the building are ...

  19. Microsoft Word - ORNL-NTRC-006_P E Johnson_TRAGIS Users Manual...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... (TM) KO Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad KRR Kiamichi Railroad (RailAmerica, Inc.) also Dallas Garland & Northeastern Railroad (DGNO); Texas Northeastern Railroad (TNER) KYLE Kyle ...

  20. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Railroad Valley Area (Laney,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    phenomena. The second objective relates to testing satellite thermal infrared (TIR) data for locating thermal anomalies that may be related to blind systems. A third...

  1. Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System Model...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I railroads has changed over time as the revenue criteria has changed and railroads enter and exit the railroad industry. Class I railroads generate the majority of the revenue...

  2. Chicago, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS SLIDE 2 Coal 5,769,626 40% Grain 936,098 6% Chemicals ... Source: AAR Weekly Railroad Traffic ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS SLIDE 3 Coal by Rail ...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Distillate SalesDeliveries to Railroad Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Distillate SalesDeliveries to Railroad Consumers (Thousand...

  4. York County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania Parkville, Pennsylvania Pennville, Pennsylvania Railroad, Pennsylvania Red Lion, Pennsylvania Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania Shiloh, Pennsylvania Shrewsbury,...

  5. Collision of Norfolk Southern Freight Train 192 With Standing Norfolk Southern Local Train P22 With Subsequent Hazardous Materials Release at Graniteville, South Carolina January 6, 2005

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    iii Railroad Accident Report Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Factual Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Accident Synopsis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Site Description . . . . . . . . . .

  6. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",214186 2014,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",81151 2014,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding ...

  7. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",796189 2013,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",25825 2013,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding ...

  8. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",87406 2014,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",97501 2014,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",95016 ...

  9. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",81151 2014,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",156509 2014,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",214186 ...

  10. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",802677 2012,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",17349 2012,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding ...

  11. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",65620 2014,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",124124 2014,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",28514 ...

  12. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",495478 2013,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",116028 2013,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding ...

  13. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",28514 2014,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",65620 2014,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power ...

  14. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",17349 2012,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",144411 2012,4,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",802677 ...

  15. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",116028 2013,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",94157 2013,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",495478 ...

  16. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",95016 2014,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",87406 2014,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power ...

  17. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",25825 2013,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",125381 2013,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",796189 ...

  18. Coal-by-Rail: A Business-as-Usual Reference Case

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ......17 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The following individuals ... Center (USACOE) NO x Oxides of Nitrogen NS Norfolk Southern Railroad PL Public Law ...

  19. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    During the height of operations in the 1960s, the Jackass & Western Railroad, located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly know as the Nevada Test Site (NTS), was the shortest and slowest operating railroad in the United States. However, it was the railroad's important mission that made it such: the railroad trans- ported research reactors, NERVA reactors/ nuclear engines, and equipment between facilities at the NTS Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) in

  20. Collision of Norfolk Southern Freight Train 192 With Standing Norfolk Southern Local Train P22 With Subsequent Hazardous Materials Release at Graniteville, South Carolina January 6, 2005

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The safety issues addressed in the report are railroad accidents attributable to improperly lined switches and the vulnerability, under current operating practices, of railroad tank cars carrying hazardous materials. As a result of its investigation of this accident, the Safety Board makes recommendations to the Federal Railroad Administration. The National Transportation Safety Board is an independent Federal agency dedicated to promoting aviation, railroad, highway, marine, pipeline, and

  1. Location Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-27

    Map file package containing shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, major roads, railroads, and rivers. The inset map shows regional Paleozoic structural elements.

  2. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TF RailroadVesselShip Fuel It is also noted that Destination State code of "X Export" indicates movements to foreign destinations. 1 68 Domestic Coal Distribution...

  3. Property:RAPID/Contact/ID3/Name | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Environmental Protection + Jon McRae + New Mexico State Land Office + Kelly Brooks Smith + O Oregon Department of Environmental Quality + David Cole + R Railroad Commission of...

  4. "Table 2. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary Transport Mode and Supply Region" "(2013 dollars per ton)" "Coal Supply Region",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "Railroad"...

  5. American Battery Charging Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery Charging Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Battery Charging Inc Place: Smithfield, Rhode Island Zip: 2917 Product: Manufacturer of industrial and railroad...

  6. EIS-0369: Floodplain Statement of Finding | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Finding EIS-0369: Floodplain Statement of Finding Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain,...

  7. EECBG Success Story: Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Caliente, Nevada, has a unique city hall: a historic railroad depot. There was just one problem: it was built before central heating or air-conditioning. Learn more.

  8. Location Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map file package containing shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, major roads, railroads, and rivers. The inset map shows regional Paleozoic structural elements.

  9. Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    consumption including gasoline, diesel, CNG, and LPG for the following areas: railroad ... 2008 (million gallons) Gasoline Diesel LPG CNG Total Agricultural Equipment Tractors, ...

  10. California Public Utilities Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based in San Francisco, California. The CPUC regulates privately owned electric, natural gas, telecommunications, water, railroad, rail transit, and passenger transportation...

  11. CX-008876: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Railroad Island Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/23/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Railroad Valley Geothermal Area Red River Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Sharkey Hot...

  13. U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2014 To: Members of the Public From: Quadrennial Energy ... 11 Oil and Gas Journal, "Lagging Pipelines Create ... Railroads Policy and Economics Department, July 2014, at ...

  14. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Railroad",14493 2013,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Truck",267108 2013,1,"Alabama","Colorado","Electric Power ...

  15. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Sector","Truck",12356 2013,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Railroad",14493 2013,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding ...

  16. Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SPAR ensures spill prevention through the review and approval of prevention plans for oil terminals, pipelines, tank vessels and barges, railroads, refineries, and exploration...

  17. o_al_05.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alabama 770 851 1,739 * 3,360 Railroad...

  18. Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development. DNA Repair Switch A process similar in spirit to that of a railroad...

  19. The Quadrennial Energy Review (Full Report) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is focused on energy transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D), the networks of pipelines, wires, storage, waterways, railroads, and other facilities that form the backbone...

  20. Quadrennial Energy Review Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is focused on energy transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D), the networks of pipelines, wires, storage, waterways, railroads, and other facilities that form the backbone...

  1. Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System Model...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... adequate for most public policy analyses and ... 141 American Railroads, the Surface Transportation Board, the Mine Safety and Health ... Natural Resources Journal, 23 (1983), pp. ...

  2. Property:RAPID/Contact/ID5/Position | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (State Lands Contact) + N Nevada Division of Environmental Protection + Bureau of Waste Management SW Branch Supervisor + R Railroad Commission of Texas + Discharge Permitting...

  3. Maglev-rail intermodal equipment and suspension study. Final report, July 1991-February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilcrease, E.E.; Gillam, C.M.

    1993-02-01

    The physical and operational characteristics of four existing and planned maglev systems were surveyed pertinent to the intermodal interface for each system. The maglev systems investigated were: Grumman New York State' (Configuration 002) Maglev; Transrapid Intercity (Transrapid 07) Maglev; HSST Passive Intermediate Speed (HSST-300) Maglev; and Japan Railways Vertical Magnet (Configuration MLU 002) Maglev. The focus of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using existing railroad right-of-way to access center-city terminals in one of three possible methods: Maglev vehicles traveling over existing railroad tracks with the use of steel guide wheels and some means of exterior propulsion; maglev vehicles transferred onto modified railroad flatcars and transported over existing railroad tracks with locomotive power; or new grade-separated maglev guideways on existing railroad rights-of-way.

  4. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State","Destination State","Consumer Type","Transportation Mode","Coal Volume (short tons)" 2014,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",212909 2014,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",88670 2014,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Railroad",1675

  5. Year","Quarter","Origin State","Destination State","Consumer Type","Transportati

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State","Destination State","Consumer Type","Transportation Mode","Coal Volume (short tons)" 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",1051202 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",25445 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Railroad",10029

  6. d_al_05.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alabama 770 851 1,739 3,360 Railroad 642 1...

  7. Property:Author | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Its Challenges + Ladislaus Rybach + 1 15 Years of Successful H2S Abatement + Gary J. Nagl + 16 TAC 3.30 - Memorandum of Understanding between the Railroad Commission and...

  8. CX-012612: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Remove Two Sets of Railroad Tracks on Road D in A-Area CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41807 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke Plant","Truck",87126 2013,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Industrial Plants Excluding Coke","Truck",267108 2013,1,"Alabama","Indiana","Coke Plant","Railroad",164223 ...

  10. All 2015 Tables_2013 Dollars.xlsx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    c. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs from Coal Basin to State by Railroad (2013 dollars per ton) Coal Supply Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013...

  11. Untitled Document

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    natural gas use as a railroad fuel April 14, 2014 Light-duty vehicle energy demand: demographics and travel behavior April, 16, 2014 No Sunset and Extended Policies cases April 21,...

  12. 54th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 54th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. As noted in articles on recently issued DOE EISs (Complex Transformation, Yucca Mountain Repository and Railroad, and...

  13. EM Contractor Responds to Train Derailment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About 19,000 gallons of hydrochloric acid spilled from a train that derailed and slammed into six railroad cars parked on a short spur near the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Allendale, S.C.

  14. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2010 CERTIFIED MAIL Ms. Lisa Anderson Tri-City Railroad Company P.O. Box 1700 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Ms. Anderson: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Natural Gas Safety The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the safety of the natural gas and propane industries. (Reference Texas Statutes, Natural Resources Code 113.011 and 116.011

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRC T Plant PRC T Plant PRC U Plant PRC U Plant PRC Waste and Fuels PRC Waste and Fuels Pretreatment Facility Pretreatment Facility Public Outreach Public Outreach Public Tours Public Tours Railcars at Hanford Railcars at Hanford Railcars Go To B Reactor Railcars Go To B Reactor Railroad Track Removal Railroad Track Removal Rattlesnake Communications Tower Rattlesnake Communications Tower Records Storage Facility Records Storage Facility Reducing Chromium in Groundwater Reducing Chromium in

  17. TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2005 Presentations | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 2005 Presentations TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2005 Presentations Pueblo, Colorado Presentations (September 2005) Documents Available for Download PDF icon Plenary I - Rail Rolling Stock Development PDF icon Plenary I - Testing at the Transportation Technology Center Inc. PDF icon Plenary II - American Short Line and Regional Railroad Association PDF icon Plenary II - Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen PDF icon Plenary II - U.S. Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends

  18. EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

  19. QER- Comment of Steve Sharp

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Steve Sharp Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2014 2:53 PM To: Richards, John Cc: Steve Sharp; Scott McAdory Subject: Freight rail "Quote a Rate" issue John: Attached is a map we often use to help explain the "Quote a Rate" problem that we have with the freight railroads in the United States. There are many other similar situations but this one is a good example. The Rodemacher Plant near Alexandria, Louisiana primarily burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal from near Gillette, Wyoming. This power plant is less than 20 miles from Alexandria, Louisiana. The distance from Gillette, Wyoming to Alexandria, Louisiana is about 1,500 miles. As you can see from the map, you could deliver coal from the PRB to Alexandria by using only the Union Pacific (UP) or you could (it would appear) use the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) and the Kansas City Southern (KCS). From Alexandria the only one of the rail lines that actually goes to the plant is UP. So it would appear that the only portion of the route that doesn't have rail competition is the last portion from Alexandria to the plant which is less than 20 miles. Even though all these railroads are Common Carrier railroads, the STB practices and administrative decisions over the years allow railroads to refuse to quote customers a rate in this situation. In other words, UP will only give the owner of the plant a rate to haul PRB coal from Wyoming to the plant. They will not quote a rate from Alexandria to the plant, Kansas City to the plant, etc. Other traffic is interchanged between these same railroads at these locations. Decisions like these were originally intended to help boost the finances of railroads that were on the verge of bankruptcy. Now that the railroads are financially healthy, these past decisions need to be reviewed and reversed. Steve Sharp CURE President

  20. LNG Safety Assessment Evaluation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muna, Alice Baca; LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluated published safety assessment methods across a variety of industries including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), hydrogen, land and marine transportation, as well as the US Department of Defense (DOD). All the methods were evaluated for their potential applicability for use in the LNG railroad application. After reviewing the documents included in this report, as well as others not included because of repetition, the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist is most suitable to be adapted to the LNG railroad application. This report was developed to survey industries related to rail transportation for methodologies and tools that can be used by the FRA to review and evaluate safety assessments submitted by the railroad industry as a part of their implementation plans for liquefied or compressed natural gas storage ( on-board or tender) and engine fueling delivery systems. The main sections of this report provide an overview of various methods found during this survey. In most cases, the reference document is quoted directly. The final section provides discussion and a recommendation for the most appropriate methodology that will allow efficient and consistent evaluations to be made. The DOE Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist was then revised to adapt it as a methodology for the Federal Railroad Administration’s use in evaluating safety plans submitted by the railroad industry.

  1. High-speed rail transportation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, October 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    H.R. 1087 would authorize a high speed rail transportation development and commercialization program, establish a national high speed rail transportation policy, and promote development and commercialization of high speed rail transportation by providing Federal guarantees of certain investments in high speed rail transportation facilities. Testimony was heard from representatives of MAGLEV USA, Federal Railroad Administration, National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak), the Office of Technology Assessment, MAGLEV, Inc., National Maglev Initiative, High Speed Rail Association, and the Texas High-Speed Rail Association. Additional information was supplied by the Coalition of Northeastern Governors, Republic Locomotive, Washington State High Speed Ground Transportation, and the Texas High Speed Authority.

  2. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State","Origin State","Consumer Type","Transportation Mode","Coal Volume (short tons)" 2014,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",88670 2014,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",86031 2014,1,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",212909

  3. Year","Quarter","Destination State","Origin State","Consumer Type","Transportati

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State","Origin State","Consumer Type","Transportation Mode","Coal Volume (short tons)" 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Railroad",25445 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Coke Plant","Truck",141202 2012,3,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric Power Sector","Railroad",1051202

  4. Microsoft Word - Crude by rail July 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Moving Crude Oil by Rail Page 1 of 10 Summary U.S. crude oil production has risen sharply in recent years, with much of the increased output moving by rail. In 2008, U.S. Class I railroads originated 9,500 carloads of crude oil. In 2013, they originated 407,761 carloads. In light of these increased volumes, railroads have taken numerous steps to enhance crude oil safety. They've undertaken top-to-bottom reviews of their operations and voluntarily updated their operating practices, from the

  5. Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Garretson, Justin (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Wetmore, CO); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-24

    A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

  6. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  7. Audit Report: WR-B-97-04 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Audit Report: WR-B-97-04 March 20, 1997 Audit of the Use of Hanford Site Railroad System PDF icon Audit Report: WR-B-97-04 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: WR-B-97-03...

  8. Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  10. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the 54th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. As noted in articles on recently issued DOE EISs (Complex Transformation, Yucca Mountain Repository and Railroad, and Western Energy Corridors), DOE has received and is responding to extensive public comment. This issue also pays tribute to two women who have made extraordinary contributions to NEPA implementation.

  11. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  12. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network News

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Archives | Department of Energy Idling Reduction Network News Archives Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network News Archives The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United

  14. Coal Distribution and Utilization Act of 1987. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on S. 801, September 10, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The hearing was called to review Senate bill S.801 which would provide Federal eminent domain authority for coal slurry pipelines to facilitate the national distribution and utilization of coal. Obtaining rights-of-way for the pipelines, particularly across railroad lands, has been a major stumbling lock to construction in the US. Testimony was heard from 9 witnesses, representing the Building and Construction Trade Department of AFL-CIO, Snamprogetti USA, Association of American Railroads, Railway Labor Executives Association, Coal and Slurry Technology Association, American Mining Congress, Edison Electric Institute, and the state of Louisiana. An attorney at law also gave testimony. Additional material was submitted by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, the American Farm Bureau Federation, American Public Power Association, several union representatives, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

  15. Ac traction gets on track

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, L.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes inverter-based ac traction systems which give freight locomotives greater adhesion, pulling power, and braking capacity. In the 1940s, dc traction replaced the steam engine as a source of train propulsion, and it has ruled the freight transportation industry ever since. But now, high-performance ac-traction systems, with their unprecedented levels of pulling power and adhesion, are becoming increasingly common on America`s freight railroads. In thousands of miles of demonstration tests, today`s ac-traction systems have outperformed traditional dc-motor driven systems. Major railroad companies are convinced enough of the benefits of ac traction to have integrated it into their freight locomotives.

  16. Fuel cell propulsion systems for large vehicles: buses, freight locomotives, and marinecraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altseimer, J.H.; Frank, J.A.; Nochumson, D.H.

    1983-08-01

    A recent Los Alamos study assessed the use of fuel cell systems in transportation vehicles. Study results for buses, railroad locomotives, and marinecraft are presented in this paper. Levelized-life-cycle costs and a figure-of-merit ranking technique for noneconomic criteria were used. Advanced fuel cell systems appear necessary for fuel-cell-powered buses to be costcompetitive. The application of near-term fuel cell technology to city buses might still be worthwhile because of air pollution considerations. For locomotives and marinecraft especially, the cost data was rather limited but certain design and operational features of fuel cell systems were found that could impact favorably on both railroad and ship applications. These are discussed.

  17. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

  18. Transporation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2012-06-30

    This Transportation Energy Project is comprised of four unique tasks which work within the railroad industry to provide solutions in various areas of energy conservation. These tasks addressed: energy reducing yard related decision issues; alternate fuels; energy education, and energy storage for railroad applications. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team examined these areas and provided current solutions which can be used to both provide important reduction in energy usage and system efficiency in the given industry. This project also sought a mode in which rural and long-distance education could be provided. The information developed in each of the project tasks can be applied to all of the rail companies to assist in developing efficiencies.

  19. Atlanta TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 3-6-07

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atlanta, GA - January 31, 2007 Session Chaired by: Jay Jones (DOE, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, OCRWM) Regular Members in Attendance: Kenny Anderson (Las Vegas Paiute Tribe), Richard Arnold (Las Vegas Indian Center/Pahrump Paiute Tribe), Tony Boyd (Pueblo of Acoma), Rob Burnside (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, CTUIR), Floyd Chaney (Mohegan Tribe), Sandra Covi (Union Pacific Railroad), Martha Crosland (DOE/Office of General Counsel, GC), Kristen Ellis

  20. abstract-grady

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building An Integrated Activity-Based and Dynamic Network Assignment Model For Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG) Brian Grady (RSG) and/or Joe Castiglione (RSG) List of Authors ================ Joe Castiglione, Resource Systems Group, Inc. 29 Belmont Street, Somerville, MA 02143 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Brian Grady, Resource Systems Group, Inc. 55 Railroad Row, White River Junction, VT 05001 802-295-4999 This email

  1. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians: Solar/Wind Feasibility Study at Whitewater Ranch

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal ancestors resided in the area surrounding the San Jacinto Mountains in the Southern California region for centuries. * The Agua Caliente Reservation (approximately 32,000 acres) was deeded in trust by Federal Order in 1876 to the Agua Caliente Tribe. * The Tribe was deeded the even numbered sections as the odd numbered sections were deeded to Southern Pacific Railroad in 1860; Creating a checkerboard reservation configuration. * Portions of the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City and

  2. Aguq Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal ancestors resided in the area surrounding the San Jacinto Mountains in the Southern California region for centuries * The Agua Caliente Reservation (approximately 32,000 acres) was deeded in trust by Federal Order in 1876 to the Agua Caliente Tribe. * The Tribe was deeded the even numbered sections as the odd numbered sections were deeded to Southern Pacific Railroad in 1860; Creating a checkerboard reservation configuration. * Portions of the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City and

  3. 21st Century Locomotive Technology: Quarterly Technical Status Report 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lembit Salasoo; Jennifer Topinka; Anthony H Furman; Paul K Houpt

    2004-11-03

    Experimental and analytical work has continued on advanced fuel injection. Experimental trends continue to agree with modeling predictions. Based on rub tests, polymeric abradable coating compositions were downselected and evaluated in the turbocharger, to give encouraging performance gains. The detailed hybrid battery duty cycle was studied and battery life testing procedure required adjustments. Optimizer algorithm robustness has been improved, and a real-time optimizer simulation system was constructed and demonstrated at a railroad suppliers trade meeting.

  4. I.C. engines still key player in rail traction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, P.; Johnson, P.

    1994-07-01

    Still an important player in locomotive applications, internal combustion engines (diesel locomotives) are an obvious choice for hauling most freight, for shunting applications, and for passenger lines that are not economic to electrify. Today, research and testing continue to take place on natural gas-fueled locomotives, with a net result expected to benefit the railroads through reducing operational costs, while meeting new emissions regulations. 8 figs.

  5. December 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News December 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News February 5, 2015 - 11:07am Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States.

  6. Railcar Switchman Platform - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Railcar Switchman Platform The swtichman platform is designed to attach to the railcar ladder providing a stable platform Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryEngineers at the Savannah River Site have devised a new railcar switchman platform for enhanced safety of railroad personnel. The switchman platform is designed to attach to the railcar ladder providing a stable platform from which the switchman can perform their

  7. September 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 National Idling Reduction Network News September 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News November 5, 2015 - 12:26pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States.

  8. Word Pro - S6

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Note 1. Coal Production. Preliminary monthly estimates of national coal production are the sum of weekly estimates developed by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) and published in the Weekly Coal Production report. When a week extends into a new month, production is allo- cated on a daily basis and added to the appropriate month. Weekly estimates are based on Association of American Railroads (AAR) data showing the number of railcars loaded with coal during the week by Class I and

  9. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2010 2006 2002 1998 1994 1991 Archive Analysis & Projections MECS Industry Analysis Briefs Steel Industry Analysis The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of construction, transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the backbone of bridges, skyscrapers, railroads,

  10. Tribal Group Call 8-2-06 final

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary TEC Tribal Topic Group Conference Call August 2, 2006 Participants: Jay Jones, Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), chaired the session. Other Topic Group members included Kevin Blackwell (Federal Railroad Administration), Peter Blaney (Legin, Inc.), Elizabeth Helvey (JK Research Associates, Inc./BSC), Ed Gonzales (Pueblo de San Ildefonso), Angela Kordyak (DOE/Office of General Counsel), Robert Lupton (DOE/NV), Corinne Macaluso (DOE/OCRWM),

  11. STUDY OF USING OXYGEN-ENRICHED COMBUSTION AIR FOR LOCOMOTIVE DIESEL ENGINES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STUDY OF USING OXYGEN-ENRICHED COMBUSTION AIR FOR LOCOMOTIVE DIESEL ENGINES Ramesh B. Poola and Raj Sekar Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Dennis N. Assanis The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan G. Richard Cataldi Association of American Railroads Washington, D.C. ABSTRACT A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air

  12. November 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 National Idling Reduction Network News November 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News January 7, 2015 - 2:17pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the most

  13. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SECTION A. Project Title: Design/Prototype Fabricate Rail Car for High Rad Mat Transport - Kasgro Rail Corp. SECTION B. Project Description The purpose of this proposal is to obtain a certification from the American Association of Railroads (AAR) on a fully constructed and tested railcar system for transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The transport system will allow transporting SNF by rail to occur at normal rail speeds thus eliminating delays on rail lines and all more rapid transport of

  14. Moving | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving We're always working on planes, trains and automobiles-and specialized ways to move people and products efficiently and sustainably. Home > Impact > Moving Rail Networks Are Getting Smarter Sources: 2012 GE Annual Report (page 12); Norfolk Southern 2010 sustainability reporter (page 17) North American Freight Railroad... Read More » The GE Store for Technology is Open for Business Welcome to GE Global Research, also known as the GE Store for Technology. Across our global network of

  15. Chapter V

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 5-1 Chapter V This chapter examines the use-for transporting, storing, and delivering energy-of transportation modes shared by other major commodities. These modes include railroads, highways, waterways, ports, and the intermodal facilities that connect them together. The discussion is divided into four major sections. The first focuses on rail transport of energy commodities, with a consideration of ancillary

  16. Career Map: Transportation Worker | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Worker Career Map: Transportation Worker Transportation workers help to guide a large wind turbine component down a narrow road. Transportation Worker Position Title Transportation Worker Alternate Title(s) Railroad worker, truck driver, driver, long-haul truck driver, water transportation officer or engineer Education & Training Level Bachelor's degree generally not expected Education & Training Level Description Transportation workers' education and training requirements

  17. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 Existing Regulations B1.3: Routine maintenance Routine maintenance activities and custodial services for buildings, structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures (including, but not limited to, pathways, roads, and railroads), vehicles and equipment, and localized vegetation and pest control, during which operations may be suspended and resumed, provided that the activities would be conducted in a manner in accordance with applicable requirements.

  18. Are shorted pipeline casings a problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, W.F. )

    1994-11-01

    The pipeline industry has many road and railroad crossings with casings which have been in service for more than 50 years without exhibiting any major problems, regardless of whether the casing is shorted to or isolated from the carrier pipe. The use of smart pigging and continual visual inspection when retrieving a cased pipeline segment have shown that whether shorted or isolated, casings have no significant bearing on the presence or absence of corrosion on the carrier pipe.

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Key Documents | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Key Documents Key Documents PDF icon Tribal Discussions on Grant Program PDF icon Native American Map PDF icon Task Plan 1 - Tribal Topic Group (Rev. 07-12-00) PDF icon May 1, 2000 Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration Memorandum PDF icon NRC Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking PDF icon DOE Final Indian Policy PDF icon Department of Transportation (DOT) Tribal Policy Order More Documents & Publications TEC Working

  20. September 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy September 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News September 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News November 4, 2014 - 5:46pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United

  1. Solar/Wind Feasibility Study at Whitewater Ranch

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal ancestors resided in the area surrounding the San Jacinto Mountains in the Southern California region for centuries. * The Agua Caliente Reservation (approximately 32,000 acres) was deeded in trust by Federal Order in 1876 to the Agua Caliente Tribe. * The Tribe was deeded the even numbered sections as the odd numbered sections were deeded to Southern Pacific Railroad in 1860; Creating a checkerboard reservation configuration. * Portions of the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City and

  2. Solar/Wind Feasibility Study at Whitewater Ranch

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * Tribal ancestors resided in the area surrounding the San Jacinto Mountains in the Southern California region for centuries. * The Agua Caliente Reservation (approximately 32,000 acres) was deeded in trust by Federal Order in 1876 to the Agua Caliente Tribe. * The Tribe was deeded the even numbered sections as the odd numbered sections were deeded to Southern Pacific Railroad in 1860; Creating a checkerboard reservation configuration. * Portions of the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City

  3. October 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 National Idling Reduction Network News October 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News December 9, 2014 - 10:39am Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the

  4. October 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 National Idling Reduction Network News October 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News December 4, 2015 - 7:53pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the

  5. January 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    January 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News January 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News March 6, 2015 - 4:10pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is

  6. May 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 National Idling Reduction Network News May 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News July 17, 2014 - 3:47pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the May 2014

  7. May 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 National Idling Reduction Network News May 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News July 2, 2015 - 4:19pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the May 2015

  8. November 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    November 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News November 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News January 7, 2016 - 1:54pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below

  9. Quadrennial Energy Review Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review Fact Sheets Quadrennial Energy Review Fact Sheets Quadrennial Energy Review Fact Sheets The first installment of the QER examines how to modernize our nation's energy infrastructure to promote economic competitiveness, energy security and environmental responsibility, and is focused on energy transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D), the networks of pipelines, wires, storage, waterways, railroads, and other facilities that form the backbone of our energy system. The QER seeks to

  10. August 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News August 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News October 3, 2014 - 12:11pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is

  11. February 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    February 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News February 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News April 2, 2015 - 11:35am Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below

  12. January 2016 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2016 National Idling Reduction Network News January 2016 National Idling Reduction Network News March 10, 2016 - 1:25pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is

  13. July 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 National Idling Reduction Network News July 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News September 3, 2014 - 3:43pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the July

  14. July 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 National Idling Reduction Network News July 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News September 8, 2015 - 11:01am Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the July

  15. June 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News June 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News September 3, 2014 - 2:54pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is

  16. June 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 National Idling Reduction Network News June 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News August 7, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the June 2015

  17. Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal site located at Burrell, Pennsylvania. The site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Location of the Burrell Disposal Site Site Description and History The Burrell disposal site is a former railroad landfll located about 1 mile east of the Borough of Blairsville, Indiana County, in southwestern Pennsylvania.

  18. Microsoft Word - Tribal Call Jan 17 Summary 1-25-07 wep

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 17, 2007 Participants: Jay Jones, Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), chaired the session. Other Topic Group members included Nithin Akuthota (National Conference of State Legislatures, NCSL), Marlene Analla (Pueblo of Laguna), Floyd Chaney (Mohegan Indian Tribe), Sandra Covi (Union Pacific Railroad), Kristen Ellis (DOE/Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs, CI), Greg Fasano (Bechtel SAIC Company, BSC), Frank Gavigan

  19. Microsoft Word - Tribal Group Call 4-11 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 11, 2006 Participants: Jay Jones, Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), chaired the session. Other Topic Group members included Richard Arnold (Pahrump Paiute Tribe/Consolidated Group of Tribes and Organizations), Vicki Best (Bechtel SAIC Company [BSC]), Kevin Blackwell (Federal Railroad Administration), Barbara Durham (Timbisha Shoshone Tribe), Bob Fry (National Conference of State Legislatures), Steve Grey (Lawrence Livermore National

  20. No Slide Title

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis (NSD&A) Division Alexander Stanculescu, NSD&A Division Director Tritium Focus Group Meeting September 23, 2014 Our Identity - The National Nuclear Laboratory Research - Development - Demonstration - Deployment 2 We Maintain - * 890 square miles * 111 miles of electrical transmission and distribution lines * 579 buildings * 177 miles of paved roads * 14 miles of railroad lines * 3 reactors * 2 spent fuel pools * Mass transit system * Security * Museum *

  1. March 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    March 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News March 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News May 6, 2015 - 10:12am Addthis The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the

  2. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Review Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Tribal ancestors resided in the area surrounding the San Jacinto Mountains in the Southern California region for centuries. * The Agua Caliente Reservation (approximately 32,000 acres) was deeded in trust by Federal Order in 1876 to the Agua Caliente Tribe. * The Tribe was deeded the even numbered sections as the odd numbered sections were deeded to Southern Pacific Railroad in 1860; Creating a checkerboard reservation configuration. * Portions of the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City

  3. Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    57 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 198 / Friday, October 10, 2008 / Notices Facilities Associated With the Caliente Rail Alignment DOE also has decided to construct and operate the Nevada Railroad Control Center and the National Transportation Operations Center, co- located with the Upland Staging Yard, along the Caliente alternative segment, rather than one mile from the southern boundary of the geologic repository operations area at the Rail Equipment Maintenance Yard. In making this

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network News |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy National Idling Reduction Network News Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network News The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking and transit companies; railroads; ports; equipment manufacturers; Federal, state, and local government agencies (including regulators); nonprofit organizations; and national research laboratories to identify consistent, workable solutions to heavy-vehicle idling for the entire United States. Below is the

  5. NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    " ,,"'1' NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY BULLETIN 104 OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENTS IN NEVADA LARRY J. GARSIDE, RONALD H. HESS, KERYL L. FLEMING, AND BECKY S. WEIMER I 1988 .,", " "- "" ~-". - CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 3 LYON COUNTY 41 Sources of infonnation 3 Well data 42 Regulation 3 Organization of bulletin and NYE COUNTY 42 explanation of tenns 3 Railroad Valley field summaries 44 Acknowledgments 5 Well data 47 HISTORICAL SUMMARY 5 PERSHING COUNTY 79 Well

  6. Low-sulfur coal usage alters transportation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, H.

    1995-07-01

    As electricity production has grown, so has the amount of coal burned by US utilities. In order to comply with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), many utilities have changed from high-sulfur coal to lower-sulfur coal to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions. The primary mode of transporting coal to utilities remains the railroad, and coal represents the largest freight tonnage shipped - two out of every five tons. Since coal is so important to the railroads, it is logical that as utilities have changed their coal-buying strategies, the railroads` strategies have also changed. The increased demand for Western coal has caused rail lines some capacity problems which they are attempting to meet head-on by buying new railcars and locomotives and expanding track capacities. The new railcars typically have aluminum bodies to reduce empty weight, enabling them to carry larger loads of coal. Train locomotives are also undergoing upgrade changes. Most new locomotives have as motors to drive the wheels which deliver more motive power (traction) to the wheel trucks. In fact the motors are up to 30% more efficient at getting the traction to the trucks. Trackage is also being expanded to alleviate serious congestion on the tracks when moving Western coal.

  7. Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-31

    Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.

  8. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1997 report provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. 24 tabs.

  9. Safety issues relating to the liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas and liquefied natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petru, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Railroad Commission of Texas, LP-Gas Division, is statutorily responsible for the safety aspects of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) most commonly known as LP-gas or propane, compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). This presentation will address the safety issues relating to their use as alternative fuels. The paper discusses the safety of pressure vessels used for storage of the fuels at refueling facilities and the containers mounted in vehicles. Other topics include the lack of odorants in LNG, the use of protective clothing when handling cryogenic fluids, and where to obtain a copy of the safety regulations for handling these three fuels.

  10. Rail versus truck fuel efficiency: The relative fuel efficiency of truck-competitive rail freight and truck operations compared in a range of corridors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The report summarizes the findings of a study to evaluate the fuel efficiency of rail freight operations relative to competing truckload service. The objective of the study was to identify the circumstances in which rail freight service offers a fuel efficiency advantage over alternative truckload options, and to estimate the fuel savings associated with using rail service. The findings are based on computer simulations of rail and truck freight movements between the same origins and destinations. The simulation input assumptions and data are based on actual rail and truck operations. Input data was provided by U.S. regional and Class I railroads and by large truck fleet operators.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-04-01

    Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R&D issues.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R D issues.

  13. Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64% of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12% of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12%) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9%).

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, 1984-2010 Total by Fuel Distillate Fuel Oil by Selected End Use Residual Fuel Oil by Major End Use Kerosene by Major End Use 154 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 5.15. On-Highway Diesel Commercial Railroad 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Million Barrels per Day Residential Distillate Fuel Oil 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Million Barrels per Day Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil Vessel

  15. TEC Meeting Evaluations Summary -- Final

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Meeting Evaluation Summary San Antonio, Texas February 6-7, 2008 Attendee Affiliation: TEC Member Organizations: 19 (38%) State, Tribal or Local Official: 21 (42%) U.S. Department of Energy: 2 (4%) DOE Contractor: 3 (6%) Other (e.g., AULG, DOT): 5 (10%) Assessment of Agenda Topics: DOE Program Updates: 42% very useful 58% somewhat useful Plenary I - Tribal Cultural Discussion: 40% very useful 36% somewhat useful 14% not useful 10% didn't attend Plenary II - Evaluation of Shortline Railroads

  16. Rail Networks Are Getting Smarter | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rail Networks Are Getting Smarter Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) RailConnect 360 makes rail networks and operations smarter RailConnect 360 includes Movement Planner, Yard Planner and Trip Optimizer RailConnect 360 increases efficiency Freight trains moving faster could save railroads millions yearly

  17. Texaco cranks up new tank cars and TOPS program in concerted LPG push

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prowler, S.

    1990-08-01

    Texaco has embarked upon two major, yet distinct, projects that should have a significant impact on propane shipping, supply, pricing, and contractual relationships. The first program involves Texaco's expanded tank car leasing arrangements that should broaden the company's railroad transportation capability. The second program, which was unveiled at the NPGA Convention in Nashville, is known as TOPS (Texaco Optimum Propane supply). It is designed to solidify contractual relationships while providing reassurance against a repetition of last winter's supply/price crunch. In this article, both programs are explored.

  18. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 55,664,448 58,258,830 59,769,444 57,512,994 58,675,008 61,890,990 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,219,180 17,965,794 17,864,868 16,754,388

  19. Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 54,100,092 56,093,645 57,082,558 57,020,840 58,107,155 60,827,930 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 17,821,973 18,136,965 17,757,005 17,382,566

  20. Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercado, M.S.

    1996-03-09

    Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

  1. Quadrennial Energy Review: First Installment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 21, 2015, the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) Task Force released its first installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review report entitled, “Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure”. The first installment of the QER examines how to modernize our nation’s energy infrastructure to promote economic competitiveness, energy security and environmental responsibility, and is focused on energy transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D), the networks of pipelines, wires, storage, waterways, railroads, and other facilities that form the backbone of our energy system. The QER seeks to identify vulnerabilities in the system and proposes major policy recommendations and investments to replace, expand, and modernize infrastructure where appropriate.

  2. Microsoft Word - FOI 2010-00296.REQUEST.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marvin J. Kinney Organization: Port of Benton Address: 3100 George Washington Way Richland, WA 99354 Country: United States Phone Number: 509-375-3060 Fax Number: 509-375-5287 E-mail: kinney@portofbenton.com Reasonably Describe Records Description: A contract between Atomic Energy Commission and the Northern Pacific Railway Company dated December 7th. 1948. The contract is also with the Union Pacific Railroad Company. Contract Number is AT-45-1-GEN 21 Optional Information Describe Yourself: n/a

  3. Remarks on Rail Transportation of Energy Resources John R. Birge

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Remarks on Rail Transportation of Energy Resources John R. Birge University of Chicago Booth School of Business Chicago, IL 60637 USA John.Birge@chicagobooth.edu 1. Overview of railroad industry and regulation a. Rapid expansion in late 19 th century b. Price complexity and market power suspicion led to Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 c. Largely regulated industry until 4R Act of 1976 and Staggers Act of 1980 d. Prices since 1981 have mainly declined and load share has increased e. Current

  4. From: Madra Fischer To: Congestion Study Comments Date:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Madra Fischer To: Congestion Study Comments Date: Friday, October 03, 2014 2:38:30 PM I am writing to state my objection to the Rock Island Clean Line project. They want to cross my farm field at a diagonal angle to the mainline railroad and across TWO (2) gas pipelines which causes even more hazard and danger to me and my operators. This line has no funding in place, no wind farm to supply it and no customers on the East coast who want it. The cost to me as a landowner in Illinois is the

  5. Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311 and 3312) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    99 2.6 IRON AND STEEL SECTOR (NAICS 3311, 3312) 2.6.1. Overview of the Iron and Steel Manufacturing Sector The iron and steel sector is an essential part of the U.S. manufacturing sector, providing the necessary raw material for the extensive industrial supply chain. U.S. infrastructure is heavily reliant on the U.S. iron and steel sector, as it provides the foundation for construction (bridges, buildings), transportation systems (railroads, cars, trucks), utility systems (municipal water

  6. Profiles in garbage: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1998-02-01

    Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. With less tin use in steel cans, the importance of the detinning market has declined substantially. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  7. FISK ASSOCIATES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FISK ASSOCIATES 1.Q ,>-,2 EHtMiLU I SlJR- 631 UNION AVENUE MIDDLESEX, NEW LRmSEY - zol-x&9322 LEGAL DESCRIPTION Existing 25' Transcontinental Pipe Line Corporation Easement Stepan Chemical - Tract "B" Township of Rochelle Park, Bergen County,New Jersey BEGINNING at a point in the southerly right-of-way line of the New York Susquehanna and Western Railroad Company, said point being distant 50.00 feet along said right-of-way line in an easterly direction from the easterly sideline

  8. Phase I A Phase I B Phase I C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Parcel 9 Parcel 8 Phase I A Phase I B Phase I C Parcel 7 Parcel 6 Parcel 4 Parcel 3 Parcel D Parcel H Parcel 6A T 61 87 3 105 2 OSE 63 28 126 45 COS OSW 100 GH 102 STP SST 301 300 Mag-82 Mag-81 Mag-80 Mag-83 Mag-84 Mound Closure Project - Current Parcels and Buildings FILE NAME: mnd_bldg_parcel_owner_c.mxd DATE: Legend Parcel - DOE Parcel - MMCIC Pond Building Ownership DOE Leased MMCIC Road - paved Railroad 200 0 200 100 Feet O:\Sites\OH\Mound\ProjectWorkArea\PawelS\mnd_bldg_parcel_owner_c.mxd

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service The Texas Gas Service Conservation Program offers a rebate of up to $2,000 for the purchase of a qualified NGV or $3,000 for the conversion of a gasoline powered vehicle to operate on natural gas. The rebate is available for up to five vehicles per customer, and only centers certified by the Railroad Commission of Texas may perform conversions. A rebate of $1,000 is also available for the purchase of a natural gas

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Consumption Comparisons in 2010 One quad equals: - 50.2 million short tons of coal = enough coal to fill a train of railroad cars 4,123 miles long (about one and a half times across the U.S.) - 974.7 billion cubic feet natural gas - 8.2 billion gallons of gasoline = 21.2 days of U.S. gasoline use = 22.89 million passenger cars each driven 12,400 miles = 20.12 million light-duty vehicles each driven 12,200 miles = all new passenger cars sold, each driven 50,000 miles = 13.69 million stock

  11. Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation: technical section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Eighteen different alternative fuels were considered in the preliminary screening, from three basic resource bases. Coal can be used to provide 13 of the fuels; oil shale was the source for three of the fuels; and biomass provided the resource base for two fuels not provided from coal. In the case of biomass, six different fuels were considered. Nuclear power and direct solar radiation were also considered. The eight prime movers that were considered in the preliminary screening are boiler/steam turbine; open and closed cycle gas turbines; low and medium speed diesels; spark ignited and stratified charge Otto cycles; electric motor; Stirling engine; free piston; and fuel cell/electric motor. Modes of transport considered are pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft. Section 2 gives the overall summary and conclusions, the future outlook for each mode of transportation, and the R and D suggestions by mode of transportation. Section 3 covers the preliminary screening phase and includes a summary of the data base used. Section 4 presents the methodology used to select the fuels and prime movers for the detailed study. Sections 5 through 8 cover the detailed evaluation of the pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft modes of transportation. Section 9 covers the demand related issues.

  12. Economic assessment of coal-burning locomotives: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The General Electric Company embarked upon a study to evaluate various alternatives for the design and manufacture a coal fired locomotive considering various prime movers, but retaining the electric drive transmission. The initial study was supported by the Burlington-Northern and Norfolk-Southern railroads, and included the following alternatives: coal fired diesel locomotive; direct fired gas turbine locomotives; direct fired gas turbine locomotive with steam injection; raw coal gasifier gas turbine locomotive; and raw coal fluid bed steam turbine locomotive. All alternatives use the electric drive transmission and were selected for final evaluation. The first three would use a coal water slurry as a fuel, which must be produced by new processing plants. Therefore, use of a slurry would require a significant plant capital investment. The last two would use classified run-of-the-mine (ROM) coal with much less capital expenditure. Coal fueling stations would be required but are significantly lower in capital cost than a coal slurry plant. For any coal fired locomotive to be commercially viable, it must pass the following criteria: be technically feasible and environmentally acceptable; meet railroads' financial expectations; and offer an attractive return to the locomotive manufacturer. These three criteria are reviewed in the report.

  13. Environmental emergency response plans (EERPs): A single plan approach to satisfy multiple regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzyka, L.

    1995-11-01

    Conrail is a freight railroad operating in twelve northeast and midwestern states transporting goods and materials over 11,700 miles of railroad. To repair, maintain, rebuild, and manufacture locomotives and rail cars, and to maintain the track, right of way, bridges, tunnels and other structures, Conrail uses petroleum products, solvents and cleaners. These products are stored in hundreds of storage tanks in and around the yards and right of way. To power the trains, locomotives are fueled with diesel fuel. With large volumes of fuel, lubricants, solvents and cleaners, safe and efficient handling of petroleum and chemicals is crucial to avoid negative impacts on the environment. Conrail recently revisited the issue of environmental emergency response planning. In an attempt to assure full compliance with a myriad of federal, state, and local regulation, a ``single plan approach`` was chosen. Single plans for each facility, coined EERPs, were decided on after careful review of the regulations, and evaluation of the company`s operational and organizational needs.

  14. Longitudinal review of state-level accident statistics for carriers of interstate freight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saricks, C.; Kvitek, T.

    1994-03-01

    State-level accident rates by mode of freight transport have been developed and refined for application to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental mitigation program, which may involve large-quantity shipments of hazardous and mixed wastes from DOE facilities. These rates reflect multi-year data for interstate-registered highway earners, American Association of Railroads member carriers, and coastal and internal waterway barge traffic. Adjustments have been made to account for the share of highway combination-truck traffic actually attributable to interstate-registered carriers and for duplicate or otherwise inaccurate entries in the public-use accident data files used. State-to-state variation in rates is discussed, as is the stability of rates over time. Computed highway rates have been verified with actual carriers of high- and low-level nuclear materials, and the most recent truck accident data have been used, to ensure that the results are of the correct order of magnitude. Study conclusions suggest that DOE use the computed rates for the three modes until (1) improved estimation techniques for highway combination-truck miles by state become available; (2) continued evolution of the railroad industry significantly increases the consolidation of interstate rail traffic onto fewer high-capacity trunk lines; or (3) a large-scale off-site waste shipment campaign is imminent.

  15. Automated remote control of fuel supply section for the coal fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudin, O.V.; Maidan, B.V.; Tsymbal, A.A.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 6,000 miles east of Moscow, lays the city of Khabarovsk. This city`s coal-fired Power Plant 3 supplies electricity, heat and hot water to approximately 250,000 customers. Plant 3 has three units with a combined turbine capacity of 540 MW, (3 {times} 180) electrical and 780 (3 {times} 260) Gkal an hour thermal capacity with steam productivity of 2010 (3 {times} 670) tons per hour at 540 C. Coal fired thermal electric power plants rely on the equipment of the fuel supply section. The mechanism of the fuel supply section includes: conveyor belts, hammer crushers, guiding devices, dumping devices, systems for dust neutralizing, iron separators, metal detectors and other devices. As a rule, the fuel path in the power plant has three main directions: from the railroad car unloading terminal to the coal warehouse; from the coal warehouse to the acceptance bunkers of the power units, and the railroad car unloading terminal to the acceptance bunkers of power units. The fuel supply section always has a reserve and is capable of uninterruptible fuel supply during routine maintenance and/or repair work. This flexibility requires a large number of fuel traffic routes, some of which operate simultaneously with the feeding of coal from the warehouse to the acceptance bunkers of the power units, or in cases when rapid filling of the bunkers is needed, two fuel supply routes operate at the same time. The remote control of the fuel handling system at Power Plant 3 is described.

  16. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996 report provides information, illustrations and State-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996. 24 tabs.

  17. Coal cars - the first three hundred years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Robert Karig III

    2007-12-15

    This is the comprehensive study of the freight cars that conveyed coal across broad swaths of land that had been impassible before the invention of the steam engine. This volume traces the history and evolution of coal cars from their earliest use in England to the construction of major railways for the purpose of coal hauling and the end of the steam era on American railroads. In addition to contextualizing coal cars in the annals of industrial history, the book features extensive design specifications and drawings as well as a complete history of the various safety and mechanical innovations employed on these freight cars. It concludes with a photographic essay illustrating the development of the coal car over its first 300 years of use. 608 photos.

  18. Wheeling coal: an antitrust alternative to ICC rate making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, W.E.; Leckie, D.A.

    1984-08-30

    Parallels are drawn between the position of an electric utility requested to transmit electric power for the benefit of third-party buyers and sellers with whom the utility may be connected but who lack a direct connection themselves, and the position of a railroad which forms the sole land-transportation link between a producer-seller of coal and its electric-utility customer purchasing coal for use as a primary fuel in power generation. The authors suggest that the federal courts can remedy any unreasonable refusal to grant trackage rights for the transport of coal by the seller or purchaser in much the same way that they have remedied refusals to wheel electric power between a third-party seller and third-party purchaser. 56 references.

  19. Transportation (technology 86)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caplan, G.

    1986-01-01

    As railroads strive to cut operating and maintenance costs in an increasingly competitive transportation industry, AC propulsion and microprocessors figure prominently in their plans. New generations of locomotives and cars incorporating AC propulsion and microprocessors entered service last year, and the trend is destined to continue. Electronics is also making possible freight trains that rely on a telemetry unit at the rear to monitor airbrake pressure, instead of a manned caboose. AC is gaining acceptance because it permits simpler motors with fewer parts to wear and replace, and it saves energy by allowing the traction motors to work as generators during braking. Microprocessors are being used in locomotives not only to reduce energy waste through better regulation of traction motor currents and auxiliary devices such as cooling fans, but also to control engine speed, braking, and other functions.

  20. A strap-on monitoring system for rail car applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, J.; Rey, D.; Mitchell, J.; Breeding, R.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-12-01

    A joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work examines a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and a consequence of hazardous materials incidents. Product requirements are based on a cost-benefit analysis of operating losses. Results of a concept validation experiment conducted on a revenue generating train are reported.

  1. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

  2. Landlord project multi-year program plan, fiscal year 1999, WBS 1.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallas, M.D.

    1998-09-22

    The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The mission of Landlord Project is to provide more maintenance replacement of general infrastructure facilities and systems to facilitate the Hanford Site cleanup mission. Also, once an infrastructure facility or system is no longer needed the Landlord Project transitions the facility to final closure/removal through excess, salvage or demolition. Landlord Project activities will be performed in an environmentally sound, safe, economical, prudent, and reliable manner. The Landlord Project consists of the following facilities systems: steam, water, liquid sanitary waste, electrical distribution, telecommunication, sanitary landfill, emergency services, general purpose offices, general purpose shops, general purpose warehouses, environmental supports facilities, roads, railroad, and the site land. The objectives for general infrastructure support are reflected in two specific areas, (1) Core Infrastructure Maintenance, and (2) Infrastructure Risk Mitigation.

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, Selected Years, 1984-2010 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 534 360 166 55 208 42 192 115 1,093 46 114 46 2,971 1985 504 291 159 45 202 34 182 111 1,127 43 99 11 2,809 1990 475 260 169 49 222 50 203 135 1,393 46 118 (s) 3,120 1991 442 246 151 48 206 39 188 133 1,336 53 107 (s) 2,949

  4. All 2015 Tables_2014 Dollars.xlsx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode Year Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton) Average Delivered Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton) Transportation Cost Share of Delivered Cost (Percent) Railroad 2008 18.71 45.59 41.04% 2009 17.56 47.91 36.65% 2010 18.90 48.50 38.97% 2011 20.63 50.27 41.05% 2012 20.96 48.87 42.89% 2013 21.27 46.33 45.91% 2014 21.24 45.85 46.32% Waterway 2008 7.22 56.86 12.69% 2009 6.74 62.87 10.71% 2010 6.78

  5. Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, 1984-2010 (Thousand Gallons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, 1984-2010 (Thousand Gallons) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 8,215,722 5,538,184 2,555,898 848,083 3,201,600 648,665 2,944,694 1,763,782 16,797,423 700,788 1,756,077 700,864 45,671,779 1985 7,728,057 4,463,226 2,440,661 684,227 3,102,106 523,010 2,786,479 1,698,985 17,279,650 661,644 1,522,041 168,625 43,058,711 1986

  6. On-farm anaerobic digester and fuel-alcohol plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtson, H.H.

    1985-12-01

    An anaerobic-digestion system, coupled with a fuel-alcohol plant, was constructed and set up on a southern Illinois farm as part of an integrated farm-energy system. The digester heating can be done using waste hot water from the alcohol plant and biogas from the digester can be used as fuel for the alcohol production. The anaerobic digestion system is made up of the following components; a hog finishing house with a manure pit; a solids handling pump to feed the manure; and a 13,000-gallon railroad tank car as the main digester vessel and pump to transfer effluent from the digester to a 150,000 gallon storage tank. The digester was operated for sufficient time to demonstrate the use of hot water in an automated digester temperature control system. Sufficient biogas was produced to demonstrate the use of biogas in a converted propane boiler.

  7. Evaluation of aftermarket LPG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, E.A.

    1993-06-01

    SwRI was contracted by NREL to evaluate three LPG conversion kits on a Chevrolet Lumina. The objective of the project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of these kits, and compare their performance to gasoline-fueled operation and to each other. Varying LPG fuel blends allowed a preliminary look at the potential for fuel system disturbance. The project required kit installation and adjustment according to manufacturer`s instructions. A limited amount of trouble diagnosis was also performed on the fuel systems. A simultaneous contract from the Texas Railroad Commission, in cooperation with NREL, provided funds for additional testing with market fuels (HD5 propane and industry average gasoline) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions speciation to determine the ozone-forming potential of LPG HC emissions. This report documents the procurement, installation, and testing of these LPG conversion kits.

  8. Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan

    2010-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

  9. Overfilling of cavern blamed for LPG blasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    Three explosions and a fire Apr. 7 at an LPG salt dome storage cavern near Brenham, Tex., were triggered when the cavern was overfilled, the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC) has reported. This paper reports that a TRC investigation found that LPG escaped to the surface at the Brenham site through brine injection tubing after excessive fill from an LPG line forced the cavern's water level below the brine tubing's bottom. At the surface, LPG was released into a brine storage pit where it turned into a dense, explosive vapor. At 7:08 a.m., the vapor was ignited by an unknown source. The resulting blast killed three persons and injured 19 and brought operations at the site to a halt.

  10. Successful so far, coal lobby's campaign may run out of steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-15

    The anti-coal lobby has mounted a highly successful campaign that has brought the permitting, financing, and construction of new conventional coal-fired plants to a virtual halt. But the coal lobby is not yet ready to concede defeat. With powerful constituents in coal-mining and coal-burning states and influential utilities, mining companies, and railroads, it continues to fight for its survival using any and all gimmicks and scare tactics in the book. The battle is being waged in courtrooms, public forums, media campaigns, and especially in Congress. The problem with the coal lobby is that it refuses to admit that coal combustion to generate electricity is among the chief sources of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions; unless they address this issue honestly, effectively, and immediately, their efforts are going to win few converts in the courts of law or public opinion.

  11. Freight Shuttle System: Cross-Border Movement of Goods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    The Freight Shuttle System (FSS) is designed to provide freight transportation services between those short and intermediate distance locations (within 600 miles) that are currently handling large volumes of freight traffic. Much like trucks, the FSS's transporters are autonomous: each transporter has its own propulsion and travels independently of other transporters. Inspired by railroads, each FSS transporter has steel wheels operating on a steel running surface and can carry either a standardsize freight container or an over-the-road truck trailer. However, unlike either rail or trucks, the FSS runs on an elevated, dedicated guideway to avoid the interference of other transportation systems. The objective of this report is to examine the potential viability for an alternative transportation system for trailers and containers in a multi-national, cross-border setting. The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez region serves as the environment of this analysis.

  12. Expanded public notice: Washington State notice of intent for corrective action management unit, Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document is to serve notice of the intent to operate an Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), adjacent to the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington, as a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 264.552. The ERDF CAMU will serve as a management unit for the majority of waste (primarily soil) excavated during remediation of waste management sites on the Hanford Facility. Only waste that originates from the Hanford Facility can be accepted in this ERDF CAMU. The waste is expected to consist of dangerous waste, radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Mixed waste contains radioactive and dangerous components. The primary features of the ERDF could include the following: one or more trenches, rail and tractor/trailer container handling capability, railroads, an inventory control system, a decontamination building, and operational offices.

  13. The role of active and ancient geothermal processes in the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil in the basin and Range Province, western USA. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulen, J.B.; Collister, J.W.; Curtiss, D.K.

    1997-06-01

    The Basin and Range (B&R) physiographic province of the western USA is famous not only for its geothermal and precious-metal wealth, but also for its thirteen oil fields, small but in some cases highly productive. The Grant Canyon field in Railroad Valley, for example, for years boasted production of more than 6000 barrels of oil (BO) per day from just two wells; aggregate current production from the Blackburn field in Pine Valley commonly exceeds 1000 BO per day. These two and several other Nevada oil fields are unusually hot at reservoir depth--up to 130{degrees}C at depths as shallow as 1.1 km, up to three times the value expected from the prevailing regional geothermal gradient.

  14. Hawaii and Puerto Rico

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hawaii a nd P uerto R ico Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief Hawaii a nd P uerto R ico a re t he l argest U .S. i slands i n p opulation, size, a nd e nergy c onsumption. T hese i slands a re i solated f rom larger m ainland e nergy s upply n etworks, i ncluding p ipelines, railroads, a nd t ransmission g rids. B oth a re l ocated i n t ropical climates-Hawaii i n t he P acific O cean a nd P uerto R ico i n t

  15. The politics of Peacekeeper Rail Garrison. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tassel, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, the Congress capped at 50 the number of Peacekeeper ICBMs that could be deployed in vulnerable Minuteman silos, thereby sending the Reagan administration and the Air Force in search of another basing mode so that 100 of the ton-warhead missiles could be deployed as recommended by the Scowcroft Commission. The result was Peacekeeper rail garrison--a strategic nuclear weapon system that combined the Peacekeeper missile with railroad trains garrisoned at military installations. The missile trains would have dispersed across the nation's railways only during times of 'national need like the Cuban Missile Crisis. This case study examines the politics of that weapon system in order to contribute to the literature regarding weapons acquisition, test a number of propositions suggested by the bureaucratic politics model, and assess the influence of nonbureaucratic forces and actors on Peacekeeper rail garrison's fortunes.

  16. Rail transport of western coal: the history of rail deregulation and its influence on western coal resource development; prospects for legislative change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.N.; Rose, R.R.

    1985-04-01

    The one major cloud on the horizon for the future of western coal outside the region is the high cost of transportation. With rail transportation costs running as much as 75% of the delivered price to some of the Gulf States, the ability to keep rail costs in check becomes critical to the future of western coal. Four years of experience with deregulation of the railroads and the performance of the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) under the new regulatory environment have led many shippers and buyers of rail transported commodities to the belief that national legislation is needed to give better protection to shippers in monopoly service areas. A tentative legislative effort began in the last Congress. Proposals for rail rate relief for captive shippers are taking more formidable shape in the 99th Congress with the organization of a well-financed and staffed coalition of coal and utility companies. They are seeking amendments to the Staggers Act which more explicitly define the protections and procedures available to captive shippers in advancing complaints through the ICC. Industrial shippers have formed a coalition of their own for fair rail service practices. Finally, another group has emerged in recent months seeking a bolder strategy for rail rate relief. This group asserts that unfair rail practices violate the antitrust laws. At the same time, the railroads are building their defenses and developing alliances with interests in the shipping community that would resist a return to greater rail regulation. While the outcome of this controversy is uncertain, the issue of rail rate equity and reregulation promises to become one of the more active and hotly debated issues in the 99th Congress. However it comes out, the results will have a lasting impact on many western states, their present economy and future development.

  17. Agenda of critical issues: coal price and availability. Final report. [Includes effect of legislation, sulfur content and rail transport costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennican, M.L.; Wayland, R.E.; Weinstein, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    Temple, Barker, and Sloane, Inc. developed an agenda of critical issues regarding future coal prices and coal availability for EPRI. TBS interviewed nearly 50 utility, coal company, and railroad officials, academic experts, and coal consultants; held a one-day participatory workshop; and conducted a literature review and follow-up interviews with selected utilities. TBS found four causes of uncertainty in the utility industry over future coal prices. First, the acid deposition proposals in Congress vary in terms of the structure of the legislation, the costs of compliance, and the impact on coal prices; in turn these uncertainties impede utility fuel planning and decision making. Second, powerplant-specific factors will have a major impact on whether utilities switch or scrub in response to acid deposition legislation; existing analyses do not capture these factors. The most important powerplant-specific factors are matching unit characteristics with coal specifications, retrofit scrubber costs, and differing state regulatory environments. Third, TBS found that utility fuel managers have great uncertainty over the availability and future cost of compliance coal. TBS estimated that the existing production capacity of eastern compliance coal is at least twice as high as current production. Fourth, TBS concluded that uncertainty over future coal transportation rates was a major reason for utilities' uncertainty over future delivered prices of coal. Critical transportation-related issues are the strategic and tactical response of eastern coal producers to the Staggers Act; the impact on rail rates of the sale of Conrail, of possible transcontinental mergers, and of multi-modal mergers; and the future pricing policies that eastern railroads will adopt in response to imports of Colombian coal. 21 references.

  18. USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

    2002-02-01

    Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000{trademark} lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000{trademark} wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected compounds are on the EPA's Superfund List of Analytes. The major compound in the semivolatile fraction is 1,2-propanediol, which was also found as the major component of the TOR lubricant before testing. Other compounds found in trace quantities either were present in the TOR lubricant or were small fragments from the polymeric component of the TOR lubricant. The second task for Argonne in this project was to investigate the effects of axle load, angle of attack, and quantity of lubricant on lateral friction forces, as well as the consumption time of the TOR lubricant. The second task was to collect and qualitatively identify any volatile and semivolatile compounds produced upon use of the TOR lubricant.

  19. LNG infrastructure and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forgash, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Sound engineering principals have been used by every company involved in the development of the LNG infrastructure, but there is very little that is new. The same cryogenic technology that is used in the manufacture and sale of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen infrastructure is used in LNG infrastructure. The key component of the refueling infrastructure is the LNG tank which should have a capacity of at least 15,000 gallons. These stainless steel tanks are actually a tank within a tank separated by an annular space that is void of air creating a vacuum between the inner and outer tank where superinsulation is applied. Dispensing can be accomplished by pressure or pump. Either works well and has been demonstrated in the field. Until work is complete on NFPA 57 or The Texas Railroad Commission Rules for LNG are complete, the industry is setting the standards for the safe installation of refueling infrastructure. As a new industry, the safety record to date has been outstanding.

  20. LNG -- A paradox of propulsion potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been demonstrating its viability as a clean-burning alternative fuel for buses and medium- and heavy-duty trucks for the past 30 years. The first known LNG vehicle project began in San Diego in 1965, When San Diego Gas and Electric converted 22 utility trucks and three passenger vehicles to dedicated LNG. A surge in LNG vehicle project activity over the past five years has led to a fairly robust variety of vehicles testing the fuel, from Class 8 tractors, refuse haulers and transit buses to railroad locomotives and ferry boats. Recent technology improvements in engine design, cryogenic tanks, fuel nozzles and other related equipment have made LNG more practical to use than in the 1960s. LNG delivers more than twice the driving range from the same-sized fuel tank as a vehicle powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). Although technical and economic hurdles must be overcome before this fuel can achieve widespread use, various ongoing demonstration projects are showing LNG`s practicality, while serving the vital role of pinpointing those areas of performance that are the prime candidates for improvement.

  1. Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

    2003-02-25

    In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

  2. Development of Green Box sensor module technologies for rail applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, D.; Breeding, R.; Hogan, J.; Mitchell, J.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work, supported by the New Mexico State Transportation Authority, examines a family of smart sensor products that can be tailored to the specific needs of the user. The concept uses a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. Advances in sensor microelectronics and digital signal processing permit us to produce a class of smart sensors that interpret raw data and transmit inferred information. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and consequence of hazardous materials incidents. The system would be capable of numerous activities including: monitoring cargo integrity, controlling system braking and vehicle acceleration, recognizing component failure conditions, and logging sensor data. A cost-benefit analysis examines the loss of revenue resulting from theft, hazardous materials incidents, and accidents. Customer survey data are combined with the cost benefit analysis and used to guide the product requirements definition for a series of specific applications. A common electrical architecture is developed to support the product line and permit rapid product realization. Results of a concept validation, which used commercial hardware and was conducted on a revenue-generating train, are also reported.

  3. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 2 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each corrective action site (CAS) within CAU 168. The corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted in accordance with the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', as developed under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 168 is located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada and is comprised of the following 12 CASs: CAS 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; CAS 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; CAS 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; CAS 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; CAS 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-99-16, USW G3; CAS 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; CAS 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; and CAS 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs) for CASs within CAU 168. Radiological measurements of railroad cars and test equipment were compared to unrestricted (free) release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from the CAI activities revealed the following: (1) Corrective Action Site 25-16-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (2) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-16-03. Buried construction waste is present in at least two disposal cells contained within the landfill boundaries. (3) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-19-02. (4) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-23-02 identified 13 railroad cars that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. Six railroad cars were below these limits and therefore met the free-release criteria. (5) An In-Situ Object Counting System survey taken at CAS 25-23-02 identified two railroad cars possibly containing fuel fragments; both exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual free release criteria. (6) Corrective Action Site 25-23-18 contains total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics, Aroclor-1260, uranium-234, uranium-235, strontium-90, and cesium-137 that exceed PALs. (7) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-34-01 indicate that there were no total contamination readings that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. (8) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-34-02 indicate that there were no total contamination readings that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. (9) Radiological surveys at CAS 25-23-13 identified six pieces of equipment that exceed the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. (10) Corrective Action Site 25-99-16 was not investigated. A review of historical documentation and current site conditions showed that no further characterization was required to select the appropriate corrective action. (11) Corrective Action Site 26-08-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (12) Corrective Action Site 26-17-01 contains total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics and Aroclor-1260 exceeding the PALs. (13) Radiological surveys at CAS 26-19-02 identified metallic debris that exceeded the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual limits for free release. Concentrations of radiological or chemical constituents in soil did not exceed PALs.

  5. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  6. Plowshare Program - American Atomic Bomb Tests For Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-22

    The United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Plowshare Program as a research and development activity to explore the technical and economic feasibility of using nuclear explosives for industrial applications. The reasoning was that the relatively inexpensive energy available from nuclear explosions could prove useful for a wide variety of peaceful purposes. The Plowshare Program began in 1958 and continued through 1975. Between December 1961 and May 1973, the United States conducted 27 Plowshare nuclear explosive tests comprising 35 individual detonations. Conceptually, industrial applications resulting from the use of nuclear explosives could be divided into two broad categories: 1) large-scale excavation and quarrying, where the energy from the explosion was used to break up and/or move rock; and 2) underground engineering, where the energy released from deeply buried nuclear explosives increased the permeability and porosity of the rock by massive breaking and fracturing. Possible excavation applications included: canals, harbors, highway and railroad cuts through mountains, open pit mining, construction of dams, and other quarry and construction-related projects. Underground nuclear explosion applications included: stimulation of natural gas production, preparation of leachable ore bodies for in situ leaching, creation of underground zones of fractured oil shale for in situ retorting, and formation of underground natural gas and petroleum storage reservoirs.

  7. Coal data: A reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  8. Historic, enthnohistoric and prehistoric cultural resource inventory. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide a literature search and write a historical narrative of the cultural significance of the study area for the proposed WyCoalGas Inc., pipeline, railroad, well fields, and coal gasification plant. The request for a cultural resource investigation states at a minimum the study shall be a literature search on the narrow one mile corridor along the proposed pipelines, areas included within the various facilities plus a one mile buffer surrounding these facilities. In addition, the study must be tied into appropriate local, state, and national history. The writer of this history has felt a responsibility for providing a realistic assessment of the themes of the study area's historical development. Several ideas have been concentrated upon: its American Indian heritage; the Euro-American's exploitive relationship with the region; and the overriding fragile, arid nature of its land. It is hoped that the government agencies and ultimately the energy company will feel a similiar responsibility toward the study area's historical integrity.

  9. New Mexico Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    09,709 554,352 574,557 608,490 621,430 669,923 1984-2014 Residential 55 46 37 27 72 53 1984-2014 Commercial 11,030 9,435 9,609 9,145 9,112 12,114 1984-2014 Industrial 33,804 24,429 27,110 31,316 32,029 32,917 1984-2014 Oil Company 9,871 1,705 2,127 5,857 11,218 27,016 1984-2014 Farm 11,278 14,821 10,955 12,816 15,784 11,752 1984-2014 Electric Power 4,321 4,000 1,689 5,155 4,816 3,826 1984-2014 Railroad 245 1,780 1,707 19,123 38,543 45,446 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984-2014

  10. Alabama Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    987,571 1,038,133 1,094,359 1,132,711 1,047,981 1,027,777 1984-2014 Residential 3,971 4,895 432 750 639 722 1984-2014 Commercial 39,802 46,009 48,475 46,654 30,536 27,874 1984-2014 Industrial 90,659 77,542 81,120 120,347 77,119 65,322 1984-2014 Oil Company 0 328 1,035 2,640 2,929 2,985 1984-2014 Farm 17,882 19,881 24,518 24,503 24,651 20,459 1984-2014 Electric Power 8,276 10,372 22,490 9,375 6,514 10,071 1984-2014 Railroad 44,546 42,465 97,177 125,439 63,570 56,873 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering

  11. Texas Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,329,790 5,693,270 6,373,078 6,688,629 6,914,481 7,837,118 1984-2014 Residential 67 28 127 102 16 59 1984-2014 Commercial 136,419 100,886 184,312 173,303 142,268 132,601 1984-2014 Industrial 189,981 197,024 233,292 241,601 240,179 270,760 1984-2014 Oil Company 210,865 316,523 541,640 736,186 679,737 886,957 1984-2014 Farm 201,769 207,183 243,170 216,915 190,572 222,849 1984-2014 Electric Power 19,495 15,646 23,156 20,022 20,706 24,700 1984-2014 Railroad 429,026 467,128 498,006 483,096 504,823

  12. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  13. Factors fragmenting the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.

    1993-10-06

    This paper examines the factors that threaten the future of the Russian Federation (RF). The observations are based on a study that focused on eight republics: Mordova, Udmurtia, Tatarstan, Mari El, Bashkortostan, Kabardino-Balkaria, Buryatia, and Altay Republic. These republics were selected for their geographic and economic significance to the RF. Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, and Mari El are located on important supply routes, such as the Volga River and the trans-Siberian railroad. Some of these republics are relatively wealthy, with natural resources such as oil (e.g., Tatarstan and Bashkortostan), and all eight republics play significant roles in the military-industrial complex. The importance of these republics to the RF contrasts to the relative insignificance of the independence-minded Northern Caucasus area. The author chose not to examine the Northern Caucasus region (except Kabardino-Balkaria) because these republics may have only a minor impact on the rest of the RF if they secede. Their impact would be minimized because they lie on the frontiers of the RF. Many Russians believe that {open_quotes}it might be best to let such a troublesome area secede.{close_quotes}

  14. Long Term Stewardship Challenges at the St. Louis District FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell'Orco, L.; Chambers, D.

    2002-02-27

    Non-Federally owned radioactively contaminated sites in St. Louis, Missouri are currently being remediated by the St. Louis District Corps of Engineers under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). When FUSRAP remediation is complete, inaccessible soils which have levels of contamination greater than unrestricted use standards, will remain. The purpose of this paper is to document the initial challenges facing the project team during its development of the Long Term Stewardship plan for the management of these soils. These soils are located under buildings, roads, railroads and bridges. The Long Term Stewardship plan for the majority of the sites is being developed simultaneously with the remedy selection process. A living document, it will ultimately document the remedial action end state and location of inaccessible soils and implement the plan for ensuring these soils are not a threat to human health and the environment. Although these soils are protective in their current configuration, at some point in time, when activities such as maintenance, utility or property improvement occur, the soils will become accessible and need to be addressed by the federal government. Up until that point in time they will need to be effectively managed to ensure they remain protective. The St. Louis District is in the process of collaboratively developing this plan with its regulators, affected stakeholders and interested parties.

  15. Cofiring waste biofuels and coal for emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouwer, J.; Owens, W.D.; Harding, N.S.

    1995-12-01

    Combustion tests have been performed in two pilot-scale combustion facilities to evaluate the emissions reduction possible while firing coal blended with several different biofuels. Two different boiler simulations, pulverized coal fired boilers and stoker coal fired boilers, were simulated. The pc-fired studies investigated the use of waste hardwood, softwood, and sludge as potential reburning fuels and compared the results with coal and natural gas. The results of this program showed that a reduction of 50-60% NO was obtained with approximately 10% wood heat input. Reburn stoichiometry was the most important variable. The reduction was strongly dependent on initial NO and only slightly dependent upon temperature. The stoker program investigated barriers to the successful blending of coal with waste railroad ties; parameters evaluated included blend firing rate, chip size, optimum feed location, overfire/underfire air ratio, and natural gas addition. The results of this study demonstrated that NO emissions could be reduced by more than 50% without any significant increase in CO or THC emissions by the proper use of zoned reburning. Both programs demonstrated several benefits of biofuel blends, including: (1) lower operating costs due to reduced fuel prices; (2) reduced waste disposal; (3) reduced maintenance costs; (4) reduced environmental costs, and (5) extension of the useful life of existing equipment.

  16. Consortium for coal log pipeline research and development. Final technical progress report, August 10, 1993--August 9, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrero, T.R.

    1996-10-01

    The main objective of this project was to conduct intensive research and development of the Coal Log Pipeline (CLP). Specifically, the R & D was to concentrate on previously neglected and insufficiently studied aspects of CLP which were deemed significant. With improvements in these areas, CLP could be implemented for commercial use within five years. CLP technology is capable of transporting coal logs for long distances. The many potential advantages of CLP over truck and railroad transportation include: lower freight costs, less energy consumption, less air pollution, decreased environmental problems, increased safety, and improved reliability. Previous studies have shown that CLP is advantageous over slurry pipeline technology. First, CLP uses one-third the water required by a coal slurry pipeline. Second, CLP provides easier coal dewatering. Third, the CLP conveying capacity of coal is twice as much as a slurry transport line of equal diameter. In many situations, the cost for transporting each ton of coal is expected to be less expensive by CLP as compared to other competing modes of transportation such as: truck, unit train and slurry pipeline.

  17. Florida Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    840,100 2,027,012 1,914,621 1,918,039 2,023,650 2,038,923 1984-2014 Residential 1,551 1,820 1,085 572 451 728 1984-2014 Commercial 126,292 113,313 100,791 104,860 113,873 110,082 1984-2014 Industrial 36,512 43,088 35,652 32,087 31,458 42,894 1984-2014 Oil Company 236 2,255 4,038 4,359 4,427 3,802 1984-2014 Farm 86,642 204,866 109,177 103,325 122,563 98,418 1984-2014 Electric Power 31,161 43,675 35,577 16,137 16,244 12,182 1984-2014 Railroad 33,651 42,353 46,461 66,711 93,844 92,435 1984-2014

  18. An overview of flywheel energy systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolsky, A. M.; Energy Systems

    2002-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings incorporating permanent magnets and ReBaCuO, together with carbon fibre, offer the possibility of increasing the stored, volumetric energy density of FES and unprecedentedly low idling loss of FES. Its stored energy need only satisfy customers needs for the time it takes to bring on conventional 'back-up'. The FES itself must come up to power quickly enough to avoid any disruption in the customer's operation (e.g., continuous industrial processes involving fragile materials, for example paper forming). Such customers do not care about the price of electricity nearly as much as they care about not ruining their product, damaging their machines or having 'clean ups' that stop or slow output. Firms that engage in electronic commerce and/or telecommunications also value uninterruptible power. Another set of potential customers (construction, electric railroads) may wish to avoid fluctuations in their electrical supply or they may wish to avoid causing harm to others who may hold them liable for poor power quality. Finally, real time prices (e.g., every 15 s) and real time commands, disseminated via internet, and distributed storage might enable reduced system generation costs. Generators and FES makers would have to cooperate to make this feasible. Now, the central techno-economic challenge is to build a high-power, low-loss motor generator that reaches full power in a very short time.

  19. LPG land transportation and storage safety. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of fatal accidents involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) releases during transportation and/or transportation related storage. Principal emphasis was on accidents during the nine-year period 1971 to 1979. Fatalities to members of the general public (i.e., those at the scene of the accident through coincidence or curiosity) were of special interest. Transportation accidents involving railroad tank cars, trucks, and pipelines were examined as were accidents at storage facilities, including loading and unloading at such facilities. The main sources of the necessary historical accident data were the accident reports submitted to the Department of Transportation by LPG carriers, National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, articles in the National Fire Protection Association journals, other literature, and personal interviews with firemen, company personnel, and others with knowledge of certain accidents. The data indicate that, on the average, releases of LPG during transportation and intermediate storage cause approximately six fatalities per year to members of the general public. The individual risk is about 1 death per 37,000,000 persons; about the same as the risk of a person on the ground being killed by an airplane crash, and much less than the risk of death by lightning, tornadoes, or dam failures.

  20. LPG land transportation and storage safety. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinsen, W.E.; Cavin, W.D.

    1981-09-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of fatal accidents involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) releases during transportation and/or transportation related storage. Principal emphasis was on accidents during the nine-year period 1971 through 1979. Fatalities to members of the general public (i.e., those at the scene of the accident through coincidence or curiosity) were of special interest. Transportation accidents involving railroad tank cars, trucks, and pipelines were examined as were accidents at storage facilities, including loading and unloading at such facilities. The main sources of the necessary historical accident data were the accident reports submitted to the Department of Transportation by LPG carriers, National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, articles in the National Fire Protection Association journals, other literature, and personal interviews with firemen, company personnel, and others with knowledge of certain accidents. The data indicate that, on the average, releases of LPG during transportation and intermediate storage cause approximately six fatalities per year to members of the general public. The individual risk is about 1 death per 37,000,000 persons; about the same as the risk of a person on the ground being killed by an airplane crash, and much less than the risk of death by lightning, tornadoes, or dam failures.

  1. Technology Transfer Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    BPF developed the concept of a mobile, on-site NORM remediation and disposal process in late 1993. Working with Conoco and receiving encouragement born the Department of Energy, Metarie Office, and the Texas Railroad Commission the corporation conducted extensive feasibility studies on an on-site disposal concept. In May 1994, the Department of Energy issued a solicitation for cooperative agreement proposal for, "Development and Testing of a Method for Treatment and Underground Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)". BPF submitted a proposal to the solicitation in July 1994, and was awarded a cooperative agreement in September 1995. BPF proposed and believed that proven equipment and technology could be incorporated in to a mobile system. The system would allow BPF to demonstrate an environmentally sound and commercially affordable method for treatment and underground disposal of NORM. The key stop in the BPF process incorporates injection of the dissolved radioactive materials into a water injection or disposal well. Disposal costs in the BPF proposal of July 1995 were projected to range from $1000 to $5000 per cubic yard. The process included four separate steps. (1) De-oiling (2) Volume Reduction (3) Chemical Dissolution of the Radium (4) Injection

  2. Louisiana Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    514,474 1,744,771 1,873,769 1,488,986 1,405,392 1,375,580 1984-2014 Residential 1,036 140 34 53 84 89 1984-2014 Commercial 59,689 38,695 39,659 36,840 17,590 21,197 1984-2014 Industrial 21,826 26,063 20,770 33,052 31,744 33,670 1984-2014 Oil Company 243,789 319,394 364,261 245,303 183,801 178,810 1984-2014 Farm 42,624 44,027 49,985 48,462 40,785 46,134 1984-2014 Electric Power 4,321 4,775 5,464 2,733 4,610 4,826 1984-2014 Railroad 18,345 25,425 32,515 28,110 39,578 45,790 1984-2014 Vessel

  3. Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dec, John Edward (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

  4. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Washington. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Washinton State Constitution grants authority to the legislature to regulate railroads and other common carriers as well as telegraph and telephone companies in the state. No section of the constitution expressly provides for the regulation of electric, gas, water, or heating utilities. The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Utilities and Transportation Commission, formerly designated at the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the governor, with the consent of the senate. The term of office for commissioners is six years. Recently enacted legislation provides for the implementation of tax incentives to encourage the development of cogeneration facilities in the state. This plan is to be administered by the Department of Revenue in conjunction with the Energy Office. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  5. Mississippi Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    835,855 800,065 771,577 830,756 806,396 819,763 1984-2014 Residential 5 5 4 7 7 8 1984-2014 Commercial 26,641 23,713 26,383 26,386 24,019 28,803 1984-2014 Industrial 21,853 18,362 15,450 20,153 21,186 19,595 1984-2014 Oil Company 3,955 4,262 4,058 6,226 7,450 6,419 1984-2014 Farm 41,080 57,087 52,559 81,878 84,753 79,443 1984-2014 Electric Power 3,796 3,393 2,019 1,674 2,223 1,921 1984-2014 Railroad 24,727 17,936 37,741 29,848 32,550 35,578 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 141,302 93,384 58,285 58,505

  6. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-06-01

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

  7. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

  8. Coal-fueled diesel locomotive test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, B.D.; McDowell, R.E.; Confer, G.L.; Basic, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    The biggest challenges to the development of a commercially-acceptable coal-fueled diesel-electric locomotive are integrating all systems into a working unit that can be operated in railroad service. This involves mainly the following three systems: (1) the multi-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine, (2) the locomotive and engine controls, and (3) the CWS fuel supply system. Consequently, a workable 12-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine was considered necessary at this stage to evolve the required locomotive support systems, in addition to gaining valuable multi-cylinder engine operating experience. The CWS fuel used during this project was obtained from Otisca, Inc. (Syracuse, NY). It was prepared from micronized and deashed Kentucky Blue Gem coal to 49.0% coal loading by weight, with less than 1% ash and 5 micron mean diameter particle size. Its higher heating value was analyzed at approximately 34630 kJ/k. Anti-agglomerating additive Triton X-114 was added to the CWS at GE Transportation Systems at 2% of coal weight. The nature of the Otisca CWS fuel makes it inherently more difficult to store, pump, and inject than diesel fuel, since concepts which govern Newtonian or normally viscous liquids do not apply entirely to CWS. Otisca CWS tends to be unstable and to settle in tanks and lines after a period of time, making it necessary to provide a means of agitation during storage. To avoid long term settling problems and to minimize losses, piping velocities were designed to be in the 60-90 m/min range.

  9. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-05

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  10. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

  11. Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant at Brady's Hot Springs. The results of the study are positive, showing that a plant of innovative, yet proven design can be built to adapt current commerical fermentation-distillation technology to the application of geothermal heat energy. The specific method of heat production from the Brady's Hot Spring wells has been successful for some time at an onion drying plant. Further development of the geothermal resource to add the capacity needed for an ethanol plant is found to be feasible for a plant sized to produce 10 million gallons of motor fuel grade ethanol per year. A very adequate supply of feedgrains is found to be available for use in the plant without impact on the local or regional feedgrain market. The effect of diverting supplies from the animal feedlots in Northern Nevada and California will be mitigated by the by-product output of high-protein feed supplements that the plant will produce. The plant will have a favorable impact on the local farming economies of Fallon, Lovelock, Winnemucca and Elko, Nevada. It will make a positive and significant socioeconomic contribution to Churchill County, providing direct employment for an additional 61 persons. Environmental impact will be negligible, involving mostly a moderate increase in local truck traffic and railroad siding activity. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 deals with the technical design aspects of the plant. The second volume addresses the issue of expanded geothermal heat production at Brady's Hot Springs, goes into the details of feedstock supply economics, and looks at the markets for the plant's primary ethanol product, and the markets for its feed supplement by-products. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic viability of the proposed project.

  12. Publications on maglev technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, J.L.; Coffey, H.T.; Rote, D.M.; Wang, Z.

    1991-12-01

    Magnetically levitated passenger-transportation vehicles, using attractive and repulsive magnetic forces, are currently in the development or prototype-revenue stages in Japan and Germany. The basic principles of these technologies have been understood for several decades, but their practical applications awaited advances in high-power electronic devices, modern controls, superconducting magnets, and improvements in our transportation infrastructures. A considerable amount of work was devoted to magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation system in the late 1960s and the 1970s. Detailed development was sustained primarily in Germany and Japan. This listing of publications was begun as the initial phase of a design study for a maglev development facility sponsored by the State of Illinois. The listing has been continually updated under programs sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration and the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the National Maglev Initiative issued 27 contracts for the study of technical issues related to maglev and four contracts for the definition of maglev systems. In December 1991, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act was enacted, mandating the development of a US-designed maglev system in a six-year period. This listing is offered as an aid to those working on these projects, to help them locate technical papers on relevant technologies. The design and installation of a maglev transportation system will require the efforts of workers in many disciplines, from electronics to economics to safety. Accordingly, the references have been grouped in 14 different sections to expedite review of the listing. In many case, the references are annotated to indicate the general content of the papers. Abstracts are not available. A list of information services from which the listed documents might be obtained and an author index are provided.

  13. Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas; Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

  14. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  15. Independent Review of Elemental Phosphorus Remediation at the Eastern Michaud Flats FMC Operable Unit near Pocatello, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, L. E.; Jerden, J. J.; Kimmell, T. A.; Quinn, J.

    2016-01-01

    If, despite risks to workers and these potential impacts, stakeholders decide that P4 wastes need to be excavated and treated, the Review Team determined that a number of the ETTs examined warrant further consideration for the treatment of P4 waste that has been characterized (for example, P4 waste present in the historical ponds). Nevertheless, concerns about the health and safety of site investigation workers using then-available investigation approaches prevented the collection of subsurface samples containing P4 from large areas of the site (e.g., the railroad swale, the vadose zone beneath the Furnace Building, and the abandoned railcars), As a result, the contaminant CSM in those particular areas was not refined enough to allow the Review Team to draw conclusions about using some of the ETTs to treat P4 waste in those areas. The readiness of an ETT for implementation varies depending on many factors, including stakeholder input, permitting, and remedial action construction requirements. Technologies that could be ready for use in the near term (within 1 year) include the following: mechanical excavation, containment technologies, off-site incineration, and drying and mechanical mixing under a tent structure. Technologies that could be ready for use in the mid-term (1 to 2 years) include cutter suction dredging, thermal-hydraulic dredging, and underground pipeline cleaning technologies. Technologies requiring a longer lead time (2 to 5 years) include on-site incineration, a land disposal restriction waste treatment system, an Albright & Wilson batch mud still, post-treatment on-site disposal, and post-treatment off-site disposal.

  16. Cofiring waste biofuels and coal for emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouwer, J.; Owens, W.D.; Harding, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Combustion tests have been performed in two pilot-scale combustion facilities to evaluate the emissions reduction possible while firing coal blended with several different biofuels. Two different boiler simulations, pulverized coal fired boilers and stoker coal fired boilers, were simulated. The pc-fired studies investigated the use of waste hardwood, softwood and sludge as potential reburning fuels and compared the results with coal and natural gas. The use of these wood wastes is attractive because: wood contains little nitrogen and virtually no sulfur; wood is a regenerable biofuel; wood utilization results in a net reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions; and, since reburning accounts for 10-20% of the total heat input, large quantities of wood are not necessary. The results of this program showed that a reduction of 50-60% NO was obtained with approximately 10% wood heat input. Reburn stoichiometry was the most important variable. The reduction was strongly dependent upon initial NO and only slightly dependent upon temperature. The stoker program investigated barriers for the successful blending of coal with waste railroad ties. Parameters evaluated included blending firing rate, chip size, optimum feed location, overfire/underfire air ratio, and natural gas addition. The results of this study demonstrated that NO emissions can be reduced by more than 50% without any significant increase in CO or THC emissions by the proper use of zoned reburning. Both programs demonstrated several benefits of biofuel blends, including: (1) lower operating costs due to reduced fuel prices; (2) reduced waste disposal; (3) reduced maintenance costs; (4) reduced environmental costs; and (5) extension of the useful life of existing equipment.

  17. An evaluation of gas field rules in light of current conditions and production practices in the Panhandle non-associated gas fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, C.L.; O`Rear, C.H.

    1996-09-01

    During the early years of development in the Panhandle fields the Rule of Capture was king. Under the Rule of Capture each property owner has the right to drill as many wells as desired at any location. Adjacent property owners protect their rights by doing the same. Courts adopted the Rule of Capture to protect mineral owners from liability due to migration of oil and gas across property boundary lines. This general practice {open_quotes}to go and do likewise{close_quotes} generally leads to enormous economic and natural resource waste. Established to offset the waste created under the Rule of Capture is the doctrine of Correlative Rights. Correlative Rights is the fight of each mineral owner to obtain oil and gas from a common source of supply under lawful operations conducted from his property. However, each mineral owner has a duty to every other mineral owner not to extract oil and gas in a manner injurious to the common source of supply. This paper will examine the historical context of these common law principles with regard to the Panhandle non-associated gas fields. Discovered in 1917, the Panhandle fields are ideal to evaluate the merit of statutes and regulations enacted in response to production practices. As in many Texas fields, proration in the Panhandle fields is the primary mechanism to protect correlative rights and prevent waste. Signed and made effective May 1989, the current field rules pre-date much of the enhanced recovery techniques that use well-head vacuum compression. This paper reviews the gas rules in the 1989 Texas Railroad Commission order in light of current reservoir conditions and production practices.

  18. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  19. Educating the public about America`s fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H. [C.E.E.D., Northfield, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Today we would like to take a few moments of your time to talk about America`s fuel-coal, and a new organization created to educate decision makers, the public and educators. The Center for Energy & Economics Development (CEED) began as a concept in late 1992, and began operations with the creation of the Southern Region in March of 1993. Discussions began among several railroad CEO`s who were concerned that their major revenue commodity - coal - was experiencing serious problems due to public opposition and governmental restrictions. Conversations with their counterparts in the coal industry resulted in an agreement to forget parochial and often conflicting interests in Washington, and pursue the development of an overall grassroots joint-effort to protect the coal option. Those of you familiar with the history of conflict between these two industries recognize that this was a major step, and one that has led to an exciting new initiative. The coal/rail discussions examined a variety of approaches that the coalition might follow. Rather than jumping off into unchartered waters, or retraveling old roads, the group decided to first find out what was known and unknown about coal and energy. A Washington public relations firm, and a well known polling organization began the process in December of 1992 with a comprehensive opinion research program that would allow us to understand attitudes and opinions about energy and economic development, specifically coal and related issues. We reviewed the public-opinion history of coal beginning with the first national survey conducted in 1944, and then held a series of qualitative focus discussions in Tampa, Hartford, Denver and Indianapolis. In each city there was a discussion between business leaders and environmental activists, and one with the general public. In January of 1993, the focus groups were followed by a quantitative assessment of national opinion measuring trends, collecting demographic and geographic differences.

  20. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  1. AN ELECTROMAGNETIC PNEUMO CAPSULE SYSTEM FOR CONVEYING MINERALS AND MINE WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Liu; Charles W. Lenau

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of using a new and advanced pneumatic capsule pipeline (PCP) system for transporting minerals and mine wastes. The new system is different from conventional PCPs in two main respects: (1) it uses linear induction motors (LIMs) instead of blowers (fans) at the inlet of the pipeline to drive (pump) the capsules and the air through the pipeline; and (2) the capsules in the PCP have steel wheels running on steel rails as opposed to capsules in conventional systems, which use wheels with rubber tires running inside a pipe without rail. The advantage of using LIM pump instead of blower is that the former is non-intrusive and hence does not block the passage of capsules, enabling the system to run continuously without having to make the capsules bypass the pump. This not only simplifies the system but also enables the system to achieve much larger cargo throughput than that of PCPs using blowers, and use of LIMs as booster pumps which enables the system to have any length or to be used for transporting cargoes over practically any distance, say even one thousand kilometers or miles. An advantage of using steel wheels rolling on steel rails instead of using rubber tires rolling inside a pipeline is that the rolling friction coefficient and hence the use of energy is greatly reduced from that of conventional PCP systems. Moreover, rails enable easy control of capsule motion, such as switching capsules to a branch line by using railroad switching equipment. The advanced PCP system studied under this project uses rectangular conduits instead of circular pipe, having cross-sectional areas of 1 m by 1 m approximately. The system can be used for various transportation distances, and it can transport up to 50 million tonnes (metric tons) of cargo annually--the throughput of the largest mines in the world. Both an aboveground and an underground system were investigated and compared. The technical feasibility of this new PCP system was determined by designing the details of the system and conducting a detail analysis of the system--both steady and unsteady analyses. Through the detailed design and analyses, it was found that no technical problem or hurdle exist that would otherwise prevent commercial use of the system today. Still, since it is a new technology, it will be prudent and advantageous to run a demonstration project before this technology is used.

  2. TEXAS LPG FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Full-Text - Submission contains both citation data and full-text of the journal article. Full-text can be either a pre-print or post-print, but not the copyrighted article.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SOUTHWEST RESEARCH LABORATORY SUBMITTED BY SUBCONTRACTOR, RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix?s LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power?s residential-scale GenSys? 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program?s primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation?s TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units. For further information please contact Mary-Jo Rowan at mary-jo.rowan@cpa.state.tx.us

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-11-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites. CAU 398, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996), and consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 25-44-01 , a fuel spill on soil that covers a concrete pad. The origins and use of the spill material are unknown, but the spill is suspected to be railroad bedding material. (2) CAS 25-44-02, a spill of liquid to the soil from leaking drums. (3) CAS 25-44-03, a spill of oil from two leaking drums onto a concrete pad and surrounding soil. (4) CAS 25-44-04, a spill from two tanks containing sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide used for a water demineralization process. (5) CAS 25-25-02, a fuel or oil spill from leaking drums that were removed in 1992. (6) CAS 25-25-03, an oil spill adjacent to a tipped-over drum. The source of the drum is not listed, although it is noted that the drum was removed in 1991. (7) CAS 25-25-04, an area on the north side of the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility, where oils and cooling fluids from metal machining operations were poured directly onto the ground. (8) CAS 25-25-05, an area of oil and/or hydraulic fluid spills beneath the heavy equipment once stored there. (9) CAS 25-25-06, an area of diesel fuel staining beneath two generators that have since been removed. (10) CAS 25-25-07, an area of hydraulic oil spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside X-Tunnel. (11) CAS 25-25-08, an area of hydraulic fluid spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside Y-Tunnel. (12) CAS 25-25-16, a diesel fuel spill from an above-ground storage tank located near Building 3320 at Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) that was removed in 1998. (13) CAS 25-25-17, a hydraulic oil spill associated with the historical operations of a vacuum pump oil recovery system at the E-MAD facility.

  4. Coal slurry pipelines: Blach Mesa and future projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brolick, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Most people in the mining industry have some familiarity with pipelining of minerals in slurry form, however, many may not realize the extent that mineral slurry pipeline transport is used throughout the world. The author is referring to the shipment of the minerals in the raw or concentrate form, not tailings pipelines which are also commonplace in the minerals industry. There are over forty mineral pipelines around the world. The list covers a wide range of minerals, including copper ore concentrate, iron ore concentrate, limestone, phosphate concentrate, kaolin, Gilsonite and gold ore, with only eleven of the mineral pipelines located in the USA. It should be noted that one of the earliest slurry pipelines was a 108 mile coal slurry pipeline in Ohio, which started up in 1957. The pipeline only operated until 1963 when a railroad company literally bought out the transportation contract. This really was the beginning of the unit train concept. Each mineral has specific physical and chemical characteristics to be considered when evaluating transport by pipeline. The processing required at the pipeline origin, as well as at the pipeline termination, are also important factors in determining slurry pipeline feasibility. Transport distance, annual volume, and continuity of shipments are other important factors. One of the most difficult minerals to transport as a slurry is coal because the specific gravity is closer to water than most other minerals. Thus, the fine balance of creating enough fine particles to serve as a carrier for the coarser material, while at the same time having a material that can be economically dewatered is very sensitive and technical designs will vary with types of coal. Additionally, since coal is purchased for its thermal value, excess surface moisture can lower the value of the coal to the customer. One of the most successful slurry pipeline operations, and the only current operating long-distance coal slurry pipeline is the Black Mesa Pipeline System. The Black Mesa Pipeline is a 273 mile (439 km) long, 18-inch (457 mm) coal/water slurry pipeline, originating on the Black Mesa in the Northeastern part of Arizona, USA. The system delivers coal from the Peabody Coal Company`s Black Mesa open pit mine to the Mohave Generating Station which is a 1580 MW steam powered electric generating plant located in Laughlin, Nevada. Black Mesa Pipeline began commercial operation in November, 1970 and has transported in excess of 110,000,000 tons (99,800,000 metric tons) of coal with an availability factor of 99%.

  5. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2008-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No Further Investigation (NFI) determination made on land that adjoins ED-4 to the east (DOE 1997a) and to the south (DOE 1997b).

  6. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of Westinghouse WE 17×17 pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies with a discharge burnup range of 30-58 GWd/MTU (assembly average), loaded in a representative high-capacity (?32 fuel rod assemblies) transportation package. Evaluations will be performed for representative normal conditions of rail transport involving a rail conveyance capable of meeting the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-2043 specification. UNF modeling is anticipated to be defined to the pellet-cladding level and take in to account influences associated with spacer grids, intermediate fluid mixers, and control components. The influence of common degradation issues such as ductile-to-brittle-transition will also be accounted for. All model development and analysis will be performed with commercially available software packages exclusively. Inputs and analyses will be completely documented, all supporting information will be traceable, and bases will be defendable so as to be most useful to the U.S. Department of Energy community and mission. The expected completion date is the end of fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  7. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100 centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  8. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in groundwater only at well GW01. No evidence of contamination was found in other monitoring wells and piezometers. This pattern is consistent with findings of previous investigations. The findings of the 2007 targeted investigation clearly demonstrate that the former CCC/USDA facility at Hilton was not the source of the carbon tetrachloride contamination persistently detected in well GW01. Well GW01 is approximately 300 ft upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. This well is the only sampling location at Hilton where carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater has ever been identified. The CCC/USDA never operated grain storage facilities on the property on which well GW01 is located.

  9. Recent Developments in the Management of Cameco Corporation's Fuel Services Division Waste - 13144

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Thomas P.

    2013-07-01

    Cameco Corporation is a world leader in uranium production. Headquartered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan our operations provide 16% of the world uranium mine production and we have approximately 435 million pounds of proven and probable uranium reserves. Cameco mining operations are located in Saskatchewan, Wyoming, Nebraska and Kazakhstan. Cameco is also a major supplier of uranium processing services required to produce fuel for the generation of clean energy. These operations are based in Blind River, Cobourg and Port Hope, Ontario and are collectively referred to as the Fuel Services Division. The Fuel Services Division produces uranium trioxide from uranium ore concentrate at the Blind River Refinery. Cameco produces uranium hexafluoride and uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Conversion Facility. Cameco operates a fuel manufacturing facility in Port Hope, Ontario and a metal fabrication facility located in Cobourg, Ontario. The company manufactures fuel bundles utilized in the Candu reactors. Cameco's Fuel Services Division produces several types of low-level radioactively contaminated wastes. Internal processing capabilities at both the Blind River Refinery and Port Hope Conversion Facility are extensive and allow for the recycling of several types of waste. Notwithstanding these capabilities there are certain wastes that are not amenable to the internal processing capabilities and must be disposed of appropriately. Disposal options for low-level radioactively contaminated wastes in Canada are limited primarily due to cost considerations. In recent years, Cameco has started to ship marginally contaminated wastes (<500 ppm uranium) to the United States for disposal in an appropriate landfill. The landfill is owned by US Ecology Incorporated and is located near Grand View, Idaho 70 miles southeast of Boise in the Owyhee Desert. The facility treats and disposes hazardous waste, non-hazardous industrial waste and low-activity radioactive material. The site's arid climate, deep groundwater and favourable geology help ensure permanent waste isolation. Combined with a state of the art multi-layer landfill liner system, the Grand View facility represents an ideal choice to minimize environmental liability. Marginally contaminated wastes from operations within the Fuel Services Division are typically loaded into PacTec IP-2 rated Intermediary Bulk Containers and then transported by road to a nearby rail siding. The Intermediary Bulk Containers are then loaded in US Ecology owned gondola rail-cars. The gondolas are then transported via Canadian Pacific and Union Pacific railroads to the US Ecology Rail Transfer facility located in Mayfield, Idaho. The Intermediary Bulk Containers are unloaded into trucks for transport to the disposal facility located approximately 32 miles away. (authors)

  10. The Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement: An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sweeney

    2005-01-20

    On July 23,2002, the President of the United States signed into law a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating the Yucca Mountain site in Nye County, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If the US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission authorizes construction of the repository and receipt and possession of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive at Yucca Mountain, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would be responsible for transporting these materials to the Yucca Mountain repository as part of its obligation under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Part of the site recommendation decision included the analysis of a nation-wide shipping campaign to the proposed repository site. The ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada'' (February 2002) (Repository EIS) evaluated the potential impacts of the transportation of 70,000 Metric Tons of Heavy Metal spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 locations around the nation to the potential repository in Nevada over a 24 year shipping campaign. In the Repository EIS, DOE identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. In December 2003, based on public comments and the environmental analyses in the Repository EIS, DOE identified a preference for the Caliente rail corridor in Nevada. On April 8, 2004, DOE issued a Record of Decision (ROD) on the Mode of Transportation and Nevada Rail Corridor for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. In this ROD, the DOE announced that it had decided to select the mostly rail scenario analyzed in the Repository EIS as the transportation mode both on a national basis and in the State of Nevada. Under the mostly rail scenario, the DOE would rely on a combination of rail, truck and possibly barge to transport to the repository site at Yucca Mountain up to 70,000 MTHM of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, with most of the spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste being transported by rail. This will ultimately require construction of a rail line in Nevada to the repository. In addition, the DOE has decided to select the Caliente rail corridor in which to examine potential alignments within which to construct that rail line. A corridor is a strip of land, approximately 400 meters (0.25 miles) wide, that encompasses one of several possible routes through which DOE could build a rail line. An alignment is the specific location of a rail line in a corridor, and would likely be 60 meters [200 feet] or less in width. Also on April 8, 2004, DOE issued a Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV. In the Notice of Intent, the Department announced its intent to prepare a Rail Alignment EIS to assist in selecting a possible alignment for construction of a rail line that would connect the repository at Yucca Mountain to an existing main rail line in Nevada. The Rail Alignment EIS also would consider the potential construction and operation of a rail-to-truck intermodal transfer facility, proposed to be located at the confluence of an existing mainline railroad and a highway, to support legal-weight truck transportation until the rail system is fully operational. This corridor is approximately 513 kilometers (319 miles) long and would cost an estimated $880 million (2001 dollars). Should DOE decide to build the Caliente corridor, it may be the longest rail line built in the United States since the Transcontinental Railroad was constructed in 1869. Some of the challenges in building this rail corridor are steep grades (the corridor crosses over 7 mountain ranges), isolated terrain, possible tunnels, and stakeholder acceptance.

  11. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.; Massaro, Lawrence M.; Jensen, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel (UNF) from 12 shutdown nuclear power plant sites. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites are Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. The evaluation was divided into four components: characterization of the UNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory; a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of UNF and GTCC waste; an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing UNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information; and, an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove UNF and GTCC waste. The primary sources for the inventory of UNF and GTCC waste are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) RW-859 used nuclear fuel inventory database, industry sources such as StoreFUEL and SpentFUEL, and government sources such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The primary sources for information on the conditions of site and near-site transportation infrastructure and experience included observations and information collected during visits to the Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion sites; information provided by managers at the shutdown sites; Facility Interface Data Sheets compiled for DOE in 2005; Services Planning Documents prepared for DOE in 1993 and 1994; industry publications such as Radwaste Solutions; and Google Earth. State and Regional Group representatives, a Tribal representative, and a Federal Railroad Administration representative participated in six of the shutdown site visits. Every site was found to have at least one off-site transportation mode option for removing its UNF and GTCC waste; some have multiple options. Experience removing large components during reactor decommissioning provided an important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. Additional conclusions from this evaluation include: The 12 shutdown sites use designs from 4 different suppliers involving 9 different (horizontal and vertical) dry storage systems that would require the use of 8 different transportation cask designs to remove the UNF and GTCC waste from the shutdown sites; Although there are common aspects, each site has some unique features and/or conditions; Although some regulatory actions will be required, all UNF at the initial 9 shutdown sites (Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion) is in licensed systems that can be transported, including a small amount of high-burnup fuel; Each site indicated that 2-3 years of advance time would be required for its preparations before shipments could begin; Most sites have more than one transportation option, e.g., rail, barge, or heavy haul truck, as well as constraints and preferences. It is expected that additional site visits will be conducted to add to the information presented in the evaluation.

  12. Constraint-Based Routing Models for the Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a historic programmatic interest in the safe and secure routing, tracking, and transportation risk analysis of radiological materials in the United States. In order to address these program goals, DOE has funded the development of several tools and related systems designed to provide insight to planners and other professionals handling radioactive materials shipments. These systems include the WebTRAGIS (Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System) platform. WebTRAGIS is a browser-based routing application developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focused primarily on the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel from US nuclear reactors via railway, highway, or waterway. It is also used for the transport planning of low-level radiological waste to depositories such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. One particular feature of WebTRAGIS is its coupling with high-resolution population data from ORNL s LandScan project. This allows users to obtain highly accurate population count and density information for use in route planning and risk analysis. To perform the routing and risk analysis WebTRAGIS incorporates a basic routing model methodology, with the additional application of various constraints designed to mimic US Department of Transportation (DOT), DOE, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Aside from the routing models available in WebTRAGIS, the system relies on detailed or specialized modal networks for the route solutions. These include a highly detailed network model of the US railroad system, the inland and coastal waterways, and a specialized highway network that focuses on the US interstate system and the designated hazardous materials and Highway Route Controlled Quantity (HRCQ) -designated roadways. The route constraints in WebTRAGIS rely upon a series of attributes assigned to the various components of the different modal networks. Routes are determined via a constrained shortest-path Dijkstra algorithm that has an assigned impedance factor. The route constraints modify the various impedance weights to bias or prefer particular network characteristics as desired by the user. Both the basic route model and the constrained impedance function calculations are determined by a series of network characteristics and shipment types. The study examines solutions under various constraints modeled by WebTRAGIS including possible routes from select shut-down reactor sites in the US to specific locations in the US. For purposes of illustration, the designated destinations are Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. To the degree that routes express sameness or variety under constraints serves to illustrate either a) the determinism of particular transport modes by either configuration or regulatory compliance, and/or b) the variety of constrained routes that are regulation compliant but may not be operationally feasible.

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end of the casting opposite the gate. (3) It is recommended that lost foam castings in steel be gated for a quiescent fill in an empty cavity mold to prevent foam occlusion defects from the collapse mode. The energy benefit is primarily in yield savings and lower casting weight per function due to elimination of draft and parting lines for the larger lost foam castings. For the smaller investment casting, scrap losses due to shell cracking will be reduced. Both of these effects will reduce the metal melted per good ton of castings. There will also be less machine stock required per casting which is a yield savings and a small additional energy savings in machining. Downstream savings will come from heavy truck and railroad applications. Application of these processes to heavy truck castings will lighten the heavy truck fleet by about ten pounds per truck. Using ten years to achieve full penetration of the truck fleet at linear rate this will result in a fuel savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  14. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

    2003-02-01

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

  15. FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt

    2001-11-01

    The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuels at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consists of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal at up to 30% on a Btu basis, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing prior art with respect to high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. Activities and results thus far include the following. Several potential alternative fuels have been obtained for evaluation and testing as potential feedstocks, including sewage sludge, used railroad ties, urban wood waste, municipal solid waste, and used waste tires/tire-derived fuel. Only fuels with potential tipping fees were considered; potential energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge has been selected as one of the primary feedstocks for consideration at the Wabash plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary. High-temperature drop-tube furnace tests were conducted to determine if explosive fragmentation of high-moisture sludge droplets could be expected, but showed that these droplets underwent a shrinking and densification process that implies that the sludge will have to be well dispersed when injected into the gasifier. Fuel dispersion nozzles have been obtained for measuring how well the sludge can be dispersed in the second stage of the gasifier. Future work will include leasing a Schwing America pump to test pumping sewage sludge against 400 psig. In addition, sludge dispersion testing will be completed using two different dispersion nozzles to determine their ability to generate sludge particles small enough to be entrained out of the E-Gas entrained-flow gasifier.

  16. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal, cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  17. QER- Comment of Jeff Cobb 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Please also see the letter after my signature at the bottom. I was at the unitization hearing for the Helis Oil planned fracking operation in St. Tammany Parish. I refrained from speaking, because I do not live in St. Tammany. I wish to affirm my support for everything said at that hearing in opposition to the unitization permit, and everything relayed to the Army Corps of Engineers regarding the wetlands permit opposing it. As well as opposition to fracking not only in St Tammany, but anywhere in the world, for the multiple reasons I outline below. Primarily I'm opposed because the Texas Railroad Commission has conducted a study that shows conclusively that water wells located near fracking operations in the Barnett Shale have been contaminated with hyropcarbons that could ONLY have come from the Barnett Shale. Given that the Southern Hills Aquifer is the sole source aquifer for Baton Rouge as well as hundreds of thousands of other people in southeastern Louisiana including much if not all of St Tammany Parish, and the recent Legislative Auditors report showing DNR's regulation of thousands of oil and gas wells is negligent, allowing any drilling in ANY sole source aquifer is an accident waiting to happen, with repercussions lasting centuries. The World Bank is in agreement with other global experts such as PricewaterhouseCoopers that only 20% of the known fossil fuel reserves can be burned (http://blogs.worldbank.org/climatechange/carbon-bubbles-stranded-assets.) This means the remaining 80% of reserves are stranded assets, resulting in a carbon bubble in the investment market. The biggest of the Big Five global accounting firms, PricewaterhouseCoopers agrees with this in their report, 'Too Late for Two Degrees?' (http://www.pwc.co.uk/sustainability-climate-change/publications/low-carb...). ExxonMobil has recognized this carbon bubble risk, and then dismissed it (http://corporate.exxonmobil.com/en/environment/climate-change/managing-c...). Which is like an alcoholic admitting their addiction, and then saying 'but my continued drinking of alcohol is necessary'. Denial is the most seductive whore in the human psyche. All nations in the UN agreed to keep global warming driven mostly by the burning of fossil fuels below 2 degrees C in 2009. We are currently on track for 3-4 degrees C warming, perhaps higher. We have already identified fossil fuel reserves containing 2,795 gigatons of carbon (www.carbontracker.org), while we can only burn 565 gigatons of carbon to stay below the agreed upon 2 degrees C target (https://www.pik-potsdam.de/news/press-releases/archive/2009/on-the-way-t...). As we have five times more identified reserves than we can burn, the search for more is an exercise in futility. Although EPA has conducted two major studies linking well water contamination to fracking in both Pavilion, Wyoming and Dimock, Pennsylvania, this study by the Texas Railroad Commission is the most definitive to date (http://www.earthworksaction.org/media/detail/scientists_fracking_pollute...). Lower level EPA employees were told to discontinue and/or bury the results of those two studies, no doubt because higher level EPA employees were paid by the fossil fuel industry to hide the ugly truth that fossil fuels knew from the beginning. Louisiana already has some of the most polluted water in the US (http://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2014/06/louisiana_waterways_among...), as described in "Wasting Our Waterways: Toxic Industrial Pollution and Restoring the Promise of the Clean Water Act" (http://environmentamericacenter.org/sites/environment/files/reports/US_w...). Continued oil and gas activities, and particularly fracking which requires millions of gallons of water, and the 'produced' water that results which is too polluted and poisoned with benzenes, brine, and radioactive materials to be purified, must be stopped ASAP. The entire energy infrastructure for the planet needs to be upgraded to the supergrid and moved to renewables. Needless to say, after the Legislative Auditors Report it is clear that Louisiana can't be trusted to guard our health any better than Pennsylvania. "Pennsylvania has had more than 6,000 hydraulic fracturing wells drilled within the last six years, and zero state studies on their health impacts. In Pennsylvania, and near fracking operations across the country, people have won settlements from fossil fuel companies after being sickened. In many cases the drilling company imposes a gag order to prevent sickened people from spreading the word about what caused their illness and building the case that fracking has negative health effects." (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/06/20/3451311/pennsylvania-frack-g...) Although the argument is often made that fracking is igniting an economic boom, climate change will wipe away any benefits, exaggerated as these benefits are certain to be. A new economic model shows risks from climate change are bigger than previously estimated, according to former chief economist for the World Bank, Sir Lord Nicholas Stern, who was knighted for his 2006 "Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change." (http://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/news/dietz_stern_june2014/) Given the Legislative Auditors recent report on oil and gas wells, I have no faith in any part of the Louisiana government to regulate oil and gas activities of any kind, on any scale. Particularly as the Southern Hills Aquifer is the sole source aquifer for hundreds of thousands of people, including myself. Due to the carbon budget for the planet, we need to move away from fossil fuels and switch to clean renewable energy sources as soon as possible, which will help avoid some of the economic impacts mentioned above, as well as prevent even more poisoned water, air, and land due to oil and gas activities. Therefore I oppose any and all permits for any fossil fuel activities in the state of Louisiana. Jeff Cobb GreenARMY volunteer Very few people on earth ever get to say: 'I'm doing, right now, the most important thing I could possibly be doing.' If you join the fight against climate change, that's what you'll get to say. - Bill McKibben Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Attn: Chris Davis Re: Louisiana Natural and Scenic Rivers System Permit Applications # 896 & 902 Dear Mr. Davis, I am writing to request a public hearing on the two permits shown above. Both of these are vital natural Louisiana scenic river resources. As such, both are enjoyed by many citizens in our extended community. The thought of allowing fresh water to be pulled out of these rivers in such large quantities to satisfy the needs of large corporate industrial projects that will pollute the water to such a degree that it can never be safely returned to the eco-system is abhorrent. According to Wilma Subra*, the early phases of production after fracking, the produced water flows to the surface mixed with flowback water. The produced water is disposed of in injection/disposal wells. The produced water contains toxic chemical contaminants: volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene and xylene semi-volatile organic compound such as naphthalene, phenanthrene heavy metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead sulfur containing compounds NORM Radioactive Radium 226, Radium 228 and Uranium 238 These are only the first permits of what will become literally, thousands, should you allow this activity. I ask you to mindfully consider the impact of thousands of hydrofracturing wells in our area, depleting water supplies at alarming rates. Thank you for your time and consideration in this matter. I look forward to hearing from you regarding public hearings on these permit requests. Additionally, I would like to request a full Environmental Impact Statement regarding the use of our scenic rivers for such activity. Sincerely, Jeff Cobb *Subra holds degrees in Microbiology/Chemistry from the University of Southwestern Louisiana, received the MacArthur Fellowship "Genius" Award from the MacArthur Foundation for helping ordinary citizens understand, cope with and combat environmental issues in their communities and was one of three finalist in the Environmental Category of the 2004 Volvo for Life Award, selected in 2011 as one of the 'Lifetime Remarkable Woman' and most recently won the 2011 Global Exchange, Human Rights Award for her ongoing work with the BP Oil Spill and the communities affected by it.