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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. There were no constituents which exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. There were also no constituents which were above the SRS Flag 2 criteria in any well at the three sites during second quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

OPERATING PLAN TAILINGS CELLS AND EVAPORATION PONDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Content Calculation Brief #12;1 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Piñon Ridge Mill will extract both uranium the ponds during milling operations. Energy Fuels researched historical data for raffinate at uranium with the hydrated lime during sample preparation. Uranium and vanadium mills such as the proposed Piñon Ridge Mill

5

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum, iron, lead, and manganese, which were above standards and Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1994, were not analyzed this quarter. Second quarter results are similar to results for fourth quarter 1993.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond Pond 5 15-M03D 14.97 15-M14D 14.65 15-M27D 14.1 15-M32D 14.53 18-0507 14.28 18-0509 14.3 18-0520 14.06 18-0523 14.22 20-0502 14.36...

8

Closure plan for CAU No. 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The steam cleaning effluent ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Nevada Operations Office operates the NTS and has entered into a trilateral agreement with the State of Nevada and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA). The trilateral agreement provides a framework for identifying, characterizing, remediating, and closing environmental sites on the NTS and associated bombing ranges. The SCEP waste unit consists of: two steam cleaning effluent ponds; layout pad and associated grease trap; Building 6-623 steam cleaning pad; test pad; Building 6-623 grease trap; Building 6-800 steam cleaning pad; Building 6-800 separator; Building 6-621 sump; and the concrete asbestos piping connecting these components to both SCEPs. Clean closure is the recommended closure strategy for the majority of the components within this CAU. Four components of the unit (Building 6-621 Sump, Test Pad Grease Trap, Building 6-623 Steam Cleaning Pad, and North SCEP pipeline) are recommended to be closed in place. This closure plan provides the strategy and backup information necessary to support the clean closure of each of the individual components within CAU 93. Analytical data generated during the characterization field work and earlier sampling events indicates the majority of CAU 93 soil and infrastructure is non-hazardous (i.e., impacted primarily with petroleum hydrocarbons).

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. The only constituent that exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well was lead which was found in wells HSS 3D and PSS 3D. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2007 are included in Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three Wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. Lead presently exceeds the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in two wells from the three sites. As in third quarter 1993, aluminum, iron, and lead were reported in excess of the SRS Flag 2 criteria during first quarter 1994. An elevated concentration of manganese was found in one well at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site during first quarter.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13, 173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During fourth quarter 1992, no constituents analyzed exceeded the PDWS or the SRS Flag 2 criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 26 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow directions are south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates).

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

J. L. Traynor

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Solar ponds and their applications  

SciTech Connect

Solar ponds are probably the simplest and least expensive technology for conversion of solar energy to thermal energy. The solar pond is unique in its ability to act both as collector and as storage. The cost of a solar pond per unit area is considerably less than that of any active collector available today. The combination of their economic and technical factors make solar ponds attractive for district heating and industrial process heat applications. Solar ponds have the potential to displace significant quantities of fossil fuel in low-temperature heating applications in nonurban areas.

Jayadev, T. S.; Edesess, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solar ponds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The different types of solar ponds are described, including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. Then the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds are discussed and costs are compared. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirement is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals. also are required by the permits.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 478: Area 12 T-Tunnel Ponds, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 478, Area 12 T-Tunnel Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 478 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS): 12-23-01, Ponds (5) RAD Area The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 478.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Farm Ponds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farm Ponds Farm Ponds Nature Bulletin No. 410-A March 13, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FARM PONDS Since colonial times, farmers have been scooping out reservoirs or damming small watercourses to impound water for their livestock or satisfy a hankering for a private fishing hole. Such a pond was usually too shallow and was rarely fenced. In hot weather, cattle stood belly- deep in the water and hogs wallowed in the shallows. The shores were trampled bare of vegetation. It served as a swimming place for a flock of tame ducks and the youngsters of the family but, other than bullheads, a few fish could live in it. In most cases the dam was made of earth dug with a team and "slip scraper" to deepen the hole, without a proper spillway for the overflow during heavy rains. As a result, or because of holes tunneled through them by muskrats and crawfish, these dams eventually washed out. A number of them in our Palos preserves, built by early settlers, have been enlarged, provided with adequate spillways, and serve as harbors for fish and wildlife.

23

Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

L. V. Street

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Life History of a Pond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of a Pond History of a Pond Nature Bulletin No. 617 November 12, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE LIFE HISTORY OF A POND In the Palos division of the Forest Preserve District there is an extraordinary number of ponds and sloughs Many were created by damming the outlets from wet places; some were originally farm ponds that we have restored. The largest and probably oldest pond is located in Swallow Cliff Woods, west of the picnic area in a grove of white pines planted about 40 years ago. The pond is dying. Like most others, if undisturbed, after fifty years or so it will be forgotten because in its place there will be trees willows, cottonwoods, soft maples, and probably swamp white and bur oaks. Indeed, at one time it had already filled up until, after being drained by tile, corn was grown there.

26

Pond pH Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pond pH Control Pond pH Control Name: CLIFTON Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have just put in a pond in eastern Ky it is about 400 ft by 150ft the water level is about 6 ft on the low end and about 20ft on the dam end our problem is slate and shale rock the ph is around .That was the soil test before we started digging. What I would like to know is is there anyway to lower the ph and how? Also all the run off to the pond on two sides runs over slate and shale. We were told that if the water was a bright green there was to much acid,and there are a lot of crawdads in this bottom area. Replies: Dear Clifton, re. pH control of ponds, see: http://www.grassrootsnursery.com/answers/h20qual/queswq12.htm There are various pond care companies. Here's one: http://www.pondauthority.com/pondcare.htm

27

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

NA

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006 are included in Appendix C of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Solar ponds for industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar ponds offer perhaps the simplest technique for conversion of solar energy to thermal energy, which can be used for industrial process heat. It is unique in its capability in acting both as collector and storage. Further, the cost of solar pond per unit area is less than any active collectors available today. Combination of these economic and technical factors make solar ponds attractive as a fuel saver in IPH applications. Detailed calculations are given for solar ponds in two specific applications: providing hot water for aluminum can washing in a manufacturing plant and hot water for washing in a large commercial laundry. With the help of computer codes developed at SERI for other solar IPH systems, it is shown that solar ponds are far more cost effective than any other solar IPH technology for these applications.

Brown, K.C.; Edesess, M.; Jayadev, T.S.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Solar ponds: a selected bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations on: regular solar ponds; shallow solar ponds; and patents. Certain references are specifically recommended. The data bases searched for the bibliography are listed. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 482: Area 15 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document /Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 482 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 482 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and one adjacent area: CAS 15-06-01, U15e Muckpile; CAS 15-06-02, U15a Muckpile; CAS 15-38-01, Area 15 U15a/e Ponds; and Drainage below the U15a Muckpile. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions on the three CASs and the adjacent area of CAU 482. To support this recommendation, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was performed in September 2002. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to determine appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 482 dataset from the CAI was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Tier 2 FALS were determined for the hazardous constituents of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-diesel-range organics (DRO) and the radionuclides americium (Am)-241, cesium (Cs)-137, plutonium (Pu)-238, and Pu-239. The Tier 2 FALs were calculated for the radionuclides using site-specific information. The hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO were compared to the PALs defined in the CAIP, and because none of the preliminary action levels (PALs) were exceeded, the PALs became the FALs. The radionuclide FALs were calculated using the Residual Radioactive (RESRAD) code (version 6.21). The RESRAD calculation determined the activities of all radionuclides that together would sum to an exposure dose of 25 millirem per year to a site receptor (based on their relative abundances at each CAS). Based on the field investigation, the following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) CAS 15-06-01 - None. (2) CAS 15-06-02 - Cs-137 and Pu-239. (3) CAS 15-38-01 - Am-241, Cs-137, Pu-238, and Pu-239. (4) Drainage below CAS 15-06-02 - Cs-137 and Pu-239. Based on the data and risk evaluations, the DQO data needs presented in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan were met, and the data accurately represent the radiological and chemical risk present at CAU 482. Based on the results of the CAI data evaluation, it was determined that closure in place with use restrictions is the appropriate corrective action for CAU 482 and that use restrictions will effectively control exposure to future land users. This is based on the fact that even though the FALs were exceeded in a few samples, this remote, controlled access site poses only limited risk overall to public health and the environment. Given the relatively low levels of contamination present, it would create a greater hazard to worker safety, public health, and the environment to remove the contamination, transport it, and bury it at another location. Therefore, DTRA provides the following recommendations: (1) Close COCs in place at CAS 15-06-02, CAS 15-38-01, and the drainage below CAS 15-06-02 with use restrictions. (2) No further action for CAU 482. (3) A Notice of Completion be issued to DTRA by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 482. (4) Move CAU 482 from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Par Pond water balance  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 2: December 2009. In this issue: DOE - NDA relationship recognized at International Environmental Cleanup Conference NDA - DOE Standing Committee Meeting commends progress Topic Area Update: Significant Progress Being Made Information Exchange is one of "DOE's best business practices" Glass Chemistry - A Flagship of Progress Under the Statement of Intent US Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board visit UK Visit from Senior Sellafield Ltd staff to Hanford considered a 'Great Success' Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 3 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6

34

Uranium studies in the Tims Branch and Steed Pond system  

SciTech Connect

During the weekend of September 2--3, 1984, a part of the wooden spillway for Steed Pond gave way and the pond slowly drained. Consideration is being given to leaving Steed Pond dry. Steed Pond has accumulated some of the uranium discharged from 300 Area operations and past surveys have shown that the uranium concentration in the sediments ranges between 20 and 531 pCi/gm. The recently completed aerial survey of the exposed area of Steed Pond showed that the uranium was widely spread in the sediments of Steed Pond. Until ground cover is established over the exposed pond sediments, they will be subject to erosion. As much as 90 tons of sediment could be eroded from the exposed sediments in Steed Pond the first year, but the erosion could be reduced to 5--15 tons by establishing a ground cover such as rye grass. Only about 40% of the eroded sediment would be delivered to Upper Three Runs Creek, because most of the eroded sediment deposited before it reaches Upper Three Runs Creek. Less than 20 mCi of uranium would be transported downstream the first year from erosion of Steed Pond sediments, and this could be reduced to 2-- 5 mCi/year if ground cover is established.

Hayes, D.W.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Partial oxidation of Raffinate II and other mixtures of n-Butane and n-Butenes to maleic anhydride in a fixed-bed reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The utilisation of the C4 streams of steamcrackers by converting raffinate II to maleic anhydride was studied. The oxidation reactions were investigated in a laboratory-scale (more)

Brandstdter, Willi Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Demonstration of a TODGA/TBP process for recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from a PUREX raffinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of the partitioning of trivalent actinides from a PUREX raffinate has been demonstrated with a TODGA + TBP extractant mixture dissolved in an industrial aliphatic solvent TPH. Based on the results coming from cold and hot batch extraction studies and with the aid of computer code calculations a continuous counter current process have been developed and two flowsheets were tested using miniature centrifugal contactors. The feed solutions was a synthetic PUREX raffinate, spiked with {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs. More than 99.9 % of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides were extracted and back-extracted and very high decontamination factors to most fission products were obtained. Co-extraction of zirconium, molybdenum and palladium was prevented using oxalic acid and HEDTA. However 10% of ruthenium was extracted and only 3 % could be back extracted using diluted nitric acid. (authors)

Modolo, G.; Asp, H.; Vijgen, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energieforschung, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Malmbeck, R.; Magnusson, D. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements - ITU, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sorel, C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Valrho - CEA, DRCP/SCPS, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Baseline mapping study of the Steed Pond aquifer and vadose zone beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the second phase of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this second phase is to map the structure and distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized sediment) within the vadose zone beneath A/M Area. The results presented in this report will assist future characterization and remediation activities in the vadose zone and upper aquifer zones in A/M Area.

Jackson, D.G. Jr.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 1: Summer 2009. In this issue: The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement Initial Topic Areas for Discussion US DOE Represented at NDA-Sponsored Pu Workshop DOE - NDA Implementation Plan (4th Standing Committee Meeting held in Phoenix ) SRNL and NNL Collaborate on RadBall Trials NDA Provides Support to EM in Prioritization of D&D Technology Needs DOE and NRC Criticality Team visit Sellafield NDA Nucleargraduates Program Participant Seconded to DOE Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 More Documents & Publications RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization

40

Solar Ponds - What Are They?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar ponds can provide low cost solar energy collection as well as low temperature heat storage. Currently there are two types of solar ponds in an advanced state of development in the U.S. Each system uses a different collection and energy storage technique. The first system uses a large bag of water (a water bed in a greenhouse) which collects the solar energy during the day. After the sun's energy can no longer be collected the water is transferred to an insulated storage tank for use the next day. The second system uses a salt gradient within a water filled pond. The gradient prevents natural convective currents from dissipating the collected energy. The gradient pond has a solar heated layer within the pond. In this layer, a heat exchanger is installed to retrieve the collected solar energy. A solar pond of this design is providing heated pool water for a municipal pool in Miamisburg, Ohio. This overview paper reviews the various designs of solar ponds and how they can be used to collect and store solar energy. The performance and cost data available will be presented and discussed.

Anderson, A. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ORNL Pond; Past, Present, and Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL'S Pond: ORNL'S Pond: Past, Present, and Future Mike Ryon Summer 2008 All pictures: ORNL staff photos ORNL'S Pond: Past, Present, and Future * Pond was created in 1961. * Swans were added in 1964, as a result of campaign by physicist Frances Pleasonton. * First swans named Y and Not, lived more than 10 years, and sired more than 50 offspring. * Swans were viewed as "symbolic of Oak Ridge's tranquility and the natural beauty that surrounds the Laboratory." Transition of the Pond * Although a fixture on campus, ORNL Swan Pond was not integrated into the landscape. * As it was managed, pond invited use by large numbers of Canada geese. * Fish fauna of pond was dominated by non-native species. August 1965 Initially it looked like a farm pond. Transition of the Pond

42

Convection Patterns in a Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unusual convection patterns were observed in snow-slush an a pond in Seattle, Wash., during January 1980 and again during February 1981. The patterns are reminiscent of spoke-type convection discovered experimentally by Busse and Whitehead (1974)...

Kristina B. Katsaros

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Integrated Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is directed toward solving new challenges to meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge limits for ammonia and selected metals from coal-fired power plants. Based on the field and laboratory study of fly ash ponds at five operating coal-fired power plants, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in fly ash sluicing systems are discussed and recommendations are made as to how to best manage the pond...

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

46

Across the Pond Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across the Pond Newsletters Across the Pond Newsletters Across the Pond Newsletters April 10, 2013 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 8: Winter 2013. April 15, 2012 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 7: Spring 2012. April 1, 2011 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 6: Spring 2011. December 1, 2010 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 5: Winter 2010. July 1, 2010 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 4: Summer 2010. April 15, 2010

47

Analysis of Evaporation Data From Heated Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled field experiments have improved understanding of the role evaporation plays in the thermal performance and water consumption of utility cooling ponds. The data show significant effects of water surface temperature, fetch or wind direction, and pond sheltering.

1987-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway`s opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date.

Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Densification of pond ash by blasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF OF ENERGY ACROSS THE POND Issue 1: Summer 2009 The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement The US DOE (Department of Energy) and the UK NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) signed an agreement in March 2007 in which both parties agreed that there was mutual benefit in working together and sharing information in the development and application of technologies and approaches to pressing needs in a number of areas including environmental remediation, radioactive waste management and decommissioning & deactivation (D&D). Since then there have been a number of `Information Exchange' activities between the parties discussing a wide range of topics which have assisted both parties in their approach to

52

Use of American Lotus in Pond Remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Lotus in Pond Remediation Adam S. Riazi, Mathematics Department, Lincoln County High School, WV and Michael G. Ryon, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National...

53

raffinate_pit.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

St. Charles, MO 63304 (970) 248-6070 (monitored continuously) or (877) 695-5322 (toll-free) http:www.lm.doe.govweldonSites.aspx 12122011 Please e-mail your questions or...

54

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 5: Winter 2010. In this issue: Introduction 7th Standing Committee Meeting between USDOE - UKNDA held in Sellafield. Topic Area Update Group From Sellafield Visits Idaho To Exchange Information On Hot Isostatic Pressing Glass Chemistry Collaboration Update International Partnership Workshop on DOE Used Nuclear Fuel & High Level Waste NWTRB Discusses Technical Lessons Gained From NDA HighLevel Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts To Date Richard Abitz From SRNL Delivers Key Address At 2010 UK Decommissioning And Waste Management Conference In Penrith, Cumbria Upcoming Events: Waste Management Conference in Phoenix Across the Pond Newsletter - Issue 5 More Documents & Publications

55

Case Studies in Ash Pond Management, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Toward Developing Integrated Strategies for Managing Multiple Constituents in Ash Pond Discharges," EPRI's second workshop on Ash Pond Management, was hosted by TVA on May 16, 2006, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The presentations in this workshop reflected specific research challenges identified by participants in the first Ash Pond Management workshop, held in 2004. Among the presentations given in this second workshop were the following: Ash Pond Limnology Optimizing Ash Pond Treatment of Ammonia Predic...

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

Man-Made Lakes and Ponds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAN-MADE LAKES AND PONDS Conservation is on the march. Slowly, we are stopping the pollution of our streams by sewage and industrial wastes; we are restoring many lakes and...

57

Easton Pond Business Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Easton Pond Business Center Easton Pond Business Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Easton Pond Business Center Facility Easton Pond Business Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Middletown RI Coordinates 41.50220171984°, -71.28672659° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.50220171984,"lon":-71.28672659,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, J.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

59

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDAUS DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 8: Winter 2013. In this issue: UK...

60

Evaluation of historical and analytical data on the TAN TSF-07 Disposal Pond  

SciTech Connect

The Technical Support Facility (TSF)-07 Disposal Pond, located at Test Area North at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, has been identified as part of Operable Unit 1-06 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Department is conducting an evaluation of existing site characterization data for the TSF-07 Disposal Pond Track 1 investigation. The results from the site characterization data will be used to determine whether the operable unit will undergo a Track 2 investigation, an interim action, a remedial investigation/feasibility study, or result in a no-action decision. This report summarizes activities relevant to wastewaters discharged to the pond and characterization efforts conducted from 1982 through 1991. Plan view and vertical distribution maps of the significant contaminants contained in the pond are included. From this evaluation it was determined that cobalt-60, cesium-137, americium-241, mercury, chromium, and thallium are significant contaminants for soils. This report also evaluates the migration tendencies of the significant contaminants into the perched water zone under the pond and the surrounding terrain to support the investigation.

Medina, S.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

62

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Excavations in Hanford ponds, cribs, or ditches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Unplanned Excavation/Drilling in Pond/Ditch/Crib. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Salt concentration gradient solar ponds: modeling and optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation design tool has been developed to simulate dynamic thermal performance for salinity gradient solar ponds. This program will be available to the public through the SERI Solar Analysis Methods Center. Dynamic programming techniques are applied to allow significant user flexibility in analyzing pond performance under realistic load and weather conditions. Finite element techniques describe conduction heat transfer through the pond, earth, and edges. Results are presented that illustrate typical thermal performance of salinity gradient ponds. Sensitivity studies of salty pond thermal performance with respect to geometry, load, and optical transmission are included.

Jayadev, T. S.; Henderson, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Across The Pond Across The Pond 1 DOE-NDA discuss Spent Fuel Shipments Meeting with Dounreay Site Restoration Ltd. on Gap (non-US origin) Material Shipment: Environmental Management (EM) supported a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) led team on a visit to the Dounreay Site, near Thurso, Scotland on July 14-15, 2010. The purpose of the visit was to meet with DSRL representatives on a potential Gap spent fuel (non U.S.- origin) shipment to the US at the Savannah River Site. The EM-HQ representatives included Yvette Collazo, Director for Technology Innovation and Development and Gary DeLeon, Director for Nuclear Materials Disposition. Gary said "This visit gave me the opportunity to see first hand the complexities involved with planning and logistics for shipping spent fuel back to

66

Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds  

SciTech Connect

The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project`s successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Bear, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Update: Cooling tower and spray pond technology  

SciTech Connect

The 9th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium, under the auspices of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, took place at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Belgium, in September 1994. Technical topics discussed included cooling system design, performance, operation, environmental effects, modeling and components. Symposium proceedings will not be published. However, information of primary interest to staffs of power plants in the United States is summarized in this article.

Bartz, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021  

SciTech Connect

The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of the Miamsburg Salt-Gradient, Solar Pond  

SciTech Connect

This project is directed toward data collection and evaluation of the performance of the largest working, salt-gradient, solar pond in the world.

Wittenberg, Layton J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

RAFFINATE CHARACTERIZATION PION RIDGE MILL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were: I. The Uranium Fuel Cycle Facilities 2. Underground Uranium Mines 3. Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings 4. Licensed Uranium Mill Tailings 5. High-Level Waste Disposal Facilities 6. Department of Energy-2 ...........................................1.2.2 Uranium Mills 1-2 ...............................1.2.3 Uranium Conversion Facilities 1

71

Improving acid sulfate soils for brackish water aquaculture ponds in South Sulawesi, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Brackish water aquaculture is one of the largest coastal industries in Indonesia. This farming system involves the construction of ponds m coastal sediments. Many ponds (more)

Mustafa, Akhmad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

Hartman, Mary J.

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

Par Pond phytoplankton in association with refilling of the pond: Final Report for sampling from February 1995 -- September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of phytoplankton analyses from Par Pond samples collected between February 1995 and September 1996. The principal objective of the study was to determine the effect of refilling of Par Pond following repair of the dam on the phytoplankton community. Algal blooms are often responsible for fish kills and other detrimental effects in ponds and lakes, and it was postulated that decaying vegetation from formerly exposed sediments might trigger algal blooms that could result in fish kills in Par Pond following the refill. Sporadic algal blooms involving blue-green algae were detected, especially during the summer of 1996. However, the data derived from the study demonstrates that overall, the refilling effort caused no significant negative impact to the pond attributable to phytoplankton dynamics.

Wilde, E.W.; Johnson, M.A.; Cody, W.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Solar pond research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of solar pond research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. The main issues in the theory of solar ponds are discussed. Among these are the interfacial-boundary-layer model, models for interface motion and pond performance, heat extraction, and ground heat loss. The core of the research effort at Los Alamos was the development of a one-dimensional computer program to accurately predict dynamic performance of a solar pond. The computer model and the experiments that were designed and performed to validate it are described. The experiments include two laboratory tanks wherein temperature, salinity, and flow visualization data were obtained and a 232 m/sup 2/ outdoor solar pond. Results from preliminary validation show good agreement between the pond's predicted dynamic behavior and that which actually occurred in the experiments. More validation using data from full-sized solar ponds is needed. A new correlation for the ratio of interfacial salt-flux to heat-flux is proposed which agrees well with our data. Recommendations for future research are given.

Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Grimmer, D.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDAUS DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 2: December 2009. In this issue: DOE - NDA relationship recognized...

79

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 3 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDAUS DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 3: Spring 2010. In this issue: DOE Hosts Next Generation Melter...

80

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDAUS DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 4: Summer 2010. In this issue: DOE-NDA discuss Spent Fuel Shipments...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDAUS DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 6: Spring 2011. In this issue: 8th Standing Committee Meeting A...

82

International cooling-tower and spray pond symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the manuscripts of sixty-one papers that were presented at the 7th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, organized by the B.E. Vedeneev Institute (VNIIG) and held in Leningrad, USSR, in June 1990. This report represents a worldwide state-of-the-art survey of recent work on cooling towers and spray ponds. Individual papers are indexed separately on the energy database.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Distribution of transuranic elements in a freshwater pond ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results are reported from a study initiated on the Hanford Reservation concerning the ecological behavior of $sup 238$Pu, $sup 239$Pu, $sup 240$Pu, and $sup 241$Am in a freshwater environment. This study involves a waste pond which has been receiving Pu processing wastes for about 30 years. The pond has a sufficiently established ecosystem to provide an excellent location for limnological characterization. In addition, the ecological distribution of Pu and Am was investigated. The pond is also highly enriched with nutrients, thus supporting a high level of algal and macrophyte production. Seston (30 percent diatoms) appears to be the principal concentrators of Pu transuranics in the pond system. The major sink for Pu and Am in this system is the sediments. Organic floc, overlaying the pond sediments, is also a major concentrator of transuranics in this system. Aside from the seston and floc, no other ecological components of the pond appear to have concentrations significantly greater than those of the sediment. Dragonfly, larvae, watercress, and snails show concentrations which approximate those of the sediments but nearly all other food web components have levels of Pu and Am which are lower than those of the sediments, thus, Pu and Am seem to be relatively immobile in the aquatic ecosystem. (CH)

Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Five synthetic rubber pond liners protect against leakage and weather  

SciTech Connect

More than 137 million cu ft of pipeline quality gas is produced daily at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project in Beulah, ND. The facility is the only commercial plant in the US which produces gaseous and liquid fuels from low-grade coal. The plant needs to recycle and reuse 100% of the organic process wastewater, requiring a complicated treatment system of cooling towers, evaporators, a liquid waste incinerator and other units, each of which has its own surge pond. In total, the plant has five surge ponds which hold near 80 million gallons. To prevent the seepage of wastewater from the surge ponds into the ground water, a liner material was needed that would fulfill several design criteria. The liner had to be resistant to degradation caused by a very wide range of temperatures and it had to have a low coefficient of expansion. Resistance to both organic and inorganic chemical substances was another key requirement. Finally, the liner material needed to be easy to seam during field installation. An elastomeric membrane liner using the synthetic rubber and reinforcing polyester scrim best met the plant's requirements. One of the primary reasons for selecting synthetic rubber was its low coefficient of expansion. Extreme seasonal weather conditions, with temperatures ranging from below zero in the winter to over 100/sup 0/F in the summer, are common in North Dakota. And because the level of wastewater in the ponds constantly varies, a liner is frequently exposed to the elements. Overall, the synthetic rubber pond liners have performed through extreme weather conditions and have proven to be a cost-effective solution to wastewater storage at the gasification project.

Weinreich, G.; Hofsess, R.; Toy, D.A.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Surface and subsurface soils at the Pond B dam: July 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pond B, 685-13G, is an inactive reactor cooling impoundment built in 1961 on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Between 1961 and 1964, Pond B received R-Reactor cooling water discharges that were contaminated with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and plutonium. Though the pond has not been used since 1964, radionuclides from the contaminated cooling water remain in the water and in the surface sediments of the pond. The current proposal to fix and repair the Pond B dam structure includes installing a new drain system and monitoring equipment. The dam will be reinforced with additional previous material on the downstream face of the dam. The objectives of this report are to describe the sampling methodology used during the July 1998 sampling event at the downstream face of the Pond B dam and in Pond B, present the results of the sampling event, and compare, where possible, these results to related risk-based standards.

Halverson, N.V.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

87

Microsoft Word - Poorman Ponds_CX Memo_20120607.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poorman Ponds Property Funding Poorman Ponds Property Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition, or acquisition of interests in land and associated buildings for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, or fish and wildlife management provided that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that could pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Twisp, Okanogan County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation (MSRF) to acquire approximately 22.1 acres of land and 1,455 feet of the Twisp

88

Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

MHK Projects/Twin Pond | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twin Pond Twin Pond < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.7971,"lon":-89.1361,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Turbidity study of solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of experiments were conducted to study the turbidity reduction in solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source. The experiment on the turbidity reduction efficiency with chemicals indicates that alum (KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O) has a better turbidity control property because of its strongly flocculating and also well depressing the growing of algae and bacteria in the seawater. In comparison with bittern and seawater, our experiment shows that the residual brine after desalination can keep limpidity for a long time even without any chemical in it. Experiments were also conducted on the diffusion of turbidity and salinity, which show that the turbidity did not diffuse upwards in the solution. In the experiment on subsidence of soil in the bittern and saline with the same salinity, it was found that soil subsided quite quickly in the pure saline water, but very slowly in the bittern. In this paper we also proposed an economical method to protect the solar pond from the damage of rain. Finally, thermal performance of a solar pond was simulated in the conditions of different turbidities using a thermal diffusion model. (author)

Li, Nan; Sun, Wence; Shi, Yufeng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Yin, Fang [YLab, 358 South 700 East, Suit B-139, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 (United States); Zhang, Caihong [Dalian Thermoelectric Group Co. Ltd., Dalian 116001 (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Members of DOE's Office of Members of DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) held their 8th Standing Committee Meeting on March 2, 2011, at the annual Waste Management 2011 Conference in Phoenix, AZ. The meeting focused on the progress achieved since the last time the committee met in the UK in October 2010 as well as new areas for collaboration such as Project Management and Supply Chain Management. The general concensus was that the collaboration efforts are progressing steadily and that both organizations are recognizing the value of the Agreement. From left-to-right: Jim Marra (Senior Scientist, IPA, DOE), Steve Schneider (Director, Office of Waste Processing, DOE), Edgard Espinosa (US DOE Fellow, Florida International University), Graham Jonsson (National Programmes, NDA), Laurie Judd (VP, NuVision Engineering), Jay Roach (President, Nexergy

92

Microsoft Word - 11063904 DVP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Durango, Colorado, Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site and Processing Site August 2011 LMS/DUD/DUP/S00611 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2011, Durango, Colorado August 2011 RIN 11063904 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ...............................................................3 Durango Processing Site Mill Tailings Area Sample Location Map...............................................4 Durango Processing Site Raffinate Ponds Area Sample Location Map ..........................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7

93

120-D-1 (100-D) ponds training plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Environmental Restoration Contractor Team training plan for the 100-D Ponds treatment, storage, and disposal unit. This plan is intended to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303-330 and the Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit. The WAC 173-303-330(1)(d)(ii, v, vi) requires that personnel be familiar, where applicable, with waste feed cut-off systems, proper responses to groundwater contamination incidents, shutdown of operations, response to fire or explosion, and other process operation activities.

G. B. Mitchem

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Technical and economic feasibility of salt-gradient solar ponds at the Truscott Brine Lake of the Red River Chloride Control Project. A report to the House-Senate Committee on Appropriations of the Ninety-Seventh Congress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Truscott Brine Lake is being constructed to impound highly brackish water from a number of sources which would normally flow into the Wichita River, a tributary of the Red River in Knox County, Texas. A 35.4-km (22-mile) pipeline is being constructed to carry the brines from their primary source to the Truscott Brine Lake site. The reservoir is designed to contain 100 years of brine emissions from three chloride emission areas in the Wichita River Basin. The solar ponds and power generating facilities would be located in the Bluff Creek Arm of Truscott Brine Lake. The Truscott Brine Lake study includes: survey of suitability of Truscott Lake site, review of solar pond technology, preconceptual design of solar salt pond power plant, and economic evaluation.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, pro- duct or process disclosed, nor represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. F Available from National Technical Information Service

97

Direct-contact condensers for solar pond power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a direct-contact condenser as a way of reducing the cost of electricity from an organic Rankine cycle power plant coupled to a solar pond is examined. Three possible direct-contact heat exchangers are considered: drop-type, bubble-type, and packed-bed. Each condenser is designed to operate with a deaerator and a degasser to reduce contamination and loss of working fluid. Appropriate correlations and models from the literature for heat and mass transfer, particle terminal velocity, and particle production are presented. Each piece of equipment is sized and costed. Finally, the cost of the entire power plant is compared with that of a plant using a conventional shell-and-tube condenser. For two of the three direct-contact designs, a reduction in the cost of electricity is estimated. However, the reduction is not significant enough to compensate for the uncertainties involved in the relatively new technology of direct-contact heat transfer.

Fisher, E.M.; Wright, J.D.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Shallow solar ponds for industrial process heat: the ERDA--SOHIO project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy group at LLL has developed shallow solar ponds to supply cost-competitive solar heated water for industrial use. A prototype system has been built and put into operation at the site of the Sohio Petroleum Company's new uranium mine and milling complex near Grants, New Mexico. When operational, a projected full-size system is expected to furnish approximately half of the 10/sup 5/ GJ (approximately 10/sup 5/ MBtu) annual site process heat requirement. A description of the physical features of shallow solar ponds is presented along with a method for analyzing pond performance. An economic analysis of the projected Sohio solar system is provided.

Dickinson, W.C.; Clark, A.V.; Iantuono, A.

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Shallow solar ponds for industrial process heat: the ERDA--SOHIO project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy group at LLL has developed shallow solar ponds to supply cost-competitive solar heated water for industrial use. A prototype system has been built and put into operation at the site of the Sohio Petroleum Company's new uranium mine and milling complex near Grants, New Mexico. When operational, a projected full-size system is expected to furnish approximately half of the 10/sup 5/ GJ annual site process heat requirement. A description of the physical features of shallow solar ponds is presented along with a method for analyzing pond performance. An economic analysis of the projected Sohio solar system is provided.

Dickinson, W.C.; Clark, A.F.; Iantuono, A.

1976-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Engineering and cost analysis of a dry cooling system augmented with a thermal storage pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and cost study of the capacitive thermal storage pond added to a state-of-the-art dry cooling system is described. The purpose of the study was to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for thermal electric power plants using a dry cooling system that includes a thermal storage pond. Using the modified BNW-I computer code, the effect of varying significant design parameters was investigated. The parametric study included studying the effects of varying turbine type, pond size, replacement energy costing, capacity penalty methodology, pond location with respect to the dry cooling tower, design temperature, and site location (meteorology). Incremental power production costs for dry cooling (i.e., the portion of the cost of bus-bar electricity from the plant which is attributable to the cost of building and operating the heat rejection system) with a thermal storage pond system were determined for meteorologies of both Wyodak, Wyoming and Phoenix, Arizona. For Wyodak the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 2.81 mills/kWh as compared to 2.55 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. For Phoenix the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 3.66 mills/kWh as compared to 4.31 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. If the use of a modified conventional turbine with the dry-cooled system is stipulated in order to stay with proven technology for large turbines, then results of this study show that in extremely hot climates the thermal storage pond can reduce the cost of dry cooling. If no cost penalty is assigned to high back pressure turbines and it can be used, then the thermal storage pond has no advantage in hot climates. However, collateral use of the pond for makeup or emergency cooling water storage may decreae the cost. (LCL)

Drost, M.K.; Allemann, R.T.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Freshwater oligochaeta in mining subsidence ponds in the Upper Silesia region of southern Poland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I surveyed the benthic oligochaetes in three coal mining subsidence ponds in a heavily industrialized region of Upper Silesia, southern Poland. The fauna present differed in many respects from that living in natural and unpolluted water bodies. Nineteen species (11 Naididae and eight Tubificidae) were found. The two most consistently abundant species in all three ponds were Limnodrilus hoffimeisteri and Tubifex tubifex, both of which are ubiquitous and common in Poland. Polamothrix bavaricus, which is considered a rare species in Poland, was found consistently in the ponds.

Krodkiewska, M. [Silesian University, Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Hydrobiology

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Environmental sampling program for a solar evaporation pond for liquid radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is evaluating solar evaporation as a method for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes. This report describes a sampling program designed to monitor possible escape of radioactivity to the environment from a solar evaporation pond prototype constructed at LASL. Background radioactivity levels at the pond site were determined from soil and vegetation analyses before construction. When the pond is operative, the sampling program will qualitatively and quantitatively detect the transport of radioactivity to the soil, air, and vegetation in the vicinity. Possible correlation of meteorological data with sampling results is being investigated and measures to control export of radioactivity by biological vectors are being assessed.

Romero, R.; Gunderson, T.C.; Talley, A.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Microcrustaceans (Branchiopoda and Copepoda) of Wetland Ponds and Impoundments on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, contains an abundance of freshwater wetlands and impoundments. Four large impoundments, as well as several small, abandoned farm and mill ponds, and about 400 Carolina bays and other small, isolated depression wetland ponds are located within the 893 km2 area of the SRS. Crustaceans of the orders Branchiopoda and Copepoda are nearly ubiquitous in these water bodies. Although small in size, these organisms are often very abundant. They consequently play an important trophic role in freshwater food webs supporting fish, larval salamanders, larval insects, and numerous other animals, aquatic and terrestrial. This report provides an introduction to the free-living microcrustaceans of lentic water bodies on the SRS and a comprehensive list of species known to occur there. Occurrence patterns are summarized from three extensive survey studies, supplemented with other published and unpublished records. In lieu of a key, we provide a guide to taxonomic resources and notes on undescribed species. Taxa covered include the orders Cladocera, Anostraca, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata of the Subclass Branchiopoda and the Superorders Calanoida and Cyclopoida of Subclass Copepoda. Microcrustaceans of the Superorder Harpacticoida of the Subclass Copepoda and Subclass Ostracoda are also often present in lentic water bodies. They are excluded from this report because they have not received much study at the species level on the SRS.

Adrienne E. DeBiase; Barbara E. Taylor

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management  

SciTech Connect

The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L ARID (Algae Raceway Integrated Design) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8 to 20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9 C, the water temperature was 18 C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 - 25 % and 5 - 15 %, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acid comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 vs 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.34 vs. 3.47 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

Crowe, Braden J.; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Chavis, Aaron R.; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Huesemann, Michael H.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Best management practices plan for the Chestnut Ridge-Filled Coal Ash Pond at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP) Project has been established to satisfy Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2. FCAP is on Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant. A 62-foot high earthen dam across Upper McCoy Branch was constructed in 1955 to create a pond to serve as a settling basin for fly and bottom ashes generated by burning coal at the Y-12 Steam Plant. Ash from the steam was mixed with water to form a slurry and then pumped to the crest of Chestnut Ridge and released through a large pipe to flow across the Sluice Channel area and into the pond. The ash slurry eventually overtopped the dam and flowed along Upper McCoy Branch to Rogers Quarry. The purpose of this document is to provide a site-specific Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan for construction associated with environmental restoration activities at the FCAP Site.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Transport of radioactive droplet moisture from a source in a nuclear power plant spray pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to a change in the microclimate in the region surrounding a nuclear power plant resulting from the emission of vapor form a cooling tower, evaporation of water from the water surface of a cooling pond or a spray pond, in the latter case direct radioactive contamination of the underlying surface around the nuclear power plant can also occur due to discharge of process water (radioactive) into the pond and its transport in the air over a certain distance in the form of droplet moisture. A typical example may be the situation at the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in 1986 when accidental discharge of process water into the cooling pond occurred. Below we present a solution for the problem of transport of droplet moisture taking into account its evaporation, which may be used to estimate the scale of radioactive contamination of the locality.

Elokhin, A.P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties -- Alternative wastewater treatment: Advanced Integrated Pond systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a discussion of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Advanced Integrated Pond System as an alternative for other more costly municipal waste water treatment plants.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mitigation of SCR-Ammonia Related Aqueous Effects in a Fly Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated fly ash resulting from secondary injection of ammonia to mitigate SO3 produced by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system altered the water quality of a fly ash pond at a coal-fired power generation station. This project attempted to improve water quality by encouraging the growth of algae in the pond to remove ammonia, while keeping other important parameters (pH, total suspended solids, Biological Oxygen Demand, and metals) within allowable limits.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interface between land and water is often a dynamic zone that responds to relatively short-term climatic and hydrologic forces. Coastal salt marshes occupy this zone between land and sea and typically are comprised of vegetated marsh intersected by channels and shallow ponds that are subject to flooding by winds, tides, and storm surges. Coastal salt marshes are widely regarded as zones of high macrophyte productivity. However, microalgae may contribute more to salt marsh productivity than previously realized, underscoring the importance of understanding algal dynamics in such systems. Benthic and planktonic chlorophyll-a (surrogate for total algal biomass), sediment AFDW, total suspended solids, salinity, and nutrients were examined in marsh ponds in the subtropical Guadalupe Estuary, TX, USA to determine the effects of hydrologic connections on algal biomass in this system. From May 2005 May 2006 there were several pond connection, disconnection, and desiccation events. During periods of disconnection, algal biomass was higher in both the benthos and the water column than during connection events when supposed flushing occurred. Connection events also flushed out high NH4 accumulating in pond surface waters, but did not increase NOx. Therefore, the primary source of DIN seemed to be nutrient cycling within the ponds. There was a temporal effect on surface water salinity, which increased throughout the sampling period as bay water levels and subsequent pond connections decreased, demonstrating interannual variability and the link between seasons (wet vs. dry) and marsh inundation patterns (high water periods vs. low water periods) in this estuary.

Miller, Carrie J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

111

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

06-0500 06-0500 14.4 06-0501 14.53 15-M03S 14.97 18-0500 14.34 18-0502 14.23 18-0521 14.18 18-0525 14.31 18-0526 13.79 20-M025 14.26 20-M035 14.4 21-0502 12.66 21-0503 12.34 21-0504 13.12 21-0505 13.23 18-0524 14.24 12-0539 12.86 18-RW02 14.09 18-RW03 14.16 12-0523 14.43 12-0525 13.7 12-S29C 14.25 12-S32B 14.4 12-S35B 14.18 12-S37B 14.59 15-0530 14.13 15-M14S 14.68 12-0509 14.52 12-0513 13.64 12-0517 14.08 12-0521 14.35 12-0526 12.88 12-RW01 14.55 12-S31B 14.25 12-S36B 13.99 12-TE03 13.95 15-0507 13.45 15-0510 14.1 15-0515 14.24 15-0516 13.95 15-0520 13.52 15-M27S 13.84 15-M32S 14.61 18-0504 14.4 20-M003 14.54 20-M012 14.96 20-M024 14.55 20-M40S 14.45 12-S67C 13.92 12-S67B 13.85 12-S68B 13.62 12-S68C 13.47 12-S69B 12.96 12-S69C 12.95 12-S70B 13.37 12-S70C 13.4 12-S71C 13.39 12-S72B 13.11 12-S72C 12.99 12-S73B 12.95 12-S73C 12.87 15-0568 14.05 15-0571 14.4 18-RW0501 14.2 20-RW01

112

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12-S30B 713.6 12-S30B 713.6 12-S33C 1863 12-S35B 38320 15-0534 ND 20-M003 ND 20-M005 ND 20-M054 3.9 12-S68D 164.7 12-S69C ND 12-S70B 30 12-S70C 70 12-S71C 77 12-S72C 3.8 12-S73B ND 12-S73C 11.9 12-S67B 349.9 12-S67C 197.2 12-S67D 56.7 15-0566 101 12-0527 ND 12-S69D ND 12-S70D 43.2 12-S71D 28.2 12-S72D ND 12-S71B ND 12-S69B ND 20-M028 ND 20-M011 ND 20-M019 ND 20-0503 4.1 20-M024 ND 20-M025 ND 20-M035 2.9 20-M036 ND 20-M38D ND 20-M40S ND 20-M023 ND 20-M41D ND 15-0569 5.6 20-MWL3 996.1 20-M049 5.6 20-M22D 4.2 15-0559 ND 15-M32S ND 15-M32D ND 06-0500 ND 12-0526 8.5 12-0509 ND 12-0514 46.2 12-0524 1214 12-0513 ND 12-0525 1.4 12-0515 ND 12-0516 ND 12-0517 ND 12-0550-3 ND 21-0502 2.1 21-0503 ND 21-0504 ND 21-0505 ND 15-0535 17.6 15-0537 750 15-M16D ND 15-M16S ND 12-0518 1.5 12-S68C 35 12-S73D ND 20-M012 ND 20-0502 32 20-M40D ND 15-M27D ND

113

A Limnological Approach to the Management of Fly Ash Disposal Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash disposal ponds are found at half of the U.S. coal burning power plants and receive a mixture of fly ash and water used to sluice the ash from the power plant to the pond. Leaching of metals, notably Cu, As, and Se, from fly ash can be decreased by control of inflow pH, but their release through the discharge to surface waters remains a problem, particularly for Se. Comanagement of low volume wastes of varying chemical composition and volume with fly ash make the management of water quality at the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 7: Spring 2012. In this issue: DOE and UK NDA Renew Information Exchange Agreement Topic Area Update and Future Plans International...

115

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tex. , 3rd Ann. Solar Heating & Cooling R&D Contractors'Proceedings, Passive Solar Heating & Cooling~'-~&-l~orkshop,Solar Jubilee, Phoenix, AZ, June 2-6, 1980 A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING

Tavana, Medhi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

Hranac, K.C. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Hopkins, J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Decontaminate Effect of Paddy Field on Waste Water from Fish Pond under Different Residence Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater from aquiculture contains usefu1 nutrients for plant, such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Drainage of the wastewater resulted in eutrophication of water body. The nutrients in wastewater from fish pond was assimilated and utilized by paddy field. ... Keywords: Decontaminate effect, Fishpond, Paddy field, Water cycle, Water quality

Shun-Yao Jiang, Jian-Qiang Zhu, Gu Li, Qi-Xia Wu, Yuan Zhou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Investigation of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and water systems for saturated solar ponds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to gather relevant data primarily from the published literature to investigate the technical feasibility of using a Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaHCO/sub 3/ mixture for a saturated solar pond. This objective was accomplished by a literature search and review of existing chemical information and by performing simple chemistry experiments in the laboratory. Information on density, solubility, phase diagram, equilibrium compositions, reaction rate constant, equilibrium constant, diffusion coefficient, vapor pressure and potentially useful additives is compiled. It is concluded that even though both the saturation density and solubility increase with temperature for trona, it is not chemically stable either at room temperature or higher temperatures (80/sup 0/C). Therefore, as is, trona is not suitable for use in a saturated solar pond. From the literature it has been found that sugar and gum can retard the decomposition of bicarbonate to carbonate in the mixture. Nevertheless, trona is a very attractive solute for an unsaturated solar pond. A laboratory unsaturated pond with a stable density gradient has worked without any problems for about two months at InterTechnology/Solar Corporation.

None

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Design and Application of the Water Temperature Control System for Large Aquaculture Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the traditional cooling methods such as ice cooling and natural convection cooling can not meet the special requirements of ornamental fish breeding, the way based on mechanical refrigeration, heat exchange system, water supply system and automatic ... Keywords: aquaculture pond for ornamental fish, water temperature automatic control, mechanical refrigeration, plate exchanger, water supply system

Chen Shuai; Zhong Ke; Cai Yingling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Is degradation of the herbicide atrazine enhanced in turfgrass pond sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To further understand the fate of atrazine, a herbicide of public concern in the environment, this study was undertaken to determine if atrazine degradation potential is increased in turfgrass ponds having a history of repeated exposure to agrichemicals. Two sets of mesocosms (20 L) were established: one containing sediments from a pond at the Turfgrass Research Center on the Texas A&M campus, which had repeated exposure to agrichemicals, the other containing sediments from a pond on a local horse-farm that had no contact with agrichemicals in recent years. These mesocosms were fortified with atrazine (100 [u]g L?) and incubated under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and the concentrations of atrazine in the water and sediment were monitored. In addition, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, and ammonium levels, and bacterial populations were monitored in the mesocosms. To determine the role of microbes in the degradation of atrazine, sterile controls were developed in a manner similar to the mesocosms. By monitoring the twelve mesocosms, it was possible to determine that the appropriate environments were maintained, and that the water chemistry was consistent with either an aerobic or hypoxic environment, as appropriate. The rates of atrazine degradation in both pond systems were very similar. Atrazine concentrations declined by about 65% in 160 days. Degradation was more rapid under aerobic conditions, but the difference was not statistically significant. Effects of prior exposure to agrichemicals on the rate of atrazine degradation were not detected. The most likely cause is that there was insufficient exposure to atrazine in the turfgrass pond to develop a population of rapid atrazine degraders.

Shourds, Shalyn Wayne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Optimization and preconceptual design of a 5 MWe salt-gradient solar pond power plant at Great Salt Lake  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The techniques used to optimize and design a solar salt-gradient pond (SSP) power plant for installation at the Great Salt Lake are described. The method and results of the site selection study are described as well as the characteristics of the selected site. The figure of merit used as well as the characteristics of the selected site. The figure of merit used in the optimization study, the general optimization approach, and the specific optimization method used for each subsystem are described. Results are then discussed of the optimization of the pond configuration, total system, and piping. Pond design and ground rule sensitivity studies are reported. (LEW)

Drost, M.K.; Brown, L.M.; Barnhart, J.S.; Cavola, R.G.; Hauser, S.G.; Johnson, B.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Water Balance of a Stock-Watering Pond in the Flint Hills of Kansas J. L. Duesterhaus,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Balance of a Stock-Watering Pond in the Flint Hills of Kansas J. L. Duesterhaus,1 J. M. Ham,2 in the Flint Hills region of east-central Kansas from June 2005 to October 2006. The 0.35-ha pond supplied´n de las colinas de Flint en la regio´n central del este de Kansas a partir de junio del 2005 hasta

Owensby, Clenton E.

128

Functional Conceptual Design Criteria - 5-MW/sub e/ salt-gradient solar pond power plant at Great Salt Lake  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this solar pond plant facility would be to provide valid data on the cost, operation, and reliability of salt-gradient solar ponds as a means of producing power. A general facility description is given which includes design code requirements, site selection, site characteristics, and site-specific design requirements. Functional requirements discussed include: civil-structural; mechanical; electrical; and control, instrumentation and alarms. Occupational and environmental safety, security, and quality assurance are also discussed.

Brown, L.M.; Barnhart, J.S.; Cavola, R.G.; Drost, M.K.; Hauser, S.G.; Johnson, B.M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE/EA-1075 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75 75 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT MAY 1995 DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT I S UNLMlTED DOE /EA4075 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied. or assumes any legal liability or respnsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

130

Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

Simos, N.; Reich, M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility operational test specification. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met. The technical requirements for operational testing of the 200 Area TEDF are defined by the test requirements presented in Appendix A. These test requirements demonstrate the following: pump station No.1 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; pump station No. 2 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; water is transported through the collection and transfer lines to the disposal ponds with no detectable leakage; the disposal ponds accept flow from the transfer lines with all support equipment operating as designed; and the control systems operate and status the 200 Area TEDF including monitoring of appropriate generator discharge parameters.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Legacy Ecosystem Management Framework: From Theory to Application in the Detention Pond Case Study  

SciTech Connect

The Detention Pond is a constructed and lined storm water treatment basin at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that serves multiple stakeholder objectives and programmatic goals. This paper examines the process and outcome involved in the development of a new management plan for the Detention Pond. The plan was created using a new ecosystem management tool, the Legacy Framework. This stakeholder-driven conceptual framework provides an interdisciplinary methodology for determining ecosystem health, appropriate management strategies, and sensitive indicators. The conceptual framework, the Detention Ponds project, and the use of the framework in the context of the project, are described and evaluated, and evaluative criteria for this and other ecosystem management frameworks are offered. The project benefited in several ways from use of the Legacy Framework, although refinements to the framework are suggested. The stakeholder process created a context and environment in which team members became receptive to using an ecosystem management approach to evaluate and support management alternatives previously not considered. This allowed for the unanimous agreement to pursue support from upper management and organizational funding to implement a progressive management strategy. The greatly improved stakeholder relations resulted in upper management support for the project.

Coty, J; Stevenson, M; Vogt, K A

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Finding of No Significant Impact/Construction of a New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, and Storm-Water Retention Pond  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEW OFFICE BUILDING, CHILD-CARE FACILITY, PARKING GARAGE, NEW OFFICE BUILDING, CHILD-CARE FACILITY, PARKING GARAGE, AND STORM- WATER RETENTION POND AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FaNS I) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1444, to analyze the potential environmental consequences of a major facilities construction effort at the Morgantown, West Virginia, campus of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Within the existing NETL site, the DOE would construct a new 3-story office building with 48,000 ft2 of usable office space, sufficient to accommodate approximately 135 employees. Existing parking space lost to the proposed new office building would be replaced by construction of a 3-level parking garage plus the addition of one or more new paved parking areas. Several

134

Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

NONE

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

Herbst, David B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Management of Riparian Areas on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) commonly cross streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes. Plant communities along the edges of these water resources are important because of their role in soil conservation and habitat diversity as well as the influence they have on fauna and aquatic ecosystems. The area of vegetation affected by the water-based habitatand that in turn affects the wateris the riparian area. This report provides guidance on the definition and management considerations for riparian ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove specific toxic target chemicals from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The target chemicals studied were arsenic (As(III) and As(V)), mercury (Hg(II)) and selenium (Se(IV) and Se(VI)). The adsorbent/reactants that were evaluated are iron sulfide (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Procedures for measuring concentrations of target compounds and characterizing the surfaces of adsorbent-reactants were developed. Effects of contact time, pH (7, 8, 9, 10) and sulfate concentration (0, 1, 10 mM) on removal of all target compounds on both adsorbent-reactants were determined. Stability tests were conducted to evaluate the extent to which target compounds were released from the adsorbent-reactants when pH changed. Surface characterization was conducted with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify reactions occurring on the surface between the target compounds and surface iron and sulfur. Results indicated that target compounds could be removed by FeS{sub 2} and FeS and that removal was affected by time, pH and surface reactions. Stability of residuals was generally good and appeared to be affected by the extent of surface reactions. Synthesized pyrite and mackinawite appear to have the required characteristics for removing the target compounds from wastewaters from ash ponds and scrubber ponds and producing stable residuals.

Bill Batchelor; Dong Suk Han; Eun Jung Kim

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because man-made radionuclides and chemical contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. The CAI will be conducted following the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The DQOs are used to identify the type, amount, and quality of data needed to define the nature and extent of contamination and identify and evaluate the most appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 552. The primary problem statement for the investigation is: ''Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 12-23-05.'' To address this problem statement, the resolution of the following two decision statements is required: (1) The Decision I statement is: ''Is a contaminant present within the CAU at a concentration that could pose an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment?'' Any site-related contaminant detected at a concentration exceeding the corresponding preliminary action level (PAL), as defined in Section A.1.4.2, will be considered a contaminant of concern (COC). A COC is defined as a site-related constituent that exceeds the screening criteria (PAL). The presence of a contaminant within each CAS is defined as the analytical detection of a COC. (2) The Decision II statement is: ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs.'' This decision will be achieved by the collection of data that are adequate to define the extent of COCs. Decision II samples are used to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination as well as the likelihood of COCs to migrate outside of the site boundaries. The migration pattern can be derived from the Decision II samples, since the analytical results of those samples will show how far the contamination has travelled in the time period since activities at the site ended. Most of the data necessary to resolve the decisions will be generated from the analysis of environmental samples collected during the CAI for CAU 552. The general purpose of the investigation is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COCs. (2) Determine the vertical and lateral extent of identified COCs. (3) Ensure sufficient data is collected to support the selection of a corrective action compliant with all NDEP, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA)'', and DOE requirements. In addition, data will be obtained to support (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates  

SciTech Connect

The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Effects of Trona Use in Flue Gas on Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, researchers analyzed the effect of the use of trona on the dynamics of a fly ash pond (FAP) at a plant in Ohio, using both field and laboratory measurements. They compared the chemical concentrations and biological dynamics in the FAP from four years before the onset of trona use with those from two years after trona use was implemented. They compared the chemical composition of fly ash from two generating units with trona injection systems with that from a generating unit without trona. T...

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Variability in greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost thaw ponds Isabelle Lauriona,b,* Warwick F. Vincent,b,c Sally MacIntyre,d Leira Retamal,a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variability in greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost thaw ponds Isabelle Lauriona,b,* Warwick F period for greenhouse gas emissions from subarctic ponds. These results underscore the increasingly important contribution of permafrost thaw ponds to greenhouse gas emissions and the need to account

California at Santa Barbara, University of

144

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

145

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

146

Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SHIPROCK.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shiprock Disposal Site Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History Regulatory Setting Disposal Site The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New Mexico near the town of Shiprock, approximately 28 miles west of Farmington. Kerr-McGee built the mill and operated the facility from 1954 until 1963. Vanadium Corporation of America purchased the mill and operated it until it closed in 1968. The milling operations created process- related wastes and radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. The mill, ore storage area, raffinate ponds (ponds that contain spent liquids from the milling process), and tailings piles occupied approximately 230 acres leased from the Navajo Nation.

150

SHIPROCK.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shiprock Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History Regulatory Setting Disposal Site The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium and vanadium ore-processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New Mexico near the town of Shiprock, approximately 28 miles west of Farmington. Kerr-McGee built the mill and operated the facility from 1954 until 1963. Vanadium Corporation of America purchased the mill and operated it until it closed in 1968. The milling operations created process- related wastes and radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. The mill, ore storage area, raffinate ponds (ponds that contain spent liquids from the milling process), and tailings piles occupied approximately 230 acres leased from the Navajo Nation. In 1983, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Navajo Nation entered into an agreement for site cleanup.

151

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

152

Processing of Oak Ridge B&C pond sludge surrogate in the transportable vitrification system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) developed at the Savannah River Site is designed to process low-level and mixed radioactive wastes into a stable glass product. The TVS consists of a feed preparation and delivery system, a joule-heated melter, and an offgas treatment system. Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) B&C pond sludge was treated in a demonstration of the TVS system at Clemson University and at ORR. After initial tests with soda-lime-silica (SLS) feed, three melter volumes of glass were produced from the surrogate feed. A forthcoming report will describe glass characterization; and melter feeding, operation, and glass pouring. Melter operations described will include slurry characterization and feeding, factors affecting feed melt rates, glass pouring and pour rate constraints, and melter operating temperatures. Residence time modeling of the melter will also be discussed. Characterization of glass; including composition, predicted liquidity and viscosity, Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and devitrification will be covered. Devitrification was a concern in glass container tests and was found to be mostly dependent on the cooling rate. Crucible tests indicated that melter shutdown with glass containing Fe and Li was also a devitrification concern, so the melter was flushed with SLS glass before cooldown.

Zamecnik, J.R.; Young, S.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Smith, M.E.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Durango.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Durango processing site is a former uranium-ore- Durango processing site is a former uranium-ore- processing facility located 0.25 mile southwest of the city of Durango, Colorado. The site consists of two geographically contiguous, but hydrogeologically separate, areas: the mill tailings area and the raffinate ponds area. Both areas are located on the west bank of the Animas River and are immediately southwest of the intersection of U.S. Highways 160 and 550. A narrow terrace above the Animas River connects the two areas. The facility was constructed on the site of a former lead smelter that operated from 1880 to 1930. Vanadium Corporation of America constructed and operated the mill from 1942 to 1946 to produce vanadium. Between 1949 and 1963, the mill processed uranium ore for U.S. Government national defense programs. Milling

154

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE/EA-1444: Environmental Assessment for the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond (September 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 DOE/EA-1444 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade facilities and infrastructure at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV, through acquisition of a 5-acre

159

Design and analysis of microalgal open pond systems for the purpose of producing fuels: A subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The designs and systems developed include many innovative concepts and experiments, including the design and operation of a low-cost system. Cost-effectiveness is realized by minimizing capital costs of the system and achieving efficient use of inputs. Extensive engineering analysis of carbonation, mixing, and harvesting subsystems has elucidated both the lowest cost, most efficient options and the essential parameters needed to construct, test, and evaluate these subsystems. The use of growth ponds sealed with clay and lined with crushed rock results in construction cost savings of 50% over ponds lined with synthetic membranes. In addition a low-cost but efficient design allows improvements in technology to have maximum impact on final product cost reductions. In addition to the innovations in low-cost construction, the operational efficiency of the design is both higher and more feasible than that attained by any previous system concept of comparable scale. The water analysis has led to operational specifications that minimize water use and virtually eliminate losses of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide injection system is designed for 95% efficiency, but is still low in cost. The construction of a large-scale, covered anaerobic lagoon to recycle carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus has not been attempted at the scale analyzed here. Yet efficient recycling is essential for achieving economic affordability. 23 refs., 21 figs., 53 tabs.

Weissman, J.C.; Goebel, R.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Survey of Radionuclide Distributions Resulting from the Church Rock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Pond Dam Failure  

SciTech Connect

An intensive site survey and on-site analysis program were conducted to evaluate the distribution of four radionucliGes in the general vicinity of Gallup, New Mexico, subsequent to the accidental breach of a uranium mill tailings pond dam and the release of a large quantity of tailings pond materials. The objective of this work was to determine the distribution and concentration levels of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 238}U in the arroyo that is immediately adjacent to the uranium tailings pond (pipeline arroyo) and in the Rio Puerco arroyo into which the pipeline arroyo drains. An intensive survey between the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Church Rock Mill site and the New Mexico-Arizona state border was performed. Sampling locations were established at approximately 500-ft intervals along the arroyo. During the weeks of September 24 through October 5, 1979, a series of samples was collected from alternate sampling locations along the arroyo. The purpose of this collection of samples and their subsequent analysis was to provide an immediate evaluation of the extent and the levels of radioactive contamination. The data obtained from this extensive survey were then compared to action levels which had been proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and were adapted by the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division (NMEID) for {sup 230}Th and {sup 226}Ra concentrations that would require site cleanup. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory/Nuclear Regulatory Commission mobile laboratory van was on-site at the UNC Church Rock Mill from September 22, 1979, through December 13, 1979, and was manned by one or more PNL personnel for all but four weeks of this time period. Approximately 1200 samples associated with the Rio Puerco survey were analyzed 1n the laboratory. An additional 1200 samples related to the Rio Puerco cleanup operations which the United Nuclear Corporation was conducting were analyzed on-site in the mobile laboratory. The purpose of these analyses was to determine the effectiveness of the cleanup operations that were ongoing and to evaluate what additional cleanup would be required. This on-site analysis of radioactive contamination constituted the principal task of this project, with the identification of those portions of the arroyo exceeding the NMEID proposed cleanup criteria being the major output. Additiond1 tasks included an evaluation of the initial soil sampling scheme (letter from T. Wolff [NMEID] to J. Abiss [UNC]. oated September 25, 1979) and the proposed NMEID verification sampling scheme (letter from T. Buhl [NMEID] to H. Miller [NRC]. dated April 23, 1980).

Weimer, W. C.; Kinnison, R. R.; Reeves, J. H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 7, 2004 April 7, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the upper Yakima south of Cle Elum, WA. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS)

162

Development of fly ash-based slope protection materials for waste disposal ponds. Topical report, Task 7.7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research project was conducted to develop a cost-effective slope protection material for a 100-acre scrubber sludge disposal pond located at the Sherco power plant. The technical objective of the project was to formulate and evaluate the performance of a slope protection material produced using self-cementing coal combustion by-products. The material was to have sufficient durability and erosion resistance to protect the underlying bottom ash fill and clay liner from wave erosion for at least 5 years when it was placed on the interior side slopes of the pond. The two coal combustion by-products that were considered for use in the slope protection material were 1) a spray dryer waste and 2) a subbituminous coal fly ash. The spray dryer waste was approximately a 50:50 mixture of subbituminous coal fly ash and reacted, lime-based scrubber sorbent. The subbituminous coal fly ash was produced from a cyclone-fired boiler. Both by-products displayed self-cementing behavior when mixed with water. The results of the field tests indicated that a slope protection slab prepared from Sherco spray dryer waste placed with a 20% moisture content showed almost no deterioration after 20 months in the field. A slab prepared from a mixture of 25% Riverside fly ash and 75% bottom ash with a moisture content of 18% showed a slight loss of material from the surface of the slab, but no substantial deterioration after 20 months in the field. Two other materials containing Riverside fly ash that were prepared with higher moisture contents showed somewhat more deterioration after 20 months, although none of the field test slabs appeared to have failed in that time period.

Moretti, C.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cold tolerance of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and thermal-refuge technology to protect this species from cold-kill in aquaculture ponds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to protect red drum in aquaculture ponds from cold-kill led to the development of thermalrefuge technology for overwintering these fish. Successive versions of an experimental thermal refuge were installed and operated in two adjacent red drum culture ponds at Redfish Unlimited, Palacios, Texas, during the winters of 1991-92 and 1992-93. Although red drum in the ponds at Palacios were not threatened by cold during either of these mild winters, the thermodynamic efficiency of the two versions of the refuge could be tested and compared, both with each other and with the prototype refuge used in the winter of 1990-91. The 1992-93 refuge design, which featured an inflated, dome-like cover, was the most effective in terms of cost, ease of maintenance, and resistance to heat loss. A mathematical model, based on Newton's law of cooling, was used to simulate refuge thermodynamics. The best-fitting model had exponential rate constants ranging from 0.01 1 to 0.026 min-' for the 1991-92 version and 0.004 to 0.006 min-' for the 1992-93 version (r > 0.99). A second phase of the research focused on cold tolerance of red drum in ponds at Palacios, from 6 February to 2 April 1993. Values of the 24-h lower lethal temperature of fish sampled from refuge-equipped and non-refuge-equipped ponds were estimated via lethal-cold bioassays. Regression of probit-transformed percent survival at 24 h yielded estimates of mean lower lethal temperature which rose from 0.7 IC on 6 February to 6.6 IC on 2 April. Within dates lower lethal temperatures of fish taken from refuge-equipped and non-refugeequipped ponds did not differ; however, there was a significant difference among sample dates. Values of estimated acclimation temperature for these red drum ranged from 13.5 IC on 6 February to 17.7 IC on 2 April. Acclimation temperatures were inferred by exponentially filtering the pondtemperature time series so that the filtered values had maximum linear correlation (r = 0.93) with the lower-lethal-temperature series; the requisite filter had an exponential rate constant of 0.044 day-1.

Dorsett, Paul Wesley

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Strategic Focus Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect effective...

165

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Durango, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Durango, Colorado, conducted in April 1976, in cooperation with a team from Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., are presented together with descriptions of the instruments and techniques used to obtain the data. Direct above-ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface soil and sediment samples indicate movement of tailings from the piles toward Lightner Creek on the north and the Animas River on the east side of the piles. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in the former raffinate pond area is only slightly above the background level. Two structures in Durango were found to contain high concentrations of airborne radon daughters, where tailings are known to have been utilized in construction. Near-background concentrations of radon daughters were found in a well-ventilated building close to the tailings.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Ellis, B.S.; Chou, K.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of special compliance conditions Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David Frederick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

Phillips, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Halbig, James K. (Los Alamos, NM); Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Klosterbuer, Shirley F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Division/ Interest Area Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn more about Divisions and Interest areas. Division/ Interest Area Information Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a member Membership memori

173

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

174

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric...

175

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

176

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

177

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Boulder Area Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST does not endorse or guarantee the quality or services provided by these businesses. All Denver/Boulder area transportation companies. ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

NIST Aperture area measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... particularly critical, for example, in climate and weather applications on ... of aperture areas used in exo-atmospheric solar irradiance measurements; ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. 4th Quarterly technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microalgae cultivation in large open ponds is the only photosynthetic process likely to directly utilize power plant flue gas CO{sub 2} for production of biomass. The algal biomass can be converted into substitutes for fossil fuels, in particular liquid fuels such as biodiesel (vegetable oil methyl or ethyl esters), thus reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels and the potential for global warming. This concept is being investigated, among others, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at Golden, Colorado, with support from PETC.

Benemann, J.R.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Portable instrument for inspecting irradiated nuclear-fuel assemblies in a water-filled storage pond by measurement of induced Cerenkov radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable instrument for measuring induced Cerenkov radiation associated with irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in a water-filled storage pond is disclosed. The instrument includes a photomultiplier tube and an image intensifier which are operable in parallel and simultaneously by means of a field lens assembly and an associated beam splitter. The image intensifier permits an operator to aim and focus the apparatus on a submerged fuel assembly. Once the instrument is aimed and focused, an illumination reading can be obtained with the photomultiplier tube. The instrument includes a lens cap with a carbon-14/phosphor light source for calibrating the apparatus in the field.

Nicholson, N.; Dowdy, E.J.; Holt, D.M.; Stump, C.J. Jr.

1982-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Commonly Found in Energy Control Systems Experts at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) discovered some common areas of vulnerability in the energy control systems assessed between late 2004 and early 2006. These vulnerabilities ranged from conventional IT security issues to specific weaknesses in control system protocols. The paper "Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems" describes the vulnerabilities and recommended strategies for mitigating them. It should be of use to asset owners and operators, control system vendors, system integrators, and third-party vendors interested in enhancing the security characteristics of current and future products.

184

area | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area area Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from a composite of high resolution wind resource datasets modeled for specific countries with low resolution data originating from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (United States) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States) as processed for use in the IMAGE model. The high resolution datasets were produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States), Risø DTU National Laboratory (Denmark), the National Institute for Space Research (Brazil), and the Canadian Wind Energy Association. The data repr Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords area capacity clean energy international National Renewable Energy Laboratory

185

Geographic Area Month  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

186

3. Producing Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The OCS area provides surplus capacity to meet major seasonal swings in the lower 48 States gas requirements. The ... Jun-86 9,878 17,706 1,460 19,166 9,288 51.5

187

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

188

300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

{sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

BORGHESE JV

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

APS Area Emergency Supervisors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Emergency Supervisors BUILDING AES AAES 400-EAA Raul Mascote Debra Eriksen-Bubulka 400-A (SPX) Tim Jonasson 400-Sectors 25-30 Reggie Gilmore 401-CLO Steve Downey Ed Russell...

191

Comparison of constant-rate pumping test and slug interference test results at the Hanford Site B pond multilevel test facility  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, is responsible for monitoring the movement and fate of contamination within the unconfined aquifer to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring and assessment of contamination migration on the Hanford Site, a sitewide 3-dimensional groundwater flow model is being developed. Providing quantitative hydrologic property data is instrumental in development of the 3-dimensional model. Multilevel monitoring facilities have been installed to provide detailed, vertically distributed hydrologic characterization information for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer. In previous reports, vertically distributed water-level and hydrochemical data obtained over time from these multi-level monitoring facilities have been evaluated and reported. This report describes the B pond facility in Section 2.0. It also provides analysis results for a constant-rate pumping test (Section 3.0) and slug interference test (Section 4.0) that were conducted at a multilevel test facility located near B Pond (see Figure 1. 1) in the central part of the Hanford Site. A hydraulic test summary (Section 5.0) that focuses on the comparison of hydraulic property estimates obtained using the two test methods is also presented. Reference materials are listed in Section 6.0.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Storm Water Detention Pond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allow water to meander through them. * Amend soil on the banks of the drainages with a compost-based soil builder. * Plant or stake the channel with with appropriate vegetation...

193

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Septic Systems and Discharge Area. CAU 151 consists of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada: (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). CAU 151 closure activities were conducted according to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 151 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007) from October 2007 to January 2008. The corrective action alternatives included no further action, clean closure, and closure in place with administrative controls. CAU 151 closure activities are summarized in Table 1. Closure activities generated liquid remediation waste, sanitary waste, hydrocarbon waste, and mixed waste. Waste generated was appropriately managed and disposed. Waste that is currently staged onsite is being appropriately managed and will be disposed under approved waste profiles in permitted landfills. Waste minimization activities included waste characterization sampling and segregation of waste streams. Some waste exceeded land disposal restriction limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other waste meeting land disposal restrictions was disposed of in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. Waste disposition documentation is included as Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

195

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Bay Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bay Area Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Bay Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Bay Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Bay Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Bay Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area Products and Services in the Bay Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

197

Texas Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Texas Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Texas Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Texas Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Texas Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area Products and Services in the Texas Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

198

Rockies Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Area Rockies Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Rockies Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Rockies Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Rockies Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area Products and Services in the Rockies Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

199

Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

David Frederick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

borrow_area.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. developed by the former WSSRAP Community Relations Department to provide comprehensive descriptions of key activities that took place throughout the cleanup process The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) approved a plan on June 9, 1995, allowing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to excavate nearly 2 million cubic yards of clay material from land in the Weldon Spring Conservation Area. Clay soil from a borrow area was used to construct the permanent disposal facility at the Weldon Spring site. Clay soil was chosen to construct the disposal facility because it has low permeability when

203

Focus Area Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM Corporate QA Board. The status of QAP/QIP approvals etc. was accurate at the time of posting; however, additional approvals may have been achieved since that time. If you have any questions about the information provided, please contact Bob Murray at robert.murray@em.doe.gov Task # Task Description Status 1.1 Develop a brief questionnaire to send out to both commercial and EM contractors to describe their current approach for identifying the applicable QA requirements for subcontractors, tailoring the requirements based upon risk, process for working with procurement to ensure QA requirements are incorporated into subcontracts, and implementing verification of requirement flow-down by their

204

Focus Area 3 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Commercial Grade item and Services 3 - Commercial Grade item and Services Dedication Implementation and Nuclear Services Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 3-Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication 3.1-Complete a survey of selected EM contractors to identify the process and basis for their CGI dedication program including safety classification of items being dedicated for nuclear applications within their facilities Completed Survey Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Yes Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker, D. Amerine No EM QA Corporate Board: No Energy Facility Contractors Group

205

Argonne area restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area restaurants area restaurants Amber Cafe 13 N. Cass Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 630-515-8080 www.ambercafe.net Argonne Guest House Building 460 Argonne, IL 60439 630-739-6000 www.anlgh.org Ballydoyle Irish Pub & Restaurant 5157 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-969-0600 www.ballydoylepub.com Bd's Mongolian Grill The Promenade Shopping Center Boughton Rd. & I-355 Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-972-0450 www.gomongo.com Branmor's American Grill 300 Veterans Parkway Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-226-9926 www.branmors.com Buca di Beppo 90 Yorktown Convenience Center Lombard, IL 60148 630-932-7673 www.bucadibeppo.com California Pizza Kitchen 551 Oakbrook Center Oak Brook, IL 60523 630-571-7800 www.cpk.com Capri Ristorante 5101 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60516 630-241-0695 www.capriristorante.com Carrabba's Italian Grill

206

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping equipment, and ancillary facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Finding of No Significant Impact Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment

207

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v*Zy- i , . v*Zy- i , . r ,v * -i S # Af [, (e- . - o -A tl }r- 0 v-" l^~4~S J l ^-)^ I^U^ck iM clti ^ Area Power Administration Follow-up to Nov. 25, 2008 Transition Meeting Undeveloped Transmission Right-of-Way Western has very little undeveloped transmission right-of-way. There is a 7-mile right- of-way between Folsom, CA and Roseville, CA where Western acquired a 250' wide right-of-way but is only using half of it. Another line could be built parallel to Western's line to relieve congestion in the Sacramento area. In addition, Western has rights-of- way for many transmission lines that could be rebuilt to increase transmission capacity. For example, Western's Tracy-Livermore 230-kV line is a single circuit line but the existing towers could support a double circuit line. These rights-of-way would have to

209

Geothermal Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas are specific locations of geothermal potential (e.g., Coso Geothermal Area). The base set of geothermal areas used in this database came from the 253 geothermal areas identified by the USGS in their 2008 Resource Assessment.[1] Additional geothermal areas were added, as needed, based on a literature search and on projects listed in the GTP's 2011 database of funded projects. Add.png Add a new Geothermal Resource Area Map of Areas List of Areas Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":2500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

210

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Area Power Administration Customer Meeting The meeting will begin at 12:30 pm MST We have logged on early for connectivity purposes Please stand-by until the meeting begins Please be sure to call into the conference bridge at: 888-989-6414 Conf. Code 60223 If you have connectivity issues, please contact: 866-900-1011 1 Introduction  Welcome  Introductions  Purpose of Meeting ◦ Status of the SLCA/IP Rate ◦ SLCA/IP Marketing Plan ◦ Credit Worthiness Policy ◦ LTEMP EIS update ◦ Access to Capital  Handout Materials http://www.wapa.gov/crsp/ratescrsp/default.htm 2 SLCA/IP Rate 3 1. Status of Repayment 2. Current SLCA/IP Firm Power Rate (SLIP-F9) 3. Revenue Requirements Comparison Table 4.SLCA/IP Rate 5. Next Steps

211

Hydrogeology of Ambrosia Lake-San Mateo area, McKinley and Cibola counties, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake-San Mateo area is located about 10 mi north of Grants, New Mexico, in the heart of the Grants uranium region, which spans the southern edge of the San Juan Basin. The climate is semiarid and local streams are ephemeral, except where discharge from mines or tailings ponds has made them perennial. Ground water is thus the main source of water in the area. Major aquifers include alluvium, sandstones of the Mesaverde Group, sandstones of the Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison Formation, Bluff Sandstone, Todilto Limestone, Chinle Formation, San Andres Limestone, and Glorieta Sandstone. Although shallow unconfined ground water flows southwesterly, deeper, confined ground water flows toward the northeast and east. Ground water in the area generally has a total-dissolved-solids content of 400 to 2000 mg/L; waters in the notheast are more saline (2000 to 5000 mg/L). Because the uranium occurs in a regional artesian aquifer (Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation), extensive dewatering is required: approximately 164 mgd. A new state law brings mine dewatering under the jurisdiction of the State Engineer and permits use of excess uranium-mine water. Private or municipal wells presently provide adequate supplies of water for most domestic and stock purposes.

Brod, R.C.; Stone, W.J.

1981-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Program Areas | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Initiatives Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program...

214

Body Area Networks: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in wireless communication technologies, such as wearable and implantable biosensors, along with recent developments in the embedded computing area are enabling the design, development, and implementation of body area networks. This class of ... Keywords: body area networks, survey, wireless sensor networks

Min Chen; Sergio Gonzalez; Athanasios Vasilakos; Huasong Cao; Victor C. Leung

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Quality assurance project plan for the Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization Project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization (CRFAPS) Project will stabilize a 19-m-high (62-ft-high) earthen embankment across Upper McCoy Branch situated along the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge. This task will be accomplished by raising the crest of the embankment, reinforcing the face of the embankment, removing trees from the face and top of the embankment, and repairing the emergency spillway. The primary responsibilities of the team members are: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) will be responsible for project integration, technical support, Title 3 field support, environmental oversight, and quality assurance (QA) oversight of the project; Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) will be responsible for design and home office Title 3 support; MK-Ferguson of Oak Ridge Company (MK-F) will be responsible for health and safety, construction, and procurement of construction materials. Each of the team members has a QA program approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations. This project-specific QA project plan (QAPP), which is applicable to all project activities, identifies and integrates the specific QA requirements from the participant`s QA programs that are necessary for this project.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

218

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas Lisa M. Campbell, Noella J. Gray; and Zoe A. Meletis In many countries, parks and protected areas construction of nature, conservation and development narratives, and alternative consumption - and what World' or 'developing' countries. One feature of political ecology has been an overriding emphasis

Bolch, Tobias

219

Data Administration Area: Date Issued  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Data Administration Policy Area: Date Issued: April, 1994 Title: Data Administration Last. INTRODUCTION The President established the Committee on Data Administration (CODA) in May, 1992, to advise him on policies in the area of data administration (attached as references Policy ADC 011 and TOR for CODA

Brownstone, Rob

220

Area 410 status and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This memo is distributed to acquaint personnel with (a) the status of the various 410 areas, (b) time and personnel required to do optic experiments in the ``Dog`` area, and (c) status of the timing and firing system and conditions of cables from Able to Dog.

Bennett, W. P.

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

222

Tech Area II: A History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy's compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission's integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area's primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on hi...

Rebecca Ullrich; Rebecca Ullrich

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material Drainage below the Muckpile Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Accelerating Observers, Area and Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an explicit example of a process, where the entropy carried by radiation through an accelerating two-plane is proportional to the decrease in the area of that two-plane even when the two-plane is not a part of any horizon of spacetime. Our results seem to support the view that entropy proportional to area is possessed not only by horizons but by all spacelike two-surfaces of spacetime.

Makela, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Accelerating Observers, Area and Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an explicit example of a process, where the entropy carried by radiation through an accelerating two-plane is proportional to the decrease in the area of that two-plane even when the two-plane is not a part of any horizon of spacetime. Our results seem to support the view that entropy proportional to area is possessed not only by horizons but by all spacelike two-surfaces of spacetime.

Jarmo Makela

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Variable area fuel cell cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Initial Results of ISCO for a Large TCE DNAPL Source Area  

SciTech Connect

This paper will describe the results of an in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) remedial action currently in progress to address subsurface contamination by trichloroethene (TCE) dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). The U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the cleanup of environmental media at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in southern Ohio. The X-701B Solid Waste Management Unit is an unlined surface impoundment at PORTS which was operated from 1954 to 1988. A TCE plume in groundwater emanates from the unit and is approximately 2,200 feet in length. Metals, radioactive inorganics, and other organic chemicals are also present at lower concentrations in the groundwater. An ongoing 1.6-acre TCE DNAPL source area for the plume is believed to exist up-gradient in the vicinity of the X-701B pond. The extent of the source area is inferred from actual recovery of DNAPL in production wells and from detection of TCE concentrations between 100 and 1,000 mg/L in monitoring wells. Previous remedial activities at X-701B have included a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure and a technology demonstration that recirculated permanganate solutions between two horizontal wells. Results of sampling after these remedial activities showed that the permanganate effectively destroyed TCE in portions of the aquifer where adequate contact was achieved, but that uniform distribution by the recirculation system was problematic. As a result, the TCE concentration in the groundwater eventually rebounded after the treatment. To overcome distribution issues and to more aggressively remediate the source, a new remediation approach is being implemented for the unit. The new approach involves the injection of Modified Fenton's Reagent directly into the source area using temporary direct push injection points. This new approach provides the ability to overcome limitations imposed by heterogeneities in the subsurface by injecting relatively small quantities of reagent into a large number of temporary injection points across the source area. These injections are then repeated, as necessary, on a grid pattern until performance goals are achieved. The remediation is being implemented in four phases under a work plan approved by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. Phase I, the pilot test, was conducted over a small portion of the source area. Phase II currently involves full-scale treatment of the source area. In Phase III, the source area will be monitored for TCE rebound. Phase IV will involve limited treatment for the down-gradient portion of the plume. (authors)

Thompson, S.L.; Cross, P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Focus Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Focus Areas Mission » Focus Areas Focus Areas Safety With this focus on cleanup completion and risk reducing results, safety still remains the utmost priority. EM will continue to maintain and demand the highest safety performance. All workers deserve to go home as healthy as they were when they came to the job in the morning. There is no schedule or milestone worth any injury to the work force. Project Management EM is increasing its concentration on project management to improve its overall performance toward cost-effective risk reduction. This will involve review of validated project baselines, schedules, and assumptions about effective identification and management of risks. Instrumental in refining the technical and business approaches to project management are the senior

233

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If this page is taking a long time to load, click here for a photo gallery with smaller versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

235

Application of RAD-BCG calculator to Hanford's 300 area shoreline characterization dataset  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RAD-BCG Calculator. The RAD-BCG Calculator, a computer program that uses an Excel spreadsheet and Visual Basic software, showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RAD-BCG-Calculators site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the programs kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RAD-BCG Calculator results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Patton, Gene W.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r r r r r t r r t r r r * r r r r r r CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA ,FACILITY RECORDS 1970 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMlSSION NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE LAS VEGAS, NEVADA September 1970 Prepared By Holmes & Narver. Inc. On-Continent Test Division P.O. Box 14340 Las Vegas, Nevada 338592 ...._- _._--_ .. -- - - - - - - .. .. - .. - - .. - - - CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA FACILITY RECORDS 1970 This page intentionally left blank - - .. - - - PURPOSE This facility study has been prepared in response to a request of the AEC/NVOO Property Management Division and confirmed by letter, W. D. Smith to L. E. Rickey, dated April 14, 1970, STS Program Administrative Matters. The purpose is to identify each facility, including a brief description, the acquisition cost either purchase and/or construction, and the AE costs if identi- fiable. A narrative review of the history of the subcontracts

237

RHIC | New Areas of Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Area of Physics A New Area of Physics RHIC has created a new state of hot, dense matter out of the quarks and gluons that are the basic particles of atomic nuclei, but it is a state quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions is more like a liquid. Quarks Gluons and quarks Ions Ions about to collide Impact Just after collision Perfect Liquid The "perfect" liquid hot matter Hot Nuclear Matter A review article in the journal Science describes groundbreaking discoveries that have emerged from RHIC, synergies with the heavy-ion program at the Large Hadron Collider, and the compelling questions that will drive this research forward on both sides of the Atlantic.

238

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Carlsbad Area Office Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 1998 June 1998 Carlsbad Area Office Executive Summary The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to CAO, WIPP site operations, transportation, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program (NTP). The CAO develops and directs implementation of the TRU waste program, and assesses compliance with the program guidance, as well as the commonality of activities and assumptions among all TRU waste sites. A cornerstone of the Department of Energy's (DOE) national cleanup strategy, WIPP is

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241

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

242

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

243

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

244

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

245

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

246

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

247

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

248

Innovation investment area: Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited areas of Los Alamos. The data from Technical Area 15, another part of the survey, will be published in another report. Contour maps of the gamma survey data show some Cs-137 activity in Los Alamos Canyon as well as in DP Canyon beside TA-21. Some Be-7, Sb-124, and Co-58 apparently exist in the canyon immediately below the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) ponds. Estimates on the Cs-137 inventory in the canyons range from 210 mCi to 1270 mCi. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates ranged from 6{mu}R/h to about 18{mu}R/h. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Tanks focus area. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

Frey, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

History of 100-B Area  

SciTech Connect

The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

Wahlen, R.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

254

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

255

Area Science Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Science Park Jump to: navigation, search Name Area Science Park Place Italy Sector Services Product General Financial & Legal Services ( Government Public sector )...

256

Southwest Area Corridor Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Map DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 FACT SHEET: Designation of National Interest Electric...

257

Southwest Area Corridor Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Map DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy...

258

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

259

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

260

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Redevelopment of Areas Needing Redevelopment Generally (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Local redevelopment commissions may be established to oversee areas needing redevelopment (previously known as blighted, deteriorated, or deteriorating areas). The clearance, replanning, and...

262

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure - Program Areas - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell Welcome> Program Areas> Program Areas Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Production & Delivery | Storage | Fuel Cell R&D | Systems Integration & Analysis | Safety...

263

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

264

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

265

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

266

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lualualei Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

267

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SMALL) SMALL) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If you have a fast internet connection, you may wish to click here for a photo gallery with larger versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

268

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area (Redirected from Chena Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

269

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Double Tracks Radiological Safety Area (DTRSA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 486, was clean-closed following the approved Corrective Action Decision Document closure alternative and in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of a single Corrective Action Site, 71-23-001-71DT. The DTRSA was used during May 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, personnel and animals from the Double Tracks Test. Double Tracks was one of four storage-transportation tests. The Double Tracks test was conducted in Stonewall Flat, approximately 32 kilometers (20 miles) east of Goldfield, Nevada, on the Nellis Air Force Range. The Double Tracks Test used a single device containing plutonium and depleted uranium and was designed to investigate the characteristics of plutonium-bearing particulate material formed by the non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear weapon. All facilities associated with the DTRSA operation were removed. Based on available information, the areas of concern at the DTRSA consisted of a decon facility (vehicle decon pad and decon sump) in the southern half of the DTRSA, and a burial pit and former loading/unloading area located in the northern half of the DTRSA. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation, radiological field screening detected elevated gamma and alpha readings on excavated plastic debris. Swipe surveys taken on the plastic debris detected removable alpha. No contaminants were detected above preliminary action levels in soil samples. The debris excavated during the corrective action investigation was not characterized. The clean-closure corrective action consisted of excavation, disposal, verification sampling, backfilling, and regrading. Field activities began on May 1, 2000, and ended on May 10, 2000. Soil that was associated with the radiologically contaminated man-made debris was placed into B-25 bins, moved to the designated waste management area where it was scanned, and hauled off-site for disposal. Verification soil samples were collected and analyzed to determine if clean closure had bene achieved. Clean borrow soil was hauled to the site and used to backfill the excavation. The excavation was then regraded to promote drainage and minimize ponding of surface water. Since the site is clean-closed, post-closure care is not required.

D. H. Cox

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mapping Population onto Priority Conservation Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas and (in every case except Mesoamerican Reef and Namib-Karoo) are higher in areas within aggregated. Rural areas in Namib-Karoo have the highest total fertility rates (mean rate of 6.2). Areas inside / Namib Karoo (p

Lopez-Carr, David

271

Boulder Area Directions and Transportation Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boulder Area Directions and Transportation Information. NIST Boulder Visitor Check-In & Parking. Transportation. ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ashland Area Support Substation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

275

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

276

Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern CA Area Southern CA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Southern CA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Southern CA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Southern CA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Southern CA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Southern CA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area Products and Services in the Southern CA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

277

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

278

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

279

Pacific Northwest Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Northwest Area Pacific Northwest Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Pacific Northwest Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Pacific Northwest Area Products and Services in the Pacific Northwest Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

280

Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greater Boston Area Greater Boston Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Greater Boston Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Greater Boston Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Greater Boston Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Greater Boston Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Greater Boston Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Greater Boston Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Greater Boston Area Products and Services in the Greater Boston Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area (Redirected from Maui Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

283

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

284

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area (Redirected from Obsidian Cliff Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

285

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

286

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

287

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

288

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

289

Amedee Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Amedee Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Amedee Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

290

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

291

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kawaihae Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

292

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Pueblo Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

293

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Socorro Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

294

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kauai Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

295

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area (Redirected from Dixie Meadows Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

296

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

297

Alderwood Area Service Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) proposal to build a new 115-kV transmission line and 115-12.5-kV, 25-MW substation in the Alderwood, Oregon, area is discussed in the attached Environmental Assessment. The proposed substation site has been relocated about 500 feet east of the site outlined in the Environmental Assessment, but in the same field. This is not a substantial change relevant to environmental concerns. Environmental impacts of the new site differ only in that: Two residences will be visually affected. The substation will be directly across Highway 36 from two houses and would be seen in their primary views. This impact will be mitigated by landscaping the substation to create a vegetative screen. To provide access to the new site and provide for Blachly-Lane Cooperative's distribution lines, a 60-foot-wide right-of-way about 200 feet long will be needed. The total transmission line length will be less than originally planned. However, the tapline into the substation will be about 50 feet longer. 4 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

299

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

300

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

302

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

303

Global Vegetation Data: Leaf Area Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaf Area Index Data Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a global data set containing approximately 1000 estimates of leaf area index (LAI) for a variety of...

304

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

305

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

306

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

307

Molokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Geothermal Area Molokai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Molokai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

308

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

309

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Rhodes Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase:

310

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: near Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

311

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

312

Separation Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Separation Creek Geothermal Area Separation Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Separation Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

313

Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Program Reformulated Gasoline Program Contents * Introduction * Mandated RFG Program Areas o Table 1. Mandated RFG Program Areas * RFG Program Opt-In Areas o Table 2. RFG Program Opt-In Areas * RFG Program Opt-Out Procedures and Areas o Table 3. History of EPA Rulemaking on Opt-Out Procedures o Table 4. RFG Program Opt-Out Areas * State Programs o Table 5. State Reformulated Gasoline Programs * Endnotes Spreadsheets Referenced in this Article * Reformulated Gasoline Control Area Populations Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Areas Participating in Oxygenated Gasoline Program

314

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

315

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

316

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

317

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

318

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

319

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

320

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

322

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

323

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

324

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

325

AREA USA LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AREA USA LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name AREA USA LLC Place Washington, DC Zip 20004 Sector Services Product Washington, D.C.-based division of Fabiani & Company providing...

326

For the B-Area Operable Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 April 16, 2013 Notice of Availability Record of Decision For the B-Area Operable Unit The Record of Decision (ROD) Remedial Alternative Selection for the B-Area Operable Unit...

327

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

328

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

329

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

330

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

331

Cryptographic Challenges for Smart Grid Home Area ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Cryptographic Challenges for Smart Grid Home Area Networks Secure Networking Author Apurva Mohan, Honeywell ACS Labs ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas ... Robust Energy Cost Optimization of Water Distribution System with...

333

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - October 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - October 2013. Network Optimization Optimization Models for Differentiating Quality of Service Levels in Probabilistic Network Capacity...

334

Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training RangeSouth (UTTRS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Local control of area-preserving maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method of control of chaos in area-preserving maps. This method gives an explicit expression of a control term which is added to a given area-preserving map. The resulting controlled map which is a small and suitable modification of the original map, is again area-preserving and has an invariant curve whose equation is explicitly known.

Cristel Chandre; Michel Vittot; Guido Ciraolo

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

337

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping equipment, and ancillary facilities at the U.S. Department of...

338

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

339

Redfield Campus Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Redfield Campus Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Redfield Campus Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate

340

Category Key Area Sub Area Do?an, .N., "Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Papers funded by the Fuels Program (2013) Category Key Area Sub Area Doan, .N., "Materials Development for Fossil Fueled Energy Conversion Systems," Materials Science...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Map: Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Coordinates: 33.352°, -115.353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.352,"lon":-115.353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8,"lon":-118.87,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Astor Pass Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Astor Pass Geothermal Area Astor Pass Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Astor Pass Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.352110729808,"lon":-118.48461985588,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

South Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Geothermal Area South Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: South Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.15,"lon":-157.1166667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.3641,"lon":-115.856,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Geysers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Heat Source 8 Geofluid Geochemistry 9 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 10 Exploration Activities (22) 11 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Banbury Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Banbury Geothermal Area Banbury Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Banbury Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.688,"lon":-114.8256,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

349

Weiser Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Weiser Geothermal Area Weiser Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Weiser Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.29833333,"lon":-117.0483333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

351

Colado Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colado Geothermal Area Colado Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Colado Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.23,"lon":-118.37,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

Moana Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moana Geothermal Area Moana Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Moana Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.495,"lon":-119.815,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilo Geothermal Area Kilo Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.8101865,"lon":-151.2360627,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

Sierra Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.71166667,"lon":-120.3216667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

355

Wendel Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wendel Geothermal Area Wendel Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wendel Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.35734979,"lon":-120.2549785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

Crane Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crane Creek Geothermal Area Crane Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Crane Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.3064,"lon":-116.7447,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

Mother Goose Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mother Goose Geothermal Area Mother Goose Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mother Goose Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.18,"lon":-157.0183,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

358

Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.92,"lon":-119.07,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

359

Newcastle Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newcastle Geothermal Area Newcastle Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Newcastle Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.66166667,"lon":-113.5616667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.23333333,"lon":-121.7666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Clear Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Clear Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.85,"lon":-162.3,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Heber Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heber Geothermal Area Heber Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Heber Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Heat Source 8 Geofluid Geochemistry 9 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 10 Exploration Activities (2) 11 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.71666667,"lon":-115.5283333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

South Brawley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Brawley Geothermal Area South Brawley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: South Brawley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.90607,"lon":-115.54,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

364

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.57,"lon":-121.57,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Fernley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fernley Geothermal Area Fernley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fernley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.598803,"lon":-119.110415,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

366

Lakeview Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakeview Geothermal Area Lakeview Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lakeview Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2,"lon":-120.36,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

367

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

The Needles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Geothermal Area The Needles Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: The Needles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (15) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.15,"lon":-119.68,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Signal Geothermal Area Signal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Signal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.65,"lon":-115.71,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Carson River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Geothermal Area River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Carson River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.77,"lon":-119.715,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Harney Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Geothermal Area Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Harney Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.18166667,"lon":-119.0533333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

False Pass Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

False Pass Geothermal Area False Pass Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: False Pass Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.93,"lon":-163.24,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":69.3,"lon":-144.0333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

Hot Pot Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Pot Geothermal Area Hot Pot Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hot Pot Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.922,"lon":-117.108,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

376

Stillwater Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stillwater Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Stillwater Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.51666667,"lon":-118.5516667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

Area Guide - National Transportation Research Center (NTRC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Guide Area Guide Recreational & Cultural Opportunities Some Things To Do In and Around the NTRC Area Area Attractions Big South Fork The following links offer general information about parks, cultural events, and recreational opportunities available. All locations listed are within a few hours' drive. Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area of the U.S. National Park Service, located near Oak Ridge. Biltmore Estate- A 250-room historical chateau in located in Asheville, North Carolina (about 3 hours from Oak Ridge); open all year Knoxville, Tennessee Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, Knoxville Star of Knoxville Riverboat Ice Rinks Ice Chalet Icearium Korrnet - Website for area nonprofit organizations Big South Fork Park - Canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking; located near

379

Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.1469,"lon":-165.9078,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

380

Fallon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fallon Geothermal Area Fallon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fallon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.38,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Randsburg Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Randsburg Geothermal Area Randsburg Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Randsburg Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.38333333,"lon":-117.5333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

Kwiniuk Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kwiniuk Geothermal Area Kwiniuk Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kwiniuk Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.70787,"lon":-162.46488,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

Worswick Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worswick Geothermal Area Worswick Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Worswick Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5636,"lon":-114.7986,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Area Information | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Us / Area Information Visiting Us / Area Information Area Information Guides, Area Maps, Airport... Airport, About: McGhee Tyson Airport Airport: map to Oak Ridge/Knoxville Oak Ridge: City Guide for City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee Knoxville: maps for visitors Oak Ridge: area map with location of Y-12 Visitor's Center Oak Ridge: map of city streets Roane County: Roane County Guide Resources: News, History... Knoxville: Knoxville, Tennessee Knoxville: Museums Knoxville: Knoxville News-Sentinel Oak Ridge: City of Oak Ridge Oak Ridge: Chamber of Commerce Oak Ridge: Convention and Visitors Bureau Oak Ridge: Oak Ridger Oak Ridge: Secret City History Area Attractions: To Do and See Knoxville: Clarence Brown Theater Knoxville: Frank H. McClung Museum Knoxville: Knoxville Opera Company, Francis Graffeo, General

385

Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radio Towers Geothermal Area Radio Towers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Radio Towers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.03666667,"lon":-115.4566667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

386

Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (18) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.71666667,"lon":-121.2333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

387

Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.85703165,"lon":-164.7097211,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

North Brawley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Geothermal Area North Brawley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: North Brawley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0153,"lon":-115.5153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

Canby Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canby Geothermal Area Canby Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Canby Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.438,"lon":-120.8676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.028,"lon":-117.136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

391

Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.763,"lon":-117.156,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

Circle Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Circle Geothermal Area Circle Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Circle Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.48236057,"lon":-144.6372556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Patua Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patua Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Patua Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (11) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.598611111111,"lon":-119.215,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Ophir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ophir Geothermal Area Ophir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Ophir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.1925,"lon":-159.8589,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Geothermal Area Hawthorne Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hawthorne Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.53,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Manley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manley Geothermal Area Manley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Manley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65,"lon":-150.633333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Routt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Routt Geothermal Area Routt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Routt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.56,"lon":-106.85,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Definition: Reliability Coordinator Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordinator Area Coordinator Area Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reliability Coordinator Area The collection of generation, transmission, and loads within the boundaries of the Reliability Coordinator. Its boundary coincides with one or more Balancing Authority Areas.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, Reliability Coordinator, Balancing Authority Area, transmission line, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inlin LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. e Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reliability_Coordinator_Area&oldid=502626" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages

399

Paso Robles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Paso Robles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.657,"lon":-120.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

400

Emmons Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Geothermal Area Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Emmons Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.3333,"lon":-162.14,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dulbi Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dulbi Geothermal Area Dulbi Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dulbi Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.2667,"lon":-155.2667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Mcdermitt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcdermitt Geothermal Area Mcdermitt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mcdermitt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.08092,"lon":-117.75895,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

403

Cherry Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherry Creek Geothermal Area Cherry Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cherry Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.85,"lon":-114.905,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

Kanuti Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kanuti Geothermal Area Kanuti Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kanuti Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.3425,"lon":-150.846,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

East Brawley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Brawley Geothermal Area East Brawley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: East Brawley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.99,"lon":-115.35,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

Butte Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Geothermal Area Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Butte Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.771138,"lon":-119.114138,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

Emigrant Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emigrant Geothermal Area Emigrant Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Emigrant Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.86,"lon":-117.87,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

Milky River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milky River Geothermal Area Milky River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Milky River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.32,"lon":-174.1472,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

Dunes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dunes Geothermal Area Dunes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dunes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.80333333,"lon":-115.0133333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

410

Black Warrior Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Warrior Geothermal Area Black Warrior Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Black Warrior Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9,"lon":-119.22,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

411

Idaho Bath Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bath Geothermal Area Bath Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Idaho Bath Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.7211,"lon":-115.0144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

412

Shakes Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shakes Springs Geothermal Area Shakes Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Shakes Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.71765648,"lon":-132.0025034,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Adak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adak Geothermal Area Adak Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Adak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.975,"lon":-176.616,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Clark Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch Geothermal Area Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Clark Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8569,"lon":-118.5453,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8617,"lon":-120.1592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silver Peak Geothermal Area Silver Peak Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Silver Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (5) 9 Exploration Activities (26) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.746167220142,"lon":-117.60267734528,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

Geyser Bight Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geyser Bight Geothermal Area Geyser Bight Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geyser Bight Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.21666667,"lon":-168.4666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

Reese River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Geothermal Area Reese River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Reese River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.89,"lon":-117.14,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

Tolovana Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tolovana Geothermal Area Tolovana Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tolovana Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.2728,"lon":-148.851,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raffinate ponds area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Lava Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lava Creek Geothermal Area Lava Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lava Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.2283,"lon":-162.894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

Riverside Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside Geothermal Area Riverside Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Riverside Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.46666667,"lon":-118.1883333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Geothermal Area Desert Peak Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.75,"lon":-118.95,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

2010sr29[M Area].doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wednesday, October 20, 2010 Wednesday, October 20, 2010 Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 Savannah River Site Marks Recovery Act Cleanup Milestone M Area cleanup work was finished nearly two years ahead of schedule AIKEN, S.C. (October 20) - Department of Energy, contractor and regulatory representatives gathered today to celebrate the completion of cleanup work at Savannah River Site's M Area, nearly two years ahead of schedule. This area

425

How China utilizes biogas in rural areas  

SciTech Connect

An outline is presented of how China utilizes biogas in rural areas. Already, 7,140,000 small biogas digesters have been built. Sichuan province has 4,160,000 digesters including about 20,000 large digesters which operate diesel engines to generate electricity. This is seen as the key area for further research and development. In rural areas, biogas is used principally for cooking and to power stationary units such as grinding mills, electric generators and crop driers.

Ji, M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

3D Technologies for Large Area Trackers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe technologies which can be developed to produce large area, low cost pixelated tracking detec- tors. These utilize wafer-scale 3D electronics and sensor technologies currently being developed in industry. This can result in fully active sensor/readout chip tiles which can be assembled into large area arrays with good yield and minimal dead area. The ability to connect though the bulk of the device can also provide better electrical performance and lower mass.

Deptuch, G; Johnson, M; Kenney, C; Lipton, R; Narian, M; Parker, S; Shenai, A; Spiegel, L; Thom, J; Ye, Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

3D Technologies for Large Area Trackers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe technologies which can be developed to produce large area, low cost pixelated tracking detec- tors. These utilize wafer-scale 3D electronics and sensor technologies currently being developed in industry. This can result in fully active sensor/readout chip tiles which can be assembled into large area arrays with good yield and minimal dead area. The ability to connect though the bulk of the device can also provide better electrical performance and lower mass.

G. Deptuch; U. Heintz; M. Johnson; C. Kenney; R. Lipton; M. Narian; S. Parker; A. Shenai; L. Spiegel; J. Thom; Z. Ye

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

429

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota) Minnesota) Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas

430

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely

431

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Areas (Texas) Management Areas (Texas) Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater and groundwater

432

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Colorado Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

433

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - August 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - August 2012. Convex and ... Dual-level scenario trees - Scenario generation and applications in energy planning. Michal Kaut, Kjetil T.

434

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - December 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - December 2012. Linear, Cone and ... Solving the integrated airline recovery problem using column-and-row generation. Stephen J ...

435

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - June 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All Areas Submissions - June 2012. Convex and ... A new warmstarting strategy for the primal-dual column generation method. Jacek Gondzio, Pablo Gonzlez- ...

436

NETL: Energy System Dynamics Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy System Dynamics Onsite Research Energy System Dynamics Energy System Dynamics (ESD) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and...

437

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Field Information Development Area: Number of Production Wells: Number of Injection Wells: Number of Replacement Wells: Average Temperature of Geofluid: Sanyal...

438

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Field Information Development Area: Number of Production Wells: Number of Injection Wells: Number of Replacement Wells: Average Temperature of Geofluid: Sanyal...