Sample records for rail transportation corridor

  1. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor...

  2. Intercity passenger rail productivity in the Northeast Corridor : implications for the future of high-speed Rail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archila Téllez, Andrés Felipe

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing discussion about the future implementation of high-speed rail (HSR) in the Northeast Corridor (NEC) is full of questions on the feasibility of HSR and the ability of Amtrak to implement it. Indeed, the introduction ...

  3. EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

  4. Air, High Speed Rail, or Highway: A Cost Comparison in the California Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    these reduced social costs offset rail's high capital and operating costs. The development of cost estimates, any of these three modes. In this study we include estimates of four types of external, social costs design characteristics observed in the California corridor. We estimate rail costs with models adapted

  5. Geologic selection methodology for transportation corridor routing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultz, Karin Wilson

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lack of planning techniques and processes on long, linear, cut and cover-tunneling route transportation systems has resulted because of the advancement of transportation systems into underground corridors. The proposed methodology is tested...

  6. Geologic selection methodology for transportation corridor routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultz, Karin Wilson

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lack of planning techniques and processes on long, linear, cut and cover-tunneling route transportation systems has resulted because of the advancement of transportation systems into underground corridors. The proposed methodology is tested...

  7. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  8. Causal Analysis of Passenger Train Accidents on Freight Rail Corridors Chen-Yu Lin, Mohd Rapik Saat, Christopher P.L. Barkan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Causal Analysis of Passenger Train Accidents on Freight Rail Corridors Chen-Yu Lin, Mohd Rapik Saat. Comprehensive understanding of train accidents on shared-use corridors is critical for rational allocation of resources to reduce train accident risk. Nevertheless, little research has been undertaken to quantify

  9. Rail Access to Yucca Mountain: Critical Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.; Moore, R. C.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository site currently lacks rail access. The nearest mainline railroad is almost 100 miles away. Absence of rail access could result in many thousands of truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Direct rail access to the repository could significantly reduce the number of truck shipments and total shipments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identified five potential rail access corridors, ranging in length from 98 miles to 323 miles, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Yucca Mountain. The FEIS also considers an alternative to rail spur construction, heavy-haul truck (HHT) delivery of rail casks from one of three potential intermodal transfer stations. The authors examine the feasibility and cost of the five rail corridors, and DOE's alternative proposal for HHT transport. The authors also address the potential for rail shipments through the Las Vegas metropolitan area.

  10. Estimating commuter rail demand to Kendall Square along the Grand Junction Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelie, Adam

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since acquiring the Grand Junction Railroad in June 2010 from CSX, the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) has explored the possibility of using the line for commuter rail service. In addition the Grand Junction ...

  11. The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Alameda Corridor: Lessons Learned Plus Past and Future Challenges Presented to: Portland State Corridor **Trucked around Corridor but leaves or enters Southern California by rail. #12;Lessons Learned

  12. Southwest Area Corridor Map | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007....

  13. Light Rail Transit Strengthening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Light Rail Transit Improving mobility Easing congestion Strengthening our communities Central Corridor Communicating to the Public During Major Construction May 25, 2011 #12;2 Light Rail Transit;Light Rail Transit Central Corridor Route and Stations 3 · 18 new stations · 9.8 miles of new double

  14. Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

  15. Assessment of the potential diversion of air passengers to high-speed rail in the northeast corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Michael D. D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high level of intercity passenger travel in the Northeast Corridor is supported by densely populated metropolitan city-centers, the suitable distance between the urban areas, and the extent to which economic and social ...

  16. Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (RailTEC) The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Effects and Interaction of Terminal and Mainline Delay Rail Operational and Energy Efficiency -Passenger ! RESEARCHAREAS Advanced Track Engineering -Integration of Railroad Vehicle-Track Interaction and Dynamics Models Rail Energy Consumption and Emissions Relative to Competing Modes -Economic and Operating Impacts

  17. rail inspections matrix

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENHANCED SAFETY INSPECTION OF COMERCIAL HIGHWAY VEHICLES TRANSPORTING TRANSURANICS, SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, AND HIGH LEVEL WASTE TO RAIL INSPECTION STANDARDS -TEC-WG, RAIL TOPIC GROUP...

  18. Rail Focused US DOTRITA Tier I University Transportation Center University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    .S. freight railroad system is one of the transportation success stories of the latter 20th and early 21st centuries. The efficiency of North American freight rail transport is a world leader, providing the nation with substantial economic, energy, and environmental benefits. Meanwhile, increasingly congested highway and air

  19. Cost-effectiveness of freeway median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facility conversion to rail guideway transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Matthew Evans

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evolution of the HOV corridor. A few states require that freeway HOV facilities be designed to allow conversion to rail transit modes. Although there have been no examples of this type of conversion, such a concept should be explored as a possible... of different transportation improvements at the corridor, system, and project level for the purpose of cross-modal comparisons. The model can be calibrated to local conditions, thus avoiding the use of national averages. A computerized model (MODECOST...

  20. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

  1. Streamlining Transportation Corridor Planning Processess: Freight and Traffic Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The traffic investigation is one of the most important parts of an Environmental Impact Statement of projects involving the construction of new roadway facilities and/or the improvement of existing ones. The focus of the traffic analysis is on the determination of anticipated traffic flow characteristics of the proposed project, by the application of analytical methods that can be grouped under the umbrella of capacity analysis methodologies. In general, the main traffic parameter used in EISs to describe the quality of traffic flow is the Level of Service (LOS). The current state of the practice in terms of the traffic investigations for EISs has two main shortcomings. The first one is related to the information that is necessary to conduct the traffic analysis, and specifically to the lack of integration among the different transportation models and the sources of information that, in general, reside in GIS databases. A discussion of the benefits of integrating CRS&SI technologies and the transportation models used in the EIS traffic investigation is included. The second shortcoming is in the presentation of the results, both in terms of the appearance and formatting, as well as content. The presentation of traffic results (current and proposed) is discussed. This chapter also addresses the need of additional data, in terms of content and coverage. Regarding the former, other traffic parameters (e.g., delays) that are more meaningful to non-transportation experts than LOS, as well as additional information (e.g., freight flows) that can impact traffic conditions and safety are discussed. Spatial information technologies can decrease the negative effects of, and even eliminate, these shortcomings by making the relevant information that is input to the models more complete and readily available, and by providing the means to communicate the results in a more clear and efficient manner. The benefits that the application and use of CRS&SI technologies can provide to improve and expedite the traffic investigation part of the EIS process are presented.

  2. Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

  3. A Simulation Tool for Combined Rail-Road Transport in Intermodal Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambardella, Luca Maria

    A Simulation Tool for Combined Rail-Road Transport in Intermodal Terminals Andrea E. Rizzoli. A simulation tool to model the flow of Intermodal Terminal Units (ITUs) among intermodal terminals is presented. This terminal simulator tool is part of the DGVII EC-funded PLATFORM project. The terminal model is composed

  4. Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail Coal

  5. The Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement: An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sweeney

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 23,2002, the President of the United States signed into law a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating the Yucca Mountain site in Nye County, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If the US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission authorizes construction of the repository and receipt and possession of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive at Yucca Mountain, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would be responsible for transporting these materials to the Yucca Mountain repository as part of its obligation under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Part of the site recommendation decision included the analysis of a nation-wide shipping campaign to the proposed repository site. The ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada'' (February 2002) (Repository EIS) evaluated the potential impacts of the transportation of 70,000 Metric Tons of Heavy Metal spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 locations around the nation to the potential repository in Nevada over a 24 year shipping campaign. In the Repository EIS, DOE identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. In December 2003, based on public comments and the environmental analyses in the Repository EIS, DOE identified a preference for the Caliente rail corridor in Nevada. On April 8, 2004, DOE issued a Record of Decision (ROD) on the Mode of Transportation and Nevada Rail Corridor for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. In this ROD, the DOE announced that it had decided to select the mostly rail scenario analyzed in the Repository EIS as the transportation mode both on a national basis and in the State of Nevada. Under the mostly rail scenario, the DOE would rely on a combination of rail, truck and possibly barge to transport to the repository site at Yucca Mountain up to 70,000 MTHM of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, with most of the spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste being transported by rail. This will ultimately require construction of a rail line in Nevada to the repository. In addition, the DOE has decided to select the Caliente rail corridor in which to examine potential alignments within which to construct that rail line. A corridor is a strip of land, approximately 400 meters (0.25 miles) wide, that encompasses one of several possible routes through which DOE could build a rail line. An alignment is the specific location of a rail line in a corridor, and would likely be 60 meters [200 feet] or less in width. Also on April 8, 2004, DOE issued a Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV. In the Notice of Intent, the Department announced its intent to prepare a Rail Alignment EIS to assist in selecting a possible alignment for construction of a rail line that would connect the repository at Yucca Mountain to an existing main rail line in Nevada. The Rail Alignment EIS also would consider the potential construction and operation of a rail-to-truck intermodal transfer facility, proposed to be located at the confluence of an existing mainline railroad and a highway, to support legal-weight truck transportation until the rail system is fully operational. This corridor is approximately 513 kilometers (319 miles) long and would cost an estimated $880 million (2001 dollars). Should DOE decide to build the Caliente corridor, it may be the longest rail line built in the United States since the Transcontinental Railroad was constructed in 1869. Some of the challenges in building this rail corridor are steep grades (the corridor crosses over 7 mountain ranges), isolated terrain, possible tunnels, and stakeholder acceptance.

  6. Development of Improved Traveler Survey Methods for High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperry, Benjamin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed passenger rail is seen by many in the U.S. transportation policy and planning communities as an ideal solution for fast, safe, and resource-efficient mobility in high-demand intercity corridors. To expand the body of knowledge for high...

  7. The agglomerative role of transportation investment : a comparative analysis of Portuguese and American high-speed rail proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westrom, Ryan J. (Ryan Jeremy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research uses a comparative analysis of High-Speed Rail (HSR) impacts from proposals in both Portugal and Illinois to understand the wider economic implications of these proposed transportation links and corollary ...

  8. www.rtands.com Railway Track & Structures March 2009 37 s rail transport continues to grow in popularity, so does

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    www.rtands.com Railway Track & Structures March 2009 37 A s rail transport continues to grow is protected from debris, rain and freezing temperatures, the more smoothly it flows." Barr cites the findings

  9. Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Francesco Bedini Jacobini, Erol Tutumluer, Mohd Rapik Saat Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (Rail

  10. ILLINOIS -RailTEC Optimal Grade Crossing Project Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    BNSF Railway Global Level Crossing Safety Symposium - August 5th, 2014 #12;Slide 2 ILLINOIS - Rail,000,000~$1,000,000 #12;Slide 4 ILLINOIS - RailTEC Corridor Improvements Passenger rail corridor involves a series ILLINOIS - RailTEC 240 120 60 45 40 33 29 23 18 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 225

  11. See also http://www.umass.edu/loop/content/civil-andenvironmental-engineering-student-wins-fulbright-study-rail-transportation-spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    See also http://www.umass.edu/loop/content/civil-andenvironmental-engineering- student-wins-fulbright-study-rail-transportation-spain to study transportation engineering in Madrid, Spain during 2013-2014. I had the good fortune to meet with Radha a short time ago and learned during our conversation that while abroad in Spain, one of her

  12. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,

  13. Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

  14. Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Under Section 368, Congress divided the United States into two groups of states: the 11 contiguous western states and the remaining states. Direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in the 11 western states was addressed in Section 368(a) of EPAct, while direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in all other states was addressed under Section 368(b) of EPAct. It was clearly the priority of Congress to conduct corridor location studies and designation first on federal lands in the western states. Under Section 368(a), the Agencies produced a programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS), Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States (DOE and DOI 2008), that was used in part as the basis for designating more than 6,000 mi (9,656 km) of energy transportation corridors on federal land in 11 western states. Under Section 368(a) of EPAct, Congress clearly stated the Agencies needed to (1) designate energy transportation corridors on federal land, (2) conduct the necessary environmental review of the designated corridors, and (3) incorporate the designated corridors into the appropriate land use plans. Congressional direction under Section 368(b) of EPAct differs from that provided under Section 368(a). Specifically, Section 368(b) requires the secretaries of the Agencies, in consultation with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), affected utility industries, and other interested persons, to jointly: (1) Identify corridors for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities on federal land in states other than the 11 western states identified under Section 368(a) of EPAct, and (2) Schedule prompt action to identify, designate, and incorporate the corridors into the applicable land use plans. While Section 368(a) clearly directs designation as a necessary first step for energy transportation corridors in the 11 western states, Section 368(b) directs the Agencies to first identify corridor

  15. Hybrid Transmission Corridor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clairmont, B.A.; Johnson, G.B.; Zaffanella, L.E. (General Electric Co., Lenox, MA (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid Transmission Corridors are areas where High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC) transmission lines and High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines exist in close proximity of each other. Because of the acceptance of HVDC as a means of transporting electric power over long distances and the difficulties associated with obtaining new right-of-ways, HVDC lines may have to share the same transmission corridor with HVAC lines. The interactions between conductors energized with different types of voltages causes changes in the electrical stresses applied to the conductors and insulators. As a result, corona phenomena, field effects and insulation performance can be affected. This report presents the results of an investigation of the HVAC-HVDC interaction and its effect on corona and AC and DC electric field phenomena. The method of investigation was based on calculation methods developed at the EPRI High Voltage Transmission Research Center (HVTRC) and supported by the results of full and reduced-scale line tests. Also, a survey of existing hybrid corridors is given along with the results of measurements made at one of those corridors. A number of examples in which an existing AC corridor may be transformed into a hybrid corridor are discussed. The main result of the research is an analytical/empirical model for predicting the electrical/environmental performance of hybrid corridors, a definition of ACDC interaction and a set of criteria for specifying when the interaction becomes significant, and a set of design rules.

  16. EIS-0490: Boulder City/U.S. 93 Corridor Transportation Improvements, Boulder City, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Highway Administration and the Nevada Department of Transportation prepared an EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Boulder City/U.S. 93 Bypass Project in...

  17. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

  18. Performance Analysis of the SensorNet's Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot Viewer at the Dorchester West Bound Interstate Weigh Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon Mendoza, R.A.; Lagos, L.E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Hill, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 9-11 attacks, the United States has increased its focus on developing technologies designed to warn us in the event of another attack and to prevent these attacks from happening in the first place. The SensorNet research group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Computer Science and Engineering Division is participating in this effort by developing systems to give critical real-time information to federal, state, and local emergency response decision makers. SensorNet has approached this goal by putting together a system with several sensors and programs called the Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot project (SETCP). The SETCP utilizes interstate weigh stations not only to weigh the passing trucks but also to check for gamma and neutron radiation inside the truck without the aid of a human in close proximity. The system also collects additional data that help identify the truck (the truck's length, weight, license plate number, and photographs of the truck). The objective of this research work was to characterize and analyze the data collected from the South Carolina weigh station on I-26W and compare it with previous data analysis on the performance of the Tennessee weigh station on I-40E. The purpose was to find patterns in the trucks with radioactive alarms and, regional truck traffic, as well as to find patterns of inconsistency in the system (illogical length measurements of the truck, inaccurate readings and character recognition of the license plate). During a three-month period, radioactive alarms and traffic patterns were identified and characterized by grouping all of the data and making graphs and charts in Microsoft Excel to show the flow of traffic, the type of truck traffic, the number of alarms and other information. Inconsistence patterns were found by analyzing the data, looking for missing or illogical information, and determining how often it happens. The improvements of these inconsistencies were also analyzed after repairs were made to the system. Given the small number of radiation alarms detected, there were no clear patterns found. Further research has to be done in this area; also, the analysis period needs to be extended from three months to a year. For traffic flow patterns, it was found that the truck traffic was heaviest on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. The inconsistencies found and fixed in the system were the illogical length measurements and the inaccurate reading and character recognition of the license plate. During the summer of 2007, a Florida International University (FIU) student supported this research work under the direct supervision of Mr. David Hill at ORNL's Computer Science and Engineering Division. The 10-week student internship was supported by the DOE/FIU Science and Technology Workforce Initiative, an innovative program developed by the US Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and FIU's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) (authors)

  19. The climate impacts of high-speed rail and air transportation : a global comparative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing concerns about the energy use and climate impacts of the transportation sector have prompted policymakers to consider a variety of options to meet the future mobility needs of the world's population, while ...

  20. Reducing the Risk of Rail Transport of Hazardous Materials by Route Rationalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Kawprasert (Corresponding Author) Graduate Research Assistant Railroad Engineering Program Department practices intended to reduce the likelihood or severity of accidents involving trains transporting certain Engineering Program Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana

  1. Agenda of critical issues: coal price and availability. Final report. [Includes effect of legislation, sulfur content and rail transport costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennican, M.L.; Wayland, R.E.; Weinstein, D.M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temple, Barker, and Sloane, Inc. developed an agenda of critical issues regarding future coal prices and coal availability for EPRI. TBS interviewed nearly 50 utility, coal company, and railroad officials, academic experts, and coal consultants; held a one-day participatory workshop; and conducted a literature review and follow-up interviews with selected utilities. TBS found four causes of uncertainty in the utility industry over future coal prices. First, the acid deposition proposals in Congress vary in terms of the structure of the legislation, the costs of compliance, and the impact on coal prices; in turn these uncertainties impede utility fuel planning and decision making. Second, powerplant-specific factors will have a major impact on whether utilities switch or scrub in response to acid deposition legislation; existing analyses do not capture these factors. The most important powerplant-specific factors are matching unit characteristics with coal specifications, retrofit scrubber costs, and differing state regulatory environments. Third, TBS found that utility fuel managers have great uncertainty over the availability and future cost of compliance coal. TBS estimated that the existing production capacity of eastern compliance coal is at least twice as high as current production. Fourth, TBS concluded that uncertainty over future coal transportation rates was a major reason for utilities' uncertainty over future delivered prices of coal. Critical transportation-related issues are the strategic and tactical response of eastern coal producers to the Staggers Act; the impact on rail rates of the sale of Conrail, of possible transcontinental mergers, and of multi-modal mergers; and the future pricing policies that eastern railroads will adopt in response to imports of Colombian coal. 21 references.

  2. Watering the Sun Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Watering the Sun Corridor Managing Choices in Arizona's Megapolitan Area #12;#12;Managing ChoicesSored by Printing generously provided by SRP. Watering the Sun Corridor Tom Buschatzke, City of Phoenix Peter Culp i C y | 5 Introduction............................................7 I. The Sun Corridor

  3. Fuel rail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haigh, M.; Herbert, J.D.; O'Leary, J.J.

    1988-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a fuel rail for a V-configuration automotive type internal combustion engine having a throttle body superimposed over an intake manifold. The throttle body has an air plenum above an induction channel aligned with a throttle bore passage in the manifold for flow or air to the engine cylinders. The rail includes a spacer body mounted sealingly between the throttle body and the manifold of the engine and having air induction passages therethrough to connect the throttle body channels and the manifold, the spacer body having at least on longitudinal bore defining a fuel passage extending through the spacer body, and a fuel injector receiving cups projecting from and communicating with the fuel passage. The spacer body consists of a number of separated spacer members, and rail member means through which the fuel passage runs joining the spacer members together.

  4. DOE to Transport Moab Mill Tailings by Rail | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 ChairsEnergyawards contract for sludgeDOEto Transport Moab Mill

  5. HIGH SPEED RAIL COSTS, BENEFITS, AND FINANCING RAYMOND H. ELLIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Corridor PHASE 1 ­ TAMPA TO ORLANDO #12;FLORIDA TAMPA ­ ORLANDO (PHASE 1) HSR CAPITAL COST · Estimated Incremental Capital Cost Capital Cost Year of (Billions (Billions Completion Expenditure Section 2010$) 2010$) of Section Capital Cost #12;CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL PHASE 1 CAPITAL COSTS SECTION INCREMENTAL CAPITAL

  6. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436 EnergyAssemblyOrderCoal

  7. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436

  8. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009

  9. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 Weekly7a.

  10. PRB rail loadings shatter record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rail transport of coal in the Powder River Basin has expanded, with a record 2,197 trains loaded in a month. Arch Coal's Thunder basin mining complex has expanded by literally bridging the joint line railway. The dry fork mine has also celebrated its safety achievements. 4 photos.

  11. High-speed rail commuting in the United States : a case study in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasuya, Shuichi, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) is primarily for intermediate distance intercity passenger travel. The concept of high-speed rail commuting is to provide short distance commuting transportation service on dedicated HSR, by sharing ...

  12. Western Energy Corridor -- Energy Resource Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Roberts; Michael Hagood

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is facing significant growth in energy demand over the next several decades. Strategic in meeting this demand are the world-class energy resources concentrated along the Rocky Mountains and northern plains in Canada and the U.S., informally referred to as the Western Energy Corridor (WEC). The fossil energy resources in this region are rivaled only in a very few places in the world, and the proven uranium reserves are among the world's largest. Also concentrated in this region are renewable resources contributing to wind power, hydro power, bioenergy, geothermal energy, and solar energy. Substantial existing and planned energy infrastructure, including refineries, pipelines, electrical transmission lines, and rail lines provide access to these resources.

  13. DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Transportation Planning, Route Selection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Transportation Planning, Route Selection, and Rail Issues DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Transportation Planning, Route Selection, and Rail Issues...

  14. PHOENIX ENERGIZES LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR WITH UPGRADES | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential energy upgrade projects typically included: insulation; air and duct sealing; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) upgrades; sunscreens; and solar water...

  15. PHOENIX ENERGIZES LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR WITH UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverviewPHOENIX

  16. Comparative Cost Estimates Caliente Rail Corridor Summary Report

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t i RFire

  17. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  18. Ultrasonic methods for rail inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Robert Ronald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Bed .. 161 Figure 7-18: Fixed ReactionFixed Rail) . 159 Large-scale Rail Test-bed:Bed buckling mechanism. In this experimental exercise the rail is constrained to have a fixed-

  19. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal extraction Rail transport Power plant Elec transmission emissionsCoal extraction Rail transport Power plant Elec transmission emissionsCoal extraction Rail transport Power plant Elec transmission emissions

  20. Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrechaga, Jose; Wei, Xinghan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horn, Oct, 2003 4.   Alamo Creek final report, 2005 5.  Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, Californiabiodiversity corridors along the creek in the city and uses

  1. Innovative Corridors Initiative: Business Model Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lingham, Viginia; Finson, Rachel S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wenger, Joyce. Business Models for Vehicle InfrastructureCorridors Initiative: Business Model Analysis Rachel S.Corridors Initiative: Business Model Analysis Task Order

  2. Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt | Department ofEvaluation Report:ReturnsTransportation

  3. TRIMBLE BUSINESS CENTER TUTORIAL Working with Corridors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    BUSINESS CENTER TUTORIAL Working with Corridors 2 Corporate Office Trimble Navigation Limited EngineeringF TRIMBLE BUSINESS CENTER TUTORIAL Working with Corridors Contents About this tutorial BUSINESS CENTER TUTORIAL Working with Corridors 3 About this tutorial A "corridor" is a 3D model

  4. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Comparison of magnetic and electric fields of conventional and advanced electrified transportation systems. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Jacobs, W.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns exist regarding the potential safety, environmental and health effects on the public and on transportation workers due to electrification along new or existing rail corridors, and to proposed maglev and high speed rail operations. Therefore, the characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz) is of interest. The report summarizes and compares the results of a survey of EMF characteristics (spatial, temporal and frequency bands) for representative conventional railroad and transit and advanced high-speed systems including: the German TR-07 maglev system; the Amtrak Northeast Corridor (NEC) and North Jersey Transit (NJT) trains; the Washington, DC Metrorail (WMATA) and the Boston, MA (MBTA) transit systems; and the French TGV-A high speed rail system. This comprehensive comparative EMF survey produced both detailed data and statistical summaries of EMF profiles, and their variability in time and space. EMF ELF levels for WMATA are also compared to those produced by common environmental sources at home, work, and under power lines, but have specific frequency signatures.

  5. Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, James A.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hlava, Kevin J.; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B.; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). The intent of WECC’s work was to identify planning-level energy corridors that the Department of Energy (DOE) and its affiliates could study in greater detail. Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the WECC Proposed Energy Corridors in five topic areas for use in reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. In compliance with Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Secretaries of Energy, Agriculture, and the Interior (Secretaries) published a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in 2008 to address the proposed designation of energy transport corridors on federal lands in the 11 western states. Subsequently, Records of Decision designating the corridors were issued in 2009 by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The 2012 settlement of a lawsuit, brought by The Wilderness Society and others against the United States, which identified environmental concerns for many of the corridors requires, among other things, periodic reviews of the corridors to assess the need for revisions, deletions, or additions. A 2013 Presidential Memorandum requires the Secretaries to undertake a continuing effort to identify and designate energy corridors. The WECC Proposed Energy Corridors and their analyses in this report provide key information for reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. Load centers and generation hubs identified in the WECC analysis, particularly as they reflect renewable energy development, would be useful in reviewing and potentially updating the designated Section 368 corridor network. Argonne used Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to analyze the proposed energy corridors in the WECC report in five topic areas: ? Federal land jurisdiction, ? Existing Section 368 corridors, ? Existing transmission lines, ? Previously studied corridor locations, and ? Protected areas. Analysis methods are explained and tables and maps are provided to describe the results of the analyses in all five topic areas. WECC used a rational approach to connecting the hubs it identified, although there may be opportunities for adapting some of the proposed WECC routes to previously designated Section 368 corridors, for example: ? The WECC proposed energy corridors are in fact centerlines of proposed routes connecting hubs of various descriptions related to electric energy transmission. Although the centerlines were sited to avoid sensitive areas, infrastructure proposed within actual pathways or corridors defined by the centerlines would sometimes affect lands where such development would not normally be allowed, such as National Parks and Monuments, National Wildlife Refuges, and Wilderness Areas. ? Many WECC proposed energy corridors are sited along centerlines of existing roads, including Interstate Highways, where in some cases additional width to accommodate energy transmission infrastructure may not be available. Examples include the WECC Proposed Corridor along Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon in Colorado, and along U.S. Highway 89 across Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona. ? Several WECC proposed energy corridors are parallel to designated Section 368 corridors that have already cleared the preliminary steps to right-of-way approval. In many of these cases, the WECC hub connection objectives can be met more efficiently by routing on the designated Section 368 corridors.

  6. Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

  7. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo. 195 - Oct. 7, 2011 | Department ofEIS,

  8. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ ReportEnergy NationalDepartment of EnergyNo. 154 -|EIS,

  9. Agenda: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Members of the general public and interested stakeholders who wish to make a public comment for the Quadrennial Energy Review record may sign up to speak at the meeting on a first-come-first-served...

  10. Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Requirements Definition for ORNL Trusted Corridors Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL; White, James D [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Hively, Lee M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ORNL Trusted Corridors Project has several other names: SensorNet Transportation Pilot; Identification and Monitoring of Radiation (in commerce) Shipments (IMR(ic)S); and Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP). The project involves acquisition and analysis of transportation data at two mobile and three fixed inspection stations in five states (Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington DC). Collaborators include the State Police organizations that are responsible for highway safety, law enforcement, and incident response. The three states with fixed weigh-station deployments (KY, SC, TN) are interested in coordination of this effort for highway safety, law enforcement, and sorting/targeting/interdiction of potentially non-compliant vehicles/persons/cargo. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is interested in these deployments, as a Pilot test (SETCP) to identify Improvised Nuclear Devices (INDs) in highway transport. However, the level of DNDO integration among these state deployments is presently uncertain. Moreover, DHS issues are considered secondary by the states, which perceive this work as an opportunity to leverage these (new) dual-use technologies for state needs. In addition, present experience shows that radiation detectors alone cannot detect DHS-identified IND threats. Continued SETCP success depends on the level of integration of current state/local police operations with the new DHS task of detecting IND threats, in addition to emergency preparedness and homeland security. This document describes the enabling components for continued SETCP development and success, including: sensors and their use at existing deployments (Section 1); personnel training (Section 2); concept of operations (Section 3); knowledge discovery from the copious data (Section 4); smart data collection, integration and database development, advanced algorithms for multiple sensors, and network communications (Section 5); and harmonization of local, state, and Federal procedures and protocols (Section 6).

  12. Northeast corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. To Boston, MA. Volume 1. Final report, September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 X 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. This volume considers impacts on the Human and Natural Environment utilizing guidance as outlined in CFR Part 1500, Council on Environmental Quality, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA as amended and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) regulations (301 CMR 11:00). Impacts analyzed include changes in the natural environment (air quality, noise and vibration, energy, electromagnetic fields, natural resources, hazardous materials and visual/aesthetics), changes in the social environment (land use and recreation, transportation and traffic), impacts on historic and archaeological sites, changes in transit service and patronage, associated changes in highway and airport congestion, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and financial implications. Impacts are identified both for the proposed construction period and for the long-term operation of the alternatives.

  13. Reliability-based optimization of rail inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashima, Takashi, 1971-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a quantitative method to optimize inspection/repair intervention in rail defect management. Rail defect management is important for track maintenance, since rails are the most significant and basic ...

  14. Effect of Rail Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports from the South Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen; Shanmugham, C. V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I line-haul railroads. The railroad freight rate index, constructed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, was used to update estimated rail cost parameters to 1977. To facilitate the estimation of the variable cost parameters, a rail cost algorithm... Country Elevator, Inland Terminal, and Port Terminal Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Commercial Truck Transportation Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Barge...

  15. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the 2014 Joint Rail Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    , Colorado Springs, CO, USA JRC2014-3787 ANALYSIS OF TRENDS IN COMMUTER RAIL ENERGY EFFICIENCY Giovanni C. Di transportation alternative to reduce energy consumption and emissions in large urban areas. Use of commuter rail Transit Administration (FTA) grants are required to report operations and energy consumption data

  16. Ultrasonic methods for rail inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Robert Ronald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cut to Proper Length, (b) Thermite Welding of Rail, (c) Railrails was welded together using the Thermite welding method.Thermite welding is and exothermal chemical process between

  17. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  18. Ultrasonic methods for rail inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Robert Ronald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating speed over defective rail to 30 m.p.h. until jointoperating speed over the defective rail to 30 m.p.h. until jointThe operating speed cannot be over 30 m.p.h. C. Apply joint

  19. USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a cask’s internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

  20. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation aims to study the benefit of rail grinding on service life of railroad rails, focusing on failures due to rolling contact fatigue (RCF) at the rail head. Assuming a tangent rail with one-point contact at the running surface, a...

  1. Application of a systems-theoretic approach to risk analysis of high-speed rail project management in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawakami, Soshi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) is drawing attention as an environmentally-friendly transportation mode, and is expected to be a solution for socio-technical transportation issues in many societies. Currently, its market has been ...

  2. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Federal Lands in States Identified by EPAct 2005 (August 2011) Related Links West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic EIS Information Center East-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic...

  3. Energy Transport Corridor Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    fractional percentages are on lands managed by the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, or by the...

  4. Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project Under Way

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergy International Fuel7Radiative Transferrucks

  5. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  6. The Environmental Injector: Beyond Common Rail and Hydraulic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Environmental Injector: Beyond Common Rail and Hydraulic Intensificatiion The Environmental Injector: Beyond Common Rail and Hydraulic Intensificatiion The Environmental...

  7. An Inside Look at River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

  8. Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology in Tennessee to demonstrate, test, evaluation, and showcase innovative commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety

  9. 7.1.1. Fernbahnhof / Rail Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Fernbahnhofs 7.1.1.4.5 Kälteversorgung des Fernbahnhofs / Cooling Supply of Rail Station 7 Abwasserversorgung des Fernbahnhofs / Fresh and Used Water Supply of Rail Stations 7.1.1.4.1.1 Verfahren zur Fernbahnhofs 7.1.1.4.2 Stromversorgung des Fernbahnhofs / Power Supply of Rail Station 7

  10. New York state high-speed surface transportation study: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, New York State Governor Mario M. Cuomo created an interagency task force under the leadership of Lt. Governor Stan Lundine to investigate the potential of high speed ground transportation (HSGT) systems. Building on information from previous agency activities, including consultant efforts contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA), and in-house analyses performed by New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the task force focused on the corridor between New York City and the Niagara Frontier. In December 1991, NYSERDA issued a contract for a study of high speed ground transportation options for New York State. The study`s objective was to assess potential rights-of-way, ridership, energy and environmental impacts, economic benefits, capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and financial viability of HSGT systems. This study builds upon and supplements previous and on-going HSGT activities conducted by the members of the interagency task force. These activities include: Maglev Technical and Economic Feasibility Study (NYSERDA); Maglev Demonstration Site Investigation (NYSTA); and New York/Massachusetts High Speed Ground Transportation Study (NYSDOT). This study is intended to verify and refine previous information and analyses and provide supplemental information and insights to be used in determining if additional investigation and activities involving HSGT are desirable for New York State. This study evaluates HSGT technologies capable of speeds significantly higher than those achieved with the present rail system. Three HSGT categories are used in this study: incremental rail improvement, very high-speed rail, and Maglev.

  11. Current Status and Potential Impacts Regarding the Proposed Development of a Rail Line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanthrum, G. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Gunnerson, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a description of the current status regarding the proposed development of a rail line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Nye County, Southern Nevada, which includes potential impacts analyzed during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and the subsequent creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the rail line. Potential impacts are addressed within the context of impacts to natural and human environmental resources found within the geographic area of the proposed federal project. Potential impacts to these resources have been fully analyzed in the Rail Alignment Draft EIS (DEIS). This paper includes a summary of the potential impacts analyzed in the DEIS. Examples of potential impacts include land use conflicts, air quality, water use, and impacts to biological and cultural resources, among others. In conclusion: Based on its obligations under the NWPA and its decision to select the mostly rail scenario for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, DOE needs to ship these materials by rail in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE prepared the Rail Alignment EIS to provide the background, data, information, and analyses to help decision makers and the public understand the potential environmental impacts that could result from constructing and operating a railroad for shipment of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing rail line in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. This railroad would consist of a rail line, railroad operations support facilities, and other related infrastructure. DOE will use the Rail Alignment EIS to decide whether to construct and operate the proposed railroad, and if so, to: - Select a rail alignment (Caliente rail alignment or Mina rail alignment) in which to construct the railroad; - Select the common segments and alternative segments within either a Caliente rail alignment or a Mina rail alignment. The Department would use the selected common segments and alternative segments to identify the public lands to be included in right-of-way applications; - Decide where to construct proposed railroad operations support facilities; - Decide whether to restrict use of the rail line to DOE trains, or whether to allow commercial shippers to operate over the rail line; and - Determine what mitigation measures to implement. (authors)

  12. EIS-0250: Notice of Preferred Nevada Rail Corridor | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22,EERE: Record|Department ofofImpact

  13. Common Rail Injection System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electro-Motive,

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

  14. PORTAL Corridor Implementation PORTAL Corridor Implementation will consist of interface changes plus the addition of three tables in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    plus the addition of three tables in the database. One table (corridors) will list all corridors, name. In addition, we anticipate Concurrency and Congestion Management Corridors from the Vancouver area and is used in calculating measures such as traveltime and VMT, which require a length value. The addition

  15. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  16. TEC Rail TG Summary_Kansas City

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    January 31-February 1, 2007 Atlanta, Georgia Rail Topic Group Mr. Thrower (OCRWMOLM) introduced Mr. Blackwell (FRA), who gave a presentation on the DOT Notice of Proposed...

  17. Optimization Online - Shunting Minimal Rail Car Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco E. Luebbecke

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 30, 2003 ... Abstract: We consider the rail car management at industrial in-plant railroads. Demands for materials or empty cars are characterized by a track, ...

  18. EIS-0250-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain–Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  19. Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine This study measured the effects of hydrogen...

  20. Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine P-3 Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine P-3 Gregory Lilik, Jos Martn...

  1. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

  2. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    all rights of disposal such as copying and passing on to third parties. 1 Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Roger Busch Common Rail...

  3. Impacts of Rail Pressure and Biodiesel Composition on Soot Nanostructu...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impacts of Rail Pressure and Biodiesel Composition on Soot Nanostructure Impacts of Rail Pressure and Biodiesel Composition on Soot Nanostructure Fractal dimensions of particle...

  4. Challenges of Including the Mina Route in the Nevada Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanthrum, G.; Larson, N. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste, Washington, DC (United States); Mussler, R. [Booze Allen Hamilton, Suite (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing the Yucca Mountain repository for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW). Part of that development is the transportation infrastructure needed to ship SNF and HLW from 77 sites around the country to the repository. A Record of Decision was issued in 2004 to use mostly rail as the mode of transport both nationally, and in the State of Nevada. No rail access exists to the Yucca Mountain site, so a Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement (RA-EIS) is being prepared to address the impacts associated with connecting existing track in Nevada to Yucca Mountain. Late in the preparation of the Draft RA-EIS, an option to consider an additional alignment alternative was introduced. This paper describes the consideration given to the new alternative and describes how it is being incorporated into the RA-EIS. (authors)

  5. Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ...._ _) Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails by N.S. Tsai* and T.W. Eagar* ABSTRACT 421 The advantages and limitations ofseveral conventional and prospective rail welding processes are reviewed with emphasis on the heat input rate, on joint preparation, on post weld grinding and on resultant metallurgical

  6. Improved ultrasonic testing of railroad rail for transverse discontinuities in the rail head using higher order Rayleigh (M{sub 21}) waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grewal, D.S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Railroads are a very efficient and economical way of moving bulk commodities over large distances. However, like any other mode of transportation, this mode has its fair share of problems. It can be seen from the data (AAR, 1993) that over a period of time the average carload and trainload tonnage has gone up substantially. The average length of haul has also increased. However, the amount of new rail laid has actually decreased significantly. This presents a challenging opportunity to research better and more efficient ways of keeping the current railroad rail track in service and to find better ways of testing those rails to pre-empt any causes for accidents. An important factor to be considered here is the testing of the railroad rail for the amount of cold work in the top layer and the presence of microcracks in that layer. This article describes a surface guided acoustic mode with several inherent characteristics that make it particularly useful for detecting subsurface transverse flaws in railroad rail. These flaws have been previously in the blind spot of other ultrasonic NDT techniques.

  7. Intermodal transportation of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H.K.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

  8. Thiago Bizarria, Ryan Kernes, Riley Edwards Joint Rail Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    variation in temperature FMEA Analysis #12;Slide 7Mechanistic behavior of rail pad assemblies Mechanics

  9. Building bus rapid transit into the existing public transit system : competition and integration of BRT and the Urban Rail Transit in cities in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Yun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BRT is a new type of bus transit with high speed and capacity. With its advantages and benefits, BRT is getting popular in the world, including China. Since BRT and urban rail transit (URT) are both rapid public transports, ...

  10. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  11. District heating feasibility, Industrial Corridor, Jamestown, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Industrial Corridor of Jamestown, New York, contains more than twenty industrial/manufacturing companies, whose thermal demands, in addition to space heating, include significant process heating loads. This study investigated in depth, the technical and economic feasibility of implementing a district heating system in the Industrial Corridor which can serve both process and space heating loads. Based upon the heat load assessment conducted, the study focused upon nine companies with the largest thermal demand. Alternative system implementation designs were considered including new conventional centralized boiler plants, gas turbine cogeneration, and both high temperature hot water and steam as the heat transport media in an underground distribution system. The study concluded that, in view of the nature of existing prospective customer loads being primarily steam based, the most economical system for near term phased development is a steam based system with a new conventional centrally located steam boiler plant. The economic potential for a cogeneration system was found to be sensitive to electricity buy back rates, which at present, are not attractive. Implementing a modern high temperature hot water system would require significant customer retrofit costs to convert their steam based systems to hot water, resulting in long and unattractive pay back periods. Unless customer hot water retrofit costs can be expended without penalty to the district system economics, hot water district heating is not considered economically feasible. Chapters describe heat load assessment; heat source analysis; system implementation; transmission and distribution systems assessment; institutional assessment; system economic analysis; and customer retrofit, economic analysis, and conclusions 20 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Optimal Railroad Rail Grinding for Fatigue Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tangtragulwong, Potchara

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    or induction methods, 6 must be used to detect the subsurface cracks instead with some limitations on resolution and reliability. Focusing on subsurface crack nucleation in the head of a thermite welded rail, Fry et al. [12] determine an approximated...

  13. Public Meeting In Chicago - Rail Infrastructure Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    largest source of coal-fired generation. At the beginning of December 2013, our coal inventory at Weston was at about 105% of our targeted level. Rail deliveries during 2013 had...

  14. Determination of Longitudinal Stress in Rails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djayaputra, Ferdinand

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to determine the longitudinal stress in rails by using the polarization of Rayleigh waves. Analytical models are developed to describe the effect of applied stress on wave speed and on the polarization of Rayleigh...

  15. Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

  16. Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

  17. Taiwan High Speed Rail Keeping passenger safety at the forefront

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benefits Increased safety and reliability of the Taiwan High Speed Rail network through conditionTaiwan High Speed Rail Keeping passenger safety at the forefront Overview The Need Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation (THSRC) needed a highly reliable, cost- effective and proactive means

  18. Non-Operational Property Evaluation for the Hanford Site River Corridor - 12409

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, John [CH2M HILL, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Aly, Alaa [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and INTERA Incorporated, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site River Corridor consists of the former reactor areas of the 100 Areas and the former industrial (fuel processing) area in the 300 Area. Most of the waste sites are located close to the decommissioned reactors or former industrial facilities along the Columbia River. Most of the surface area of the River Corridor consists of land with little or no subsurface infrastructure or indication of past or present releases of hazardous constituents, and is referred to as non-operational property or non-operational area. Multiple lines of evidence have been developed to assess identified fate and transport mechanisms and to evaluate the potential magnitude and significance of waste site-related contaminants in the non-operational area. Predictive modeling was used for determining the likelihood of locating waste sites and evaluating the distribution of radionuclides in soil based on available soil concentration data and aerial radiological surveys. The results of this evaluation indicated: 1) With the exception of stack emissions, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas, 2) Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides, and (3) the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations or other waste sites in non-operational area soils is very small. The overall conclusions from the NPE evaluation of the River Corridor are: - With the exception of stack emissions to the air, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas. While pathways such as windblown dust, overland transport and biointrusion have the potential for dispersing waste site contaminants, the resulting transport is unlikely to result in substantial contamination in non-operational areas. - Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides; these radionuclides either would have decayed and would be undetectable in soil, or likely would not have deposited onto Hanford Site soils. A small fraction of the total historical emissions consisted of long-lived particulate radionuclides, which could have deposited onto the soil. Soil monitoring studies conducted as part of surveillance and monitoring programs do not indicate a build-up of radionuclide concentrations in soil, which might indicate potential deposition impacts from stack emissions. Aerial radiological surveys of the Hanford Site, while effective in detecting gamma-emitting nuclides, also do not indicate deposition patterns in soil from stack emissions. - The surveillance and monitoring programs also have verified that the limited occurrence of biointrusion observed in the River Corridor has not resulted in a spread of contamination into the non-operational areas. - Monitoring of radionuclides in ambient air conducted as part of the surveillance and monitoring programs generally show a low and declining trend of detected concentrations in air. Monitoring of radionuclides in soil and vegetation correspondingly show declining trends in concentrations, particularly for nuclides with short half lives (Cs-137, Co-60 and Sr-90). - Statistical analysis of the geographical distribution of waste sites based on man -made features and topography describes the likely locations of waste sites in the River Corridor. The results from this analysis reinforce the findings from the Orphan Site Evaluation program, which has systematically identified any remaining waste sites within the River Corridor. - Statistical analysis of the distribution of radionuclide concentrations observable from aerial surveys has confirmed that the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations in non-operational area soils is very small; the occurrences and locations where potentially elevated concentrations may be found are discussed below. In

  19. STAFF-PROPOSED REGULATIONS FOR AN ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CORRIDOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Preparation of Environmental Impact Report, Need Assessment, and Staff's Role............................................................................................................... 8 § 2411. Publication of the Environmental Impact Report, Need Assessment, and Public Review................................................................... 12 § 2419. Catalogue of Environmental Impact Reports for Designated Corridors.... 12 § 2420. Review

  20. Weather conditions affecting VTOL airbus operations in the Northeast Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R. W.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of hourly weather observations in the Northeast Corridor during the periods 0600-2400 for a ten year period 1944-1958 was made to study the implications of weather affecting the operations of a VSTOL Airbus ...

  1. I-65 Clean Corridor: Fall Drive Overview and Media Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the May 1, 2008 joint quarterly Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Julie Howe (Indiana Office of Energy & Defense Development) described the I-65 Corridor Project.

  2. The opportunistic green : building on Toronto's utility corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimi, Kamyar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Green Line or hydro corridors of Toronto are sprawling lengths of continuous, mostly vacant land used for the primary purpose of transmitting electricity. They are unusual terrain, physically sparse but culturally ...

  3. I-65 Clean Corridor: Fall Drive Overview and Media Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to the Gulf of Mexico, the entire length of I65, on either E85 ethanol or B20 biodiesel. The 886 miles of the Clean Biofuels Corridor allows drivers to be no more than a...

  4. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last two decades, the railroad industry has experienced a significant increase in heavy axle loads acting on railroad rails. In addition, railroad operations have been consolidated resulting in the elimination of ...

  5. An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Scott Laurence

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

  6. Development Impacts of high-speed rail : megalopolis formation and implications for Portugal's Lisbon-Porto High-Speed Rail Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melibaeva, Sevara (Sevara Mukhtarovna)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) has been gaining acceptance worldwide with development of rail technology and rising concerns over climate change and congestion in airports and on roads. The implementation of high-speed rail lines ...

  7. New Orleans Urbanized Area Metropolitan Transportation Plan FY 2032

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Orleans Urbanized Area Regional Planning Commission

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    which are more economical or which have less environmental eff ects while achieving similar transportation objectives. Burgeoning corridors such as the corridor between the Louis Armstrong International Airport and the Central Business District...2 0 23 F Y Metropolitan Transportation Plan New Orleans Urbanized AreaNew Regional Planning Commission Jefferson, Orleans Plaquemines, St. Bernard and St. Tammany Parishes, Louisiana June 12, 2007 Metropolitan Transportation Plan New Orleans...

  8. Rail gun development for EOS research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of a railgun program for EOS research in progress at Los Alamos and Livermore National Laboratories is described. The operating principle of rail guns, the power supplies used to drive them, diagnostic techniques used to monitor their performance and initial efforts to develop projectiles suitable for EOS research are discussed. (WHK)

  9. Dispatcher Reliability Analysis : SPICA-RAIL Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    consider that humans are fully reliable. But experience shows that many accidents involve human failuresDispatcher Reliability Analysis : SPICA-RAIL Experiments Fabien Belmonte, Jean-Louis Boulanger of scenarios and evaluate the behaviour of human operators. A state of the art in human reliability is pre

  10. Adverse Weather Conditions If adverse weather conditions occur which affects tube, bus or rail services, Heads of Department/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adverse Weather Conditions If adverse weather conditions occur which affects tube, bus or rail to present him/herself for work. Where, due to the adverse weather conditions, public transport is affected as a result of the adverse weather conditions (for example a child's school is closed), they should consult

  11. Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

  12. William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Transportation Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Transportation Energy Analysis and Modal Comparisons;Transportation Energy Analysis and Modal Comparisons William W Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar September 27 (Energy Efficiency and Air Emissions Intensity) 2. Intercity Passenger Rail Comparison (Air Emissions

  13. Energy Transport Corridor Draft Environmental Impact Statement Available

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergySession 3 |Department ofVehicularToo!for Review |

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation Corridors

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06)

  15. RIVER CORRIDOR BUILDINGS 324 & 327 CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.; SMITH, B.A.

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge in the recently awarded River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is decontaminating and demolishing (D&D) facilities in the 300 Area. Located along the banks of the Columbia River about one mile north of Richland, Washington, the 2.5 km{sup 2} (1 mi{sup 2})300 Area comprises only a small part of the 1517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. However, with more than 300 facilities ranging from clean to highly contaminated, D&D of those facilities represents a major challenge for Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), which manages the new RCC Project for DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL). A complicating factor for this work is the continued use of nearly a dozen facilities by the DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Most of the buildings will not be released to WCH until at least 2009--four years into the seven-year, $1.9 billion RCC Contract. The challenge will be to deactivate, decommission, decontaminate and demolish (D4) highly contaminated buildings, such as 324 and 327, without interrupting PNNL's operations in adjacent facilities. This paper focuses on the challenges associated with the D4 of the 324 Building and the 327 Building.

  16. Fall Protection Procedures for Sealing Bulk Waste Shipments by Rail Cars at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Sites - 13509

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.D. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, New York 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, New York 14207 (United States); Fort, E. Joseph; Lorenz, William [Cabrera Services (Cabrera) East Harford, CT 06108 (United States)] [Cabrera Services (Cabrera) East Harford, CT 06108 (United States); Mills, Andy [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. (Shaw) Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States)] [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. (Shaw) Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rail-cars loaded with radioactive materials must be closed and fastened to comply with United States Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements before they shipped. Securing waste shipments in a manner that meets these regulations typically results in the use of a sealable rail-car liner. Workers accessing the tops of the 2.74 m high rail-cars to seal and inspect liners for compliance prior to shipment may be exposed to a fall hazard. Relatively recent revisions to the Fall Protection requirements in the Safety and Health Requirements Manual (EM385-1-1, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) have necessitated modifications to the fall protection systems previously employed for rail-car loading at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In response these projects have developed site-specific procedures to protect workers and maintain compliance with the improved fall protection regulations. (authors)

  17. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to Berkeley...

  18. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Print Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to...

  19. Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in the Indian Road and Rail Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel production and use evaluates the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (not considering land-use change), net energy value (NEV), and net petroleum consumption impacts of substituting Jatropha biodiesel for conventional petroleum diesel in India. Several blends of biodiesel with petroleum diesel are evaluated for the rail freight, rail passenger, road freight, and road-passenger transport sectors that currently rely heavily on petroleum diesel. For the base case, Jatropha cultivation, processing, and use conditions that were analyzed, the use of B20 results in a net reduction in GHG emissions and petroleum consumption of 14% and 17%, respectively, and a NEV increase of 58% compared with the use of 100% petroleum diesel. While the road-passenger transport sector provides the greatest sustainability benefits per 1000 gross tonne kilometers, the road freight sector eventually provides the greatest absolute benefits owing to substantially higher projected utilization by year 2020. Nevertheless, introduction of biodiesel to the rail sector might present the fewest logistic and capital expenditure challenges in the near term. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the sustainability benefits are maintained under multiple plausible cultivation, processing, and distribution scenarios. However, the sustainability of any individual Jatropha plantation will depend on site-specific conditions.

  20. Pen Branch stream corridor and Delta Wetlands change assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blohm, J.D.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data from 1987 to 1991 covering the Pen Branch corridor and delta at SRS were utilized to provide a detailed change detection analysis. The multispectral data were geo-referenced to a Universal Transverse Mercator projection using finite element registration. Each year was then classified into eleven different landcover categories, and the yearly changes in each landcover category were analyzed. The decrease in operations of K Reactor in 1988 has resulted in drying of the corridor and delta. This has led to the decline of nonpersistent vegetation and the increase of persistent vegetation. Cattails, willow, and bottomland hardwoods, in particular, have grown to dominate the corridor and most of the delta.

  1. Information House Committee on Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The energy efficiency and environmental advantage of rail over trucks are well established in terms Transportation Institute Page 2 MULTIMODAL FREIGHT Texas has a well developed and efficient multimodal, or more than $690 billion. Railroads transport more than a third of the tonmiles for freight valued

  2. Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, Steve

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

  3. The Valley Fever Corridor Year 2 Fundraising Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    Marianne Stephens Ray Thurston Valley of the Sun Boston Terrier Club Mark Whitaker Nickel $500The Valley Fever Corridor Year 2 Fundraising Status Goal = $85,000 Updated: 2/15/2011 *The Valley Fever Clinic Titanium $5,000 or more: Anonymous Shirley and Ken Cole Heller Foundation

  4. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013)

  5. Truck and rail charges for shipping spent fuel and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNair, G.W.; Cole, B.M.; Cross, R.E.; Votaw, E.F.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed techniques for calculating estimates of nuclear-waste shipping costs and compiled a listing of representative data that facilitate incorporation of reference shipping costs into varius logistics analyses. The formulas that were developed can be used to estimate costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel or nuclear waste by either legal-weight truck or general-freight rail. The basic data for this study were obtained from tariffs of a truck carrier licensed to serve the 48 contiguous states and from various rail freight tariff guides. Also, current transportation regulations as issued by the US Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were investigated. The costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear waste, as addressed by the tariff guides, are based on a complex set of conditions involving the shipment origin, route, destination, weight, size, and volume and the frequency of shipments, existing competition, and the length of contracts. While the complexity of these conditions is an important factor in arriving at a ''correct'' cost, deregulation of the transportation industry means that costs are much more subject to negotiation and, thus, the actual fee that will be charged will not be determined until a shipping contract is actually signed. This study is designed to provide the baseline data necessary for making comparisons of the estimated costs of shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear wastes by truck and rail transportation modes. The scope of the work presented in this document is limited to the costs incurred for shipping, and does not include packaging, cask purchase/lease costs, or local fees placed on shipments of radioactive materials.

  6. Development of a Longitudinal Rail Stress Measurement Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurley, Samuel J

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous welded rails used in most of the United States lack expansion joints of any sort. This leads to a much smoother ride and a longer service life for rails and wheels, but also causes extreme temperatures to induce high stresses...

  7. High Speed Rail in America Thomas Ducharme, Matt Schena,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    to Washington D.C. · A renewed interest in High Speed Rail Due to increased congestion Desire for cheaper emissions by 2.8 million tons o High speed trains use 1/3 the energy of planes and 1/5 that of cars · Reduce Resulting in improvement to those lines o Reducing operating costs due to sharing rail · Increase in freight

  8. Development of a Longitudinal Rail Stress Measurement Device 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurley, Samuel J

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous welded rails used in most of the United States lack expansion joints of any sort. This leads to a much smoother ride and a longer service life for rails and wheels, but also causes extreme temperatures to induce high stresses...

  9. URBAN LOGISTICS BY RAIL AND WATERWAYS IN FRANCE AND JAPAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 URBAN LOGISTICS BY RAIL AND WATERWAYS IN FRANCE AND JAPAN Main author: Diana Diziain, Greater-Est, France KEYWORDS: rail, waterways, intermodal logistics, urban freight, city logistics ABSTRACT been carried out on intermodal logistic policies at national scales. However, in urban areas, the use

  10. Rail Splitter Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGSRadium HotRail Splitter Wind Farm

  11. Explosive flux compression generators for rail gun power sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.; King, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of explosive magnetic flux compression generators is described that has been used successfully to power rail guns. A program to increase current magnitudes and pulse lengths is outlined. Various generator loss terms are defined and plans to overcome some of them are discussed. Included are various modifications of the conventional strip generators that are more resistant to undesirable expansion of generator components from magnetic forces. Finally, an integral rail gun is discussed that has coaxial geometry. Integral rail guns utilize the rails themselves as flux compression generator elements and, under ideal conditions, are theoretically capable of driving projectiles to arbitrarily high velocities. Integral coaxial rail guns should be superior in some regards to their square bore counterparts.

  12. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  13. Slide 1Mapping Rail Seat Pressure Distributions Matthew J. Greve, J. Riley Edwards, Marcus S. Dersch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Slide 1Mapping Rail Seat Pressure Distributions Matthew J. Greve, J. Riley Edwards, Marcus S 7 October 2013 Effect of Lateral Load on Rail Seat Pressure Distributions #12;Slide 2Mapping Rail vs. L/V ­ Pressure Comparison · Conclusions · Future Work #12;Slide 3Mapping Rail Seat Pressure

  14. A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

  15. Remarks on Rail Transportation of Energy Resources John R. Birge

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    e. Crude oil is a small but increasing component f. Public externalities: Accidents, pollution, noise, right-of-way interference 3. Policy impacts a. Direct i. Taxes: relative...

  16. Estimation of run times in a freight rail transportation network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonsra, Kunal (Kunal Baldev)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to improve the accuracy of individual freight train run time predictions defined as the time between departure from an origin node to arrival at a destination node not including yard time. ...

  17. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced Reduce

  18. QER Public Meeting in Chicago, IL: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartmentHederman,Department of Energy

  19. Robotics virtual rail system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walton, Miles C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual track or rail system and method is described for execution by a robot. A user, through a user interface, generates a desired path comprised of at least one segment representative of the virtual track for the robot. Start and end points are assigned to the desired path and velocities are also associated with each of the at least one segment of the desired path. A waypoint file is generated including positions along the virtual track representing the desired path with the positions beginning from the start point to the end point including the velocities of each of the at least one segment. The waypoint file is sent to the robot for traversing along the virtual track.

  20. LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT AS A MAGNET FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT AS A MAGNET FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: EVIDENCE FROM TWIN CITIES Jason Cao Engineering (PE): December 13, 2006 Full Funding GrantAgreement (FFGA):April 27, 2011 #12;Data Collection

  1. Novel monitoring system to diagnose rail track foundation problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aw, Eng Sew, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low cost, remote monitoring system has been developed to diagnose rail track subgrade failures. The portable monitoring system consists of five liquid vertical settlement probes, one piezometer, a small data acquisition ...

  2. Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Story, Brett Alan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high...

  3. Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Story, Brett Alan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high...

  4. Impacts of Rail Pressure and Biodiesel Composition on Soot Nanostructu...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rail Pressure and Biodiesel Composition on Soot Nanostructure P-20 Ye, P 1 ; Sun, C-X 1 ; Lapuerta, M 2 ; Agudelo, J 3 ; Vander Wal, R 1 ; Boehman, AL 1 , Toops, TJ 4 ; Daw, CS 4...

  5. River Corridor Cleanup Contract Fiscal Year 2006 Detailed Work Plan: DWP Summary, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project Integration

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This detailed work plan provides the scope, cost, and schedule for the Fiscal Year 2006 activities required to support River Corridor cleanup objectives within the directed guidance.

  6. Codornices Creek Corridor: Land Use Regulation, Creek Restoration, and their Impacts on the Residents’ Perceptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokenberga, Aiga; Sen, Arijit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Restoration on Codornices Creek. Restoration of Rivers andHarper Colophon. Cordonices Creek Corridor Haggerty, L.Associates. 2003. Codornices Creek Watershed Restoration

  7. EIS-0386: Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in Western States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to designatate corridors on Federal land in the eleven Western States for oil, gas and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities.

  8. http://tti.tamu.edu > Variable message signs > Traffic actuated controllers > Traffic signals > Flashing traffic signals > Lane use control signals > Road markings > Rumble strips > Warrants (Traffic control devices) > Gro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    agencies and private- sector companies on the design, construction, testing and evaluation of highway railings > Transportation corridors > Streambeds > Pipelin Street lighting > Freeways > Highways > Arterial > Light emitting diodes > Portable equipment > Construction equipment > Roadbuilding machinery

  9. Planning for a regional rail system : analysis of high speed and high quality rail in the Basque region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Paul R. S. (Paul Robinson S.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to provide guidance for regional rail network planning to achieve the maximum benefits in terms of economic growth, passenger satisfaction, and environmental sustainability. The hypothesis is ...

  10. West Vero Corridor, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED JumpHills, New York:Springfield,Vero Corridor, Florida: Energy

  11. Rapid Prototyping of Urban River Corridors Using 3D Interactive, Real-time Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    Living Agendas, is a major project looking at sustainability led redevelopment of these areas. Part Introduction URSULA, Urban River corridors and Sustainable Living Agendas, is a complex, interdisciplinary task with many elements needing to be drawn together. URSULA, Urban River corridors and Sustainable

  12. The River Team Corridor Project The Gateshead area of North East England contains some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The River Team Corridor Project objectives The Gateshead area of North East England contains some of a wider project to regenerate the River Team area, the River Team Corridor Project seeks to enhance Reserve, the Team Valley Trading Estate, riverbanks and the Bowes Railway Path. · Expand involvement

  13. DOE Announces Additional Public Comment Meetings for Draft National Corridor Designations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will hold four additional public meetings for the two draft National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (National Corridors) during the 60-day public comment period, which will close on July 6, 2007.

  14. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013).Processing flowchart for each corridor:Ground control points (GCP, 20.3 cm square white targets, every 20 m) surveyed with RTK GPS. Acquisition of RGB pictures using a Kite-based platform. Structure from Motion based reconstruction using hundreds of pictures and GCP coordinates. Export of DEM and RGB mosaic in geotiff format (NAD 83, 2012 geoid, UTM zone 4 north) with pixel resolution of about 2 cm, and x,y,z accuracy in centimeter range (less than 10 cm). High-accuracy and high-resolution inside GCPs zone for L2 corridor (500x20m), AB corridor (500x40) DEM will be updated once all GCPs will be measured. Only zones between GCPs are accurate although all the mosaic is provided.

  15. Non-destructive inspection protocol for reinforced concrete barriers and bridge railings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chintakunta, Satish R. [Engineering and Software Consultants, Inc., 14123 Robert Paris Ct., Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Boone, Shane D. [Federal Highway Administration, Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center, 6300 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22101 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinforced concrete highway barriers and bridge railings serve to prevent errant vehicles from departing the travel way at grade separations. Despite the important role that they play in maintaining safety and their ubiquitous nature, barrier inspection rarely moves beyond visual inspection. In August 2008, a tractor-trailer fatally departed William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after it dislodged a section of the bridge barrier. Investigations following the accident identified significant corrosion of the anchor bolts attaching the bridge railing to the bridge deck. As a result of the information gathered during its investigation of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) made recommendations to the Federal Highway Administration concerning Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of concrete bridge railings. The Center for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA is currently evaluating feasibility of using four technologies - ground penetrating radar (GPR), ultrasonic pulse-echo, digital radiography and infrared thermal imaging methods to develop bridge inspection methods that augment visual inspections, offer reliable measurement techniques, and are practical, both in terms of time and cost, for field inspection work. Controlled samples containing predefined corrosion levels in reinforcing steel were embedded at barrier connection points for laboratory testing. All four NDE techniques were used in the initial phase I testing. An inspection protocol for detecting and measuring the corrosion of reinforced steel embedded in the anchorage system will be developed as part of phase II research. The identified technologies shall be further developed for field testing utilizing a structure with a barrier in good condition and a structure with a barrier in poor condition.

  16. Using land value capture to fund rail transit extensions in Mexico City and Santiago de Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covarrubias, Alvaro, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of rail rapid transit on land uses and land values are discussed. Rail transit can enhance accessibility, and can raise the demand for locating in areas around stations, increasing land value, and in some cases ...

  17. Union Station, Tacoma, Washington : a design study for a surplus rail site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, Jeffrey David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological changes in railroads, mergers, major shifts in urban land use patterns, and declining rail passenger travel has resulted in a surplus of urban rail lands. These lands represent a significant resource ...

  18. ILLINOIS -RAILROAD ENGINEERING Understanding the Transition Behavior of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    at Level Crossings on US High Speed Rail Shared Corridors Francesco Bedini Jacobini PhD Student Rail

  19. Stray current control in rehabilitating rail transit facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III; Bosma, R.; Paladines, F.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An old Chicago direct current electrified railway yard and shop are being rehabilitated. Modern stray current control techniques are being introduced. Efficient rail operation and safety for the public and operating personnel are paramount. Metra is Chicago's commuter railroad, serving six counties in the metropolitan area. The Electric District, which was electrified in 1926, is a heavy rail system from downtown, serving the south side and suburbs. Operating on the same tracks from Randolph St., to Kensington is America's last electric interurban line, the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad. All trains operate on 1,500-V direct current (DC) propulsion from an overhead catenary system, with the running rails as the negative return.

  20. Turbine blade squealer tip rail with fence members

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Little, David A

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade includes an airfoil, a blade tip section, a squealer tip rail, and a plurality of chordally spaced fence members. The blade tip section includes a blade tip floor located at an end of the airfoil distal from the root. The blade tip floor includes a pressure side and a suction side joined together at chordally spaced apart leading and trailing edges of the airfoil. The squealer tip rail extends radially outwardly from the blade tip floor adjacent to the suction side and extends from a first location adjacent to the airfoil trailing edge to a second location adjacent to the airfoil leading edge. The fence members are located between the airfoil leading and trailing edges and extend radially outwardly from the blade tip floor and axially from the squealer tip rail toward the pressure side.

  1. The Future (and Current) State of Rail in Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    equipment ­ Reliability of at least 80%85% · Missouri received federal grant to improve STLKC corridor times, reliable service, and new equipment #12;The CREATE Program · "Chicago Region EnvironmentalPontiac segment expected to go to 110 in 2012 · RFP for new equipment to go out in summer 2011 · 110 mph service

  2. Using Strain Gauges to Detect Epoxy Debonding in Insulated Rail Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    within a control block. Adjacent circuits within the track are separated by insulated rail joints (alsoUsing Strain Gauges to Detect Epoxy Debonding in Insulated Rail Joints Daniel Peltier, Christopher mainline track. These require insulated rail joints every several kilometers in order to electrically

  3. Development and testing of a low-maintenance, energy-absorbing bridge rail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, John Craig

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vehicle leaves the flow of traffic and strikes a bridge rail. The second concern is for the safety of the maintenance workers who must repair bridge rail damage following a collision. Third, the increasing cost of maintaining br idge decks and rails... during a more severe collision. Furthermore, the new bridge rail is designed to fit either new or existing standard bridge decks. Following development of the new bridge rail, two full-scale vehicle crash-tests were performed at the TTI Research...

  4. Development and testing of a low-maintenance, energy-absorbing bridge rail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, John Craig

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vehicle leaves the flow of traffic and strikes a bridge rail. The second concern is for the safety of the maintenance workers who must repair bridge rail damage following a collision. Third, the increasing cost of maintaining br idge decks and rails... during a more severe collision. Furthermore, the new bridge rail is designed to fit either new or existing standard bridge decks. Following development of the new bridge rail, two full-scale vehicle crash-tests were performed at the TTI Research...

  5. Strategy for the Identification of an INL Comprehensive Utility Corridor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the strategy developed to identify a comprehensive utility corridor (CUC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The strategy established the process for which the Campus Development Office will evaluate land management issues. It is a process that uses geographical information system geospatial technology to layer critical INL mission information in a way that thorough evaluations can be conducted and strategies developed. The objective of the CUC Project was to develop a process that could be implemented to identify potential utility corridor options for consideration. The process had to take into account all the missions occurring on the INL and other land-related issues. The process for developing a CUC strategy consists of the following four basic elements using geographical information system capabilities: 1. Development of an INL base layer map; this base layer map geospatially references all stationary geographical features on INL and sitewide information. 2. Development of current and future mission land-use need maps; this involved working with each directorate to identify current mission land use needs and future land use needs that project 30 years into the future. 3. Development of restricted and potential constraint maps; this included geospatially mapping areas such as wells, contaminated areas, firing ranges, cultural areas, ecological areas, hunting areas, easement, and grazing areas. 4. Development of state highway and power line rights of way map; this included geospatially mapping rights-of-way along existing state highways and power lines running through the INL that support INL operations. It was determined after completing and evaluating the geospatial information that the area with the least impact to INL missions was around the perimeter of the INL Site. Option 1, in this document, identifies this perimeter; however, it does not mean the entire perimeter is viable. Many places along the perimeter corridor cannot be used or are not economically viable. Specific detailed studies will need to be conducted on a case-by-case basis to clearly identify which sections along the perimeter can and cannot be used. Option 2, in this document, identifies areas along existing highways that could be a viable option. However, discussions would have to take place with the State of Idaho to use their easement as part of the corridor and mission impact would need to be evaluated if a specific request was made to the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. Option 3, in this document, is a combination of Options 1 and 2. This option provides the most flexibility to minimize impacts to INL missions. As with the other two options, discussions and agreements with the State of Idaho would be needed and any specific route would need to be thoroughly evaluated for impact, implementation, and operability beyond just a strategy.

  6. Commuter Choice Program Rail/Vanpool Reimbursement Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    workdays to meet program eligibility. Eligible non-permit holders receive 100% reimbursement (max $120); eligible permit holders receive 25% reimbursement (max $30) You will receive your reimbursement check CHANGES FROM THE PRIOR MONTH (ADDRESS, WORK LOCATION, WORK HRS, PERMIT PURCHASE/TURNED IN) COST OF RAIL

  7. 2010 Minnesota Comprehensive Statewide Freight and Passenger Rail Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and transit connections ·! Positive return on investment, 1.5-2.5 times more than cost ·! Bridge, bottleneck for rail investment creates a unique opportunity ·! Global and national economic and environmental trends are likely to increase fuel costs and impose controls on greenhouse gas emission ·! Therefore, Minnesota

  8. High Speed Rail in Greece : methods for evaluating economic impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radopoulou, Stefania Christina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Speed Rail is a mode that gains popularity every day. Many countries have such a network and others are on the way to adopting one. Greece, which is part of the European Union, is one of those countries that are looking ...

  9. Rail assembly for use in a radioactive environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Ralph E. (Harrison, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved rail assembly and method of construction thereof is disclosed herein that is particularly adapted for use with a crane trolley in a hot cell environment which is exposed to airborne and liquidborne radioactive contaminants. The rail assembly is generally comprised of a support wall having an elongated, rail-housing recess having a floor, side wall and ceiling. The floor of the recess is defined at least in part by the load-bearing surface of a rail, and is substantially flat, level and crevice-free to facilitate the drainage of liquids out of the recess. The ceiling of the recess overhangs and thereby captures trolley wheels within the recess to prevent them from becoming dislodged from the recess during a seismic disturbance. Finally, the interior of the recess includes a power track having a slot for receiving a sliding electrical connector from the crane trolley. The power track is mounted in an upper corner of the recess with its connector-receiving groove oriented downwardly to facilitate the drainage of liquidborne contaminants and to discourage the collection of airborne contaminants within the track.

  10. Intercity Rail Ridership Forecasting and the Implementation of High-Speed Rail in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaca, Erin

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Transportation Center is gratefully iv aclmowledged. (CALTRANS) and INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROE~D transit systems, power plants,

  11. Creating sustainable air rights development over highway corridors : lessons from the Massachusetts Turnpike in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Bonnie E., 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and practice have shown that air rights development over highway corridors in America's cities is not only feasible, but desirable. As planners, policy makers and consumers attempt to curb the sprawling development ...

  12. I-65, America's First BioFuels Corridor: Timeline and Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the May 1, 2008 joint quarterly Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Julie Howe (Indiana Office of Energy & Defense Development) described the I-65 Corridor Project.

  13. Aesthetic responses to urban greenway trail corridors: Implications for sustainable development in tourism and recreation settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chon, Jin Hyung

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    that viewed two urban greenway trail corridors. Each trail had three treatments including the existing trail condition, a manipulated trail condition, and a reverse in direction of the existing trail condition. Analyses were conducted to 1) identify...

  14. Department of Energy Seeks Public Comment on Designation of Energy Corridors in the West

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that it and several other federal agencies will host eleven public meetings to discuss the designation of multi-purpose energy corridors on federal lands in the western United States.

  15. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy: Study 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited feasible options exist when considering the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. These options are rail or truck; because of the weight associated with transportation casks (68.0 to 113.4 tonnes/75 to 125 tons), heavy-haul trucks are also considered. Yucca Mountain currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way for rail; it also lacks a dedicated highway suitable for heavy-haul trucks. Approximately 11,230 shipments by rail are planned from waste producer sites to Nevada, with an additional 1,041 shipments by legal-weight truck from four reactor sites not capable of upgrading for rail shipment. This study identifies the reasonable alternatives for waste transport to the potential repository site, describes the evaluation process performed to identify those alternatives, and discusses the reasons for elimination of transportation routes deemed to be not reasonable. The study concluded that heavy haul truck transportation is feasible-cost is very favorable when compared to rail-but route restrictions must be further evaluated. In addition to restrictions due to seasonal weather conditions, specific routes have additional restrictions, including no travel on holidays or weekends, and travel during daylight hours only. Further restrictions will be imposed by the U.S. Department of Transportation based on routing of radioactive materials by highway. Operation and maintenance costs for heavy-haul over a 24-year period, based on preliminary information, were calculated on an estimated operational cost of $15,000 per trip, with an estimated 468 trips per year average (11,230 total trips), for an estimated cost of $171 million to $173 million, depending on the route used. Because the initial costs and the total system life cycle costs of heavy-haul are approximately 50 percent lower than the lowest rail cost, this option will continue to be evaluated.

  16. Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The effects of corridor characteristics on motorists' decisions to divert in resonse to time saving messages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Charles John

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF CORRIDOR CHARACTERISTICS ON MOTORISTS' DECISIONS TO DIVERT IN RESPONSE TO TIME SAVING MESSAGES A Thesis by CHARLES JOHN ROBBINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE EFFECTS OF CORRIDOR CHARACTERISTICS ON MOTORISTS' DECISIONS TO DIVERT IN RESPONSE TO TIME SAVING MESSAGES A Thesis by CHARLES JOHN ROBBINS Approved...

  18. Evaluation of the relationship between diversion percentage and delay in a freeway corridor in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sibok

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVERSION PERCENTAGE AND DELAY IN A FREEWAY CORRIDOR IN HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by SIBOK LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVERSION PERCENTAGE AND DELAY IN A FREEWAY CORRIDOR IN HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by SIBOK LEE Approved as to style...

  19. EIS-0406: Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in 39 States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has canceled this EIS, which was to evaluate the environmental impacts of the designation, under Section 368(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, of energy corridors on federal lands in 39 nonwestern states. The corridors, which were to be jointly identified by the Secretaries of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Energy, and the Interior, might have been used for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities.

  20. Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehnhausen, Martin

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A KTEC Center of Excellence 1 Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors Martin Kuehnhausen Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Master's Thesis Defense July 1, 2009 Committee Dr. Victor...Service Oriented Architecture for Monitoring Cargo in Motion Along Trusted Corridors c 2009 Martin Kuehnhausen Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial...

  1. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  2. 1.258J / 11.541J / ESD.226J Public Transportation Service and Operations Planning, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Nigel H. M.

    Evolution and role of urban public transportation modes, systems, and services, focussing on bus and rail. Description of technological characteristics and their impacts on capacity, service quality, and cost. Current ...

  3. 1.258J / 11.541J / ESD.226J Public Transportation Service and Operations Planning, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Nigel

    This course describes the evolution and role of urban public transportation modes, systems, and services, focusing on bus and rail. Technological characteristics and their impacts on capacity, service quality, and cost are ...

  4. Environmental Impacts of Transportation to the Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Sweeney; R. Best; P. Bolton; P. Adams

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada analyzes a Proposed Action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. As part of the Proposed Action, the EIS analyzes the potential impacts of transporting commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain from 77 sites across the United States. The analysis includes information on the comparative impacts of transporting these materials by truck and rail and discusses the impacts of building a rail line or using heavy-haul trucks to move rail casks from a mainline railroad in Nevada to the site. This paper provides an overview of the analyses and the potential impacts of these transportation activities. The potential transportation impacts were looked at from two perspectives: transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste by legal-weight truck or by rail on a national scale and impacts specific to Nevada from the transportation of these materials from the State borders to the Yucca Mountain site. In order to address the range of impacts that could result from the most likely modes, legal-weight truck and rail, the EIS employed two analytical scenarios--mostly legal-weight truck and mostly rail. Estimated national transportation impacts were based on 24 years of transportation activities. Approximately 8 fatalities could occur from all causes in the nationwide general population from incident-free transportation activities of the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 4 from the mostly rail scenario. The analysis examined the radiological consequences under the maximum foreseeable accident scenario and also overall accident risk. The overall accident risk over the 24 year period would be about 0.0002 latent cancer fatality for the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 0.0005 latent cancer fatality for the mostly rail scenario. The maximum reasonably foreseeable accident scenario resulted in 0.55 latent cancer fatality for the legal-weight truck case and 5 latent cancer fatalities in the case of mostly rail. The EIS also analyzed the impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the State of Nevada. This included: constructing a branch rail line and using it to ship waste to the repository; upgrading highways in Nevada for use by heavy-haul trucks; constructing and operating an intermodal transfer station; and transporting personnel and materials to support construction and operation of the repository.

  5. Estimating the variable cost for high-volume and long-haul transportation of densified biomass and biofuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Md. S. Roni; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article analyzes rail transportation costs of products that have similar physical properties as densified biomass and biofuel. The results of this cost analysis are useful to understand the relationship and quantify the impact of a number of factors on rail transportation costs of denisfied biomass and biofuel. These results will be beneficial and help evaluate the economic feasibility of high-volume and long-haul transportation of biomass and biofuel. High-volume and long-haul rail transportation of biomass is a viable transportation option for biofuel plants, and for coal plants which consider biomass co-firing. Using rail optimizes costs, and optimizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to transportation. Increasing bioenergy production would consequently result in lower GHG emissions due to displacing fossil fuels. To estimate rail transportation costs we use the carload waybill data, provided by Department of Transportation’s Surface Transportation Board for products such as grain and liquid type commodities for 2009 and 2011. We used regression analysis to quantify the relationship between variable transportation unit cost ($/ton) and car type, shipment size, rail movement type, commodity type, etc. The results indicate that: (a) transportation costs for liquid is $2.26/ton–$5.45/ton higher than grain type commodity; (b) transportation costs in 2011 were $1.68/ton–$5.59/ton higher than 2009; (c) transportation costs for single car shipments are $3.6/ton–$6.68/ton higher than transportation costs for multiple car shipments of grains; (d) transportation costs for multiple car shipments are $8.9/ton and $17.15/ton higher than transportation costs for unit train shipments of grains.

  6. Psychological Insights on Transportation Mode Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    transportation modes such as bicycles, car sharing, and mass transit. Case studies were conducted with currentAlternatives to single occupancy vehicles:occupancy vehicles: Bicycles Buses Light rail Car sharing Car pooling Photo a car..." (TriMet Journal, March 6, 2006) He had been waiting for the train at the MAX platform (at 6 PM

  7. Ark-Tex Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ark-Tex Council of Governments

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 30 corridor. The transportation network in the Ark-Tex area is managed and operated through two transit providers, a variety of organizations that provide or fund transportation in support of their primary programs (including public entities... and Texarkana proper. 3. Ark-Tex Area Agency on Aging (AAA) ? Senior transportation throughout the service area to meals and other services. 4. Northeast Texas Community College ? Service from Mt. Pleasant to the community college is provided by TRAX...

  8. Dual-circuit segmented rail phased induction motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marder, Barry M. (Albuquerque, NM); Cowan, Jr., Maynard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved linear motor utilizes two circuits, rather that one circuit and an opposed plate, to gain efficiency. The powered circuit is a flat conductive coil. The opposed segmented rail circuit is either a plurality of similar conductive coils that are shorted, or a plurality of ladders formed of opposed conductive bars connected by a plurality of spaced conductors. In each embodiment, the conductors are preferably cables formed from a plurality of intertwined insulated wires to carry current evenly.

  9. Rotary rail car dumper coal-dust-suppressant experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, J.H.; Hereford, L.G.; Lenkevich, M.J.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotary rail car dumper dust-suppressant experiment was performed at the PEPCO Morgantown Power Plant coal handling facility, Newburg, Maryland during the late summer and early fall of 1983. From previous observations of rotary coal car dumping, it was observed that large amounts of dust, especially for washed coal, were generated from the exposed top layer of coal in the open rail car. An overhead spray system using water and surfactant was used to examine the effectiveness of surface wetting just before dumping. High volume sampling at both the entrance and exit doorways of the dumper shed was used to determine the coal dust reduction. A total of 23 tests was performed, of which 16 tests were considered valid. All data were normalized for background, number of tons dumped and sampling time. The use of an overhead spray system can substantially suppress fugitive coal dust generated by rotary rail car dumping of coal. A water and surfactant mixture provided coal-dust-suppressant efficiencies ranging from 47% to 79% with an average of 61% for a combination of washed, mixed, and unwashed coal.

  10. Valuing Rail Transit: Comparing Capital and Operating Costs to Consumer Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Erick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.C. , 1994; Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. Light rail transitD.C. , 2003; Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. , Managing Capital

  11. Assessment of Critical Events Corridors through Multivariate Cascading Outages Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Kumbale, Murali; Chen, Yousu; Singh, Ruchi; Green, Irina; Morgan, Mark P.

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive blackouts of electrical power systems in North America over the past decade has focused increasing attention upon ways to identify and simulate network events that may potentially lead to widespread network collapse. This paper summarizes a method to simulate power-system vulnerability to cascading failures to a supplied set of initiating events synonymously termed as Extreme Events. The implemented simulation method is currently confined to simulating steady state power-system response to a set of extreme events. The outlined method of simulation is meant to augment and provide a new insight into bulk power transmission network planning that at present remains mainly confined to maintaining power system security for single and double component outages under a number of projected future network operating conditions. Although one of the aims of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of simulating network vulnerability to cascading outages, a more important goal has been to determine vulnerable parts of the network that may potentially be strengthened in practice so as to mitigate system susceptibility to cascading failures. This paper proposes to demonstrate a systematic approach to analyze extreme events and identify vulnerable system elements that may be contributing to cascading outages. The hypothesis of critical events corridors is proposed to represent repeating sequential outages that can occur in the system for multiple initiating events. The new concept helps to identify system reinforcements that planners could engineer in order to 'break' the critical events sequences and therefore lessen the likelihood of cascading outages. This hypothesis has been successfully validated with a California power system model.

  12. Perera Lam: An environmental justice assessment of the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor in Louisiana, U.S. APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 11(4): 681-697.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera ­ Lam: An environmental justice assessment of the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor to assess the status of environmental justice concerns in the Mississippi River Industrial Corridor injustice in the study area. The study approach allows preliminary assessment of environmental justice

  13. QA in the design and fabrication of the TMI-2 rail cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, G.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGandG Idaho, Inc., acting on behalf of the US Department of Energy, is responsible for transporting core debris from Three Mile Island-Unit 2 to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Transportation of the debris is being accomplished using an NRC licensed container, called the NuPac 125-B. This paper describes the NuPac 125-B Rail Cask and the quality assurance (QA) requirements for that system. Also discussed are the QA roles of the various organizations involved in designing, building, inspecting and testing the NuPac 125-B. The paper presents QA/QC systems implemented during the design, procurement, and fabrication of the cask to assure compliance with all applicable technical codes, standards and regulations. It also goes beyond the requirements aspect and describes unique QA/QC measures employed to assure that the cask was built with minimum QA problems. Finally, the lessons learned from the NuPac 125-B project is discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground- River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. — After careful preparation and characterization, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has begun remediation of one of the most hazardous burial grounds tackled to date on the Hanford Site’s River Corridor.

  15. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of all rail lines in the continental United States. Rail spurs are included in the network for coal- fired and nuclear power plants, DOE sites, and military bases with rail access. The rail network

  16. Combining rails and anchors with laser forcing for selective manipulation within 2D droplet arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    demonstrate the combination of a rails and anchors microfluidic system with laser forcing to enable to anchor holes made in the base of a microfluidic channel, enabling the creation of arrays their merging and a chemical reaction to take place. Finally by adding guiding rails within the microfluidic

  17. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the 2014 Joint Rail Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    energy consumption has become a major concern to rail transit operators. For electrified rail transit of on-board train control system logic or system energy analysis that will reduce energy consumption, Colorado Springs, CO, USA JRC2014-3795 OPTIMIZING TRAIN SPEED PROFILES TO IMPROVE REGENERATION EFFICIENCY

  18. Simulating calculations and optimization design of a new HVDC supply power for light rail system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simulating calculations and optimization design of a new HVDC supply power for light rail system-In this paper, a new HVDC power supply system for light rail systems is presented and compared to classical such a complex system, taking into account vehicle motion and HVDC electrical distribution. Then, an optimization

  19. Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

  20. Intermodal Transportation, USACE Style

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grumski, K. M.; Coutts, P. W.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has developed project management techniques with a proven track record for safe and successful results for constructing large scale and massive projects such as improving our nations water transportation systems, flood control, bridges and dams. Applying many of these techniques to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) managed by USACE to remediate the environment is achieving the same safe and successful results as their construction projects. This paper examines the additional economics and improved safety results of using intermodal containers and a combination of rail and truck transportation conveyances to transport the contaminated soil and debris from the Linde FUSRAP site, located in Tonawanda, New York.

  1. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  2. Texarkana Urban Transportation Study 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texarkana Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This page intentionally left blank. TUTS 2035 PLAN i October 1, 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION 4 OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT What is the MPO? 1-1 O&M Goals 4-2 What does the MPO do? 1-1 O&M Strategies 4-2 Challenges...-7 TUTS 2035 PLAN ii October 1, 2009 7 PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Amtrak-Passenger Rail Service 7-1 Texarkana Regional Airport 7-2 Greyhound Intercity Bus Service 7-4 Texarkana Urban Transit District Public Transportation 7-4 TRAX ? Rural Public...

  3. BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE CONNECTIVE CORRIDOR OF INNOVATIVE AND SUSTAINED PARTNERSHIPS opinion mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE CONNECTIVE CORRIDOR OF INNOVATIVE AND SUSTAINED PARTNERSHIPS opinion mining sentiment analysis social computing social media in marketing text mining BEI YU Assistant Professor School in developing text mining methods, especially emotion and opinion analysis approaches, to support data

  4. How fragmentation and corridors affect wind dynamics and seed dispersal in open habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; c Movement Ecology Laboratory, Department widespread human-induced changes such as habitat loss, landscape fragmentation, and climate instability measurements, and seed releases in a large-scale experimental landscape to show that habitat corridors affect

  5. Dynamically Predicting Corridor Travel Time Under Incident Conditions Using a Neural Network Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Xiaosi

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    into the ANN model development, despite that incident might be a major source of prediction degradations. Additionally, directly deriving corridor travel times in a one-step manner raises some intractable problems, such as pairing input-target data, which have...

  6. Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department has decided that, prior to issuing a report that designates any national interest electric transmission corridor, the Department will first issue any designation that it is considering in draft form, so as to allow additional opportunities for review and comment by affected States, regional entities, and the general public.

  7. Lessons Learned during Creation of the I-65 Biofuels Corridor (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of Clean Cities coalitions and state agencies worked together to create a biofuels corridor along I-65 between Indiana and Alabama. The team built relationships with stakeholders and learned the value of strong partnerships, good communication, marketing, and preparation.

  8. RAILROAD STRATEGY FOR CRUDE OIL TRANSPORT: Considering Public Policy and Pipeline Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    of crude oil transportation by rail from the Alberta oil sands has been slower than the growth, stakeholders, and objectives for the bitumen transport system from the Alberta oil sands, and reviews: Existing railroad network: Some products shipped: Fig. 1: Predicted oil sands production growth

  9. telephone 217-333-8637 fax 217-333-1924 Transportation Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    HRM High-Speed Rail Construction Management CEE 498PS (Pavement Sustainability) CEE 508 (Pavement Eval. & Rehab) CEE 509 (Transportation Soils) CEE 512 (598-LSA) (Logistics System Analysis) offered in odd years. CEE 598TSS (Transportation Soil Stabilization) Spring (take three or four) CEE 407 (Airport

  10. Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation Chandra Prakash Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phani, A. Srikantha

    Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation by Chandra Prakash Sharma B. Tech., Sardar;Abstract Controlling friction at the wheel-rail interface is indispensable for extending track life implementation of friction modifier system consists of a stick-tube assembly, attached through a bracket which

  11. Linear Utility Corridors--A Simulated Visual Field Trip1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    terms; those that transport energy, which would, of course, include power transmission lines of all, the use of electric power has been doubling about every 10 years. They go on to say that per capita consumption of electric power has been increasing, roughly five times as fast as population growth. The United

  12. Steering system for a train of rail-less vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voight, Edward T. (Worthington, OH)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steering system for use with a multiple vehicle train permits tracking without rails of one vehicle after another. This system is particularly useful for moving conveyor systems into and out of curved paths of room and pillar underground mine installations. The steering system features an elongated steering bar pivotally connected to each of adjacent vehicles at end portions of the bar permitting angular orientation of each vehicle in respect to the steering bar and other vehicles. Each end portion of the steering bar is linked to the near pair of vehicle wheels through wheel yoke pivot arms about king pin type pivots. Movement of the steering bar about its pivotal connection provides proportional turning of the wheels to effect steering and tracking of one vehicle following another in both forward and reverse directions.

  13. Nest predation, predator abundance, and avian diversity in transmission line corridors and adjacent habitats in east central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Tani Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line corridors and other types of rights-of-way (ROW) are narrower and more continuous than other types of disturbances and, therefore, result in a proportionately higher amount of "edge" in the vegetation types they bisect. These ROW...

  14. Design for the Frail Old: Environmental and Perceptual Influences on Corridor Walking Behaviors of Assisted Living Residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhipeng

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    living among these residents and yet, there is little research that has been done in this regard. The researcher conducted two studies in Central Texas to explore how corridor design features influenced indoor walking behaviors among assisted living...

  15. Impact of the Proposed I-69 Corridor on Bobcat (Felis rufus) Habitat in Southwestern Indiana Jeffrey L. Ashby1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    , interstate, and highway shapefiles from the IndianaMap website (indianamap.org), and then classified the study area. The I-69 corridor shapefile was then added and the reduction in habitat calculated to show

  16. Evaluation of a nodal capacity restricted dynamic model for the Southwest Freeway (US-59) corridor in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac, Palathinkal Manu

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF A NODAL CAPACITY RESTRICTED DYNAMIC MODEL FOR THE SOUTHWEST FREEWAY (US-59) CORRIDOR IN HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by PALATHINKAL MANU ISAAC Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF A NODAL CAPACITY RESTRICTED DYNAMIC MODEL FOR THE SOUTHWEST FREEWAY (US-59) CORRIDOR IN HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis...

  17. Shaping time light and movement : a modern rail station for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Juintow, 1973-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After a century of neglect, due to investment in worldwide road construction and enlargements of airports, there is a renewed incentive to revive rail travel within the continental US. This motivation is derived from both ...

  18. Coal-by-Rail: A Business-as-Usual Reference Case

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of rail tonnage and gross revenue. While growth in other traffic-most notably, crude oil-may offset some of any potential decline in coal shipments, would it be sufficient?...

  19. Financial impacts of and financing methods for high-speed rail in Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Teng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-speed rail (HSR) becomes a very hot topic recently when all Portugal, the United Stated, China, Japan, Spain, etc. are ambitious in building their HSR systems. Although HSR is expected to shrink the temporal distance ...

  20. Low cost monitoring system to diagnose problematic rail bed : case study of Mud Pumping Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aw, Eng Sew, 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of low cost sensors and wireless sensor network (WSN) platform aimed at characterizing problematic rail beds (subgrade). The instrumentations are installed at a busy high-speed Northeast ...

  1. Cooled electronic system with thermal spreaders coupling electronics cards to cold rails

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-cooled electronic systems are provided which include an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket or removal of the card from the socket. A liquid-cooled cold rail is disposed at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader couples the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The thermally conductive extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  2. Determination of applied stresses in rails using the acoustoelastic effect of ultrasonic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokhale, Shailesh Ashok

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops a procedure to determine the applied stresses in rails using the acoustoelastic effect of ultrasonic waves. Acoustoelasticity is defined as the stress dependency of ultrasonic wave speed or wave polarization. Analytical models...

  3. Determination of applied stresses in rails using the acoustoelastic effect of ultrasonic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokhale, Shailesh Ashok

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops a procedure to determine the applied stresses in rails using the acoustoelastic effect of ultrasonic waves. Acoustoelasticity is defined as the stress dependency of ultrasonic wave speed or wave polarization. Analytical models...

  4. 2010 - 2035 Brownsville Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownsville Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Selection ?????????????????????...... 2-1 Intermodal Facilities & West Rail Project ???????.??????.. 2-1 thru 2-5 Airport Transportation/Air Cargo ?????????????????. 2-5 thru 2-6 International Border Crossings ??????????????????... 2-6 thru 2... and the Union Pacific Railraod tracks. The TxDOT contract for these F.M. 511 construction activities is worth approximately 44.2 million dollars. This F.M. 511 widening project, by itself, may not seem very remarkable. However, if one considers...

  5. Effectiveness of bomber deployed autonomous airborne vehicles in finding rail mobile SS-24s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abey, A.E.; Erickson, S.A.; Norquist, P.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulation predictions of the effectiveness of autonomous airborne vehicles in finding rail mobile SS-24s are presented. Effectiveness is discussed for several autonomous airborne vehicle endurances and survivabilities for the search area southwest of Moscow. The effect of where the Soviets place the SS-24s on the rail network was also investigated. The simulation predicts significant variations in the ability of a multi-autonomous airborne vehicle system to find SS-24s with these parameters. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Effect of Rail Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports from the South Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen; Shanmugham, C.V

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8-1385 February 1982 Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports From the La , ,- .. 2- ', - LA>:^"; South plains-*-? :?:% " %> The Texas Agricultural Experimant Station: lllwEMe P. C i h , The Texas A&#th,-m 6ydem. Cotlaqp Station, Texas.... ....................................... 4 Effect of Rail Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports from the South Plains Stephen Fuller and C.V. Shanmugham" a INTRODUCTION Agriculture is an important user of rail services for shipping products to market and for moving produc...

  7. Road-corridor planning in the EIA procedure in Spain. A review of case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loro, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.loro@upm.es [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain) [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Transport Research Centre (TRANSyT-UPM) Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arce, Rosa M., E-mail: rosa.arce.ruiz@upm.es [Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Environment, Civil Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Transport Research Centre (TRANSyT-UPM) Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ortega, Emilio, E-mail: e.ortega@upm.es [Transport Research Centre (TRANSyT-UPM) Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain) [Transport Research Centre (TRANSyT-UPM) Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Centro de investigación del transporte, TRANSyT-UPM, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Department of Construction and Rural Roads, Forestry Engineering School, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The assessment of different alternatives in road-corridor planning must be based on a number of well-defined territorial variables that serve as decision making criteria, and this requires a high-quality preliminary environmental assessment study. In Spain the formal specifications for the technical requirements stipulate the constraints that must be considered in the early stages of defining road corridors, but not how they should be analyzed and ranked. As part of the feasibility study of a new road definition, the most common methodology is to establish different levels of Territorial Carrying Capacity (TCC) in the study area in order to summarize the territorial variables on thematic maps and to ease the tracing process of road-corridor layout alternatives. This paper explores the variables used in 22 road-construction projects conducted by the Ministry of Public Works that were subject to the Spanish EIA regulation and published between 2006 and 2008. The aim was to evaluate the quality of the methods applied and the homogeneity and suitability of the variables used for defining the TCC. The variables were clustered into physical, environmental, land-use and cultural constraints for the purpose of comparing the TCC values assigned in the studies reviewed. We found the average quality of the studies to be generally acceptable in terms of the justification of the methodology, the weighting and classification of the variables, and the creation of a synthesis map. Nevertheless, the methods for assessing the TCC are not sufficiently standardized; there is a lack of uniformity in the cartographic information sources and methodologies for the TCC valuation. -- Highlights: • We explore 22 road-corridor planning studies subjected to the Spanish EIA regulation. • We analyze the variables selected for defining territorial carrying capacity. • The quality of the studies is acceptable (methodology, variable weighting, mapping). • There is heterogeneity in the methods for territorial carrying capacity valuation.

  8. Usage of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Along the Corridors between the EV Project Major Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindy Kirkpatrick

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report explains how the EVSE are being used along the corridors between the EV Project cities. The EV Project consists of a nationwide collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), ECOtality North America, Nissan, General Motors, and more than 40 other city, regional and state governments, and electric utilities. The purpose of the EV Project is to demonstrate the deployment and use of approximately 14,000 Level II (208-240V) electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and 300 fast chargers in 16 major cities. This research investigates the usage of all currently installed EV Project commercial EVSE along major interstate corridors. ESRI ArcMap software products are utilized to create geographic EVSE data layers for analysis and visualization of commercial EVSE usage. This research locates the crucial interstate corridors lacking sufficient commercial EVSE and targets locations for future commercial EVSE placement. The results and methods introduced in this research will be used by INL for the duration of the EV Project.

  9. Satellite Detec*on of Truck & Rail NO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    for future VMT (2011 to 2035) were taken from the 2012 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) table of Transportation

  10. Transportation energy data book: Edition 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Morris, M.D.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 12 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes--highway, air, water, rail, pipeline--is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  11. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes - highway, air, water, rail, pipeline - is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  12. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes -- highway, air, water, rail, pipeline -- is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  13. Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis based on ELECTRE and AHP methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis on a case of freight transport between Paris and Marseille. Keywords: Supply chain, Environmental impacts with lower environmental impacts, such as rail and waterways. The dilemma here is that all motorized modes

  14. Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. (Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)) [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 122 commercial nuclear facilities from which spent nuclear fuel will be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). Since some facilities share common sites and some facilities are on adjacent sites, 76 sites were identified for the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) project. The objective of the NSTI project was to identify the options available for transportation of spent-fuel casks from each of these commercial nuclear facility sites to the main transportation routes -- interstate highways, commercial rail lines and navigable waterways available for commercial use. The near-site transportation infrastructure from each site was assessed, based on observation of technical features identified during a survey of the routes and facilities plus data collected from referenced information sources. The potential for refurbishment of transportation facilities which are not currently operational was also assessed, as was the potential for establishing new transportation facilities.

  15. Modeling cost and time uncertainty in rail line construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moret, Yvonne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation construction projects are often plagued by cost overruns and delays. Technical, economic-political, psychological, and legal causes explain the frequent underestimations. To counteract such underestimations, ...

  16. Energy Unit lecture outline & graphics Fritz Stahr Tues 1/21/03 -Transportation of Energy & Energy of Transportation an intricate link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transportable and denser energy than coal - McNeill's Coke-town cluster where it is due to ease of access of energy until ~1880s then coal, and finally oil takes over in US after ~1925, largely because oil most to coal shipped on water (and later rail) and steel shipped out, somewhat true of Mo-town cluster as well

  17. Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal extraction Rail transport Power plant Elec transmission emissionsemissions emissions Coal extraction Rail transport Power

  18. The Contribution of Degraded Modes of Operation to Accidents in the US, UK and Australian Rail Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    The Contribution of Degraded Modes of Operation to Accidents in the US, UK and Australian Rail, operators develop `work arounds' that help them to cope with these degraded modes. This has led to a culture with the safety culture in rail operati

  19. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  20. BPA Transmission, I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project Scoping Summary Appendix C, 2/4/2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade Later: AreAugust 19,1 BPA I-5 CORRIDOR

  1. Proposed Work Scope for the Rail Topic Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    option: A DOE supplement to the Yucca Mountain EIS evaluated the impacts of shipping spent nuclear fuel to Nevada using LWT casks transported on railcars for the first six...

  2. TEC/WG TRANSPORTATION SAFETY WIPP-PIG RAIL COMPARISON: A Framework...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the safe working condition of all mechanical equipment as well as a safe operating environment for the train are also prevalent throughout the industry, including the utilization...

  3. Recommendation on Using Rail Transport for Moving Waste (09/19/2011)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuringDepartmentDepartment of

  4. DOE to Transport Moab Mill Tailings by Rail | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |ProductionDepartmentDevelopment |to

  5. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Rail Transport for Moving Waste Recommendation2011-03.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENTtheStatus of the Mixed250 Rev. 0 May

  6. Proceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    American operating environment differs than the operating practices found throughout much of the rest freight and intercity passenger traffic. One of the challenges created by this operating environmentProceedings of the 2013 Joint Rail Conference JRC2013 April 15-18, 2013, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

  7. Page 1 of 16 The reform of passenger rail in Switzerland: more performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1 of 16 The reform of passenger rail in Switzerland: more performance without competition: christian.desmaris@sciencespo-lyon.fr Keywords: Swiss railway reform Regulation Regionalization Railway of ongoing institutional reform. This article strives to shed light on passenger traffic reform, and more

  8. In Press: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit Machine vision analysis of the energy efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    In Press: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit 1 Machine vision analysis of the energy efficiency of the Train Energy Model. Slot efficiency represents the difference between the actual and ideal loading used for loading assignment. Keywords: environment, energy efficiency, aerodynamics, fuel use

  9. Rail costs and capital adjustments in a quasi-regulated environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlaender, Ann Fetter

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on results obtained from estimation of a rail cost function using a pooled time-series cross section of Class I U.S. railroads for the period 1973-1986. Based on the results of this cost function, an ...

  10. CALCULATIONS OF FIRE SMOKE BEHAVIOUR IN LONG RAIL TUNNELS S. DARON, E. RUFFIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2000-13 CALCULATIONS OF FIRE SMOKE BEHAVIOUR IN LONG RAIL TUNNELS S. DAÃ?RON, E. RUFFIN INERIS Parc in complex underground networks, we want to implement a coupling between a ID ventilation code and a CFD model or a zone model. The project consists in 3 main steps: the development of a ID ventilation code

  11. Structured hypothesis tests based diagnosis : application to a common rail diesel injection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Structured hypothesis tests based diagnosis : application to a common rail diesel injection system Zahi SABEH, José RAGOT, Frédéric KRATZ Delphi Diesel Systems, Centre Technique de Blois 9 boulevard de to increase diesel engine performances and to reduce noise, emission and fuel consumption. Such goals

  12. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -scattering or in the transmission mode using a variety of sensor probes. In this work we used the infrared (IR) photothermal radioLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation A. Mandelis*, M. Munidasa, L. Nicolaides Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  13. Hydraulic Mechanisms of the Deterioration of Concrete Sleeper Rail Seats , R. Kernes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Hydraulic Mechanisms of the Deterioration of Concrete Sleeper Rail Seats J. Zeman 2 , R. Kernes 1 to have five potential mechanisms, and this research investigates three of them: hydraulic pressure cracking, hydro-abrasive erosion, and abrasion. In order to investigate the two hydraulic-driven mechanisms

  14. A GIS-Assisted Rail Construction Econometric Model that Incorporates LlDAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Michael E.

    A GIS-Assisted Rail Construction Econometric Model that Incorporates LlDAR Data David J. Cowen employed a raster GIS econometric routing model for the exploration of potential routes using construction in the grid-based econometric model was obtained from Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR)data with accurate 0

  15. An Econometrics Analysis of Freight Rail Demand Growth in Albert Wijeweera a, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Econometrics Analysis of Freight Rail Demand Growth in Australia Albert Wijeweera a, * , Hong of non-bulk freight demand in Australia. The paper uses a simple but robust econometrics method this growth at about four per cent per year (BTRE, 2006). The econometric model used herein enables us

  16. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 122(2):385387, 2010 Yellow Rails Wintering in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher J.

    The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 122(2):385­387, 2010 Yellow Rails Wintering in Oklahoma discovered to migrate through southeastern Oklahoma in small numbers during fall with a few records through Mar 2009) to Red Slough Wildlife Management Area in McCurtain County (Oklahoma) to catch and band

  17. 1 Copyright 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the 2012 Joint Rail Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    1 Copyright © 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the 2012 Joint Rail Conference JRC2012 April 17-19, 2012 power against the need for power at other yards. At the same time, we have to plan the need to return foreign power, and move power to maintenance facilities for scheduled FRA appointments. An additional

  18. Comparison of vehicle travel times and measurement techniques along the I-35 corridor in San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Pete James

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    collected for three days and compared to travel times derived from loop detector data along the 1-35 corridor in San Antonio, Texas. The loop detector data were made available through TransGuide's Internet site. TransGuide is the traffic management center...

  19. EIS-0250-S1: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  20. EIS-0250: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  1. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, PE

    2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model is used to calculate highway, rail, or waterway routes within the United States. TRAGIS is a client-server application with the user interface and map data files residing on the user's personal computer and the routing engine and network data files on a network server. The user's manual provides documentation on installation and the use of the many features of the model.

  2. Structural analysis in support of the waterborne transport of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety of the transportation of radioactive materials by road and rail has been well studied and documented. However, the safety of waterborne transportation has received much less attention. Recent highly visible waterborne transportation campaigns have led to DOE and IAEA to focus attention on the safety of this transportation mode. In response, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a program to establish a method to determine the safety of these shipments. As part of that program the mechanics involved in ship-to-ship collisions are being evaluated to determine the loadings imparted to radioactive material transportation packages during these collisions. This paper will report on the results of these evaluations.

  3. Transportation scenarios for risk analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation risk, like any risk, is defined by the risk triplet: what can happen (the scenario), how likely it is (the probability), and the resulting consequences. This paper evaluates the development of transportation scenarios, the associated probabilities, and the consequences. The most likely radioactive materials transportation scenario is routine, incident-free transportation, which has a probability indistinguishable from unity. Accident scenarios in radioactive materials transportation are of three different types: accidents in which there is no impact on the radioactive cargo, accidents in which some gamma shielding may be lost but there is no release of radioactive material, and accident in which radioactive material may potentially be released. Accident frequencies, obtainable from recorded data validated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, are considered equivalent to accident probabilities in this study. Probabilities of different types of accidents are conditional probabilities, conditional on an accident occurring, and are developed from event trees. Development of all of these probabilities and the associated highway and rail accident event trees are discussed in this paper.

  4. Corridor Information Corridor Length (miles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Rest of PA Allentown PA-NJ Harrisburg Philadelphia PA PA PA US-22 WB I-83 NB Schuylkill Expy/I-76 WB 15

  5. Corridor Information Corridor Length (miles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Expy/I-290 WB I-290 WB Stevenson Expy/I-55 NB S Ashland Ave/Exit 28B I-88/Exit 15A US-20/US-45/US-12

  6. Mobility 2030: The Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Dallas-Fort Worth Area 2009 Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Central Texas Council of Governments

    2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    the airports via DART light rail. DCTA will connect to the system in Carrollton. ? Review surface access to aviation and related changes over time. St udy alternative access and congestion scenarios at commercial airports based on alternative air travel... Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Kathryn Wilemon Councilm e m b e r, City of Arlingt on Michael Morris, P.E. Director of Transportation, NCTC OG Surface Transportation Technical Committee Jim Sparks, Chair City of Grand Prairi e...

  7. Potential importance of water pathways for spent fuel transportation accident risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the potential importance of water pathway contamination for spent fuel transportation accident risk using a ''worst-case'' water contamination scenario. The scenario used for the analysis involves an accident release that occurs near a reservoir. Water pathway doses are compared to doses for accident releases in urban or agricultural areas. The results of the analysis indicate that water pathways are not important for assessing the risk of transporting spent reactor fuel by truck or by rail.

  8. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pomper, S.D. , Life Cycle Inventory of a Generic U.S. Family2007. [EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook, ActivitiesVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption

  9. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maintenance, and petroleum production. The attribution ofRunning) Manufacture Petroleum Production Herbicides /Roadway Maintenance Petroleum Production Herbicides /

  10. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resting, running, and crankcase losses are disaggregated).Evaporative losses, primarily from running, resting, and hotRunning Startup Braking Tire Wear Evaporative Losses Idling

  11. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyUCB-ITS-VWP-2007-7 Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

  12. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $74,000 per mile. Total substations cost for the Muni systempower structure and substations construction costs have beenStructure ($M 1997 ) Cost of Substations ($M 1997 ) Caltrain

  13. Productivity of the U.S. freight rail industry: a review of the past and prospects for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriem, Youssef

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Productivity growth in the U.S. freight rail industry has slowed in recent years, raising the issue of the sustainability of the significant improvements achieved during the past three decades. Indeed, between 1979 and ...

  14. Cross-border barriers to the development of HSR projects : analysis of the Singapore- Kuala Lumpur high speed rail link/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Iori

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely recognized that the benefits of High Speed Rail (HSR) such as a driving force of the economy, helps us to reshape the activities of people and business. These benefits were brought to light for its reliability, ...

  15. A systems approach for developing, designing, and transitioning moving map technology in U.S. rail applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelbel, Kathleen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety, efficiency and productivity are top priorities for rail industries, but technology implementation faces many barriers. While the demands of locomotive engineers and railroads are increasing, the industry lacks a ...

  16. Preliminary analysis of the postulated changes needed to achieve rail cask handling capabilities at selected light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor-specific railroad and crane information for all LWRs in the US was extracted from current sources of information. Based on this information, reactors were separated into two basic groups consisting of reactors with existing, usable rail cask capabilities and those without these capabilities. The latter group is the main focus of this study. The group of reactors without present rail cask handling capabilities was further separated into two subgroups consisting of reactors considered essentially incapable of handling a large rail cask of about 100 tons and reactors where postulated facility changes could result in rail cask handling capabilities. Based on a selected population of 127 reactors, the results of this assessment indicate that usable rail cask capabilities exist at 83 (65%) of the reactors. Twelve (27%) of the remaining 44 reactors are deemed incapable of handling a large rail cask without major changes, and 32 reactors are considered likely candidates for potentially achieving rail cask handling capabilities. In the latter group, facility changes were postulated that would conceptually enable these reactors to handle large rail casks. The estimated cost per plant of required facility changes varied widely from a high of about $35 million to a low of <$0.3 million. Only 11 of the 32 plants would require crane upgrades. Spur track and right-of-way costs would apparently vary widely among sites. These results are based on preliminary analyses using available generic cost data. They represent lower bound values that are useful for developing an initial assessment of the viability of the postulated changes on a system-wide basis, but are not intended to be absolute values for specific reactors or sites.

  17. The River Corridor Closure Contract How Washington Closure Hanford is Closing A Unique Department of Energy Project - 12425

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feist, E.T. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleanup of the Hanford River Corridor has been one of Hanford Site's top priorities since the early 1990's. This urgency is due to the proximity of hundreds of waste sites to the Columbia River and the groundwater that continues to threaten the Columbia River. In April 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract (RCCC), a cost-plus incentive-fee closure contract with a 2015 end date and first of its kind at Hanford Site, to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited-liability company owned by URS, Bechtel National, and CH2M HILL. WCH is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely, compliantly, and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the Hanford River Corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE-RL for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. Accelerated performance of the work-scope while keeping a perspective on contract completion presents challenges that require proactive strategies to support the remaining work-scope through the end of the RCCC. This paper outlines the processes to address the challenges of completing work-scope while planning for contract termination. WCH is responsible for cleanup of the River Corridor 569.8 km{sup 2} (220 mi{sup 2}) of the 1,517.7 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site's footprint reduction. At the end of calendar year 2011, WCH's closure implementation is well underway. Fieldwork is complete in three of the largest areas within the RCCC scope (Segments 1, 2, and 3), approximately 44.5% of the River Corridor (Figure 3). Working together, DOE-RL and WCH are in the process of completing the 'paper work' that will document the completion of the work-scope and allow DOE-RL to relieve WCH of contractual responsibilities and transition the completed areas to the Long-Term Stewardship Program, pending final action RODs. Within the next 4 years, WCH will continue to complete cleanup of the River Corridor following the completion goals. As field work-scope is completed, progressive reductions of business processes, physical facilities, and staff will occur. Organizations will collapse and flatten commensurate with workload. WCH employees will move on to new endeavors, proud of their accomplishments and the legacy they are leaving behind as being the first and largest environmental cleanup closure contract at Hanford. (authors)

  18. Did "Pookie" get a green-collar job? : a critical case study on the East Bay Green Corridor's employment goals, activities, and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Matthew J. (Matthew Jordan)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the formation of the East Bay Green Corridor (EBGC), a multi-city partnership for green investment in California, and how it failed to create stable, living wage economic opportunities for those with ...

  19. Transportation Beyond 2000: Technologies Needed for Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, L.D.; Asbury, S.C.; Lamar, J.E.; Mckinley, R.E. Jr.; Scott, R.C.; Small, W.J.; Torres, A.O.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the workshop was to acquaint the staff of the NASA Langley Research Center with the broad spectrum of transportation challenges and concepts foreseen within the next 20 years. The hope is that material presented at the workshop and contained in this document will stimulate innovative high-payoff research directed towards the efficiency of future transportation systems. The workshop included five sessions designed to stress the factors that will lead to a revolution in the way one will travel in the 21st century. The first session provides the historical background and a general perspective for future transportation, including emerging transportation alternatives such as working at a distance. Personal travel is the subject of Session Two. The third session looks at mass transportation, including advanced rail vehicles, advanced commuter aircraft, and advanced transport aircraft. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this workshop.

  20. Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)] [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 122 commercial nuclear facilities from which spent nuclear fuel will be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). Since some facilities share common sites and some facilities are on adjacent sites, 76 sites were identified for the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) project. The objective of the NSTI project was to identify the options available for transportation of spent-fuel casks from each of these commercial nuclear facility sites to the main transportation routes -- interstate highways, commercial rail lines and navigable waterways available for commercial use. The near-site transportation infrastructure from each site was assessed, based on observation of technical features identified during a survey of the routes and facilities plus data collected from referenced information sources. The potential for refurbishment of transportation facilities which are not currently operational was also assessed, as was the potential for establishing new transportation facilities.

  1. Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e& Fuel Cells Program&Department

  2. Impacts of Rail Pressure and Biodiesel Composition on Soot Nanostructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),Energy PetroleumEnergy Lube-oil PhosphorusImpacts ofDepartment

  3. Efficiency limits for linear optical processing of single photons and single-rail qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominic W. Berry; A. I. Lvovsky; Barry C. Sanders

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the problem of increasing the efficiency of single-photon sources or single-rail photonic qubits via linear optical processing and destructive conditional measurements. In contrast to previous work we allow for the use of coherent states and do not limit to photon-counting measurements. We conjecture that it is not possible to increase the efficiency, prove this conjecture for several important special cases, and provide extensive numerical results for the general case.

  4. Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project. Highway infrastructure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, L.R.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to arranging for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must develop a safe and efficient transportation system in order to deliver the material that has accumulated at various sites throughout the country. The ability to transport radioactive waste safely has been demonstrated during the past 20 years: DOE has made over 2,000 shipments of spent fuel and other wastes without any fatalities or environmental damage related to the radioactive nature of the cargo. To guarantee the efficiency of the transportation system, DOE must determine the optimal combination of rail transport (which allows greater payloads but requires special facilities) and truck transport Utilizing trucks, in turn, calls for decisions as to when to use legal weight trucks or, if feasible, overweight trucks for fewer but larger shipments. As part of the transportation system, the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) study contributes to DOE`s development of transportation plans for specific facilities. This study evaluates the ability of different facilities to receive, load and ship the special casks in which radioactive materials will be housed during transport In addition, the DOE`s Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) study (forthcoming) will evaluate the rail, road and barge access to 76 reactor sites from which DOE is obligated to begin accepting spent fuel in 1998. The NSTI study will also assess the existing capabilities of each transportation mode and route, including the potential for upgrade.

  5. Transportation energy data book: edition 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFarlin, D.N. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 16 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

  6. Assessing the Environmental and Health Impacts of Port-Related Freight Movement in a Major Urban Transportation Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimate heavy duty truck emissions after the 2002 modelnot for emissions from drayage trucks and trains serving theall heavy duty trucks **: 12hours = AM emission × (2hrs) +

  7. Assessing the Environmental and Health Impacts of Port-Related Freight Movement in a Major Urban Transportation Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO X for port trucks, line-haul, and railyards for winterhaul movements. Compared to PM and NO X emission from port truckshaul distance and speed of locomotives are used. After estimating emissions for both trains and drayage trucks

  8. The Uses and Reuses of Major Urban Arterials: A Study of Recycling, Revitalizing, and Restructuring “Gray Area” Transportation Corridors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Allan B.; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Marsh, Diana; Wilson, Clark

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mission Bay and the Hunter's Point area towards Candlestickindustrial areas near Hunter's Point. In the 1960s, asWorld War II, when Hunters Point became the biggest shipyard

  9. Protect Anadromous Salmonids in the Mainstem Corridor, Monitoring and Evaluation, Annual Report 200-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigg, Steven; Johnson, John

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this annual Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) report to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), we summarize significant activities and performance measures resultant from enhanced protection by Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fisheries Enforcement (CRITFE) in the mainstem corridor (BPA Project 2000-056). This report covers the Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 performance period -- May 15, 2000 to May 14, 2001. Quarterly progress reports have previously been submitted to BPA and are posted on the M&E Web site (www.Eco-Law.net) -- for the time period April-December 2000 (Vigg 2000b,c,d) and for the period January-June 2001 (Vigg 2001a,b). We also present comprehensive data representing the first quarter of year 2000 in this report for a pre-project comparison. In addition, we have analyzed specific annual enforcement statistics to evaluate trends during the baseline period 1996-2000. Additional statistics and more years of comprehensive baseline data are now being summarized, and will be presented in future M&E annual reports--to provide a longer time series for evaluation of trends in input, output and outcome performance standards.

  10. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  11. Overview of the environmental concerns of coal transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, K.; Dauzvardis, P.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 30 environmental concerns were analyzed for the transportation of coal by rail, roads (trucks), high voltage transmission lines (that is, from mine-mouth generating plants to distribution networks), coal slurry pipelines, and barges. The following criteria were used to identify these problems: (1) real physical environmetal impacts for which control technologies must be developed, or regulation made effective where control technologies presently exist; (2) the level of impact is uncertain, although the potential impact may be moderate to high; (3) the concerns identified by the first two criteria are specific to or exacerbated by coal transportation. Generic transportation problems are not included. The significant environmental problems identified as a result of this study are: (1) rail transport - community traffic disruption and human health, safety, and habitat destruction; (2) coal haul roads - road degradation, traffic congestion and safety, air quality, and noise; (3) high voltage transmission lines - changed land use without local benefits, biological health and safety effects, and disruption of world weather patterns; (4) slurry pipelines - water availability, water quality, and possible spills from non-water slurry pipelines; and (5) barge transport - impacts common to all barge traffic. (DMC)

  12. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  13. Transportation energy data book: Edition 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 15 is a statistical compendium. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter I compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the Passing ofDepartmentRenewableArbitraryMARCH9ArchivesRail

  15. A First Preliminary Look: Are Corridor Charging Stations Used to Extend the Range of Electric Vehicles in The EV Project?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary analysis of data from The EV Project was performed to begin answering the question: are corridor charging stations used to extend the range of electric vehicles? Data analyzed were collected from Blink brand electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) units based in California, Washington, and Oregon. Analysis was performed on data logged between October 1, 2012 and January 1, 2013. It should be noted that as additional AC Level 2 EVSE and DC fast chargers are deployed, and as drivers become more familiar with the use of public charging infrastructure, future analysis may have dissimilar conclusions.

  16. Lead isotopic evidence for synextensional lithospheric ductile flow in the Colorado River extensional corridor, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuerbach, Daniel L.; Reagan, Mark K.; Faulds, James E.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    -RELATED LAVAS 46- Th/U=15 ......... 3:: __.:.:. Th/U=4  42 . ,-, : ....... . ,.,:,..  , ::.;. :I ' ....-,.--: -.7 :-:. 34 I I I õ g 23 27 3 ZOpb/ZO4pb iBor 2. Fields showing the relationship of present day oPbflo4pb to oPbflo4pb... the geochemistry of lavas from the northern Colorado River extensional corridor, we combine new data in Table I with previously published geochronologic and geochemical data from the central Black Mountains [Faulds et al., 1995; Metcalf et al., 1995] and White...

  17. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  18. Analysis of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by train

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H.K.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses risk analyses to analyze the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel for commercial rail shipping systems. The rail systems analyzed are those expected to be used in the United States when the total electricity-generating capacity by nuclear reactors is 100 GW in the late 1980s. Risk as used in this report is the product of the probability of a release of material to the environment and the consequences resulting from the release. The analysis includes risks in terms of expected fatalities from release of radioactive materials due to transportation accidents involving PWR spent fuel shipped in rail casks. The expected total risk from such shipments is 1.3 x 10/sup -4/ fatalities per year. Risk spectrums are developed for shipments of spent fuel that are 180 days and 4 years out-of-reactor. The risk from transporting spent fuel by train is much less (by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude) than the risk to society from other man-caused events such as dam failure.

  19. Determining impact routes for sulfide ore transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Tzeekiu Edwin

    the data. After importing the required shapefiles (US Grid with census data, US Cities, Rail, Federal Land

  20. The Vapor Plume at Material Disposal Are C in Relation to Pajarito Corridor Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masse, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor plume made up of volatile organic compounds is present beneath Material Disposal Area C (MDA C) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The location and concentrations within the vapor plume are discussed in relation to existing and planned facilities and construction activities along Pajarito Road (the 'Pajarito Corridor') and in terms of worker health and safety. This document provides information that indicates that the vapor plume does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of proposed facilities along Pajarito Road. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) monitors emissions, effluents, and environmental media to meet environmental compliance requirements, determine actions to protect the environment, and monitor the long-term health of the local environment. LANL also studies and characterizes 'legacy' waste from past Laboratory operations to make informed decisions regarding eventual corrective actions and the disposition of that waste. Starting in 1969, these activities have been annually reported in the LANL Environmental Report (formerly Environmental Surveillance Report), and are detailed in publicly accessible technical reports meeting environmental compliance requirements. Included among the legacy sites being investigated are several formerly used material disposal areas (MDAs) set aside by the Laboratory for the general on-site disposal of waste from mission-related activities. One such area is MDA C located in Technical Area 50 (TA-50), which was used for waste disposal between 1948 and 1974. The location of TA-50 is depicted in Figure 1. The present paper uses a series of maps and cross sections to address the public concerns raised about the vapor plume at MDA C. As illustrated here, extensive sampling and data interpretation indicate that the vapor plume at MDA C does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of the proposed facilities and utility trenches. The public cannot be directly exposed to the vapor plume beneath MDA C because Pajarito Road is closed to the public.

  1. Evaluation of Power-Constant Dual-Rail Logic as a Protection of Cryptographic Applications in FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -end applica- tions that require embedded cryptography. These devices must thus be protected against physical attacks. However, unlike ASICs, in which custom and backend-level counter-measures can be devised, FPGAs-rail logic. First of all, we report a CAD methodology for achieving WDDL in FPGA. An experimental security

  2. Stray Current Corrosion in Electrified Rail Systems --Final Report Dr. Thomas J. Barlo, formerly of Northwestern University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stray Current Corrosion in Electrified Rail Systems -- Final Report Dr. Thomas J. Barlo, formerly SUMMARY Despite a relatively mature technology for its control, corrosion caused by stray current from of that cost is the result of corrosion of the electrified rapid-transit system itself, and part is the result

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF RAIL PAD ASSEMBLIES AS A COMPONENT OF THE CONCRETE SLEEPER FASTENING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Fastening System RAIL PAD ASSEMBLY LATERAL DISPLACEMENT FAILURE MODE AND EFFECT ANALYSIS (FMEA) INTRODUCTION life · FMEA is used to define, identify, evaluate and eliminate potential failures from the system · FMEA was used to guide the process of answering questions related to the component behavior and also

  4. Assessment of the risk of transporting propane by truck and train

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, C.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risk of shipping propane is discussed and the risk assessment methodology is summarized. The risk assessment model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data becomes available or as postulated system characteristics change. The transportation system and accident environment, the responses of the shipping system to forces in transportation accidents, and release sequences are evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a comparison with other reports in this series. Based on the information presented, accidents involving tank truck shipments of propane will be expected to occur at a rate of 320 every year; accidents involving bobtails would be expected at a rate of 250 every year. Train accidents involving propane shipments would be expected to occur at a rate of about 60 every year. A release of any amount of material from propane trucks, under both normal transportation and transport accident conditions, is to be expected at a rate of about 110 per year. Releases from propane rail tank cars would occur about 40 times a year. However, only those releases that occur during a transportation accident or involve a major tank defect will include sufficient propane to present the potential for danger to the public. These significant releases can be expected at the lower rate of about fourteen events per year for truck transport and about one event every two years for rail tank car transport. The estimated number of public fatalities resulting from these significant releases in 1985 is fifteen. About eleven fatalities per year result from tank truck operation, and approximately half a death per year stems from the movement of propane in rail tank cars.

  5. FY-09 Summary Report to the Office of Petroleum Reserves on the Western Energy Corridor Initiative Activities and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas R. Wood

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet its programmatic obligations under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Office of Naval Petroleum and Shale Oil Reserves (NPSOR) has initiated the Western Energy Corridor Initiative (WECI). The WECI will implement the Unconventional Strategic Fuels Task Force recommendations for accelerating and promoting the development of domestic unconventional fuels to help meet the nations’ energy needs. The mission of the WECI is to bolster America’s future fuel security by facilitating socially and environmentally responsible development of unconventional fuels resources in the Western Energy Corridor, using sound engineering principles and science-based methods to define and assess benefits, impacts, uncertainties, and mitigation options and to resolve impediments. The Task Force proposed a three-year program in its commercialization plan. The work described herein represents work performed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of the DOE’s WECI. This effort represents an interim phase of work, designed to initiate only select portions of the initiative, limited by available funding resources within NPOSR. Specifically, the work presented here addresses what was accomplished in FY-09 with the remaining carryover (~$420K) from NPOSR FY-08 funds. It was the intent of the NPOSR program to seek additional funding for full implementation of the full scope of work; however, the original tasks were reduced in scope, terminated, or eliminated (as noted below). An effort is ongoing to obtain funding to continue the tasks initiated under this project. This study will focus on the integrated development of multiple energy resources in a carbon-neutral and environmentally acceptable manner. Emphasis will be placed on analyses of the interrelationships of various energy-resource development plans and the infrastructure, employment, training, fiscal, and economic demands placed on the region as a result of various development scenarios. The interactions at build-out during the design, permitting, and construction of individual and multiple energy developments are not fully considered at the local, state, regional, or national levels. The net impacts to the Western Energy Corridor cannot be understood and the design optimized under the current approach. A regional development plan is needed to model cumulative impacts, determine the carrying capacity of the basin, and provide valuable technically based information to both skeptics and advocates. The INL scope of work for FY-09 involved six tasks: 1. Evaluation of the ASPEN Code as a dynamic systems model for application and use under the WECI and communications with Alberta Oil Sands Research Institutions as an “analog” resource development in the Western Energy Corridor 2. Application of the Aspen Plus computer model to several oil shale processes to consider energy balances and inputs and outputs (e.g. water consumption, CO2 production, etc.) 3. Development of a regulatory roadmap for oil shale developments 4. Defining of the physiographic extent of the natural resource reserves that comprise the Western Energy Corridor 5. A review of the Unconventional Fuels Task Force Report to Congress for ideas, concepts and recommendations that crosscutting plans 6. Program development with stakeholders, including industry, academics, state and federal agencies, and non government organizations. This task also includes project management, strategic development and reporting.

  6. Mega-project politics : the evolution of Lahore's first BRT corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sajjad, Fizzah

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis asks how opportunities emerge for states in the Global South to undertake large-scale spending on public transport, particularly in cases where they have previously withdrawn from its provision. In recent years, ...

  7. Local Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

  8. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work...

  9. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

  10. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  11. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pedestrianbicycle facilities for transportation corridor, 3) signal training optimization and corridor synchronization of signals, 4) remove existing trail and construct...

  12. Environmental Survey Report for the ETTP: Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Haul Road Corridor, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveys conducted within the corridor of a temporary haul road (''Haul Road'') to be constructed from East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) located just west of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). ORNL assistance to the Haul Road Project included environmental assessments necessary to determine the best route for minimizing impacts to sensitive resources such as wetlands or rare plants. Once the final route was chosen, environmental surveys were conducted within the corridor to evaluate the impacts to sensitive resources that could not be avoided. The final Haul Road route follows established roads and a power-line corridor to the extent possible (Fig. 1). Detailed explanation regarding the purpose of the Haul Road and the regulatory context associated with its construction is provided in at least two major documents and consequently is not presented here: (1) Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January 2005, DOE/OR/01-2194&D2), and (2) Environmental Monitoring Plan for The ETTP to EMWMF Haul Road for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (April 2005, BJC/OR-2152). The focus of this report is a description of the sensitive resources to be impacted by Haul Road construction. Following a short description of the methods used for the environmental surveys, results and observations are presented in the following subsections: (1) General description of the affected environment; (2) Rare plants and vegetation assemblages; (3) Rare wildlife and their habitat; (4) Rare aquatic species; and (5) Wetlands/Floodplains. A summary of project actions taken or planned in order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate the environmental impacts associated with this project are summarized in the conclusion section of this report.

  13. Packaging, Transportation, and Disposal Logistics for Large Radioactively Contaminated Reactor Decommissioning Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mark S. [EnergySolutions: 140 Stoneridge Drive, Columbia, SC 29210 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The packaging, transportation and disposal of large, retired reactor components from operating or decommissioning nuclear plants pose unique challenges from a technical as well as regulatory compliance standpoint. In addition to the routine considerations associated with any radioactive waste disposition activity, such as characterization, ALARA, and manifesting, the technical challenges for large radioactively contaminated components, such as access, segmentation, removal, packaging, rigging, lifting, mode of transportation, conveyance compatibility, and load securing require significant planning and execution. In addition, the current regulatory framework, domestically in Titles 49 and 10 and internationally in TS-R-1, does not lend itself to the transport of these large radioactively contaminated components, such as reactor vessels, steam generators, reactor pressure vessel heads, and pressurizers, without application for a special permit or arrangement. This paper addresses the methods of overcoming the technical and regulatory challenges. The challenges and disposition decisions do differ during decommissioning versus component replacement during an outage at an operating plant. During decommissioning, there is less concern about critical path for restart and more concern about volume reduction and waste minimization. Segmentation on-site is an available option during decommissioning, since labor and equipment will be readily available and decontamination activities are routine. The reactor building removal path is also of less concern and there are more rigging/lifting options available. Radionuclide assessment is necessary for transportation and disposal characterization. Characterization will dictate the packaging methodology, transportation mode, need for intermediate processing, and the disposal location or availability. Characterization will also assist in determining if the large component can be transported in full compliance with the transportation and disposal regulations and criteria or if special authorizations must be granted to transport and/or dispose. The U.S. DOT routinely issues special permits for large components where compliance with regulatory or acceptance criteria is impractical or impossible to meet. Transportation and disposal safety must be maintained even under special permits or authorizations. For example, if transported un-packaged, performance analysis must still be performed to assess the ability of the large component's outer steel shell to contain the internal radioactive contamination under normal transportation conditions and possibly incidence normal to transportation. The dimensions and weight of a large component must be considered when determining the possible modes of transportation (rail, water, or highway). At some locations, rail and/or barge access is unavailable. Many locations that once had an active rail spur to deliver new construction materials and components have let the spur deteriorate to the point that repair and upgrade of the spur is no longer economically feasible. Barge slips that have not been used since new plant construction require significant repair and/or dredging. Short on-site haul routes must be assessed for surface and subsurface conditions, as well as longer off-site routes. Off-site routes require clearance approvals from the regulatory authorities or, in the case of rail transport, the rail lines. Significant engineering planning and analysis must be performed during the pre-mobilization. In conclusion, the packaging, transportation, and disposal of large, oversized radioactively contaminated components removed during plant decommissioning is complex. However, over the last 15 years, a 100 or more components have been safely and compliantly packaged and transported for processing and/or disposal.

  14. J. Field Ornithol. 79(4):381390, 2008 DOI: 10.1111/j.1557-9263.2008.00195.x Distribution of California Black Rails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beissinger, Steven R.

    en la regi´on del valle de Sacramento para determinar la distribuci´on y residencia del Ralido Negro foothills and Sacramento Valley region to determine the distribution and residency of Black Rails, estimate

  15. Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

  16. Waiting for the interurban : the politics of light-rail planning in Seattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Kimberly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation systems pose some of the most intractable challenges to sustainable, climate-friendly cities. As the fastest growing source of greenhouse-gas emissions, transportation is critical to sustainability. Yet ...

  17. Development of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management National Transportation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macaluso, C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Offner, J.; Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Director of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) designated development of the National Transportation Plan (NTP) as one of his four strategic objectives for the program. The Office of Logistics Management (OLM) within OCRWM was tasked to develop the plan, which will accommodate state, local, and tribal concerns and input to the greatest extent practicable. The plan will describe each element of the national transportation system that OCRWM is developing for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The plan will bring together OCRWM's approach for acquiring capital assets (casks, rail cars, and a rail line in Nevada) and its operational planning efforts in a single, comprehensive document. It will also provide a timetable for major transportation decisions and milestones needed to support a 2017 start date for shipments to the Yucca Mountain repository. The NTP will be revised to incorporate new developments and decisions as they are finalized. This paper will describe the elements of the NTP, its importance in providing a comprehensive overview of the national transportation system, and the role of stakeholders in providing input on the NTP and the national transportation system. (authors)

  18. EA-1545: DOE Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Within and Around the Caliente Rail Corridor, Nevada This notice announces the availability, and opportunity for public review and comment, of the environmental assessment...

  19. From: Alex Free To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScienceNIETC -Alternate Route0:59 PM05:34

  20. From: Alex Free To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScienceNIETC -Alternate Route0:59

  1. From: Carl Daffron To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScienceNIETC -AlternateAshleyCELIACarl

  2. From: Carol Johnson To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Re: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScienceNIETC

  3. From: Noralie Crow To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETC)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2JessiNicholas Ammann

  4. Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

  5. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  6. Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

  7. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  8. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  9. A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu and assessment of potential impacts to waterbirds from the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K.; Woodside, D.; Bruegmann, M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Honolulu, HI (United States). Pacific Islands Office

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu was conducted during August and September 1993 to identify potential waterbird habitats within the general area of the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor and to assess the potential impacts to endangered waterbird of installing and operating a high voltage transmission line from the Island of Hawaii to the islands of Oahu and Maui. Annual waterbird survey information and other literature containing information on specific wetland sites were summarized. Literature describing impacts of overhead transmission lines on birds was used to evaluate potential impacts of the proposed project on endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. On Oahu, five wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within 2.5 miles of the proposed transmission line corridor. On Maui, three wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within the general area of the proposed transmission line corridor. Several of the wetlands identified on Oahu and Maui also supported resident wading birds and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory birds may collide with the proposed transmission lines wires. The frequency and numbers of bird collisions is expected to be greater on Oahu than on Maui because more wetland habitat exists and greater numbers of birds occur in the project area on Oahu. In addition, the endangered Hawaiian goose and the endangered Hawaiian petrel may be impacted by the proposed segment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission line on Maui.

  10. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  11. Valuing Rail Transit: Comparing Capital and Operating Costs to Consumer Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Erick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Allegheny County Tri-County Metropolitan Transportationof Allegheny County Tri-County Metropolitan Transportationof Allegheny County Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation

  12. Transportation Beyond 2000: Technologies Needed for Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, L.D.; Asbury, S.C.; Lamar, J.E.; Mckinley, R.E. Jr.; Scott, R.C.; Small, W.J.; Torres, A.O.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the workshop was to acquaint the staff of the NASA Langley Research Center with the broad spectrum of transportation challenges and concepts foreseen within the next 20 years. The hope is that the material presented at the workshop and contained in this document will stimulate innovative high-payoff research directed towards the efficiency of future transportation systems. The workshop included five sessions designed to stress the factors that will lead to a revolution in the way we will travel in the 21st century. The first session provides the historical background and a general perspective for future transportation, including emerging transportation alternatives such as working at a distance. Personal travel is the subject of Session Two. The third session looks at mass transportation, including advanced rail vehicles, advanced commuter aircraft, and advanced transport aircraft. The fourth session addresses some of the technologies required for the above revolutionary approaches. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for some articles from this report.

  13. Computational Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

  14. The GIS Revolution in Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Glen

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Aviation ? Railroads ? Waterways ? Motor Carrier ? Private automobile ? Government Applications ? State and Local government ? Federal government ? Future Trends 5 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GIS-T Defined ? GIS... Commercial Applications - Railroads Rail yard management. 13 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Commercial Applications - Railroads Intermodal rail operations at the Port of Tacoma, Washington. 14 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S...

  15. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

  16. Carbon Emissions Analysis of Rail Resurfacing Work: A Case Study, Practical Guideline, and Systems Thinking Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krezo, S.

    Carbon pollution has become a sensitive topic across the globe in recent times. In Australia, incentive has been provided to industry in order to reduce carbon emissions in heavy polluting industries. The railway transportation ...

  17. Evaluation of NETSIM for modeling light rail transit in pretimed urban arterial street networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venglar, Steven Paul

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angeles, meetings with Linda Meadow and James Curry resulted in the selection of study networks. Brian Gallagher, Transportation Engineer with the City of Los Angeles, provided assistance in collecting information about the Los Angeles networks...

  18. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  19. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    electrifyingthefuture transportation The UK Government's carbon reduction strategy vehicles and the new Birmingham Science City Energy Systems Integration Laboratory (ESIL) will further enhance this work. The laboratory - unique within the UK and world leading - brings together cutting edge

  20. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy, Prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. , 9/2002 [EERE 2007] 2007 Buildings Energy Data Book,

  1. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MI. [EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook, ActivitiesVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy ConsumptionPaving: April 2001; Emission Inventory Improvement Program,

  2. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maintenance, and petroleum production. The attribution ofvehicle maintenance. Petroleum Production As discussed in §maintenance, and petroleum production. Cold Starts As

  3. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substation Production Track Maintenance Insurances Fuels Electricity Production California Mix Massachusetts

  4. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resting, running, and crankcase losses are disaggregated).Evaporative losses, primarily from running, resting, and hotRunning Startup Braking Tire Wear Evaporative Losses Idling

  5. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)..comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyat each stage. Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

  6. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    urban buses 38 Table 30 - Fundamental Environmental Factors for Onroad Modes.. 39 Table 31 - Onroad energy inventory .. 40 Table 32 - Onroad GHG inventory ..

  7. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $74,000 per mile. Total substations cost for the Muni systempower structure and substations construction costs have beenStructure ($M 1997 ) Cost of Substations ($M 1997 ) Caltrain

  8. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Cycle Assessment of Automobile/Fuel Options, EnvironmentalCycle Energy Analysis for Automobiles, Society of Automotive

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corridors, Megaregions, Rail, Truck, Fuel Efficiency, Freight Operating Costs. 18. Distribution Statement. To address this need, a truck-rail intermodal toolkit was developed for multimodal corridor analysis characteristics. The toolkit includes techniques to acquire data for simulating line-haul movements, and models

  10. The Effects of Transportation Corridors' Roadside Design Features on User Behavior and Safety, and Their Contributions to Health, Environmental Quality, and Community Economic Vitality: a Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Elizabeth; Sanders, Rebecca; Supawanich, Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Trees and Hazardous Locations. NCHRP Report 500. Northwith Trees and Hazardous Locations. NCHRP Report 500. Mokwith Trees and Hazardous Locations The View from the Road:

  11. The Effects of Transportation Corridors' Roadside Design Features on User Behavior and Safety, and Their Contributions to Health, Environmental Quality, and Community Economic Vitality: a Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Elizabeth; Sanders, Rebecca; Supawanich, Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roadway Accident Rates. Accident Analysis and Prevention 34:small urbanized areas. Accident Analysis and Prevention 33:route acceptability. Accident Analysis and Prevention 39:

  12. Integrating spatial support tools into strategic planning-SEA of the GMS North-South Economic Corridor Strategy and Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, Pavit, E-mail: pramachandran@adb.org [Environment Specialist (Regional Cooperation), Southeast Asia Department, Asian Development Bank, Manila (Philippines); Linde, Lothar, E-mail: lothar.linde@yahoo.de [Asian Development Bank Greater Mekong Subregion Environment Operations Center (RETA 6289), The Offices at Central World 23F, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The GMS countries, supported by the Asian Development Bank, have adopted a holistic, multidimensional approach to strengthen infrastructural linkages and facilitate cross border trade through (i) the establishment of a trans-boundary road connecting two economic nodes across marginalised areas, followed by 2) facilitation of environmentally and socially sound investments in these newly connected areas as a means to develop livelihoods. The North-South Economic Corridor is currently in its second phase of development, with investment opportunities to be laid out in the NSEC Strategy and Action Plan (SAP). It targets the ecologically and culturally sensitive border area between PR China's Yunnan Province, Northern Lao PDR, and Thailand. A trans-boundary, cross-sectoral Strategic Environmental Assessment was conducted to support the respective governments in assessing potential environmental and social impacts, developing alternatives and mitigation options, and feeding the findings back into the SAP writing process. Given the spatial dimension of corridor development-both with regard to opportunities and risks-particular emphasis was put in the application of spatial modelling tools to help geographically locate and quantify impacts as a means to guide interventions and set priorities.

  13. Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A planning study was made for DOE on alternate fuels for non-highway transportation (aircraft, rail, marine, and pipeline). The study provides DOE with a recommendation of what alternate fuels may be of interest to non-highway transportation users from now through 2025 and recommends R and D needed to allow non-petroleum derived fuels to be used in non-highway transportation. Volume III contains all of the references for the data used in the preliminary screening and is presented in 4 subvolumes. Volume IIIA covers the background information on the various prime movers used in the non-highway transportation area, the physical property data, the fuel-prime mover interaction and a review of some alternate energy forms. Volume IIIB covers the economics of producing, tranporting, and distributing the various fuels. Volume IIIC is concerned with the environment issues in production and use of the fuels, the energy efficiency in use and production, the fuel logistics considerations, and the overall ratings and selection of the fuels and prime movers for the detailed evaluation. Volume IIID covers the demand-related issues.

  14. TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT AND RETURN FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Arakali

    2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) of the repository including the personnel at the security gate and cask staging areas. This calculation is required to support the preclosure safety analysis (PCSA) to ensure that the predicted doses are within the regulatory limits prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Cask Receipt and Return Facility receives NRC licensed transportation casks loaded with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TCRRF operation starts with the receipt, inspection, and survey of the casks at the security gate and the staging areas, and proceeds to the process facilities. The transportation casks arrive at the site via rail cars or trucks under the guidance of the national transportation system. This calculation was developed by the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization and is intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in work regarding facility design. Environmental and Nuclear Engineering personnel should be consulted before using this calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or for use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization.

  15. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An Internationalthe ACT Map scenario, transport biofuels production reachesestimates that biofuels’ share of transport fuel could

  16. I-5 Corridor Reinforcement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNotSeventyTechnologies | Blandine

  17. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1 SignG.5

  18. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Sustainable Transportation This is the January 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. Illustration of an electric vehicle Illustration of an...

  19. Fact #554: January 19, 2009 Energy Intensity of Light Rail Transit Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy Score Maturityof Energy 2:|

  20. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Availability of data and studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to Section 1340(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), this report presents the Secretary of Energy`s review of data collected by the Federal Government on rates for rail and pipeline transportation of domestic coal, oil, and gas for the years 1988 through 1997, and proposals to develop an adequate data base for each of the fuels, based on the data availability review. This report also presents the Energy Information Administration`s findings regarding the extent to which any Federal agency is studying the impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) and other Federal policies on the transportation rates and distribution patterns of domestic coal, oil, and gas.

  1. Hawaii Geothermal Project annotated bibliography: Biological resources of the geothermal subzones, the transmission corridors and the Puna District, Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.E.; Burgett, J.M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Honolulu, HI (United States). Pacific Islands Office

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 1 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Interagency Agreement between the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DOE) includes an annotated bibliography of published and unpublished documents that cover biological issues related to the lowland rain forest in Puna, adjacent areas, transmission corridors, and in the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP). The 51 documents reviewed in this report cover the main body of biological information for these projects. The full table of contents and bibliography for each document is included along with two copies (as requested in the Interagency Agreement) of the biological sections of each document. The documents are reviewed in five main categories: (1) geothermal subzones (29 documents); (2) transmission cable routes (8 documents); (3) commercial satellite launching facility (Spaceport; 1 document); (4) manganese nodule processing facility (2 documents); (5) water resource development (1 document); and (6) ecosystem stability and introduced species (11 documents).

  2. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation News

  3. Agent-based Planning and Simulation of Combined Rail/Road Luca Maria Gambardella, Andrea E. Rizzoli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambardella, Luca Maria

    on trains and assigns trucks to deliver them to the source terminal and to pick them up in the destination and promote intermodal transport as a vi- able alternative to long-haul road transport [1]. The PLATFORM in the terminals throughput might reduce the per- centage of long-haul transports on the road. Be- cause

  4. The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of California at Davis); (ES)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.

  5. Transportation Institute Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as positive train control, high-speed rail, more energy-efficient locomo- tives, and increased security Railroad have provided the foundation to the development of the RTP. However, their contribution addresses railroad community to follow on that path and "rejuvenate" the once tight relation- ship between academia

  6. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

  7. Habitat change and the scale of habitat selection: shifting gradients used by coexisting Arctic rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Douglas W.

    deforestation, desertification, transportation and energy corridors, agricultural expansion, and urban sprawl

  8. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  9. Off-Highway Transportation-Related Fuel Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation sector includes many subcategories--for example, on-highway, off-highway, and non-highway. Use of fuel for off-highway purposes is not well documented, nor is the number of off-highway vehicles. The number of and fuel usage for on-highway and aviation, marine, and rail categories are much better documented than for off-highway land-based use. Several sources document off-highway fuel use under specific conditions--such as use by application (e.g., recreation) or by fuel type (e.g., gasoline). There is, however, no single source that documents the total fuel used off-highway and the number of vehicles that use the fuel. This report estimates the fuel usage and number of vehicles/equipment for the off-highway category. No new data have been collected nor new models developed to estimate the off-highway data--this study is limited in scope to using data that already exist. In this report, unless they are being quoted from a source that uses different terminology, the terms are used as listed below. (1) ''On-highway/on-road'' includes land-based transport used on the highway system or other paved roadways. (2) ''Off-highway/off-road'' includes land-based transport not using the highway system or other paved roadways. (3) ''Non-highway/non-road'' includes other modes not traveling on highways such as aviation, marine, and rail. It should be noted that the term ''transportation'' as used in this study is not typical. Generally, ''transportation'' is understood to mean the movement of people or goods from one point to another. Some of the off-highway equipment included in this study doesn't transport either people or goods, but it has utility in movement (e.g., a forklift or a lawn mower). Along these lines, a chain saw also has utility in movement, but it cannot transport itself (i.e., it must be carried) because it does not have wheels. Therefore, to estimate the transportation-related fuel used off-highway, transportation equipment is defined to include all devices that have wheels, can move or be moved from one point to another, and use fuel. An attempt has been made to exclude off-highway engines that do not meet all three of these criteria (e.g., chain saws and generators). The following approach was used to determine the current off-highway fuel use. First, a literature review was conducted to ensure that all sources with appropriate information would be considered. Secondly, the fuel use data available from each source were compiled and compared in so far as possible. Comparable data sets (i.e., same fuel type; same application) were evaluated. Finally, appropriate data sets were combined to provide a final tally.

  10. Transportation Security | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

  11. DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program into other training venues, thus ensuring consistency of radiological response curriculums delivered to responders. This presentation will provide an overview of the steps to achieve coordination, to avoid redundancy, and to highlight several of the successful partnerships TEPP has formed with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs. Events, accident scenarios, and training where TEPP was proven to be integral in building the radiological response capabilities for first responders to actual radiological incidents are also highlighted. Participants will gain an appreciation for the collaborative efforts States and Tribes are engaging in with the DOE to ensure that responders all along the DOE transportation corridors are adequately prepared to respond to shipments of radioactive materials through their communities.

  12. Maglev vehicles and superconductor technology: Integration of high-speed ground transportation into the air travel system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.R.; Rote, D.M.; Hull, J.R.; Coffey, H.T.; Daley, J.G.; Giese, R.F.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the potential contribution of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) to the technical and economic feasibility of magnetically levitated (maglev) vehicles, (2) determine the status of maglev transportation research in the United States and abroad, (3) identify the likelihood of a significant transportation market for high-speed maglev vehicles, and (4) provide a preliminary assessment of the potential energy and economic benefits of maglev systems. HTSCs should be considered as an enhancing, rather than an enabling, development for maglev transportation because they should improve reliability and reduce energy and maintenance costs. Superconducting maglev transportation technologies were developed in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Federal support was withdrawn in 1975, but major maglev transportation programs were continued in Japan and West Germany, where full-scale prototypes now carry passengers at speeds of 250 mi/h in demonstration runs. Maglev systems are generally viewed as very-high-speed train systems, but this study shows that the potential market for maglev technology as a train system, e.g., from one downtown to another, is limited. Rather, aircraft and maglev vehicles should be seen as complementing rather than competing transportation systems. If maglev systems were integrated into major hub airport operations, they could become economical in many relatively high-density US corridors. Air traffic congestion and associated noise and pollutant emissions around airports would also be reduced. 68 refs., 26 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. From: Austin Bird To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Citizen Comment: National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors (NIETC"s)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScienceNIETC -AlternateAshley ForemanAustin

  14. From: Katie McKay To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Opposition to National Interest Energy Transmission Corridors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2Jessi O"Bannon To:

  15. From: Martin Meyer To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (NIETC"s)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2Jessi O"Bannon To:KayPleaseMCKEOWNMartin

  16. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    "Educating transportation professionals." Michael Demetsky Henry L. Kinnier Professor mjd of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works closely with the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR), located

  17. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

  18. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Hostick, C.J.; Ross, W.A.; Peterson, R.W.; Smith, R.I.; Stiles, D.L.; Daling, P.M.; Weakley, S.A.; Grinde, R.B.; Young, J.R.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a system study of estimated radiation doses to the public and workers resulting from the transport of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors to a geologic repository. The report contains a detailed breakdown of activities and a description of time/distance/dose-rate estimates for each activity within the system. Collective doses are estimated for each of the major activities at the reactor site, in transit, and at the repository receiving facility. Annual individual doses to the maximally exposed individuals or groups of individuals are also estimated. A total of 17 alternatives and subalternatives to the postulated reference transportation system are identified, conceptualized, and their dose-reduction potentials and costs estimated. Resulting ratios of ..delta..cost/..delta..collective system dose for each alternative relative to the postulated reference transportation system are given. Most of the alternatives evaluated are estimated to provide both cost and dose reductions. Major reductions in transportation system dose and cost are estimated to result from using higher-capacity rail and truck casks, and particularly when replacing legalweight truck casks with ''advanced design'' overweight truck casks. The greatest annual dose reduction to the highest exposed individual workers (i.e., at the repository) is estimated to be achieved by using remote handling equipment for the cask handling operations at the repository. Additional shielding is also effective in reducing doses to both radiation workers at the reactor and repository and to transport workers. 69 refs., 36 figs., 156 tabs.

  19. A TRANSPORTATION RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR ANALYZING THE TRANSPORT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TO THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis addressed the potential for transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 origins for 34 types of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, and 10,911 rail shipments. The analysis evaluated transportation over 59,250 unique shipment links for travel outside Nevada (shipment segments in urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 links in Nevada. In addition, the analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The analysis also used mode-specific accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. This complex mix of data and information required an innovative approach to assess the transportation impacts. The approach employed a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database tool that incorporated data from many sources, including unit risk factors calculated using the RADTRAN IV transportation risk assessment computer program. Using Microsoft{reg_sign} Access, the analysts organized data (such as state-specific accident and fatality rates) into tables and developed queries to obtain the overall transportation impacts. Queries are instructions to the database describing how to use data contained in the database tables. While a query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one sequence of queries that is used to calculate a particular transportation impact. For example, the incident-free dose to off-link populations in a state is calculated by a query that uses route segment lengths for each route in a state that could be used by shipments, populations for each segment, number of shipments on each segment, and an incident-free unit risk factor calculated using RADTRAN IV. In addition to providing a method for using large volumes of data in the calculations, the queries provide a straight-forward means used to verify results. Another advantage of using the MS Access database was the ability to develop query hierarchies using nested queries. Calculations were broken into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing unit risk factors calculated using RADTRAN IV to produce radiological impacts. Through the use of queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained. The paper will show both the flexibility of the assessment tool and the ease it provides for verifying results.

  20. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  1. Chapter 12 Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-1 November 2012 Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 12 Transportation This chapter describes existing transportation resources in...

  2. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to...

  3. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  4. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  5. Contribution of Case Based Reasoning (CBR) in the Exploitation of Return of Experience. Application to Accident Scenarii in Railroad Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maalel, Ahmed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study is from a base of accident scenarii in rail transport (feedback) in order to develop a tool to share build and sustain knowledge and safety and secondly to exploit the knowledge stored to prevent the reproduction of accidents / incidents. This tool should ultimately lead to the proposal of prevention and protection measures to minimize the risk level of a new transport system and thus to improve safety. The approach to achieving this goal largely depends on the use of artificial intelligence techniques and rarely the use of a method of automatic learning in order to develop a feasibility model of a software tool based on case based reasoning (CBR) to exploit stored knowledge in order to create know-how that can help stimulate domain experts in the task of analysis, evaluation and certification of a new system.

  6. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Environmental Restoration Systems; Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Environmental Restoration Systems]|[Trinity Christian Coll., Palos Heights, IL (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

  7. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

  8. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

  9. Graduate Certificate in Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

  10. TRANSPORTATION Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

  11. Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

  12. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  13. Romanian Experience for Enhancing Safety and Security in Transport of Radioactive Material - 12223

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieru, Gheorghe [Institute for Nuclear Research, P.O.BOX 78, 0300 PITESTI (Romania)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of Dangerous Goods-Class no.7 Radioactive Material (RAM), is an important part of the Romanian Radioactive Material Management. The overall aim of this activity is for enhancing operational safety and security measures during the transport of the radioactive materials, in order to ensure the protection of the people and the environment. The paper will present an overall of the safety and security measures recommended and implemented during transportation of RAM in Romania. Some aspects on the potential threat environment will be also approached with special referring to the low level radioactive material (waste) and NORM transportation either by road or by rail. A special attention is given to the assessment and evaluation of the possible radiological consequences due to RAM transportation. The paper is a part of the IAEA's Vienna Scientific Research Contract on the State Management of Nuclear Security Regime (Framework) concluded with the Institute for Nuclear Research, Romania, where the author is the CSI (Chief Scientific Investigator). The transport of RAM in Romania is a very sensible and complex problem taking into consideration the importance and the need of the security and safety for such activities. The Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body set up strictly regulation and procedures according to the Recommendation of the IAEA Vienna and other international organizations. There were implemented the adequate regulation and procedures in order to keep the environmental impacts and the radiological consequences at the lower possible level and to assure the effectiveness of state nuclear security regime due to possible malicious acts in carrying out these activities including transport and the disposal site at the acceptable international levels. The levels of the estimated doses and risk expectation values for transport and disposal are within the acceptable limits provided by national and international regulations and recommendations but can increase, significantly during potential malicious acts. (authors)

  14. A Novel MagPipe Pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.R.; Montgomery, D.B.; Roderick, L. [Magplane Technology Inc., Littleton, MA (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel capsule pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives, called Magplane MagPipe, is under development with the intention to replace trucks and railways for hauling materials from the mine to the rail head, power plant, or processing plant with reduced operating cost and energy consumption. The initial demonstration of a MagPipe line in Inner Mongolia will be a 500-m-long double-pipe coal transport system with the design transportation capacity of 3 Mega-Mg per year. The pipeline consists of 6-m-long plastic pipe modules with an I-beam suspension system inside the pipe to carry sets of five coupled capsules. The pipe will also contain noncontinuous motor winding modules spaced at 50-m intervals. A set of Halbach-arrayed permanent magnets on the bottom of the capsules interact with the linear motor windings to provide propulsion. The motor is driven by variable frequency drives outside the pipe to control the speed. This paper briefly describes the overall MagPipe pipeline transportation system, including the preliminary conclusions of the linear synchronous motor analysis.

  15. Projected environmental impacts of radioactive material transportation to the first US repository site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Reardon, P.C.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; McNair, G.W.

    1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the relative national environmental impacts of transporting nuclear wastes to each of the nine candidate repository sites in the United States. Several of the potential sites are closely clustered and, for the purpose of distance and routing calculations, are treated as a single location. These are: Cypress Creek Dome and Richton Dome in Mississippi (Gulf Interior Region), Deaf Smith County and Swisher County sites in Texas (Permian Basin), and Davis Canyon and Lavender Canyon site in Utah (Paradox Basin). The remaining sites are: Vacherie Dome, Louisiana; Yucca Mountain, Nevada; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. For compatibility with both the repository system authorized by the NWPA and with the MRS option, two separate scenarios were analyzed. In belief, they are (1) shipment of spent fuel and high-level wastes (HLW) directly from waste generators to a repository (Reference Case) and (2) shipment of spent fuel to a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility and then to a repository. Between 17 and 38 truck accident fatalities, between 1.4 and 7.7 rail accident fatalities, and between 0.22 and 12 radiological health effects can be expected to occur as a result of radioactive material transportation during the 26-year operating period of the first repository. During the same period in the United States, about 65,000 total deaths from truck accidents and about 32,000 total deaths from rail accidents would occur; also an estimated 58,300 cancer fatalities are predicted to occur in the United States during a 26-year period from exposure to background radiation alone (not including medical and other manmade sources). The risks reported here are upper limits and are small by comparison with the "natural background" of risks of the same type. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

  17. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  18. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  19. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    economic growth and reduce petroleum use in Utah by increasing the number of CNG, LNG, Hybrid, and biodiesel vehicles on the road, creating an I-15 corridor for alternative...

  20. Transportation Routing Analysis Georgraphic Information System (WebTRAGIS) User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelhaugh, R.D.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1980s, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed two transportation routing models: HIGHWAY, which predicts truck transportation routes, and INTERLINE, which predicts rail transportation routes. Both of these models have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) community for a variety of routing needs over the years. One of the primary uses of the models has been to determine population-density information, which is used as input for risk assessment with the RADTRAN model, which is available on the TRANSNET computer system. During the recent years, advances in the development of geographic information systems (GISs) have resulted in increased demands from the user community for a GIS version of the ORNL routing models. In April 1994, the DOE Transportation Management Division (EM-261) held a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session with transportation routing experts and users of the HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models. As a result of the session, the development of a new GIS routing model, Transportation Routing Analysis GIS (TRAGIS), was initiated. TRAGIS is a user-friendly, GIS-based transportation and analysis computer model. The older HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models are useful to calculate routes, but they cannot display a graphic of the calculated route. Consequently, many users have experienced difficulty determining the proper node for facilities and have been confused by or have misinterpreted the text-based listing from the older routing models. Some of the primary reasons for the development of TRAGIS are (a) to improve the ease of selecting locations for routing, (b) to graphically display the calculated route, and (c) to provide for additional geographic analysis of the route.

  1. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  2. Yes, your ideas and our technologies can contribute to economic, social and environmental progress. Alstom is a global leader in the world of power generation and rail infrastructure and sets the benchmark for innovative and environmentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Alstom is a global leader in the world of power generation and rail infrastructure and sets the benchmark capacity automated metros in the world, and provides integrated power plant solutions and associated services for a wide variety of energy sources, including wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, ocean (wave), gas

  3. Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boarnet, Marlon G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making,” Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

  4. Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

  5. Transportation Investment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Transportation Investment and Economic Development: Has the TIED turned? David Levinson University Transportation Investments was Historically Concomitant with Land and Economic Development #12;Canals Railways Surfaced Roads Crude Oil Pipelines Gas Pipelines Telegraph 1825 1985 Proportion of Maximum Extent Growth

  6. Transportation Management Research Collection /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    , Peterbilt Motors, and General Electric. He was a national panel member of the American Arbitration, Noise and Environmental Pollution, Transportation Co-ordination and Consolidation, Transportation -- Docket 8613 1957 Civil Aeronautics Board ­ General passenger fare investigation -- Docket 8008 et al

  7. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  8. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  10. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  11. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  12. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  13. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  14. Lubbock Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubbock Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and its predecessors, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, specified the transportation systems on which certain federal funds can... in Chapter 5 ? Streets and Highways; Chapter 6 ? Public Transportation; Chapter 7 ? Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan; Chapter 8 ? Lubbock International Airport and Chapter 9 ? Railroads and Trucking. Federally funded transit projects were developed...

  15. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidies on fossil transport fuels, subsidies on commutingC. , 2003: Subsidies that encourage fossil fuel use in

  16. Northwestern University Transportation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

  17. PalladianDigest Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

  18. TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

  19. Louisiana Transportation Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

  20. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

  1. Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems In a technical session at the 2011 NACE conference, Dennis Foderberg of SEH Inc. discussed intelligent transportation systems (ITS) developed by SEH in collaboration with Network Transportation Technologies, Inc. These systems address the problem of crashes on low-volume roads

  2. Rail Planning Timeline

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    inspections, Safety Assurance and Compliance Program (SACP) findings concerning track and signal system safety issues and other appropriate information sources (SCOP RII-1). *...

  3. rail regulatory matrix

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from railroad operations. 6 The state role in highway regulations related to substance abuse is confined to a limited discretion available to states in excepting certain persons...

  4. Is planning failing? : the impacts of decision making processes on the Green Line Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciborowski, Matthew A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted on the proposed Green Line Extension, a light rail corridor from Cambridge through Somerville and Medford, Massachusetts. The project is being undertaken by the Massachusetts Executive Office of ...

  5. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of Westinghouse WE 17×17 pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies with a discharge burnup range of 30-58 GWd/MTU (assembly average), loaded in a representative high-capacity (?32 fuel rod assemblies) transportation package. Evaluations will be performed for representative normal conditions of rail transport involving a rail conveyance capable of meeting the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-2043 specification. UNF modeling is anticipated to be defined to the pellet-cladding level and take in to account influences associated with spacer grids, intermediate fluid mixers, and control components. The influence of common degradation issues such as ductile-to-brittle-transition will also be accounted for. All model development and analysis will be performed with commercially available software packages exclusively. Inputs and analyses will be completely documented, all supporting information will be traceable, and bases will be defendable so as to be most useful to the U.S. Department of Energy community and mission. The expected completion date is the end of fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  6. Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU CTS Research Conference May 21, 2014 Lisa Rasmussen, WTS / Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc #12;Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth SummitTransportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit Agenda What is Transportation YOU? Transportation YOU ­ WTS Local Chapter

  7. Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

  8. Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

  9. Cost of a Ride: The Effects of Densities on Fixed-Guideway Transit Ridership and Capital Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Erick; Cervero, Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rail transit capital cost study update final. Washington,2005). Managing Capital Costs of Major Federally Fundedin US rail transit project cost overrun. Transportation

  10. Breakout Session I OCRWM Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report of Hazardous Materials Transported by Rail 2005 * At full operational capability, OLM shipments will only have approximately 700 rail cars operational per year * OCRWM spent...

  11. Effect of a sudden fuel shortage on freight transport in the United States: an overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J N

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey was made of the potential effects of a sudden reduction of fuel supplies on freight transport via truck, rail, water, and pipeline. After a brief discussion of the energy characteristics of each of these modes of transport, short-term strategies for making better use of fuel in a crisis are investigated. Short-term is taken to mean something on the order of six months, and a crisis is taken to be the result of something on the order of a 20% drop in available fuel. Although no succinct or well-established conclusions are drawn, the gist of the paper is that the potential for short-term conservation, without a serious disruption of service, exists but does not appear to be large. It is remarked that it is possible, through further study, to obtain a fairly accurate reckoning of the physical ability of the freight transport network to weather a fuel crisis, but that it is impossible to say in advance what freight carriers will in fact do with the network.

  12. A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

    2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

  13. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  14. An Open System Transportation Security Sensor Network: Field Trial Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III Experiments 8 III-A Road Test with Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 III-B Short-haul Rail Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 V-B Short-haul Trial: Message Counts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 V

  15. Experiences from a Transportation Security Sensor Network Field Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 III Experiments 12 III-A Road Test with Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 III-B Short-haul Rail Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Partial Map of Road Test with Event Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 7 Short-haul

  16. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  17. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

  18. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

  19. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  20. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  1. 2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey Data Presentation #12;2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO City of Hamilton City of Kawartha Lakes City of Guelph City of Brantford

  2. The Hanford Story: River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the seventh chapter of The Hanford Story, a multimedia presentation that provides an overview of the Hanford Site—its history, today's cleanup activities, and a glimpse into the possibilities of future uses of the 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State.

  3. http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

  4. INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE by Robert Harrison, Center for Transportation Research Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System; and Jolanda Prozzi, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH Bureau of Engineering Research

  5. MAESTRAEN TRANSPORTE ESPECIALIZACINEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vásquez, Carlos

    investigaciones que permitan la comprensión de distintos componentes delsistema del transporte así como para Investigación de Operaciones y Redes de transporte Medidas y Administración del Tránsito Tecnologías de

  6. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  7. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Cancels DOE O 460.1B, 5-14-10

  8. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  9. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  10. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Energy Systems Analysis Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Transportation Energy Systems Analysis Transportation Energy Systems AnalysisTara...

  11. The Development of an Effective Transportation Risk Assessment Model for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSweeney; Thomas; Winnard; Ross; Steven B.; Best; Ralph E.

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Past approaches for assessing the impacts of transporting spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste have not been effectively implemented or have used relatively simple approaches. The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis considers 83 origins, 34 fuel types, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, 10,911 rail shipments, consisting of 59,250 shipment links outside Nevada (shipment kilometers and population density pairs through urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 shipment links in Nevada. There was additional complexity within the analysis. The analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The model also considered different accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. To capture the all of the complexities of the transportation analysis, a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database was created. In the Microsoft{reg_sign} Access approach the data is placed in individual tables and equations are developed in queries to obtain the overall impacts. While the query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one equation for a particular impact. This greatly simplifies the validation effort. Furthermore, in Access, data in tables can be linked automatically using query joins. Another advantage built into MS Access is nested queries, or the ability to develop query hierarchies. It is possible to separate the calculation into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing the state and mode specific accident rate to produce accidents by state. One of the biggest advantages of the nested queries is in validation. Temporarily restricting the query to one origin, one shipment, or one state and validating that the query calculation is returning the expected result allows simple validation. The paper will show the flexibility of the assessment tool to consider a wide variety of impacts. Through the use of pre-designed queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained.

  12. Transportation activity analysis using smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yu

    Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

  13. Transportation Economic Assistance Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Economic Assistance Program provides state grants to private business and local governments to improve transportation to projects improving economic conditions and creating or...

  14. Transportation Resources | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Resources The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports:...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Coli Bacteria Engineered to Eat Switchgrass and Make Transportation Fuels On December 7, 2011, in Energy, JBEI, News, Renewable Energy, Transportation Energy A milestone has...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JBEI, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Transportation Energy Biofuels hold great promise for the future of transportation energy, but...

  17. Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. See a complete list of Subsurface Flow and Transport...

  18. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  19. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  20. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  1. Transportation 2035 Longview Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Owen, MPO Director Melissa Bechtold, Transportation Planner Nalora Moser, Planning Technician MPO TECHNICAL COMMITTEE Karen Owen, City of Longview Fred Marquez, TXDOT-Austin Dale Spitz, TXDOT-Tyler District Debbie Sadler, City of White... Oak Will Buskell, TXDOT-Longview Area Rea Donna Jones, TXDOT-Atlanta District Margie McAllister, TCEQ-Austin Randy Redmond, TXDOT-Tyler District John Paul Jones, Harrison County Keith Bonds, City of Longview Steve Juneau, TXDOT-Marshall...

  2. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation

  3. Tulsa Metropolitan Area Destination 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indian Nations Council of Governments

    OP 151 OP 20 tu 64 ??? 44 ??? 244 ??? 44 ??? 44 tu 75 tu 412 tu 75A tu 169 tu 64 Cherokee Industrial Park Tulsa Airport Area 21st & Utica Corridor BA Expressway & US 169 Corridor South Yale Corridor Port of Catoosa 116th 106th 126th Pine 36th 146th... International Airport Port of Catoosa Johnston's Port 33 116th 106th 126th Pine 36th 146th 166th 56th Uni o n 46th 171st Y a l e 3 3 r d W 161st P e o r i a M i n g o 1 2 9 t h W E l w o o d Apache 1 2 9 t h Admiral 151st 8 1 s t W L e w i s G a r n e t t 9 7...

  4. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  5. Transportation and Stationary Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is small. Previous feedback from industry has indicated that existing transportation fuel providers (oil for multiple fuel cell applications, including material handling equipment, backup power, and light- or heavy

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be generated from coal and nuclear energy in contrast to 7%in the use of coal and nuclear energy for transportation andparticularly for coal and nuclear energy utilization, would

  7. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  8. Clean Transportation Internship Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clean Transportation Internship Description The NC Solar Center at North Carolina State University to other ongoing projects by focusing on time-sensitive tasks. While the main thrust of this internship

  9. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    federal register Monday May 17, 1999 Part II Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-series...

  10. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  11. B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING 231 B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING on transportation and connectivity issues common to UCSF as a whole. Please refer to Chapter 5, Plans for Existing characteristics specific to each individual UCSF site. DETERMINANTS OF THE 1996 LRDP The transportation

  12. Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2035

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN 2035 Revised April 22, 2010 Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 Amended/Revised April 22, 2010 Prepared by: Bucher..., Willis, and Ratliff Corporation 1828 East Southeast Loop 323, Suite 202 Tyler, Texas 75701 903.581.7844 This Document Serves as an Update to the Tyler Area Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2030. Portions of that Document were Unchanged and Appear...

  13. Thermoelectric transport in superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinecke, T.L.; Broido, D.A.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelectric transport properties of superlattices have been studied using an exact solution of the Boltzmann equation. The role of heat transport along the barrier layers, of carrier tunneling through the barriers, of valley degeneracy and of the well width and energy dependences of the carrier-phonon scattering rates on the thermoelectric figure of merit are given. Calculations are given for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and for PbTe, and the results of recent experiments are discussed.

  14. Interactive Transportable Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Irschitz; Priam Givord; Newyork Exit Newyork; Flavia Sparacino

    Transportable architecture which embeds the means to communicate with real or imaginary digital information spaces in a natural fashion offers unprecedented opportunities to make multimedia experiences available to the public almost everywhere. This installation demonstrates an example of interactive transportable architecture which incorporates unencumebered real-time body tracking and gesture recognition to explore a 3-D cityscape and a brain-like web-based information space.

  15. Campus Village Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Emmanuel

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Emmanuel Hernandez THE CAMPUS V ILLAGE : TRANSPORTATION Objective The Campus Village is a new community being constructed in northwest Lawrence with a intergenerational focus in mind. The site will be equipped with housing for students, athletes..., retirement community members, and families. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the city’s current transportation network and make recommendations on that network to better accommodate the needs of the new property. Specifically, the goal...

  16. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  17. Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochasticPlan

  18. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Texas Transportation Poll Final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Transportation Poll Final report PRC 14-16-F #12;2 Texas Transportation Poll Texas A&M Transportation Institute PRC 14-16-F September 2014 Authors Chris Simek Tina Geiselbrecht #12;3 Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... 8 Transportation Funding

  20. Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the building blocks and provides for an improved quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through physical construction and operation of transportation facilities, and through the travel