Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Portable Apparatus for the Measurement of Environmental Radon and Thoron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radometer is a portable instrument for the measurement of the concentration of atmospheric radon/thoron in a test area. A constant velocity pump pulls the air from the outside at a constant flow rate. If the air is too moist, some or all of the sample is passed through a desiccant filter prior to encountering an electrostatic filter. The electrostatic filter prevents any charged particles from entering the sampling chamber. Once the sample has entered the chamber, the progeny of the decay of radon/thoron are collected on a detector and measured. The measured data is compiled by a computer and displayed.

Negro, Vincent

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radon (Rn-222) and thoron (Rn-220) emanation fractions from three separate formations of oil field pipe scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the course of normal oil well operations, pipes used downhole in the oil and petroleum industry tend to accumulate a mineral deposit on their interior, which restricts the flow of oil. This deposit, termed scale, will eventually occlude the interior diameter of the pipe making removal from service and descaling a cost effective option. The pipes are sent to cleaning yards where they remain until descaling can be performed. This storage period can potentially create a health concern not only because of the external radiation exposure but also because of the radon gas emissions, both of which are due to the radioactive minerals contained in the scale. It was believed that the structure of the scale is formed tightly enough to prevent much of the radon from becoming airborne. The goal of this research was to determine the emanation fractions for the rattled scale samples from three formations. A high purity germanium detector was used to measure the activities of the parents and progeny of radon, and electret ion chambers were used to measure the concentration of radon emanated from the scale. The emanation fractions of between 4.9x10-5 and 1.08x10-3 for radon were a factor of approximately 100 smaller than previous research results. For thoron, the fractions were and 5.72x10-8 and 4.92x10-7 for thoron with no previous research to compare. However, information that pertains to the temperature dependence of emanation was included in this research and was not available for previous, similar research. Therefore, differences in the environment (e.g., temperature, humidity, etc.) in which the previous experiments were conducted, as well as differences in the scale formation types used, could account for the discrepancy. In addition, measuring the emanation fractions of the rattled scale was a method of determining whether surface to volume ratio dependence existed. After acquiring the emanation fractions, insufficient evidence of any surface to volume ratio dependence could be found.

Fruchtnicht, Erich Harold

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astatine Astatine Previous Element (Astatine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Francium) Francium Isotopes of the Element Radon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Radon has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 193 1.15 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 194 0.78 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195 6 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195m 5 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 196 4.4 milliseconds Alpha Decay 99.90% Electron Capture ~ 0.10% 197 53 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 197m 25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 198 65 milliseconds Alpha Decay No Data Available

4

Investigation of radon, thoron, and their progeny near the earth`s surface. Final report, 1 January 1994--31 December 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG03-94ER6178, covering a performance period of 1 January 1994 through 31 December 1997. The DOE award amount for this period was $547,495. The objective of the project as stated in its proposal was {open_quotes}to improve our understanding of the physical processes controlling the concentration of radon, thoron, and their progeny in the atmospheric environment.{close_quotes} The original project was directed at developing underlying science that would help with evaluation of the health hazard from indoor radon in the United States and implementation of corrective measures that might be employed to reduce the health hazard. As priorities within the Office of Health and Environment (OHER) changed, and the radon research program was phased out, emphasis of the project was shifted somewhat to be also relevant to other interests of the OHER, namely global pollution and climate change and pollution resulting from energy production. This final report is brief, since by reference it can direct the reader to the comprehensive research publications that have been generated by the project. In section 2, we summarize the main accomplishments of the project and reference the primary publications. There were seven students who received support from the project and their names are listed in section 3. One of these students (Fred Yarger, Ph.D. candidate) continues to work on research initiated through this project. No post-docs received support from the project, although one of the co-principal investigators (Dr. Piotr Wasiolek) received the majority of his salary from the project. The project also provided part-time support for a laboratory manager (Dr. Maryla Wasiolek). Section 4 lists chronologically the reports and publications resulting from the project (references 1 through 12), and the Appendix provides abstracts of major publications and reports.

Schery, S.D.; Wasiolek, P.T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni [Graduate School of Health Science, Fujita Health University 1-98, Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Tyoake, Aichi, 470-1192 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

Method of and apparatus for measuring the mean concentration of thoron and/or radon in a gas mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and an apparatus for detecting and accurately measuring the mean concentrations of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in a gas mixture, such as the ambient atmosphere in a mine, is provided. The apparatus includes an alpha target member which defines at least one operative target surface and which is preferably fabricated from a single piece of an alpha particle sensitive material. At least one portion of the operative target surface is covered with an alpha particle filter. The uncovered and filter covered operative surface is exposed to the gas mixture containing the .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn. In the radioactive decay series of these isotopes the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of .sup.222 Rn is about 1.1 MeV less than the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of a .sup.220 Tn. The alpha particle filter has a predetermined mass per unit area of the covered portion of the operative target surface that prevents penetration of alpha particles which originate from .sup.222 Rn decay, but which allows passage therethrough of the maximum kinetic energy alpha particles from .sup.220 Tn decay. Thus, a count of the alpha particle tracks in the uncovered portion of the target member is proportional to the mean concentration of sum of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture, while the count of alpha tracks in the target member under the filter is proportional to the concentration of only the .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture.

Lucas, Henry (P.O. Box 1454, Sedona, AZ 86336)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Carrying the Ball on Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Carrying the Ball on Radon Part one of two parts Radon gas was "discovered" as an important environmental issue in the mid-1980s, when levels 1,000 times the average of about 1.5 picocuries/liter (pCi/l) were found in homes in the eastern United States. Radon is present in all homes, and even in outdoor air, because it is a gaseous decay product of radium naturally present in the soil. Since even an average indoor exposure to radon's own decay products-isotopes of polonium, bismuth, and lead-was estimated to cause a 0.1 to 1% risk of lung cancer, depending on whether one smoked, these high levels sounded an immediate alarm. By the mid-1980s, scientists had already proven that indoor radon levels 10 to 100 times the average-an unacceptable amount-occurred in homes in

8

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of Isotope Separation as Applied to the Large~scale Production of 235 u National Nuclear Energy

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Radon detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radon detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radon Binding to Water-Soluble Cryptophane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon Binding to Water-Soluble Cryptophane. Summary: Collaboration on investigating the thermodynamics of radon binding ...

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

12

Montana Radon Control Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Radon Control Act regulates the emission of radon, the gaseous decay products of uranium or thorium. The Act addresses operator certification of radon-producing facilities, testing and...

13

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Francium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium Isotopes of the Element Francium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Francium has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 199 12 milliseconds Alpha Decay > 0.00% Electron Capture No Data Available 200 49 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201 62 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201m 19 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202 0.30 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202m 0.29 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 203 0.55 seconds Alpha Decay <= 100.00% 204 1.8 seconds Alpha Decay 92.00%

14

The High-Radon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

indoor radon concentrations across the United States. The purpose of this work is to help state and other agencies identify high-radon counties and areas more precisely so that...

15

ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

_._-l"." _._-l"." .-_ "...",.,~~-- ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter Measurements at and near the Former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey F. F. Haywood P. T. Perdue D. J . Chris tian R. W . Leggett H. W . Dickson T. E. Myric k ,--___ . . . ^.. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical information Service US. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A04 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United StatesGovernment. Neither theU nited States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

16

Recent radon transient experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radon transient analysis is being developed as a method complementary to pressure transient analysis for evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. The method is based on the observations of Stoker and Kruger (1975) that radon concentration in produced geothermal fluids is related to geothermal reservoir type, production flow rates, and time. Stoker and Kruger showed that radon concentrations were markedly different in vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated systems, and varied not only among wells of different flow rate in an individual reservoir, but also varied timewise in individual wells. The potential uses of radon as an internal tracer for geothermal reservoir engineering were reviewed by Kruger, Stoker, and Umana (1977). Also included were results of the first transient test performed with rapid flow rate change in a vapor-dominated field. The results of the next four radon-flow rate transient experiments were summarized by Kruger (1978) in which effects of well interference and startup production in a new well were demonstrated. Four of these first five radon transient experiments have been carried out in vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and Serrazzano in Italy. The systematics of the transients of radon concentration following abrupt changes in flow rate is being evaluated by Warren and Kruger (1978). The fifth test was at the HGP-A well in Hawaii, the first transient test in a liquid-dominated reservoir. Three additional radon transient tests have been carried out, each in a different type of geothermal resource. The first test was in a petrothermal resource, the reservoir created by hydraulic fracturing by LASL in the hot, dry rock experiment in New Mexico. The results of this first 75-day production test of continuous forced circulation, during January-April, 1978, are given by Tester, et al (1978). The results of the radon concentration measurements made during this test are summarized by Kruger, Cederberg, and Semprini (1978). The second test was a second transient test at the HGP-A well in the liquid-dominated reservoir at Pohoiki, Hawaii, and the third test was a second transient test at the Grottitana well in the Serrazzano field at Larderello, Italy. The general observations of these tests are listed in Table 1. A summary of each of these three tests follows. During the LASL hot dry rock flow test, five samples of recirculating production fluid were obtained by wellhead sampling. Two samples were obtained during the following shutin and venting periods of the test, and one sample of makeup water was analyzed during the test.

Kruger, P.; Semprini, L.; Cederberg, G.; Macias, L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radon: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

INSTRUMENTATION FOR A RADON RESEARCH HOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12564 Extended Summary INSTRUMENTATION FOR A RADON RESEARCHNO. W-7405-ENG-48. INSTRUMENTATION FOR A RADON RESEARCHradon daughters. The system's instrumentation is capable of

Nazaroff, W.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Indoor air radon  

SciTech Connect

This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references.

Cothern, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

It's Elemental - The Element Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

present within homes. Radon seeps into houses as a result of the decay of radium, thorium or uranium ores underground and varies greatly from location to location. On average,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Radon Progeny Deposition Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Westerdale, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

22

A radon progeny deposition model  

SciTech Connect

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiseppe, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Westerdale, S. [MIT

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Air pollution uncertainty exists in radon measurements  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses radon which is a colorless, odorless gas formed by the decay of radium and uranium that has been shown to cause lung cancer. Progress has been made in ensuring the accuracy of home radon measurements. According to this report, however, radon measurements are uncertain because the ability of the devices that measure radon and the companies analyzing the devices' readings varies and homeowners may not be following EPA's recommended testing procedures. Several possible causes for the uncertainty in radon measurements are cited.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

Langner, G.H. Jr.

1991-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

Characterizing the source of radon indoors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Radon emanation and transport in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified model of radon emanation and transport has been devel oped that combines the RAECOM model for diffusive transport with new mathematical models of advecti ve transport, moisture effects, and radon emanation. The model accounts for advective depletion in radon source regions, and for the effects of varying moistures on radon emanation, diffusion, and advecti ve transport rates. Radon transport in gas- and water-fill ed pore space is characterized, and exchange between the phases is considered. Correlations are a1 so given for diffusion and permea bil ity coefficients. The model provides a comprehensive assessment of source potent i a1 s for indoor radon accumul ation based on soil moistures, radium, emanation, and advection of soil gas.

Venn C. Rogers; Kirk K. Nielson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Radon measurement in schools: Revised edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides school administrators and facilities managers with instructions on how to test for the presence of radon. The findings from EPA's comprehensive studies of radon measurements in schools have been incorporated into these recommendations. The report supersedes Radon Measurements in Schools- An Interim Report (EPA 520/1-89-010). However, it does not invalidate tests in the process of being conducted under the interim report.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Radon Monitoring Results BPA Residential Weatherization Program, Report Number 1.  

SciTech Connect

In October 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began offering free radon monitoring to participants of its regionwide Residential Weatherization Program. The purpose of the radon monitoring is to provide information to participating homeowners or consumers on the average radon concentrations within their residences. This radon concentration information and other information on indoor air quality (IAQ) is provided to assist homeowners on their decision to install ''house-tightening'' weatherization measures. This radon report will present background information on why BPA decided to offer radon monitoring, the procedures used for monitoring, the extent of BPA radon monitoring in the region, and results of this monitoring. Subsequent BPA radon monitoring reports will be produced on a quarterly basis which will include a brief narrative on the radon monitoring and provide a summary of the radon data received to date.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A PASSIVE RADON DECAY PRODUCTS MONITOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electret-based passive air samplers have been used in United Kingdom and elsewhere for quantitative sampling for airborne dust. Alpha electret ion chambers (EIC) have been used for quantitative measurement of deposited alpha emitting isotopes. These two well documented principles are combined to create a passive radon progeny monitor. Large area (50 cm2) electret charged to 500 to 2000 volts collect airborne radon decay products and the collected sample is "viewed " and measured by an alpha EIC. Such collection and measurement continues for the entire period of sampling, providing an integrated signal to the electret in alpha EIC. The present work is of exploratory nature and provides the responses of three different sizes of collection electrets. Results are also compared with a simple passive device with no collecting electret. The study provides data for optimization of the design depending upon the requirement. Study is limited to a typical home with equilibrium ratios from 40 to 60%. This method can be used for both short term and long term monitoring of RDP in working level units.

F. Stieff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Resolving the radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey, houses  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses resolution of a radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey, where significantly elevated radon concentrations were found in several adjacent houses. The U.S. EPA screened 56 of the houses and selected 10 for demonstration of radon reduction techniques. Each of the 10 houses received an intensive radon diagnostic evaluation before a house-specific radon reduction plan was developed. Before and after the plans were implemented, radon concentrations were determined by charcoal canisters and continuous radon monitors. A variety of sealing and subslab depressurization techniques were applied to the 10 houses. Radon concentrations were reduced by over 95% in all 10 houses. Five meetings were held to explain to homeowners the radion reduction techniques being implemented and to answer questions of homeowners interested in applying similar radon reduction efforts to their houses.

Osborne, M.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Health effects of radon in air  

SciTech Connect

Widely accepted risk estimates for exposure to radon in homes are derived largely from studies of miners. These include large groups of US Czechoslovakian, and Canadian uranium miners, Newfoundland fluorspar miners, and Swedish iron, lead, and zinc miners, all of which give roughly consistent results, with the excess risk of lung cancer increasing linearly with the exposure to radon. The authors have studied correlations between average radon levels and lung cancer rates in counties of the US. One study based on 50,000 purchased measurements in the main living areas of houses in which there have been no previous measurements involves 310 counties. It gives a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between mean radon levels and lung cancer rates for both females and males, whereas the usual risk estimates predict a large positive correlation.

Cohen, B.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: radon  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has a long-standing interest in investigating the impact of energy conservation measures on indoor air quality. The Office of Environmental Analysis has prepared this handbook in an effort to bring together available information on the impact of radon and its decay products on residential indoor air quality and on human health. The handbook is designed to enhance the understanding of the current state-of-knowledge regarding indoor radon for both homeowners and technical persons with an interest in indoor air quality issues. It provides the technical reader with a comprehensive review and reference source on the sources of radon and its transport mechanisms; reported indoor concentrations; building, and meteorological effects on radon concentration; models for predicting indoor concentrations; health effects and standards; and control technologies. The major questions and concerns of homeowners regarding the issue of indoor radon are addressed in a separate section entitled Radon in the Home: A Primer for Homeowners. This section also provides a starting point for readers desiring a general overview of the subject.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Radon emanation coefficients for phosphogysum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry which is stockpiled in large quantities world-wide. Phosphogypsum consists mainly of dihydrate gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O) but also contains elevated concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and other inorganic species which originate from the processing of phosphate rock. {sup 222}Rn gas is the first decay product of {sup 226}Ra and has been identified as one of the major environmental concerns associated with phosphogypsum. This study was conducted to determine effects of particle size, weathering, and moisture content on the {sup 222}Rn emanation coefficient ({epsilon}) for phosphogypsums. Practical conclusions from this study are discussed, such as the effects of a repository of a phosphogypsum site on radon emanation. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Rutherford, P.M.; Dudas, M.J. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Arocena, J.M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Univ. of Northern British Columbia (Canada)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radon measurements at the FEMP  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radon monitoring activities at the DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have been conducted extensively since the early 1980`s. Monitoring has been conducted at ambient concentration levels (< 1 pCi/L Rn-222), inside buildings, and at significantly elevated levels (hundreds of thousands pCi/L Rn-222) within the K-65 silo that store concentrated radium bearing wastes. The purpose of this paper/presentation is to present and discuss some of the difficulties encountered/solutions (e.g. reliability, detection limits, affects of environmental factors, data transfer, etc.) that have been discovered while taking measurements using both alpha track-etch passive integrating detectors and alpha scintillation real-time detectors. A short summary and conclusion section is provided following each topic presented.

Tomczak, L.M.; Daniels, R.D.; Dennis, C.; Glassey, H.G.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Selasky, J.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Spitz, H.B.; Roush, K. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Public policy model for the indoor radon problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed that predicts the shift in distributions of indoor radon concentrations and potential risk reduction resulting from a program of homeowner sampling and remediation in a region. Indoor radon concentrations for a region are represented ...

M. J. Small; C. A. Peters

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Oxygen Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of...

38

The generalized Radon transform: Sampling, accuracy and memory considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generalized Radon (or Hough) transform is a well-known tool for detecting parameterized shapes in an image. The Radon transform is a mapping between the image space and a parameter space. The coordinates of a point in the latter correspond to the ... Keywords: Efficient implementation, Error estimation, Hough transform, Image analysis, Multi-dimensional image, Parameterized shape detection, Radon transform

Cris L. Luengo Hendriks; Michael van Ginkel; Piet W. Verbeek; Lucas J. van Vliet

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Study of the radon released from open drill holes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radon emanating from three open drill holes was measured at a site of known uranium mineralization in the Red Desert of south central Wyoming. The radon flux from the soil and drill holes was measured by the accumulator method with activated charcoal cartridges. The surface soil was found to release radon at an average rate of 0.41 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec; the radon emanating from the holes was more variable than that from the soil. The three holes studied released an average of 47 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec of radon. This average is equivalent to the radon released to the atmosphere by 14.5 ft/sup 2/ of soil. The data indicate that the radon emanated from an open drill hole is not as significant as other possible activities at a drill site (i.e. digging a trench or drilling a hole) or from household activities involving the usage of water.

Pacer, J C

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radon free storage container and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radon free containment environment for either short or long term storage of radon gas detectors can be provided as active, passive, or combined active and passive embodiments. A passive embodiment includes a resealable vessel containing a basket capable of holding and storing detectors and an activated charcoal adsorbing liner between the basket and the containment vessel wall. An active embodiment includes the resealable vessel of the passive embodiment, and also includes an external activated charcoal filter that circulates the gas inside the vessel through the activated charcoal filter. An embodiment combining the active and passive embodiments is also provided.

Langner, Jr., G. Harold (Mack, CO); Rangel, Mark J. (Austin, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

43

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PI?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

44

An Experiment with Depressurization Tests as Indicators of Radon Availability in Six New Jersey Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Indicators of Radon Availability in 6 New Jersey HousesAS INDICATORS OF RADON AVAILABILITY IN 6 NEW JERSEY HOUSESas Indicators of Radon Availability in 6 New Jersey Houses

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

46

Multidimensional simulation of radon diffusion through earthen covers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document applications of the RADMD model used at PNL to perform analyses of radon diffusion through uranium mill tailings cover systems. The accuracy of the numerical formulation of the RADMD model was demonstrated through a comparison with a two-dimensional analytic solution to the radon diffusion equation. Excellent agreement was obtained between two-dimensional radon concentration profiles predicted by RADMD and those obtained with the analytic solution. A simulation was made of radon diffusion into a test canister using the two dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The radon flux profile was computed and illustrates the effects of the canister on the surface radon flux. The influence of the canister on the radon flux was shown to be significant under certain circumstances. Defects in earthen cover systems were evaluated using the three dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The results support the expectation that defective covers can increase the surface flux from a covered talings pile. Compared to a cover with no defects, radon flux could be elevated by as much as a factor of three when 20% of the radon control layer area contained pockets of reduced moisture. The effects of temporal and spatial variations in moisture content have been modeled by coupling RADMD with a variable saturated flow model. Two dimensional simulations were made of the time dependence of radon flux from a tailings site before and after cover placement. The results demonstrated the expected flux reduction produced by a thick earthen cover. Time dependence of the radon flux after cover placement was attributed to slight changes in moisture content of the cover material with time. The particular cover studied had a compacted clay layer that effectively attenuated the radon.

Mayer, D.W.; Gee, G.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A remark on primitive cycles and the Radon transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the use of Brylinski's Radon transform elucidates some points of the Green-Griffiths approach to the Hodge conjecture.

Beilinson, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Comparison of five-minute radon-daughter measurements with long-term radon and radon-daughter concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Five-minute air filter radon daughter measurements were made in 84 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, in which annual average radon daughter concentrations have been determined from six 100-hour Radon Progeny Integrating Sampling Unit (RPISU) measurements. Averaging radon concentrations were also determined in 50 of these buildings using Terradex Track Etch detectors. The standard deviation of the difference between the (natural) logarithms of the RPISU annual averages and the logarithms of the air filter measurements (SD-ln) was found to be 0.52. This SD-ln is considerably smaller than the SD-ln of 0.71 between the RPISU annual averages and the air filter measurements reported by ALARA at Grand Junction, Colorado; presumably because a considerable number of air filter measurements in Edgemont were disregarded because of short turnover times or high wind speeds. Using the SD-ln of 0.52 it can be calculated that there would only be a 5% probability in Edgemont that the RPISU annual average would be greater than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were equal to 0.010 WL. This indicates that the procedure used in Edgemont of clearing buildings from remedial action if the five-minute measurement were less than 0.010 WL was reasonable. There was about a 28% probability that the RPISU annual average would be less than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were 0.033 WL, indicating that the procedure of performing an engineering assessment if the average of two five-minute measurements was greater than 0.033 WL was also reasonable. Comparison indicates that the average of two RPISU measurements taken six months apart would provide a dependable estimate of the annual average.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

50

Radon release and dispersion from an open pit uranium mine  

SciTech Connect

Radon-222 flux from representative sections of the United Nuclear St. Anthony open-pit mine complex was measured. The collected radon was adsorbed on activated charcoal and the radon activity was measured by gamma spectroscopy. System design, calibration, and the procedure to determine radon flux density (pCi/m/sup 2/.s) are described. A continuous series of radon flux densities were measured over a 5-month period at a control point in the mine. The average flux density at the control point was 1.9 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. A close correlation between radon flux density variations and changes in barometric pressure was observed by a comparison of meteorological data and average daily radon flux density measured at the control point. The release rate from each section of the mine was calculated from the average radon flux density and the area of the section, as determined from enlarged aerial photographs. The average radon flux density for eight locations over the ore-bearing section was 7.3 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average flux density for four locations over undisturbed topsoil was 0.17 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average Ra-226 content of ten samples taken from the ore-bearing region was 102 pCi/g ore. The ratio of radon flux density to radium content (specific flux) was 0.072. The release rate from the entire St. Anthony open pit was determined to be 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ pCi/s. This rate is comparable to the natural release of radon from one square mile of undisturbed topsoil. 16 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

Kisieleski, W.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

RESIDENTIAL RADON EXPOSURE AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: A PILOT STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Proceedings are divided into two volumes this year. The first volume is dedicated to papers concentrating on radon-related health concerns, outreach and theoretical models. The second volume focuses on surveys and practical applications associated with radon testing and mitigation.

Carolyn Allen President; James F. Burkhart; Andreus George; Phil Jenkins; Dan Steck; William Brodhead; Gary Hodgden; Leo Moorman; Dave Wilson; John S. Neuberger; Niaman Nazir; John Keighley; Sharon Lynch; Butterfield Wade G. Hill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations  

SciTech Connect

A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Optimistic biases in public perceptions of the risk from radon  

SciTech Connect

Survey data were obtained from a random sample of 657 homeowners in New Jersey and also from 141 homeowners who had already monitored their homes for radon. People who had not tested tended to believe that they were less at risk than their neighbors, and they interpreted ambiguous predictors of home radon levels in ways that supported their beliefs of below-average risk. Residents who had already tested their homes were relatively accurate about the probability of health effects. In both groups less than half of those who knew that radon can cause lung cancer were willing to admit that it would be serious if they suffered health effects from this source. The optimistic biases of the public may hamper attempts to encourage home radon monitoring and to promote appropriate mitigation measures in homes with elevated radon concentrations.

Weinstein, N.D.; Klotz, M.L.; Sandman, P.M.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Statistical uncertainty analysis of radon transport in nonisothermal, unsaturated soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accurately predict radon fluxes soils to the atmosphere, we must know more than the radium content of the soil. Radon flux from soil is affected not only by soil properties, but also by meteorological factors such as air pressure and temperature changes at the soil surface, as well as the infiltration of rainwater. Natural variations in meteorological factors and soil properties contribute to uncertainty in subsurface model predictions of radon flux, which, when coupled with a building transport model, will also add uncertainty to predictions of radon concentrations in homes. A statistical uncertainty analysis using our Rn3D finite-element numerical model was conducted to assess the relative importance of these meteorological factors and the soil properties affecting radon transport. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Holford, D.J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Resolving the radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey houses. Published paper, April-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the resolution of a radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey, where significantly elevated radon concentrations were found in several adjacent houses. The U.S. EPA screened 56 of the houses and selected 10 for demonstration of radon-reduction techniques. Each of the 10 houses received an intensive radon diagnostic evaluation before a house-specific radon reduction plan was developed. Before and after the plans were implemented, radon concentrations were determined by charcoal canisters and continuous radon monitors. A variety of sealing and sub-slab depressurization techniques were applied to the 10 houses. Radon concentrations were reduced by over 95% in all 10 houses. Five meetings were held to explain to homeowners the radon reduction techniques being implemented and to answer questions of homeowners interested in applying similar radon-reduction efforts to their houses.

Osborne, M.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

ISOTOPE SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

Bacon, C.G.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development of Super-high Sensitivity Radon Detector for the Super-Kamiokande Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

samples of standard radon water produced by the radon water making system, which takes account produced by the radon water making system. 13 #12; Diluted Rn water[mBq=m 3 ] 700L C.F[cpd/(mBq=m 3 )] 70L-high sensitivity radon detector for water which works as a real-time monitor of the radon concentration in water

Takeuchi, Yasuo

59

Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants` reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 {plus_minus} 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within {plus_minus}1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 {plus_minus} 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm{sup {minus}3}). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22.

Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A.; Perry, P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Home radon monitor modeled after the common smoke detector  

SciTech Connect

The EPA has declared that five million or so of the nation`s 80 million homes may have indoor radon levels that pose an unacceptably high risk of lung cancer to occupants. They estimate that four times as many people die from radon-induced lung cancers as from fires in the home. Therefore the EPA has recommended that all homes be tested and that action be taken to reduce the radon concentration in homes that test above the 4 pCi/L level. The push to have homeowners voluntarily test for elevated radon levels has been only marginally successful. A reliable, inexpensive, and accurate in-home radon monitor designed along the same general lines as a home smoke detector might overcome much of the public reluctance to test homes for radon. Such a Home Radon Monitor (HRM) is under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To be acceptable to the public, HRMs should have the following characteristics in common with smoke detectors: low cost, small size, ease of installation and use, low maintenance, and high performance. Recent advances in Long-Range Alpha Detection technology are being used in the design of a HRM that should meet or exceed all these characteristics. A proof-of-principle HRM detector prototype has been constructed and results from tests of this prototype will be presented.

Bolton, R.D.; Arnone, G.J.; Johnson, J.P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Long term performance of different radon remedial methods in Sweden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this project was to investigate the long time effectiveness of different radon remedial methods. The ten years project started 1991. From start the investigation comprised of 105 dwellings (91 single-family houses and 14 flats in multi-family buildings). In all of the dwellings remedial measures were carried out in the eighties. Before and immediately after the reduction the local measured the radon concentrations. New measurements of the radon concentrations have been made every third year; in 1991, 1994, 1997 and in 2000. Twelve different radon remedial methods and method combinations were used. The radon sources were building materials as well as sub-soils. In all of the dwellings the radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track films during 3 months (January-March) measurements and in half of them the air change rates by passive tracer gas methods. The results of the 2000 and the 1991 (within brackets) studies showed that the radon concentration was up to 200 Bq/m sup 3 in 54 (54) sin...

Clavensjoe, B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EPA's Recommended Residential Radon Mitigation Standard of Practice EPA recommends the Standard Practice for Installing Radon Mitigation Systems in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing Low-Rise Residential Buildings * for residential radon mitigation. This voluntary, consensus-based standard was developed and issued by the American Society for Testing and Materials International, and is identified as ASTM E-2121. The Agency first cited ASTM E-2121 in 2003 as a national consensus standard appropriate for reducing radon in homes as far as practicable below the national action level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in indoor air. As of May 2006, EPA no longer recommends, and will no longer distribute its own, superseded Radon Mitigation Standards (EPA 402-R-93-

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A range description for the planar circular Radon transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transform considered in the paper integrates a function supported in the unit disk on the plane over all circles centered at the boundary of this disk. Such circular Radon transform arises in several contemporary imaging techniques, as well as in other applications. As it is common for transforms of Radon type, its range has infinite co-dimension in standard function spaces. Range descriptions for such transforms are known to be very important for computed tomography, for instance when dealing with incomplete data, error correction, and other issues. A complete range description for the circular Radon transform is obtained. Range conditions include the recently found set of moment type conditions, which happens to be incomplete, as well as the rest of conditions that have less standard form. In order to explain the procedure better, a similar (non-standard) treatment of the range conditions is described first for the usual Radon transform on the plane.

Gaik Ambartsoumian; Peter Kuchment

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Radon transformation on reductive symmetric spaces: support theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a class of Radon transforms for reductive symmetric spaces, including the horospherical transforms, and study some of their properties. In particular we obtain a generalization of Helgason's support theorem for the horospherical transform on a Riemannian symmetric space.

Kuit, J J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radon in homes and other technologically enhanced radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

The results are described of recent observations at Argonne National Laboratory, contributing to our knowledge of such factors as the origin of high levels of radon in houses, its variability with time or otherwise, its uniformity throughout the house or otherwise, and the behavior and fate of the short-lived daughter-products. In a sample of 110 houses, mostly in the west suburban area of Chicago, 15% had radon concentrations in excess of 6 pCi litre/sup -1/ and 96% greater than 10 pCi litre /sup -1/. If this distribution is representative of all houses in the USA, the population being exposed to such high concentrations of radon is far greater than the number of people in Grand Junction being exposed to quite similar concentrations from technologically enhanced radioactivity. There is a great need for far more extensive data on radon in houses.

Rundo, J.; Toohey, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Survey of radon and radon daughter concentrations in selected Rainier Mesa tunnels  

SciTech Connect

A survey of radon and radon daughter concentrations (RDCs) in selected tunnels on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted as a part of the underground testing program at NTS. Measurements were taken in three tunnels, N, T, and G. Results of preliminary measurements indicate that N and T Tunnels have low RDCs, i.e., 0.01 WL (working level) (3% of the EPA standard), with normal ventilation conditions. However, it was demonstrated that RDCs can rise to relatively high levels, i.e., 0.24 WL when ventilation rates are significantly lowered. The radon daughter concentrations measured in G Tunnel were an order of magnitude higher than those in N and T Tunnels. The average RDC in the rock mechanics drift (the ''worst-case'' location in G Tunnel) was 0.13 WL with a range from 0.07 WL to 0.23 WL. Elevated RDCs found in the rock mechanics drift of G Tunnel seemed to be attributable to a lower ventilation rate in conjunction with the more highly fractured nature of the ''welded tuff'' rock formation in which the incline drift was mined. By increasing the ventilation rate, a 60% reduction in RDCs from an average of 0.13 Wl to an average of 0.05 WL was achieved.

Fauver, D.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Arvela, H.; Voutilainen, A.; Honkamaa, T.; Rosenberg, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Glossary Term - Isotope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helios Previous Term (Helios) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Joule) Joule Isotope The Three Isotopes of Hydrogen - Protium, Deuterium and Tritium Atoms that have the same number of...

70

Improvements needed in the Environmental Protection Agency's testing program for radon measurement companies  

SciTech Connect

Radon, a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless gas, has been shown to cause lung cancer. As a result, EPA and the Public Health Service advise homeowners to test their homes and to take action if elevated radon levels are discovered. However, GAO believes that to make health decisions, homeowners need more assurance that the radon test results they obtain are accurate. This report discusses how greater accuracy in radon measurements would result from mandating company participation in the Radon Measurement Proficiency program and requiring radon measurement firms to meet minimum quality assurance requirements as a condition to participation. In addition, to ensure that state programs provide a minimum degree of control and consistency over radon measurement companies, GAO recommends that EPA issue guidance on the type of state programs and level of control it believes are needed at the state level in order to provide homeowners with adequate assurances that radon measurements are accurate.

Hembra, R.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Method for separating isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

Jepson, B.E.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Stable isotope studies  

SciTech Connect

The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

Ishida, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Isotopes: Isotope Production, Medical IsotopesOffice of Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managers Put a short description of the graphic or its primary message here Isotope Production and Applications The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive...

74

Isotope separation by photochromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

Suslick, Kenneth S. (Stanford, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

MEASUREMENTS IN EIGHT "RADON-RESISTANT " NEW HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have logged continuous radon, differential air pressures and other characteristics for eight houses built with radon-resistant features by Habitat for Humanity of Dane County. Pressures logged in the bases of the passive stacks were predominantly below basement air pressure, varying with time, while pressures in the sealed sump pits were above basement air pressure. Wind speed, wind direction and outdoor temperature affected the depressurization in the stack bases. With the stacks closed, the pressures in their bases increased to about 2 Pascals above basement air, and indoor radon increased by factors of 1.3 to 8 among the houses. In some houses, when appliance fans withdrawing air from the house envelope were operated, they pulled the basement air pressure below the pressure in the base of the stack, and bursts of indoor radon resulted. Basement radon averaged 1, 1.3, 2.6, 2.8, 3.8, 4.0, 4.0, and 12 pCi/L in winter in the eight houses. The latter house, which had poor sealing of basement floor-wall joints, was mitigated to 0.5 pCiIL with a 14-watt fan.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Radon emissions during mill tailings backfill operations in a uranium mine  

SciTech Connect

Experimental measurements of airflow and radon concentrations in a part of an underground uranium mine in the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, area were used to determine total radon release rates during construction/maintenance, mining, and backfill operations. A mathematical model of the airflow and radon emissions was developed to simulate radon release in this same mine area. Calculated estimates were high by a factor of about 2.6. When calibrated using the experimental data, the simulation model predicted release rates and trends very well. Backfilling of mined-out rooms resulted in a small decrease in total radon release.

Kauffman, D.; Kong, E.J.C.; Lin, J.P.H. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Wavelet transform and Radon transform on the Quaternion Heisenberg group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\mathscr Q$ be the quaternion Heisenberg group, and let $\\mathbf P$ be the affine automorphism group of $\\mathscr Q$. We develop the theory of continuous wavelet transform on the quaternion Heisenberg group via the unitary representations of $\\mathbf P$ on $L^2(\\mathscr Q)$. A class of radial wavelets is constructed. The inverse wavelet transform is simplified by using radial wavelets. Then we investigate the Radon transform on $\\mathscr Q$. A Semyanistri-Lizorkin space is introduced, on which the Radon transform is a bijection. We deal with the Radon transform on $\\mathscr Q$ both by the Euclidean Fourier transform and the group Fourier transform. These two treatments are essentially equivalent. We also give an inversion formula by using wavelets, which does not require the smoothness of functions if the wavelet is smooth.

He, JIanxun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Predicting the efficiency of activated charcoal for filtering radon  

SciTech Connect

In order to accurately assess the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of radon from flowing air, a literature survey was performed to identify the models and relevant data that were available. It was found that by modifying the mathematical model of equilibrium stage theory used by Strong and Levins, the output rate of an activated charcoal filter exposed to a step function input in the radon rate at time zero with a given carrier gas flow velocity could be predicted. This paper outlines the modifications made to Strong and Levins's model and presents predictions for the filter output from the modified model.

Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E.; Christensen, R.N. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Isotope Enrichment Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... incremental isotopic percentages which are compared with an input experimentally derived profile. The theoretical profile of 15 N percentage which ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radon as an In Situ Tracer in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By measuring trace amounts of radon in geothermal steam, utilities can estimate changes in the properties of the fluid produced from a reservoir. These measurements provide a method to monitor the transition from a liquid-dominated reservoir to a boiling reservoir.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Distillation purification and radon assay of liquid xenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We succeeded to reduce the Kr contamination in liquid xenon by a factor of 1/1000 with a distillation system in Kamioka mine. Then, the remaining radioactivities (Radon and Kr) in purified liquid xenon were measured with the XMASS prototype detector. In this talk, the distillation system and the remaining internal radioactivity levels are reported.

Takeuchi, Yasuo [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Radon Monitoring and Early Low Background Counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

Thomas, K. J.; Mei, D.-M. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Heise, J. [Sanford Laboratory at Homestake, Lead, SD 57754 (United States); Durben, D. [Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD 57799 (United States); Salve, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

Time-dependent response of a charcoal bed to radon and water vapor in flowing air  

SciTech Connect

Extremely high airborne concentrations of radon gas may be encountered during the remediation of uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Radon is also a constituent of the off-gas of mill-tailing vitrification. An effective way to remove radon from either gas is to pass the gas through a packed bed containing activated charcoal. Measurements of radon concentrations in the environment using charcoal canisters were first described by George. Canisters similar to those used by George in his first experiments have become the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standard for measuring environmental radon and were described in the EPA protocol for environmental radon measurement. The dynamic behavior of EPA charcoal canisters has been previously described with a mathematical model for the kinetics of radon gas adsorption in air in the presence of water vapor. This model for charcoal canisters has been extended to large charcoal beds with flowing air containing radon and water vapor. The mathematical model for large charcoal beds can be used to evaluate proposed bed designs or to model existing beds. Parameters that affect the radon distribution within a charcoal bed that can be studied using the mathematical model include carrier gas relative humidity and flow velocity, and input radon concentration. In addition, the relative performances of several different charcoals can be studied, provided sufficient information about their adsorption, desorption, and diffusion constants is known.

Henkel, J.A.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

THE EMANATION OF RADON 220 FROM SINTERED UO$sub 2$ POWDERS AND PLATES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emanation of thoron (Rn/sup 220/) from sintered UO/sub 2/ powders and plates was measured as a function of temperature. The uranium oxide samples were indexed with radiothorium by coprecipitation and coevaporation techniques. The emanation measurements were performed in a flow system, using an alpha scintillation detector and a helium-hydrogen carrier gas mixture. Both the radiothorium concentration (5 to 100 mu C/g UO/sub 2/) and the uranium oxide density (71 to 99 percent TD) were varied. The surface areas and densities of the UO/sub 2/ plates were measured by krypton gas adsorption and liquid immersion techniques, respectively. Assuming a diffusion mechanism, diffusion coefficients for thoron in sintered UO/sub 2/ were calculated as a function of temperature. The data were represented by an equation of the form, D = D/sub O/ exp (-Q/RT). An apparent increase in both activation energy (Q) and D/sub O/ with density was observed for the 1100 to 1450 deg C temperature range. For some samples the thoron emanating power could be measured at temperatures as low as 400 deg C. Log D versus 1/T plots from 400 to 1450 deg C gave intersecttng straight lines with different activation energies. One intersection occurred near the Tammann temperature. The emanation of Rn/sup 220/ from UO/sub 2/ apparently involves several types of diffusion processes. (auth)

Clayton, J.C.; Aronson, S.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

Haller, Eugene E.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

92

Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida  

SciTech Connect

As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report recornmenrls instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two rnonth measurement rnethodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

Young,, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. 0.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols Title Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-117E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Michael G. Apte Journal Radiation Biology. Radioecology (Russian) Volume 49 Start Page Chapter Issue 3 Pagination 395-404 Other Numbers LBNL-117E Abstract The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry - nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction

95

Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols: Proposed method and research strategy Title Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols: Proposed method and research strategy Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-117E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Michael G. Apte Journal Inhalation Toxicology Volume 22 Pagination 760-766 Abstract The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry - nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction

96

Influence of local geology on the concentration of indoor radon in Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 58,000 indoor radon measurements are available for homes in Maryland. A comparative study between compilations of activated-charcoal and alpha-track measurements of indoor radon in zip-code-size geographic areas indicated that both of these methods are useful and are equally able to estimate regional indoor radon. Indoor radon measurements compiled according to zip code areas can be used to create state-size radon hazard maps. In Maryland the area with the highest indoor radon (mostly composed of zip code areas that average over 8 pCi/L) is the western half of the Piedmont Province and the eastern side of the Coastal Plain Province. The eastern half of the Piedmont and the eastern half of the Valley and Ridge mostly have intermediate and high indoor radon levels (4--8 and >8 pCi/L). The Blue Ridge, western side of the Valley and Ridge, and Plateau Province each has relatively few zip code areas, but the data suggest a range from low to high indoor radon levels. The western side of the Coastal Plain has the lowest indoor radon (most of the zip code areas average less than 4 pCi/L).

Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

Ashley, R.W.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hybrid isotope separation scheme  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Radon concentrations in residential housing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to assess the variability of exposure expected among atomic bomb survivors. Two hundred dwellings, mostly belonging to members of the fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors under study by the Radiation Effects Research Foundations, were selected for this measurement. The geometric mean values of the radon concentrations for 100 dwellings in Hiroshima and 99 dwellings in Nagasaki measured by Track-Etcho Type SF detectors were 56.8 Bq m{sup {minus}3} and 28.5 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed between lung cancer mortalities in the low-dose range in the two cities. However, apparent values of the mortality rate for low dose range in Hiroshima are consistently greater than those in Nagasaki. The exposure to radon and its progeny and the atomic bomb radiation effect might have some cooperative effects on the lung cancer incidence.

Yonehara, Hidenori; Aoyama, Takashi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science (Japan); Radford, E.P. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A study of radon-222 concentrations in North Carolina groundwater  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater of 400 North Carolina homes was sampled to ascertain the distribution and extent of {sup 222}Rn in North Carolina groundwater. Arithmetic mean (AM) and geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 1,816 pCi L{sup {minus}1} and 656 pCi L{sup {minus}1} were found for the state. These results indicate that two-thirds of 114{degree}C. homes served by groundwater exceed the EPA proposed 300 pCi L{sup {minus}1} maximum contaminant level (MCL). Only 2% of NC homes exceeded 10,000 pCi L-1. The Eastern region had the lowest radon concentrations by far, with a GM of 2-)0 pCi L{sup {minus}1}. The Central region and Western region had GM`s of 794 pCi L{sup {minus}1} and 1,032 pCi L{sup {minus}1} respectively. The groundwater data approached a log normal distribution. No consistent trends were noted in the relationship between indoor radon concentrations and groundwater radon concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.00921 revealed a very weak linear relationship.

Evans, J.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analytical risk-based model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport in landfills with radium sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport through soils is derived for environmental modeling of landfills containing uranium mill tailings or Ra-226 sources. Processes include radon diffusion in both the gas and liquid phases, ... Keywords: Landfill, Multiphase, Performance assessment, Probabilistic modeling, Radium, Radon, Transport

Clifford K. Ho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications  

SciTech Connect

This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

Cohen, B.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

Cohen, B.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Experience from Intercomparison Exercises of Radon Gas Detectors in the Years 1996?2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon gas measuring services in Switzerland must be approved by the Federal Office for Public Health (FOPH). The maintenance of approval includes the obligation to participate in annual intercomparison exercises performed at the radon gas reference laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In eleven intercomparison exercises since 1996 a total of 1

Gernot Butterweck; Christoph Schuler

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Vertical Distribution of Radon in Clear and Cloudy Daytime Terrestrial Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon (222Rn) is a powerful natural tracer of mixing and exchange processes in the atmospheric boundary layer. The authors present and discuss the main features of a unique dataset of 50 high-resolution vertical radon profiles up to 3500 m above ...

Alastair G. Williams; Wlodek Zahorowski; Scott Chambers; Alan Griffiths; Jrg M. Hacker; Adrian Element; Sylvester Werczynski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural: Hydrological: Source of fluids, circulation, andor mixing. Thermal: Heat source and general reservoir temperatures Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis: Isotopes...

108

Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Divisions Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division Jeffrey Binder, Division Director Jeffrey Binder, Division Director The Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) of the Nuclear Science...

109

Isotope Enrichment | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern electromagnetic isotope separator developed and being scaled-up to replace the Manhattan Project-era Calutrons used for stable isotope enrichment. Since 1945, ORNL has...

110

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

1975-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Isotope GeochemistryIsotope Geochemistry Isotopes do not fractionate during partial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, due to U and Th decay The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb #12;The isotope geology of PbThe isotope geology of Pb µ = 238U/204Pb Primeval lead (Isotope ratios of Pb tT t eea Pb Pb -µ+= 30.90 204 206 == a Pb Pb i 29.100 204 207 == b Pb Pb i #12;The isotope geology

Siebel, Wolfgang

112

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

HUMAN DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: THE IMPACT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect

The level of radon and its daughters inside conventional buildings is often higher than the ambient background level. Interest in conserving energy is motivating homeowners and builers to reduce ventilation and hence to increase the concentration of indoor generated air contaminants, including radon. It is unliekly that the current radiation levels in conventional homes and buildings from radon daughters could account for a significant portion of the lung cancer rate in non-smokers. However, it is likely that some increased lung cancer risk would result from increased radon exposures; hence, it is prudent not to allow radon concentrations to rise significantly. There are several ways to implement energy conservation measures without increasing risks.

Budnitz, R.J.; Berk, J.V.; Hollowell, C.D.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effectiveness of radon control features in new house construction, south central Florida. Final report, November 1993-December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of two slab types (monolithic and slab-in-stem wall) in retarding radon entry in new houses built in accordance with the State of Florida`s proposed radon standard for new construction over high radon potential soils. Fourteen houses were monitored during their construction on sites whose soil gas radon concentrations were screened to be > 1000 pCi/L. Some of the house sites had concentrations 12,000 pCi/L. Slab integrity was monitored over time, and post-construction ventilation and radon entry were measured in all the houses.

Fowler, C.S.; McDonough, S.E.; Williamson, A.D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Isotopically controlled semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

Haller, Eugene E.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radon transform on a space over a residue class ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The functions on a space of dimension N over the residue class ring Z{sub n} modulo n that are invariant with respect to the group GL(N,Z{sub n}) form a commutative convolution algebra. We describe the structure of this algebra and find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the operators of multiplication by elements of this algebra. The results thus obtained are applied to solve the inverse problem for the hyperplane Radon transform on Z{sup N}{sub n}. Bibliography: 2 titles.

Molchanov, Vladimir F [Tambov State University, Tambov (Russian Federation)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently uses a dose conversion coefficient to calculate effective dose per unit exposure to radon and its progeny. The coefficient is derived by dividing the detriment associated with unit exposure to radon, as estimated from epidemiological studies, by the detriment per unit effective dose, as estimated mainly from atomic bomb survivor data and animal studies. In a recent statement the ICRP indicated that future guidance on exposure to radon and its progeny will be developed in the same way as guidance for any other radionuclide. That is, intake of radon and progeny will be limited on the basis of effective dose coefficients derived from biokinetic and dosimetric models. This paper proposes a biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) radon for use in the calculation of dose coefficients for inhaled or ingested radon. The model is based largely on physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of the fate of internally deposited radon in human subjects.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Marsh, James [Health Protection Agency of Great Britain; Gregoratto, Demetrio [Health Protection Agency of Great Britain; Blanchardon, Eric [IRSN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

AN ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON MEASUREMENTS IN KANSAS UTILIZING GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIs) TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning January 1, 1987, the state of Kansas began collecting and recording data from residential radon tests. This data was collected based entirely upon voluntary home testing, performed by 1) the home owner (using a store-purchased radon test kit), 2) a professional radon testing laboratory or 3) by technicians from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) state laboratory. The majority of test results arc from tests conducted by homeowners. The radon database was analyzed using Arc Info 8.2. Three primary graphical information system (GIs) analyses were performed: 1) a comparison of the Kansas database to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)l Unites States Geographical Service (USGS) radon threat map for Kansas, 2) a data density analysis of statewide testing patterns and 3) an analysis of average radon values across clustered zip code districts in Sedgwick County, Shawnee County and the Kansas City metropolitan area (including Johnson, Wyandottc, Leavenworth and Douglas Counties). Comparison of the Kansas radon database to the EPAIUSGS threat asscssmcnt map showed similar but not identical trends. The data density analysis identified the zip code districts for which no test results had been collected and identified the areas of

Hanscn Brian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Effect of Steady Winds on Radon-222 Entry from soil into houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind affects the radon-222 entry rate from soil into buildings and the resulting indoor concentrations. To investigate this phenomenon, we employ a previously tested three-dimensional numerical model of soil-gas Bow around houses, a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, an established model for determining ventilation rates in the presence of wind, and new wind tunnel results for the ground-surface pressure field caused by wind. These tools and data, applied under steady-state conditions to a prototypical residential building, allow us (1) to determine the complex soil-gas flow patterns that result from the presence of wind-generated ground-surface pressures, (2) to evaluate the effect of these flows on the radon concentration in the soil, and (3) to calculate the effect of wind on the radon entry rate and indoor concentration. For a broad range of soil permeabilities, two wind speeds, and two wind directions, we quantify the"flushing" effect of wind on the radon in the soil surrounding a house, and the consequent sharp decrease in radon entry rates. Experimental measurements of the time-dependent radon concentration in soil gas beneath houses confirm the existence of wind-induced flushing. Comparisons are made to modeling predictions obtained while ignoring the effect of the wind-generated ground-surface pressures. These investigations lead to the conclusion that wind-generated ground-surface pressures play a significant role in determining radon entry rates into residential buildings. [References: 26

Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today  

SciTech Connect

In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas {sup 222}Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that {sup 222}Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected.Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's onwards a variety of radon measuring instruments were developed to assess the radon and radon decay product exposure to underground miners, workers at contaminated sites with uranium and radium tailings and to the general public in residential buildings. In the last twenty years, new instruments and methods were developed to measure radon by using grab, integrating and continuous modes of sampling. The most common are scintillation cell monitors, activated carbon collectors, electret ionization chambers, alpha track detectors, pulse and current ionization chambers and solid-state alpha detectors.

George, A. C. [201-27 26th Avenue Bayside NY 11360 (United States)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center...

123

Isotopes as Environmental Tracers in Archived Biological ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tissue Archival and Monitoring Program (STAMP ... and isotopes) and carbon/nitrogen (isotopes). The carbon/nitrogen isotope data provide valuable ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

125

Stable Isotopes in Hailstones. Part I: The Isotopic Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations describing the isotopic balance between five water species (vapor, cloud water, rainwater, cloud ice and graupel)have been incorporated into a one-dimensional steady-state cloud model. The isotope contents of the various water ...

B. Federer; N. Brichet; J. Jouzel

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

RADIATIOh RESEARCH 142,61-69 (1995) The Biological Effectiveness of Radon-ProgenyAlpha Particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for uranium miners or on data derived from A-bomb sur- vivors; comparison of domestic radon risk estimates studied. (d)The conversion from effective dose per unit exposure in a mine to effective dose per unit

Brenner, David Jonathan

127

Imaging of structure at and near the core mantle boundary using a generalized radon transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, concepts from inverse scattering and modem statistics are combined into a powerful tool for imaging interfaces in Earth's deep interior. Specially, a generalized Radon transform (GRT) approach is developed ...

Wang, Ping, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Expert systems: A new approach to radon mitigation training and quality assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Training radon mitigators and ensuring that they provide high-quality work on the scale necessary to reduce radon to acceptable levels in the large number of homes and schools requiring some mitigation is a challenging problem. The US Environmental Protection Agency and several states have made commendable efforts to train mitigators and ensure that they provide quality services to the public. Expert systems could be used to extend and improve the effectiveness of these efforts. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the radon community to this promising new technology. The paper includes a description of a prototype system developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory that illustrates several of the capabilities that expert systems can provide, a brief explanation of how the prototype works, and a discussion of the potential roles and benefits of fully-developed expert systems for radon mitigation. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Brambley, M.R.; Hanlon, R.L.; Parker, G.B.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii Abstract Rates of ground radon emanation, inthe Puna geothermal area on the lower east riftof Kilauea volcano, were measured by alpha particle sensitive cellulose nitrate films. The survey successfully defined an area of thermal significance associated with the rift structure,and suggests that a thermally driven ground gas convection system exists within, and peripheralto, the rift. This type of survey was found suitable for the basaltic island environment characteristic of Hawaii and is now used in Hawaii as a routine geothermal exploration technique. Author Malcolm E. Cox Published Journal

130

Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

Nelson, I.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ISOTOPE SEPARATION AND ISOTOPE EXCHANGE. A Bibliography with Abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The unclassified literature covering 2498 reports from 1907 through 1957 has been searched for isotopic exchange and isotepic separation reactions involving U and the lighter elements of the periodic chart through atomic number 30. From 1953 to 1957, all elements were included Numerous references to isotope properties, isotopic ratios, and kinetic isotope effects were included. This is a complete revision of TID-3036 (Revised) issued June 4, 1954. An author index is included. (auth)

Begun, G.M.

1959-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

Riley, W.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Investigation of radon-222 in subsurface waters as an earthquake predictor  

SciTech Connect

Changes of radon-222 content of well waters in seismically active regions may provide earthquake precursor signals, according to reports of recent Chinese and Russian work. A high-precision $gamma$-ray system for continuous monitoring of radon in wells and springs has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where monitoring began in April 1975, and has been extended to other sites including the San Andreas fault zone. (auth)

Smith, A.R.; Bowman, H.R.; Mosier, D.F.; Asaro, F.; Wollenberg, H.A.; King, C.Y.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

Johnston, W.H.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Method for separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The angular integral of the radon transform (aniRT) as a feature vector in categorization of visual objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently introduced angular integral of the Radon transform (aniRT) seems to be a good candidate as a feature vector used in categorization of visual objects in a rotation invariant fashion. We investigate application of aniRT in situations when ... Keywords: categorization of visual objects, chinese characters, incremental learning, radon transform, self-organizing maps

Andrew P. Papli?ski

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 activities on glass objects using stacked LR 115 detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of both active layers were calculated. Two glass samples were exposed in a chamber to determine the experimental calibration fac- tors for the radon gas and progeny, which were then compared with the theoretical agreed well. The discrepancy between the calibration factors for radon gas was due to a much higher

Yu, K.N.

139

Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha and beta activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha and beta sources, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations. Use of the current algorithm is therefore not recommended for assay applications and so use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha and beta activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 dpm level.

Robert Hayes

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

Problems Found Using a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion of anthropogenic activity estimates with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion, indicating that the system would not give false positive indications for an appropriately set decision level. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha filters, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations from calibrated values indicating that the system would give false negative indications. Use of the current algorithm is, therefore, not recommended for general assay applications. Use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve-fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 disintegrations per minute level.

Robert Hayes

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Recommended performance standard of the Florida Radon Research Program. Final report, April 1990-September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a revised version of a support document for the performance testing portion of the proposed Florida statewide building standard for radon-resistant construction. The support document was developed by the Alternate Performance Standard Development Committee of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP), commissioned by the Florida Department of Community Affairs. The report contains the rationale and technical justification for the version of the Performance Testing Section (Section 5) of the standard which was recommended by the Standard Development Committee, as well as recommended text for the section. The recommendations and draft standard language were based largely on an FRRP research project which involved study of short- and long-term average indoor radon concentrations in 80 Florida houses for over a year. At the time of the committee report the project had collected 6 months of data from about half the houses and 3 months of data from the remaining half. After a brief review of the variability of indoor radon, the report describes background, methodology, data analysis strategy, and early results from the short-/long-term radon correlation project. These are followed by a rationale for the recommended standard section.

McDonough, S.E.; Williamson, A.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radon mitigation studies: South Central Florida demonstration. Final report, November 1987-January 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation project involving 14 slab-on-grade houses in Polk County, FL, having indoor radon levels of 320-3810 Bq/cu m (8.7-103 pCi/L), using sub-slab depressurization (SSD) in a variety of applications to evaluate optimal design criteria to be recommended as cost-effective and capable of reducing indoor radon concentrations in houses built over compacted soil fills. For all houses, obvious accessible radon entry points were sealed, and 53-90 L (12-20 gal.) suction pits were dug into the fill material. Two of the houses were mitigated with exterior horizontal suction holes drilled through the stem walls. In four houses, one or more suction pipes were in the garage. The remainder of the interior suction holes were in closets or some other unobtrusive location. Except for the two houses with exterior systems, the other 12 had mitigation fans in the attic. In-line centrifugal fans were used to mitigate each house, although a larger radial blower was installed overnight for experimental purposes in one house, and a vaccumcleaner was used to simulate a larger suction in another house for pressure field measurements only. Post-mitigation worst-case radon concentrations in these houses ranged from 40 to 290 Bq/cu m.

Fowler, C.S.; Williamson, A.D.; Pyle, B.E.; Belzer, F.E.; Coker, R.N.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radon in Soil Gas Above Bedrock Fracture Sets at the Shepleys Hill Superfund Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepleys Hill remediation site near Devens, MA (Figure 1). The technical support was requested as follow-on work to an initial screening level radiation survey conducted in 2008. The purpose of the original study was to assess the efficacy of the INL-developed Backpack Sodium Iodide System (BaSIS) for detecting elevated areas of natural radioactivity due to the decay of radon-222 gases emanating from the underlying fracture sets. Although the results from the initial study were mixed, the BaSIS radiation surveys did confirm that exposed bedrock outcrops have higher natural radioactivity than the surficial soils, thus a high potential for detecting elevated levels of radon and/or radon daughter products. (INL 2009) The short count times associated with the BaSIS measurements limited the ability of the system to respond to elevated levels of radioactivity from a subsurface source, in this instance radon gas emanating from fracture sets. Thus, it was postulated that a different methodology be employed to directly detect the radon in the soil gases. The CR-39 particle track detectors were investigated through an extensive literature and technology search. The relatively long deployment or detection time of several days, as well as the sensitivity of the measurement and robustness of the detectors made the CR-39 technology promising for deployment at the Shepleys Hill site.

J.R. Giles; T.L. McLing; M.V. Carpenter; C.J. Smith; W. Brandon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

Discovery of {sup 229}Rn and the Structure of the Heaviest Rn and Ra Isotopes from Penning-Trap Mass Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The masses of the neutron-rich radon isotopes {sup 223-229}Rn have been determined for the first time, using the ISOLTRAP setup at CERN ISOLDE. In addition, this experiment marks the first discovery of a new nuclide, {sup 229}Rn, by Penning-trap mass measurement. The new, high-accuracy data allow a fine examination of the mass surface, via the valence-nucleon interaction {delta}V{sub pn}. The results reveal intriguing behavior, possibly reflecting either a N=134 subshell closure or an octupolar deformation in this region.

Neidherr, D.; Boehm, Ch. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Beck, D.; Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH Darmstadt, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K.; George, S.; Kellerbauer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Cakirli, R. B. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Department of Physics, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Casten, R. F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States); Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Noah, E.; Penescu, L. [Accelerators and Beams Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Isotopically labeled compositions and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds having stable isotopes .sup.13C and/or .sup.2H were synthesized from precursor compositions having solid phase supports or affinity tags.

Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kimball, David B. (Los Alamos, NM); Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Williams, Robert F. (Los Alamos, NM); Martinez, Rudolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

1958-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Details Activities (61) Areas (32) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Origin of hydrothermal fluids; Mixing of hydrothermal fluids Thermal: Isotopic ratios can be used to characterize and locate subsurface thermal anomalies. Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in

151

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neptunium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Previous Element (Uranium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Plutonium) Plutonium Isotopes of the Element Neptunium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

152

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sulfur  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine Isotopes of the Element Sulfur Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

153

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Argon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorine Previous Element (Chlorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Potassium) Potassium Isotopes of the Element Argon Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data...

154

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Ruthenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technetium Previous Element (Technetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhodium) Rhodium Isotopes of the Element Ruthenium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

155

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Molybdenum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium Isotopes of the Element Molybdenum Click for Main Data Most of the isotope...

156

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Thorium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Elements Next Element (Protactinium) Protactinium Isotopes of the Element Thorium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

157

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Protactinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thorium Previous Element (Thorium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Uranium) Uranium Isotopes of the Element Protactinium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data...

158

High-Precision Isotopic Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sources, is now capable of measuring isotope ratios with ... revolution in the use of isotopes by revealing ... This program will have an impact in several ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

John, Seth G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method of separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorne, James M. (Provo, UT); Cluff, Coran L. (Provo, UT); Hayes, John K. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A long-term study of radon and airborne particulates at phosphogypsum stacks in central Florida  

SciTech Connect

The EPA is presently assessing the significance of radioactive emissions from phosphogypsum stacks to determine if they should be regulated under the Clean Air Act. As part of this assessment, a one-year study was conducted to measure the airborne radionuclide emissions from five phosphogypsum stacks in central Florida. This report provides a detailed description of this study. Measurements were conducted over a 12-month period on four active and one inactive phosphogypsum stacks. The study included the following measurements: 1260 radon-222 flux, 90 ambient radon-222, and 50 gamma-ray exposure rates. Also, radionuclide analyses were performed on 33 airborne particulate samples, 9 airborne particle-size samples, and 50 phosphogypsum samples. The annual average radon flux determined for the dry-loose material on top of active phosphogypsum stacks was 20 pCi/mS-s, and is regarded as representative of stacks in the central Florida region. The annual average flux on the top surface of the inactive stack was 4 to 5 times smaller, due to a surface crust. The data suggest that to obtain a representative annual average radon flux on a phosphogypsum stack the total number of measurements made is more important than the period of time over which the measurements are made. 11 ref., 16 figs., 24 tabs.

Horton, T.R.; Blanchard, R.L.; Windham, S.T.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluating risk communication: Narrative vs. technical presentations of information about radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an experiment to test the hypothesis that people respond better to risk communication that reflects more closely the conditions of their social and cultural lives. The experiment used the case of radon to determine whether technical or narrative forms of risk communication were more effective at drawing people`s attention, imparting information, and modifying behavior. Two series of articles on radon were placed in the local newspapers of two Massachusetts communities. Homeowners attitudes, knowledge, and responses were monitored in baseline and follow-up telephone surveys. A third community was selected for comparison. The newspaper series were developed on the basis of previous research and six focus groups conducted with homeowners. The technical series presented authoritative, factual risk information, in the scientific style of the passive voice with generalized and impersonal language. The narrative series consisted of dramatized accounts of individuals making decisions about radon testing and mitigation, written in a more personal style. The findings from the focus groups confirm the results of previous studies, but the small size of the follow-up samples was a limiting factor in drawing definitive conclusions about the relative effectiveness of the two formats. The experiment demonstrates the difficulty of any risk communication effort on radon and underscores the need for good research design. The study illustrates the need for further research on the role of sociological and cultural factors in the public perception and response to risk. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Golding, D. [Center for Risk Management, Washington, DC (United States); Krimsky, S.; Plough, A. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

None

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

166

Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jojo, P. J. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India); Pereira, C. E. [CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Studies in Photosynthesis with Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chlorophyll) SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS Fig, P Fig.2 Time of photosynthesis 60c.f M U 1646 Fig. 5 Fig. 8 Fig. 94705-eng-48 STUDIES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS WITH ISOTOPES M Calvin

Calvin, M.; Bassham, J.A.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A method for determining an indicator of effective dose calculation due to inhalation of Radon and its progeny from in vivo measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct measurement of the absolved dose to lung tissue from inhalation of radon and its progeny is not possible and must be calculated using dosimetric models, taking into consideration the several parameters upon which the dose calculation depends. To asses the dose due to inhalation of radon and its progeny, it is necessary to estimate the cumulative exposure. Historically, this has been done using WLM values estimated with measurements of radon concentration in air. The radon concentration in air varies significantly, however, in space with time, and the exposed individual is also constantly moving around. This makes it almost impossible to obtain a precise estimate of an individual's inhalation exposure. This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Pb, in subjects exposed to above-average radon and its progeny concentrations in their home environments. The measureme...

Estrada, J

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferably substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. Because the molecules in the beam occupy various degenerate energy levels, if the laser beam comprises chirped pulses comprising selected wavelengths, the laser beam will very efficiently excite substantially all unexcited molecules and will cause stimulated emission of substantially all excited molecules of a selected one of the isotopes in the beam which such pulses encounter. Excitation caused by first direction chirped pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning chirped pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement of essentially all the molecules containing the one isotope is accomplished by a large number of chirped pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Feldman, Barry J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

173

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced Plasmas by Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry Title Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation...

174

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable. Fluid isotopes are used to characterize a fluids origin, age, and/or interaction with rocks or other fluids based on unique isotopic ratios or concentrations.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope geochemistry is an aspect of geology based upon study of the relative and absolute concentrations of the elements and their isotopes in

175

Definition: Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope analysis is the identification of isotopic signature, the distribution of certain stable isotopes and chemical elements within chemical compounds. This can be applied to a food web to make it possible to draw direct inferences regarding diet, trophic level, and subsistence. Isotope ratios are measured using mass spectrometry, which separates the different isotopes of an element on the basis of their mass-to-charge

176

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferable substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. The laser beam comprises .pi.-pulses of a selected wavelength which excite unexcited molecules, or cause stimulated emission of excited molecules of one of the isotopes. Excitation caused by first direction .pi.-pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning .pi.-pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement is accomplished by a large number of .pi.-pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Update on radon-mitigation research in schools. Rept. for 1988-Aug 91  

SciTech Connect

The paper is an overview of research by EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) on radon mitigation in 47 schools since 1988. The structural and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics of the research schools are presented, along with the mitigation techniques implemented in the schools. Research discussed includes recent and on-going projects in Colorado, Maine, Maryland, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Virginia. Initial research focussed on the application of active subslab depressurization (ASD) to school buildings, and recent research has emphasized the ability and limitations of using HVAC systems to reduce radon levels in schools. A goal of future projects is to compare the effectiveness of the two techniques in the same building. Slab-on-grade is the most prevalent substructure in AEERL's research schools and, depending on pressure field extension, ASD systems have been recommended for radon control in many of them. In schools where they have been installed, ASD systems have performed well and are currently being evaluated for long-term performance. The distribution of HVAC system types in these schools is about a third central air handling systems, a third unit ventilators, and a third that do not supply conditioned outdoor air (i.e., fan coil units or radiant heat).

Leovic, K.W.; Craig, A.B.; Harris, D.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States.

Gesell, T.F.; Johnson, R.H. Jr; Bernhardt, D.E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Mendelevium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nobelium) Nobelium Isotopes of the Element Mendelevium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained...

182

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neptunium) Neptunium Isotopes of the Element Uranium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

183

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium Isotopes of the Element Lithium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

184

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Helium) Helium Isotopes of the Element Hydrogen Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

185

AVLIS enrichment of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Under the Sponsorship of the United states Enrichment Corporation (USEC), we are currently investigating the large scale separation of several isotopes of medical interest using atomic vapor isotope separation (AVLIS). This work includes analysis and experiments in the enrichment of thallium 203 as a precursor to the production of thallium 201 used in cardiac imaging following heart attacks, on the stripping of strontium 84 from natural strontium as precursor to the production of strontium 89, and on the stripping of lead 210 from lead used in integrated circuits to reduce the number of alpha particle induced logic errors.

Haynam, C.A.; Scheibner, K.F.; Stern, R.C.; Worden, E.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the utilization of stable isotopes in geology, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, paleoceanography and elsewhere____________________________ ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION ____________________________ Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The term `isotope

Zeebe, Richard E.

187

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope geochemistry is difficult because. Writing an effective book on geochemistry is thus even more difficult. Claude Allègre's Isotope Geology geochemistry book, given how effective the texts by Faure and Dickin are. However, Allègre's Isotope Geology

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

188

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Radioisotope Radiochemical Separation & Processing Strategic Isotope Production Super Heavy Element Discovery Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems...

189

Isotopic Abundance in Atom Trap Trace Analysis  

isotopes for climate change and nuclear proliferation interests. The Invention Argonne scientists have created a novel method and system for

190

"Environmental Isotope Geochemistry": Past, Present Mark Baskaran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 "Environmental Isotope Geochemistry": Past, Present and Future Mark Baskaran 1.1 Introduction and Early History A large number of radioactive and stable isotopes of the first 95 elements unraveling many secrets of our Earth and its environmental health. These isotopes, because of their suitable

Baskaran, Mark

191

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319323 Passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor inside a radon exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure of human beings to ionizing radiationNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319­323 Passive monitoring for passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor F inside a radon exposure chamber. The method is based

Yu, K.N.

192

NAREL (National Air and Standard Environmental Laboratory) standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using diffusion barrier charcoal canisters  

SciTech Connect

Radon monitoring procedures for the National Air and Radiation Environment Laboratory (NAREL) are described. Radon is detected by sorption to activated charcoal, followed by detection of gamma ray emissions from the radon decay products lead-214 (295 KeV and 392 KeV) and bismuth-214 (609 KeV). The activated charcoal is held in an 8 ounce metal can, under a polyethylene diffusion barrier and a stainless steel screen, 30--50% open. The polyethylene barrier reduces water absorption by the charcoal, and improves integration over the exposure period. The proper use of the container is described, as is the counting system and calibration of the detecting system. Fabrication of reference standards and background canisters is described. Equations and sample calculations to determine radon concentrations are given. All terms in the equation are defined, and all calibration factors are calculated. The minimal detectable amounts of radon as a function of detector exposure time are calculated. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Gray, D.J.; Windham, S.T.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Radioactive isotopes on the Moon  

SciTech Connect

A limited review of experiments and studies of radioactivity and isotope ratios in lunar materials is given. Observations made on the first few millimeters of the surface where the effects of solar flare particles are important, some measurements on individual rocks, and some studies of radioactivities produced deep in the lunar soil by galactic cosmic rays, are among the experiments discussed. (GHT)

Davis, R. Jr.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

196

Radon-222 emissions and control practices for licensed uranium mills and their associated tailings piles. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report is organized into five main sections. The conclusions of the effort are summarized in Chapter 2. A general description of current milling and tailings management practices and a summary of the site-specific characteristics of operating and standby uranium mills are contained in Chapter-3. The sources and emission rates of radon-222 at licensed mills and their associated tailings piles are contained in Chapter 4 along with the results of an effort to develop generic procedures to estimate radon-222 emissions for milling operations and tailings disposal. Control practices that are being or could be applied to the milling operation and tailings disposal areas and their estimated cost and effectiveness in reducing radon-222 emissions are presented in Chapter 5. The appendices contain detailed information on mill site data and emission estimates.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radon emanometry as a geothermal exploration technique; theory and an example from Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four radon survey lines were established over the geothermal field of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. The radon flux was determined using the Westinghouse Alpha 2 system which measures the flux at each station over a period of 30 days using an alpha-sensitive dosimeter. The method was very successful in locating mapped fault systems that communicate with the structurally controlled geothermal reservoir. It is concluded that this method, coupled with a structural analysis, can be useful as a site-specific exploration tool, particularly in locating exploration holes in known geothermal areas.

Nielson, D.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Measurement of Trace Uranium Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) can measure trace quantities of 233U and 236U in the presence of a huge excess of natural uranium is evaluated. This is an important nuclear non-proliferation measurement. Four ion production methods were evaluated with three mass spectrometer combinations. The most favorable combinations are not limited by abundance sensitivity; rather, the limitations are the ability to generate a uranium ion beam of sufficient intensity to obtain the required number of counts on the minor isotopes in relationship to detector background. The most favorable situations can measure isotope ratios in the range of E10 if sufficient sample intensity is available. These are the triple sector mass spectrometer with porous ion emitters (PIE) and the single sector mass spectrometer with energy filtering.

Matthew G. Watrous; James E. Delmore

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are an apparatus and a method for determining concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0{+-}14.2 Bq/m{sup 3}, 83.4{+-}6.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 61.6{+-}6.4 Bq/m{sup 3}, 63.7{+-}5.4 Bq/m{sup 3} and 87.5{+-}6.Bq/m{sup 3} and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 5.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.0 Bq/m{sup 3} and 24 Bq/m{sup 3} respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm{sup -3} set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The ''within regions''(different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region ''1''(p = 0.783) and versus region ''5''(P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region ''3''(P = 0.0160) and also versus region ''4''(p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and 3, these regions are relatively close to the Tuwaiq mountains whereas other regions are near to the Al-Thuwayrat sands.

Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nuclear Energy Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protocol for Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe Office of Isotopes for Medicine and Science Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 16, 2002 Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Lowe/April16_02 NEPRI to NERAC.ppt (2) Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Why NEPRI? 6 NEPRI implements DOE funding priorities for fiscal year 2003 6 NEPRI will * Bring order to DOE's responses to requests for research isotopes * Introduce a high-quality peer review to the selection of research isotopes * Enable DOE to concentrate on operating its unique isotope production facilities Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

203

Strategic Isotope Production | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Isotope Strategic Isotope Production SHARE Strategic Isotope Production Typical capsules used in the transport of 252Cf source material inside heavily shielded shipping casks. ORNL's unique facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL), and Irradiated Materials Examination Testing facility (IMET) are routinely used in the production, purification, packaging, and shipping of a number of isotopes of national importance, including: 75Se, 63Ni, 238Pu, 252Cf, and others. The intense neutron flux of the HFIR (2.0 x 1015 neutrons/cm²·s) permits the rapid formation of such isotopes. These highly irradiated materials are then processed and packaged for shipping using the facilities at the REDC, IFEL, and IMET.

204

Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

Egle, Brian [ORNL; Aaron, W Scott [ORNL; Hart, Kevin J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab (EMIS) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Lab May 30, 2013 ORNL established the Stable Isotope Enrichment Laboratory (SIEL) as part of a project funded by the DOE Office of Science, Nuclear Physics Program to develop a modernized electromagnetic isotope separator (EMIS), optimized for separation of a wide range of stable isotopes. The SIEL is located in the Building 6010 Shield Test Station, space formerly allocated to the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, on the main campus of ORNL. ORNL staff have designed and built a nominal 10 mA ion current EMIS (sum of all isotopes at the collector) in the SIEL. This EMIS is currently being tested to determine basic performance metrics such as throughput and enrichment factor per pass. This EMIS unit and space will be used to

206

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR COLLECTING ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for collecting isotopes having a high vapor pressure, such as isotopes of mercury, in a calutron are described. Heretofore, the collected material would vaporize and escape from the ion receiver as fast as it was received. By making the receiver of pure silver, the mercury isotopes form a nonvolatile amalgam with the silver at the water cooled temperature of the receiver, and the mercury is thus retained.

Leyshon, W.E.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Isotopic Analysis (Not Available) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Meeting proceedings - large list of papers and presentations dealing mostly with various isotopic analyses and their applications...

208

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nobelium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mendelevium Previous Element (Mendelevium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lawrencium) Lawrencium Isotopes of the Element Nobelium Click for Main Data Most of the...

209

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Fermium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Einsteinium Previous Element (Einsteinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mendelevium) Mendelevium Isotopes of the Element Fermium Click for Main Data Most of the...

210

Available Technologies: Real Time High Throughput Isotopic ...  

Space exploration; Any scientific research involving the tracking of isotopic labels, as in: Solar power; Scintillators (deuterated, 10 B, 6 Li, 3 He) Batteries (doping)

211

Zeolite Cryopumps for Hydrogen Isotopes Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

Ivan A. Alekseev; Sergey P. Karpov; Veniamin D. Trenin

212

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 89 1.5 microseconds Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available...

213

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Promethium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 126 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available 127 No Data Available Proton Emission...

214

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Niobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 81 < 200 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 82 50 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron...

215

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Indium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 97 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available...

216

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Cerium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 119 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available 120 No Data Available Electron Capture...

217

WEB RESOURCE: Exploring the Table of Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2007 ... This page offers an interactive table of isotopes, an animated glossary of nuclear terms and relevant support documents created by the...

218

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalog of Isotope Products Please select an option below. PRODUCTS VIEWING Select using PERIODIC TABLE or NUCLIDE CHART or LIST SEARCHING SEARCH for a Product REQUESTING REQUEST a...

219

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

220

Isotopic Exchange in Air Detritiation Dryers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

A.E. Everatt; A.H. Dombra; R.E. Johnson

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny  

SciTech Connect

A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.

Morrison, H.I.; Semenciw, R.M.; Mao, Y.; Wigle, D.T.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microaneurysms detection with the radon cliff operator in retinal fundus images  

SciTech Connect

Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the industrialized world. Early detection is the key in providing effective treatment. However, the current number of trained eye care specialists is inadequate to screen the increasing number of diabetic patients. In recent years, automated and semi-automated systems to detect DR with color fundus images have been developed with encouraging, but not fully satisfactory results. In this study we present the initial results of a new technique for the detection and localization of microaneurysms, an early sign of DR. The algorithm is based on three steps: candidates selection, the actual microaneurysms detection and a final probability evaluation. We introduce the new Radon Cliff operator which is our main contribution to the field. Making use of the Radon transform, the operator is able to detect single noisy Gaussian-like circular structures regardless of their size or strength. The advantages over existing microaneurysms detectors are manifold: the size of the lesions can be unknown, it automatically distinguishes lesions from the vasculature and it provides a fair approach to microaneurysm localization even without post-processing the candidates with machine learning techniques, facilitating the training phase. The algorithm is evaluated on a publicly available dataset from the Retinopathy Online Challenge.

Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Meriaudeau, Fabrice [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

CLUMPED ISOTOPIC EQUILIBRIUM AND THE RATE OF ISOTOPE EXCHANGE BETWEEN CO2 AND WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLUMPED ISOTOPIC EQUILIBRIUM AND THE RATE OF ISOTOPE EXCHANGE BETWEEN CO2 AND WATER HAGIT P. AFFEK Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, 210 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Connecticut, 06511, USA the exchange of oxygen isotopes with water. The use of 18 O as an environmental indicator typically assumes

225

Mercury Isotope Fractionation by Environmental Transport and Transformation Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope fractionation in fossil hydrothermal systems. Geology,isotopes: Evaporation, chemical diffusion and Soret diffusion. Chemical Geology,isotope records of atmospheric and riverine pollution from two major European heavy metal refineries. Chemical Geology,

Koster van Groos, Paul Gijsbert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Isotopic Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

H. Mariner, Terry E. C. Keith (1987) Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIsotopicA...

227

EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: Medical Isotopes Production Project EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to establish a...

228

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

229

CALIFORNIUM ISOTOPES FROM BOMBARDMENT OF URANIUM WITH CARBON IONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotopes from Bombardment of Uranium with Carbon Ions A.ISOTOPES FROM BOMBARDMENT OF URANIUM WITH CARBON IONS A.the irradiations, the uranium was dissolved in dilute

Ghiorso, A.; Thompson, S.G.; Street, K. Jr.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

231

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

232

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIsotopicAnalysis-Flu...

233

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Positive and inverse isotope effect on superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article improves the BCS theory to include the inverse isotope effect on superconductivity. An affective model can be deduced from the model including electron-phonon interactions, and the phonon-induced attraction is simply and clearly explained on the electron Green function. The focus of this work is on how the positive or inverse isotope effect occurs in superconductors.

Tian De Cao

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Quest for the Heaviest Uranium Isotope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study Uranium isotopes and surrounding elements at very large neutron number excess. Relativistic mean field and Skyrme-type approaches with different parametrizations are used in the study. Most models show clear indications for isotopes that are stable with respect to neutron emission far beyond N=184 up to the range of around N=258.

S. Schramm; D. Gridnev; D. V. Tarasov; V. N. Tarasov; W. Greiner

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Isotope hydrology of Geology and Palaeontology, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria 3 School

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Dynamical aspects of isotopic scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of the effect of the dynamical stage of heavy-ion collisions indicates that the increasing width of the initial isospin distributions is reflected by a significant modification of the isoscaling slope for the final isotopic distributions after de-excitation. For narrow initial distributions, the isoscaling slope assumes the limiting value of the two individual initial nuclei while for wide initial isotopic distributions the slope for hot fragments approaches the initial value. The isoscaling slopes for final cold fragments increase due to secondary emissions. The experimentally observed evolution of the isoscaling parameter in multifragmentation of hot quasiprojectiles at E$_{inc}$=50 AMeV, fragmentation of $^{86}$Kr projectiles at E$_{inc}$=25 AMeV and multifragmentation of target spectators at relativistic energies was reproduced by a simulation with the dynamical stage described using the appropriate model (deep inelastic transfer and incomplete fusion at the Fermi energy domain and spectator-participant model at relativistic energies) and the de-excitation stage described with the statistical multifragmentation model. In all cases the isoscaling behavior was reproduced by a proper description of the dynamical stage and no unambiguous signals of the decrease of the symmetry energy coefficient were observed.

M. Veselsky

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depends on the cost and energy efficiency of the laser.and the low cost and energy efficiency of existing, large-

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium, heavy-water-moderated CANDU reactor, as contrastedis important, and in the CANDU power reactor, which uses

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy: Uranium Enrichment (1978). UnitedRaux and W.L. Grant, uranium Enrichment in South Africa,for heavy~water and uranium enrichment is more severe. In

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is somewhat uncertain~ and projections have been reducedFigure 15 shows the recent CONAES projections for the U.S. (72,90), along with earlier projections for the U.S. and the

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Klein and S.V. Peterson, May 9-ll, 1973, Argonne NationalLaboratory, Argonne, Illinois (1973). 97. R.A. Muller,S.V. Peterson, May 9-11, 1973, Argonne National Laboratory,

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Guidebook to Nuclear Reactors, University of Californiaa thermal position of a nuclear reactor followed by analysisproduced by six large nuclear reactors. The power usage per

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as occurs in batch distillation. The urgency of developingor one plate of a distillation column, for example. Anas in the case of a distillation column, for which any other

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags  

SciTech Connect

In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

McMullen, John W. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheeler, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Cullingford, Hatice S. (Houston, TX); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

Stevens, Charles G. (Pleasanton, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

Stevens, C.G.

1978-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

Satoshi Fukada

252

Preface to bLithium isotope geochemistryQ The use of light stable isotopes to elucidate Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Li reflect heavier isotopic ratios. Chemical Geology 212 (2004) 1­4 wwwPreface Preface to bLithium isotope geochemistryQ The use of light stable isotopes to elucidate isotope geochemistry. Taylor and Urey (1938) used ion exchange chromatography to sepa- rate 6 Li from 7 Li

Rudnick, Roberta L.

253

Selective Isotope Determination of Uranium using HR-RIMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of lowest abundances of the ultra trace isotope {sup 236}U in environmental samples requires an efficient detection method which allows a high elemental and isotopic selectivity to suppress neighbouring isotopes of the same element and other background. High Resolution Laser Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-RIMS) uses the individual electron structure of each isotope to provide an outstanding element and isotope selective ionization.

Raeder, S.; Fies, S.; Wendt, K. D. A. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Tomita, H. [Nagoya University (Japan)

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

255

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

256

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

257

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

258

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

259

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

260

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

262

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

263

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

264

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

265

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

266

Isotopically engineered semiconductors: from the bulk tonanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Research performed with semiconductors with controlled isotopic composition is evolving from the measurement of fundamental properties in the bulk to those measured in superlattices and nanostructures. This is driven in part by interests associated with the fields of 'spintronics' and quantum computing. In this topical review, which is dedicated to Prof. Abstreiter, we introduce the subject by reviewing classic and recent measurements of phonon frequencies, thermal conductivity, bandgap renormalizations, and spin coherence lifetimes in isotopically controlled bulk group IV semiconductors. Next, we review phonon properties measured in isotope heterostructures, including pioneering work made possible by superlattices grown by the group of Prof. Abstreiter. We close the review with an outlook on the exciting future possibilities offered through isotope control in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions that will be possible due to advances in nanoscience.

Ager III, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Dysprosium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 138 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available 139 0.6 seconds Electron Capture No Data...

269

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Antimony  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 103 1.5 microseconds Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available 104 0.44 seconds Electron Capture 100.00%...

270

Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Improved process for preparing strontium-82 isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for making {sup 82}Sr by bombarding a molybdenum target enriched in light-mass molybdenum isotopes with high energy protons resulting in high yield, high purity {sup 82}Sr.

Michaels, G.E.; Beaver, J.E.; Moody, D.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

273

Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering  

SciTech Connect

The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Isotopes, including both radioactive and stable isotopes, make important contributions to research, medicine, and industry in the United States and throughout the world. For nearly fifty years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has actively promoted the use of isotopes by funding (a) production of isotopes at a number of national laboratories with unique nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, (b) nuclear medicine research at the laboratories and in academia, (c) research into industrial applications of isotopes, and (d) research into isotope production and processing methods. The radio- pharmaceutical and radiopharmacy industries have their origin in

275

Assessment of the radon concentrations in air caused by emissions from multiple sources in a uranium mining and milling region. A case study of the Ambrosia Lake region of New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake uranium mining and milling operations were selected to characterize the relative importance of these sources on ambient atmospheric radon concentrations. All uranium mines at Ambrosia Lake are underground. The comparisons of interest were both between the sources and between the sources and background concentrations. The results show that vents are by far the greatest source of the computed radon concentrations in the immediate area of the operations. The computed radon concentrations at receptor points were largely influenced by the closer sources, rather than by more distant stronger sources. The area where computed radon concentrations significantly exceed the background is confined to the general area around the vents and mills. A comparison between computed radon concentrations and monitoring data at selected points demonstrates order of magnitude agreement.

Droppo, J.G.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Laser Isotope Separation Employing Condensation Repression  

SciTech Connect

Molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) techniques using condensation repression (CR) harvesting are reviewed and compared with atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), gaseous diffusion (DIF), ultracentrifuges (UCF), and electromagnetic separations (EMS). Two different CR-MLIS or CRISLA (Condensation Repression Isotope Separation by Laser Activation) approaches have been under investigation at the University of Missouri (MU), one involving supersonic super-cooled free jets and dimer formation, and the other subsonic cold-wall condensation. Both employ mixtures of an isotopomer (e.g. {sup i}QF{sub 6}) and a carrier gas, operated at low temperatures and pressures. Present theories of VT relaxation, dimerization, and condensation are found to be unsatisfactory to explain/predict experimental CRISLA results. They were replaced by fundamentally new models that allow ab-initio calculation of isotope enrichments and predictions of condensation parameters for laser-excited and non-excited vapors which are in good agreement with experiment. Because of supersonic speeds, throughputs for free-jet CRISLA are a thousand times higher than cold-wall CRISLA schemes, and thus preferred for large-quantity Uranium enrichments. For small-quantity separations of (radioactive) medical isotopes, the simpler coldwall CRISLA method may be adequate.

Eerkens, Jeff W.; Miller, William H.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Analysis of Gamma Radiation from a Radon Source: Indications of a Solar Influence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of about 29,000 measurements of gamma radiation associated with the decay of radon in a sealed container at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) Laboratory in Jerusalem between 28 January 2007 and 10 May 2010. These measurements exhibit strong variations in time of year and time of day, which may be due in part to environmental influences. However, time-series analysis reveals a number of periodicities, including two at approximately 11.2 year$^{-1}$ and 12.5 year$^{-1}$. We have previously found these oscillations in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), and we have suggested that these oscillations are attributable to some form of solar radiation that has its origin in the deep solar interior. A curious property of the GSI data is that the annual oscillation is much stronger in daytime data than in nighttime data, but the opposite is true for all other oscillations. This may be a systematic effect but, if it is not, this property should help narrow the theoretical options for the mechanism responsible for decay-rate variability.

Peter A. Sturrock; Gideon Steinitz; Ephraim Fischbach; Daniel Javorsek, II; Jere H. Jenkins

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

Harley, N.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Physical stability of asphalt emulsion admix seal radon barrier for uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is investigating the use of an asphalt emulsion admix seal to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. A key requirement of any cover system is its long-term stability; the cover must withstand failure over very long periods of time. An important determinant of overall cover system stability is the integrity of the 6.35-cm (2.5-in.) thick asphalt admix seal. Therefore, the physical stability of this seal was examined. The investigation considered the mechanical interaction between the tailings pile and cover. The potential effect of differential settlement of the tailings pile on the integrity of the seal system was also examined. Results indicate that the minimum span length the seal could withstand without failing is 0.34 m (1.1 ft). This assumes a differential settlement of 4.92 cm (1.94 in.) at the center resulting from the application of a 0.76-m (2.5-ft) cover. At spans greater than 0.60 m (1.97 ft), no tensile strain would develop.

Gates, T.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Study of the combined effects of smoking and inhalation of uranium ore dust, radon daughters and diesel oil exhaust fumes in hamsters and dogs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to particulates from uranium ore dust and diesel exhaust soot provoked inflammatory and proliferative responses in lungs. Also exposure to radon and radon daughters yielded increased occurrences of bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and metaplastic changes of alveolar epithelium. The data suggest that this cellular change is also a precursor of premalignant change in hamsters. The authors suggest an animal model other than the hamster based on two observations: (1) the Syrian golden hamster has been shown to be highly refractory to carcinoma induction; and (2) that when exposed to realistic levels of agents in life-span exposure regimens, the hamster does not develop lesions. Dog studies with cigarette smoke exposure showed mitigating effects on radon daughter induced respiratory tract cancer. Two reasons are suggested although no empirical evidence was gathered. A strict comparison of human and animal exposures and interpolative models are not possible at this time. (PCS)

Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Busch, R.H.; Stuart, B.O.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

REPORT OF SURVEY OF OAK RIDGE ISOTOPE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OAK RIDGE ISOTOPE OAK RIDGE ISOTOPE ENRICHMENT (CALUTRON) FACILITY BUILDING 9204-3 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management & Office of Nuclear Energy Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 FINAL May 8, 2000 Contents 1. Introduction 1.1 Purpose 1.2 Facility Description 1.3 Organization Representatives 1.4 Survey Participants 2. Summary, Conclusions & Recommendations 2.1 Transfer Considerations 2.2 Post-Transfer EM Path Forward & Management Risk 3. Survey Results 4. Stabilization and Other Actions Required for Transfer 5. Surveillance & Maintenance After Transfer 6. Other Transfer Details 7. Attachments and References Appendix A - Detailed Survey Notes

283

The rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The envisioned Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility would add substantially to research opportunities for nuclear physics and astrophysics by combining increased intensities with a greatly expanded variety of high-quality rare-isotope beams. A flexible superconducting driver linac would provide 100 kW, 400 MeV/nucleon beams of any stable isotope from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets. Combinations of projectile fragmentation, target fragmentation, fission, and spallation would produce the needed broad assortment of short-lived secondary beams. This paper describes the project's background, purpose, and status, the envisioned facility, and the key subsystem, the driver linac. RIA's scientific purposes are to advance current theoretical models, reveal new manifestations of nuclear behavior, and probe the limits of nuclear existence [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show, respectively, examples of RIA research opportunities and the yields projected for pursuing them. Figure 3 outlines a conceptual approach for delivering the needed beams.

Christoph Leemann

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Isotope Shift Measurements of Stable and Short-Lived Lithium Isotopes for Nuclear Charge Radii Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the mean-square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a new laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8 ms lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10,000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope Li-11 at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

Nrtershuser, W; Ewald, G; Dax, A; Behr, J; Bricault, P; Bushaw, B A; Dilling, J; Dombsky, M; Drake, G W F; Gtte, S; Kluge, H -J; Khl, Th; Lassen, J; Levy, C D P; Pachucki, K; Pearson, M; Puchalski, M; Wojtaszek, A; Yan, Z -C; Zimmermann, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

Watrous, Matthew G.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Isotope effect in BEDT-TTF based organic superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The results of the comprehensive isotope effect studies, in which seven different isotopically labeled (involving {sup 13}C, {sup 34}S and {sup 2}H labeling) BEDT-TTF derivatives and isotopically labeled anion [Cu({sup 15}N{sup 13}CS){sub 2}]{sup {minus}} were utilized, are summarized. For the first time, convincing evidence for a genuine BCS-like mass isotope effect in an organic superconductor is revealed in these studies.

Kini, A.M.; Carlson, K.D.; Dudek, J.D.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H.H.; Williams, J.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Expression of Stable Isotopically Labeled Proteins for Use as ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expression of Stable Isotopically Labeled Proteins for Use as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Quantitation of Clinical Protein Biomarkers. ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

Facility for Endurance Testing of Hydrophobic Isotope Exchange Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Lidia Matei; C. Postolache; C. Tuta; S. Brad

296

Cryogenic Adsorption of Hydrogen Isotopes over Nano-Structured Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

X. Xiao; L. K. Heung

297

Space isotope power program. Quarterly report, October--December 1968  

SciTech Connect

Progress during October through December 1968 in the Space Isotope Power Program at the Sandia Laboratories is reported. (LCL)

1969-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Isotopic Interdiffusion Analysis and its Application in Multicomponent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Isotopic Interdiffusion Analysis and its Application in Multicomponent ... Calorimetric studies of lithium ion cells and their constructing materials.

299

Discovery of Scandium, Titanium, Mercury, and Einsteinium Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, twenty-three scandium, twenty-five titanium, forty mercury and seventeen einsteinium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; A. Bury; M. Thoennessen

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Isotopic Generation and Confirmation of the PWR Application Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to establish an isotopic database to represent commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in criticality analyses performed for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values represented by this isotopic database is performed as described in Section 3.5.3.1.2 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000). The isotopic database consists of the set of 14 actinides and 15 fission products presented in Section 3.5.2.1.1 of YMP 2000 for use in CSNF burnup credit. This set of 29 isotopes is referred to as the principal isotopes. The oxygen isotope from the UO{sub 2} fuel is also included in the database. The isotopic database covers enrichments of {sup 235}U ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 weight percent (wt%) and burnups ranging from approximately zero to 75 GWd per metric ton of uranium (mtU). The choice of fuel assembly and operating history values used in generating the isotopic database are provided is Section 5. Tables of isotopic concentrations for the 29 principal isotopes (plus oxygen) as a function of enrichment and burnup are provided in Section 6.1. Results of the confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values are provided in Section 6.2.

L.B. Wimmer

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

E.L. Grossman Chapter 10 Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the mineral and water respectively. Oxygen isotopic ratios are The Geologic Time Scale 2012. DOI: 10.1016/B978E.L. Grossman Chapter 10 Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy Abstract:Variations in the 18 O/16 O ratios for global correlation. Relying on previous compilations and new data, this chapter presents oxygen isotope

Grossman, Ethan L.

303

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old calutrons (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation repression. In this scheme a gas, of the selected isotopes for enrichment, is irradiated with a laser at a particular wavelength that would excite only one of the isotopes. The entire gas is subject to low temperatures sufficient to cause condensation on a cold surface. Those molecules in the gas that the laser excited are not as likely to condense as are the unexcited molecules. Hence the gas drawn out of the system will be enriched in the isotope that was excited by the laser. We have evaluated the relative energy required in this process if applied on a commercial scale. We estimate the energy required for laser isotope enrichment is about 20% of that required in centrifuge separations, and 2% of that required by use of "calutrons".

Leonard Bond

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Review of Antarctic Surface Snow Isotopic Composition: Observations, Atmospheric Circulation, and Isotopic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A database of surface Antarctic snow isotopic composition is constructed using available measurements, with an estimate of data quality and local variability. Although more than 1000 locations are documented, the spatial coverage remains uneven ...

V. Masson-Delmotte; S. Hou; A. Ekaykin; J. Jouzel; A. Aristarain; R. T. Bernardo; D. Bromwich; O. Cattani; M. Delmotte; S. Falourd; M. Frezzotti; H. Galle; L. Genoni; E. Isaksson; A. Landais; M. M. Helsen; G. Hoffmann; J. Lopez; V. Morgan; H. Motoyama; D. Noone; H. Oerter; J. R. Petit; A. Royer; R. Uemura; G. A. Schmidt; E. Schlosser; J. C. Simes; E. J. Steig; B. Stenni; M. Stievenard; M. R. van den Broeke; R. S. W. van de Wal; W. J. van de Berg; F. Vimeux; J. W. C. White

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49×10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2×10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

306

RADIATION PROTECTION AND DECONTAMINATION IN ISOTOPE LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

An accident trolley is described that contains everything needed if an accident with radioactive materials occurs. Instructions for decontamination are given and measures to be taken after mishaps with open isotopes are recommended. Cleansing and treatment of laundry that is contaminated with radioactive materials are discussed and an active laundry is described. (auth)

Schanze, U.O.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas and Isotopes Geochemistry, Kennedy, van Soest and Shevenell. During FY04, we concentrated on two primary projects. The first was a detailed study of helium isotope systematics throughout Dixie Valley and the inter-relationship between the Dixie Valley geothermal reservoir and local hydrology. The second is the construction of a helium isotope "map" of the

308

Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2], corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H[sub 2]O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered. 1 fig.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1986-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H.sub.2 O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2} ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

Buchwald, Melvin I. (Santa Fe, NM); Jones, Claude R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, Leonard Y. (Seattle, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

First AID (Atom counting for Isotopic Determination).  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has established an in vitro bioassay monitoring program in compliance with the requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. One aspect of this program involves monitoring plutonium levels in at-risk workers. High-risk workers are monitored using the ultra-sensitive Therrnal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) technique to ensure compliance with DOE standards. TIMS is used to measure atom ratios of 239Pua nd 240Puw ith respect to a tracer isotope ('Pu). These ratios are then used to calculate the amount of 239Pu and 240Pup resent. This low-level atom counting technique allows the calculation of the concentration levels of 239Pu and 240Pu in urine for at risk workers. From these concentration levels, dose assessments can be made and worker exposure levels can be monitored. Detection limits for TIMS analysis are on the order of millions of atoms, which translates to activity levels of 150 aCi 239Pua nd 500 aCi for 240Pu. pCi for Our poster presentation will discuss the ultra-sensitive, low-level analytical technique used to measure plutonium isotopes and the data verification methods used for validating isotopic measurements.

Roach, J. L. (Jeffrey L.); Israel, K. M. (Kimberly M.); Steiner, R. E. (Robert E.); Duffy, C. J. (Clarence J.); Roench, F. R. (Fred R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Provenance analysis of Olivella biplicata shell beads from the California and Oregon Coast by stable isotope fingerprinting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope composition of planktonic foraminifera, Geology 27 (isotope fractionation in biogenic aragonite: Temperature effects, Chemical GeologyIsotope paleontology: growth and composition of extant calcareous species, Marine Geology

Eerkens, J W; Herbert, G S; Rosenthal, J S; Spero, H J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

319

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References

320

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research » Isotope Research » Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority

322

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Isotopic compositions were determined for hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and siderite from core samples of the Newberry 2 drill hole, Oregon. The Δ15O values for these minerals decrease with increasing temperatures. The values indicate that these hydrothermal minerals precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with water currently present in the reservoirs. The Δ18O values of quartz and calcite from the andesite and basalt flows (700-932 m) have isotopic values which require that the equilibrated water Δ18O values increase slightly (- 11.3 to -9.2‰) with

323

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Rose Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

324

Plutonium isotopic analysis of highly enriched mixed oxides  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the analysis method used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine the plutonium isotopic composition of highly enriched mixed oxides (MOX). The IAEA currently uses the Cicero multichannel analyzer and the IAEAPU algorithm for its analysis. In our investigation the plutonium isotopic measurements were found to be good for PuO/sub 2/ powder or low-enriched MOX, but acceptable for highly enriched MOX in IAEA special nuclear material (SNM) accountability applications. The gamma-ray interferences from /sup 235/U resulted in underestimation of the isotopic composition of /sup 239/Pu and overestimation of all other plutonium isotopes. Samples with high /sup 240/Pu content were found to have significantly higher error in plutonium isotopic analyses of highly enriched MOX. Code modifications or use of calibration curves are necessary for plutonium isotopic analyses of highly enriched MOX in IAEA SNM accountability applications.

Clement, S.D.; Augustson, R.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

326

Chromatographic Measurement of Isotopic Hydrogen Impurities in Purified Tritium  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic gas chromatograph is described that was constructed for dedicated analysis of permanent gas and hydrogen isotopic impurities in tritium and deuterium-tritium mixtures. The operating characteristics of this instrument and some results are presented in order to introduce gas chromatography as an analytical technique for potential application to CTR technology situations that require accurate measurement of parts per million and higher levels of isotopic and permanent gas impurities in tritium, deuterium, or mixtures of the isotopes.

Warner, D. K.; Kinard, C.; Bohl, D. R.

1970-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oxygen isotope compositions of cores and cuttings from Long Valley exploration wells show that the Bishop Tuff has been an important reservoir for both fossil and active...

329

Stable Isotope Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Exchange, and Distillation  

SciTech Connect

Applications of stable isotopes in medicine are becoming more widespread. This has resulted from the increased availability and reduced cost of these isotopes and the improved reliability and sensitivity of detection techniques such as carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Isotopes are used in compounds labeled with either the stable isotope itself, such as carbon-13 and oxygen-18, or with the radioactive isotope that can be produced by irradiating the stable isotope, such as the irradiation of xenon-124 to produce iodine-125. As the demand for stable isotopes increases, larger scale production facilities will be justifiable. The increased size of production facilities should result in yet lower unit selling prices. A large number of methods has been suggested for the separation of stable isotopes. This paper concerns itself with four methods which have proven extremely useful for the separation of the isotopes of low and medium atomic weight elements. The four processes discussed are gas phase thermal diffusion, liquid phase thermal diffusion, chemical exchange, and distillation.

Schwind, Dr. Roger A.; Rutherford, Dr. William M.

1973-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

system. References B. Mack Kennedy, Matthijs C. van Soest (2005) Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep...

331

A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A...

332

Isotopic Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles & Lambert,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References Gordon G. Goles, Richard St J. Lambert (1990) A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Retrieved from...

333

John De Laeter Centre For Isotope Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for John De Laeter Centre For Isotope Research Citation Curtin University. John...

334

Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References David R. Cole (1983) Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah...

335

Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications...

336

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State...

337

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 Report of Survey of Oak...

338

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes ...  

Currently, there is a severe worldwide shortage of medical isotopes-specifically Molybdenum 99 (Mo-99) which is essential in cancer treatment, ...

339

Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Isotopic Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search...

340

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Superimposed on this general regional trend are isolated features with elevated helium isotope ratios (0.8-2.1 Ra) compared to the local background. Spring geochemistry and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gas Chromatographic Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes on Molecular Sieves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

R. Vogd; H. Ringel; H. Hackfort; T. Schober; C. Dieker

342

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes  

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes IP Home; Search/Browse Technology ... Drawing upon proven technology with minimal research effort required;

343

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogy and Petrology, 111984 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1007BF01150293 Source: View Original Conference Proceedings Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal...

344

Treatment of carcinoma of the pancreas with radon seed implantation and intra-arterial infusion of 5-FUDR  

SciTech Connect

This review has the shortcomings of any retrospective uncontrolled study and one should not conclude that the procedures described offer better palliation with less morbidity and mortality than present attempts at cure and palliation of this disease. At present, surgical resection offers the best chance of cure and palliation. However, the dismal results of surgical therapy make imperative the establishment of additional protocols with new therapeutic approaches, which include and combine the use of high dose external and interstitial radiation, systemic and regional chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Radon seed implantation is able to provide high dose cancericidal radiation with relatively few side effects. Concomitant chemotherapy, both regional and systemic, can therefore be given with less fear of additive toxicity from therapeutic levels for control of disseminated microscopic foci of disease. (auth)

Barone, R.M.

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

{open_quotes}Radon{close_quotes} - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities.

Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sensitive multi-photon nonlinear laser spectroscopic methods for isotope analysis in atmospheric and environmental applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotopic spectra of atomic chlorine with its two naturallythese applications. Figure 2.4 Chlorine isotope ratios inIsotope Measurements of Atomic Chlorine Using a Low-Pressure

Lyons, Wendy Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Examining Wari influence in the Las Trancas Valley, Peru using oxygen isotopes from bone carbonate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results. Chemical Geology (Isotope Geosciences Section),isotopes in fossil teeth from Pakistan. Chemical Geology,Isotope Composition of Human Tooth Enamel from Medieval Greenland: Linking Climate with Society: Comment. Geology,

Henry, Erin-Marie Lelik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

MULTIPLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY WITH SULFATE REDUCERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MULTIPLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY WITH SULFATE REDUCERS*, DONALD E. CANFIELD**, and KIRSTEN S. HABICHT** ABSTRACT. Multiple sulfur isotope measurements of sulfur disproportionation indicate that different types of metabolic processes impart differ- ent multiple isotope

Kaufman, Alan Jay

349

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Shell model description of zirconium isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate the low-lying spectra and several high-spin states of zirconium isotopes (Z=40) with neutron numbers from N=50 to N=58 using a large valence space with the {sup 78}Ni inert core, which a priori allows one to study the interplay between spherical and deformed configurations, necessary for the description of nuclides in this part of the nuclear chart. The effective interaction is derived by monopole corrections of the realistic G matrix. We reproduce essential nuclear properties, such as subshell closures in {sup 96}Zr and {sup 98}Zr. The spherical-to-deformed shape transition in {sup 100}Zr is addressed as well.

Sieja, K. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH., Planckstrasse 1, D-64-220 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nowacki, F. [Institute Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, Strasbourg (France); Langanke, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Martinez-Pinedo, G. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH., Planckstrasse 1, D-64-220 Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort.

Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

1994-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

Final Report "Structure of Rare Isotopes"  

SciTech Connect

The Junior Investigator grant 'Structure of Rare Isotopes' (DE-FG02-07ER41529) supported research in low-energy nuclear theory from September 1, 2007 to August 31, 2010. It was the main goal of the proposed research to develop and optimize an occupation-number-based energy functional for the computation of nuclear masses, and this aim has been reached. Furthermore, progress was made in linking two and three-body forces from low-momentum interactions to pairing properties in nuclear density functionals, and in the description of deformed nuclei within an effective theory.

Papenbrock, Thomas

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for controlling the position of the ion beams in a calutron used for isotope separation. The U/sup 238/ beams is centered over the U/sup 235/ receiving pocket, the operator monitoring the beam until a maximum reading is achieved on the meter connected to that pocket. Then both beams are simultaneously shifted by a preselected amount to move the U/sup 235/ beam over the U/sup 235/ pocket. A slotted door is placed over the entrance to that pocket during the U/sup 238/ beam centering to reduce the contamination to the pocket, while allowing enough beam to pass for monitoring purposes.

Barnes, S.W.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium, using infrared multiple photon dissociation of tritium-bearing products in the gas phase. One such process involves the steps of (1) catalytic exchange of a deuterium-bearing molecule XYD with tritiated water DTO from sources such as a heavy water fission reactor, to produce the tritium-bearing working molecules XYT and (2) photoselective dissociation of XYT to form a tritium-rich product. By an analogous procedure, tritium is separated from tritium-bearing materials that contain predominately hydrogen such as a light water coolant from fission or fusion reactors.

Herman, Irving P. (Castro Valley, CA); Marling, Jack B. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hydrogen Isotope Permeation In Elastomeric Materials  

SciTech Connect

The permeabilities of elastomeric and polymeric materials to hydrogen isotopes were measured at room temperature. The technique for measuring permeation rates is based on the following constant-volume method: a fixed pressure of gas is applied to one side of the specimen to be studied and the permeability constant is determined from the observed rate of pressure increase in an initially evacuated volume on the other side of the specimen. Permeability constants for hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium were measured for Mylar, Teflon, Kapton, Saran, Buna-N, and latex rubber. Results were compared with literature values for hydrogen and deuterium where available and showed excellent agreement.

Steinmeyer, R. H.; Braun, J. D.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Understanding Partition Coefficient, Kd, Values Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available Kd Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium (3H), and Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air and Radiation Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-99-004B Environmental Protection August 1999 Agency UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium August 1999 A Cooperative Effort By: Office of Radiation and Indoor Air Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

358

NATIONAL USES AND NEEDS FOR SEPARATED STABLE ISOTOPES IN PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, AND GEOSCIENCE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York, K. Rankama, Isotope Geology, McGraw-Hill, New York,geochronometry and isotope geology. elements report. ofisotopes were utilized in the research areas and geology,

Zisman, M.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expert Panel: Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes March 1999 Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes September 25-26, 1998 Arlington, Virginia The Expert Panel ............................................................................................. Page 1 Charge To The Expert Panel........................................................................... Page 2 Executive Summary......................................................................................... Page 3 Introduction ...................................................................................................... Page 4 Rationale.......................................................................................................... Page 6 Economic Analysis...........................................................................................

360

Tracking the lithium isotopic evolution of the mantle using carbonatites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking the lithium isotopic evolution of the mantle using carbonatites Ralf Halama a,, William F. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: lithium isotopes; carbonatites; mantle geochemistry 1. Introduction Lithium (Li) is an incompatible element that is typi- cally enriched 10 to 50-fold in crustal

Mcdonough, William F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hafnium isotopes in Arctic Ocean water Bettina Zimmermann a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-GEOMAR, 24148 Kiel, Germany d Laboratory for Isotope Geology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SEHafnium isotopes in Arctic Ocean water Bettina Zimmermann a , Don Porcelli b,*, Martin Frank c-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden e Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA f

Baskaran, Mark

362

Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C; zirconium, 500 to 600/sup 0/C; LaNi/sub 5/, -78 to +30/sup 0/C; Mg/sub 2/Ni, 300 to 375/sup 0/C; palladium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%.

Wiswall, R; Reilly, J; Bloch, F; Wirsing, E

1977-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

Ahle, L E

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

366

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

367

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

368

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility New capability expands existing program, creates treatment product in quantity. April 13, 2012 Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward - Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments. Research indicates that it will be possible to match current annual, worldwide production of Ac-225 in just two to five days of operations using the accelerator at Los Alamos and analogous facilities at Brookhaven. Alpha particles are energetic enough to destroy cancer cells but are unlikely to move beyond a tightly controlled target region and destroy

369

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that similar to 7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow of mantle-derived helium up along the

370

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

371

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

372

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

373

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

374

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

375

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 August, 20, 1999 Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning the relocation of an irradiated [isotope] pellet from within a hot cell to an adjoining, outside, charging port service area. This incident occurred on January 6, 1999, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility (TRA-632). Building TRA-632 is utilized by International

376

Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 Enforcement Letter, International Isotopes Idaho Inc - August 20, 1999 August, 20, 1999 Issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc. related to the Relocation of an Irradiated Pellet at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning the relocation of an irradiated [isotope] pellet from within a hot cell to an adjoining, outside, charging port service area. This incident occurred on January 6, 1999, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility (TRA-632). Building TRA-632 is utilized by International

378

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Carbon isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12C/13C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behaviour is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12C/13C ratios in the Solar System comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

Woods, Paul M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Carbon isotope fractionation in protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12C/13C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behaviour is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12C/13C ratios in the Solar System comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

Paul M. Woods; Karen Willacy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Properties of Porous Solids Containing Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous solids such as activated alumina, silica and molecular sieves generally contain significant amounts of hydrogen atoms in the form of H2O or OH even at high temperature and low humidity environment. A significant amount of this hydrogen is available for reversible isotopic exchange. This exchange reaction is slow under normal conditions and does not render itself to practical applications. But if the exchange kinetics is improved this reaction has the potential to be used for tritium removal from gas streams or for hydrogen isotopic separation.The use of catalysts to improve the exchange kinetics between hydrogen isotope in the gas phase and that in the solid phase was investigated. Granules of alumina, silica and molecular sieve were coated with platinum or palladium as the catalyst. The granules were packed in a 2-cm diameter column for isotope exchange tests. Gas streams containing different concentrations of deuterium in nitrogen or argon were fed through the protium saturated column. Isotope concentration in column effluent was monitored to generate isotope break-through curves. The curves were analyzed to produce information on the kinetics and capacity of the material. The results showed that all materials tested provided some extent of isotope exchange but some were superior both in kinetics and capacity. This paper will present the test results.

HEUNG, LEUNGK.

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes There are two possible explanations for the inferred presence of relatively 18O-enriched thermal water at Yellowstone in the past: (1) meteoric

383

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

VELOCITY SELECTOR METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A velocity selector apparatus is described for separating and collecting an enriched fraction of the isotope of a particular element. The invention has the advantage over conventional mass spectrometers in that a magnetic field is not used, doing away with the attendant problems of magnetic field variation. The apparatus separates the isotopes by selectively accelerating the ionized constituents present in a beam of the polyisotopic substance that are of uniform kinetic energy, the acceleration being applied intermittently and at spaced points along the beam and in a direction normal to the direction of the propagation of the uniform energy beam whereby a transverse displacement of the isotopic constituents of different mass is obtained.

Britten, R.J.

1957-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO.sub.2 and CuCl. The CO.sub.2 is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH.sub.3 I to form CH.sub.3 Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio.

Holt, Ben D. (Hindsdale, IL); Sturchio, Neil C. (Oswego, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

Scott, S.W.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

New Contact Device for Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes in the Water-Hydrogen System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. L. Rastunova; M. B. Rozenkevich

388

Isotopes of helium, hydrogen, and carbon as groundwater tracers in aquifers along the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope studies in the Mojave Desert, California: implications for groundwater chronology and regional seismicity, Chemical Geology.

Haber, Samuel Ainsworth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Isotope-shift measurements of stable and short-lived lithium isotopes for nuclear-charge-radii determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the mean square nuclear charge radii along the lithium isotopic chain were determined using a combination of precise isotope shift measurements and theoretical atomic structure calculations. Nuclear charge radii of light elements are of high interest due to the appearance of the nuclear halo phenomenon in this region of the nuclear chart. During the past years we have developed a laser spectroscopic approach to determine the charge radii of lithium isotopes which combines high sensitivity, speed, and accuracy to measure the extremely small field shift of an 8-ms-lifetime isotope with production rates on the order of only 10 000 atoms/s. The method was applied to all bound isotopes of lithium including the two-neutron halo isotope {sup 11}Li at the on-line isotope separators at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, and at TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada. We describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, present updated and improved values from theory and experiment, and discuss the results.

Noertershaeuser, W.; Sanchez, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Ewald, G.; Dax, A.; Goette, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kuehl, Th.; Wojtaszek, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Behr, J.; Bricault, P.; Dilling, J.; Dombsky, M.; Lassen, J.; Levy, C. D. P.; Pearson, M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bushaw, B. A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Drake, G. W. F. [Department of Physics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Pachucki, K. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Puchalski, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, PL-60-780 Poznan (Poland); Yan, Z.-C. [Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method for the simultaneous preparation of radon-211, xenon-125, xenon-123, astatine-211, iodine-125 and iodine-123  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a practical method for commercially producing radiopharmaceutical activities and, more particularly, relates to a method for the preparation of about equal amount of Radon-211 (/sup 211/Rn) and Xenon-125 (/sup 125/Xe) including a one-step chemical procedure following an irradiation procedure in which a selected target of Thorium (/sup 232/Th) or Uranium (/sup 238/U) is irradiated. The disclosed method is also effective for the preparation in a one-step chemical procedure of substantially equal amounts of high purity /sup 123/I and /sup 211/At. In one preferred arrangement of the invention almost equal quantities of /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe are prepared using a onestep chemical procedure in which a suitably irradiated fertile target material, such as thorium-232 or uranium-238, is treated to extract those radionuclides from it. In the same one-step chemical procedure about equal quantities of /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I are prepared and stored for subsequent use. In a modified arrangement of the method of the invention, it is practiced to separate and store about equal amounts of only /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe, while preventing the extraction or storage of the radionuclides /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I.

Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992  

SciTech Connect

During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

Harley, N.H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System,

394

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal springs associated with normal faults in Utah have been analyzed for major cations and anions, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. Springs with measured temperatures averaging greater than 40°C are characterized by Na + K- and SO4 + Cl-rich waters containing 103 to 104 mg/l of dissolved solids. Lower temperature springs, averaging less than 40°C, are more enriched in Ca + Mg relative to Na + K. Chemical variations monitored through time in selected thermal springs are probably produced by

395

Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection December 11, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National Science Foundation Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 2007 Long Range Plan and the 2003 DOE report, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook." A Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) was used to solicit applications for the conceptual design and establishment of FRIB in order

396

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF, Calutron, Building 9204-3) on the Y-12 Plant property at the Oak Ridge Site. The survey was conducted during the week of November 29, 1999. The primary purpose of the survey is to identify facility conditions and to define the characterization, stabilization, and material/waste/equipment removal (if any) requirements that need to be met to transfer responsibility for the facility from the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) to the Office of Environmental Management (EM). Additionally, estimated post stabilization surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities and costs are

397

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

398

A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Tectonic and geochemical interpretation of this boundary is difficult, however, because there are so many potential

399

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

400

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the location of the heat source Notes Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

402

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily

403

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

404

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

405

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

406

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List List Please select an available isotope product from the lists below. If you would like an isotope product that is not listed, you can make a request by clicking here. Stable Isotope Products Radio-Isotope Products Antimony Argon (Alt) Barium Bromine Bromine (Alt) Cadmium Calcium Carbon (Alt) Cerium Chlorine Chlorine (Alt) Chromium Copper Dysprosium Erbium Europium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Hafnium Helium (Alt) Indium Iridium Iron Krypton (Alt) Lanthanum Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon (Alt) Nickel Nitrogen (Alt) Osmium Oxygen (Alt) Palladium Platinum Potassium Rhenium Rubidium Ruthenium Samarium Selenium Silicon Silver Strontium Sulfur Sulfur (Alt) Tantalum Tellurium Thallium Tin Titanium Tungsten Vanadium Xenon (Alt) Ytterbium Zinc Zirconium Actinium-225 Aluminum-26 Americium-241

407

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

408

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites

409

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State System(Question) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Here we present the helium and carbon isotope results from the initial study of a fluid chemistry-monitoring program started in the summer of 2001 near the South Sister volcano in central Oregon. The Separation Creek area which is several miles due west of the volcano is the locus of

410

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

411

Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Medical ... Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply Our goal is to fuel research and test reactors with low-enriched uranium. Y-12 tops the short list of the...

412

Surface-cycling of rhenium and its isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of elemental and isotopic metal palaeoredox tracers to the geologic past rests on an understanding of modern metal cycles. This study reevaluates the surface-cycling of Mo and Re in near-surface reservoirs. ...

Miller, Christian Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The marine geochemistry of iron and iron isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addressed questions about the Fe cycle by measuring detailed profiles and transects of Fe species in the ocean and also by exploring the use of a new tracer of Fe, Fe isotopic fractionation. In the subtropical ...

Bergquist, Bridget A., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Preliminary study: isotopic safeguards techniques (IST). LMFBR fuel cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memorandum presents the preliminary results of the effort to investigate the applicability of isotope correlation techniques (ICT), formulated for the LWR system, to the LMFBR fuel cycle. The detailed isotopic compositional changes with burnup developed for the CRBR was utilized as the reference case. This differs from the usual LMFBR design studies in that the core uranium is natural uranium rather than depleted. Nevertheless, the general isotopic behavior should not differ significantly and does allow an initial insight into the expected behavior of isotopic correlations for the LMFBR power systems such as: the U.K. PFR and reprocessing plant; the French Phenix and Superphenix; and the US reference conceptual design studies (CDS) of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR systems as they are developed.

Persiani, P.J.; Kroc, T.K.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Intercomparison of Four Commercial Analyzers for Water Vapor Isotope Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ?18O and ?D of atmospheric water vapor are important tracers in hydrological and ecological studies. Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) provides an in situ technology for measuring ?18O and ?D in ambient conditions. An intercomparison ...

Xue-Fa Wen; Xuhui Lee; Xiao-Min Sun; Jian-Lin Wang; Ya-Kun Tang; Sheng-Gong Li; Gui-Rui Yu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Multiple-sulfur isotope effects during photolysis of carbonyl sulfide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine sulfur isotope effects during ultraviolet photolysis of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) to carbon monoxide (CO) and elemental sulfur (S[superscript 0]). The OCS gas at 3.7 to 501 ...

Lin, Ying

417

Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

Hindin, Saul G. (Mendham, NJ); Roberts, George W. (Westfield, NJ)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An inventory of 2,300 batches of enriched stable isotopes of 53 different Elements with a list...

419

The HIgh Flux Isotope Reactor: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HFIR construction began in 1965 and completed in 1966. During the first 15 years of operation, the heavy actinide isotope production mission was dominant. HFIR is now positioned as one of the most versataile research reactors in the world.

Beierschmitt, Kelly J [ORNL; Farrar, Mike B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Sources Management Group  

SciTech Connect

The Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Sources Management Group (NISSMG) is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management and managed by Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL) to serve as a complex-wide resource for the management of DOE-owned Nonactinide Isotope and Sealed Source (NISS) materials. NISS materials are defined as including: any isotope in sealed sources or standards; and isotopes, regardless of form, with atomic number less than 90. The NISSMG assists DOE sites with the storage, reuse, disposition, transportation, and processing of these materials. The NISSMG has focused its efforts to date at DOE closure sites due to the immediacy of their problems. Recently, these efforts were broadened to include closure facilities at non-closure sites. Eventually, the NISSMG plans to make its resources available to all DOE sites. This paper documents the lessons learned in managing NISS materials at DOE sites to date.

Low, J. L.; Polansky, G. F.; Parks, D. L.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Quantitation of Glycidyl Esters via Stable Isotope Dilution Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitation of Glycidyl Esters via Stable Isotope Dilution Analysis Michael Granvogl and Peter Schieberle Technical University of Munich, Chair for Food Chemistry and German Research Centre for Food Chemistry, Lise-Meitner-Str. 34, Freising, Germ

422

PDP of Hydrogen Isotopes in a Low Temperature Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Properties and Interactions with Material / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

M. Okamoto; T. Yoshida; M. Takizawa; M. Aida; M. Nomura; Y. Fujii

423

A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Strontium Isotopic Study Of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon- Structural And Thermal Implications Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ratios of 87Sr/86Sr were determined in twenty-seven basaltic rocks from Newberry. These ratios range from 0.70330 to 0.70414; most fall between 0.7035 and 0.7038. Covariance of Al2O3/FeO* ratio, TiO2 content, and Th content with 87Sr/86Sr suggests that some isotopic ratios reflect shallow crustal contamination, but the data also suggest that two mantle sources, a prominent one at 0.7036 and a less-prominent one at 0.7033 or less, are represented. The hypothesis of crustal contamination is supported

424

Isotopic Anomalies in CP Stars: Helium, Mercury, Platinum, and Calcium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the classical observational results for isotopic abundance variations for several elements in CP stars. We concentrate on the "newest" anomaly, in calcium. The cosmically very rare isotope, Ca-48 can rival and even dominate the more common, alpha nuclide, Ca-40. Relevant examples are found in the hot, non-magnetic HgMn stars, and the field horizontal-branch star, Feige 86. The calcium anomaly is also present in cool, magnetic stars, including the notorious HD 101065, Przybylski's star.

C. R. Cowley; S. Hubrig; F. Castelli

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

HOLDEN, N.E.

2005-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

STUDIES ON AIR POLLUTION OF ISOTOPE DEPARTMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The need for a simple, effective, low-cost filter to measure atmospheric radioactive pollution in radiotherapy departments employing isotopes is considered. It was noted that not only may the patients emit substantial gamma radiation, but various body discharges, soiled laundry, treatment equipment, storage areas for laundry, and urine specimens present a radiation hazard for hospital personnel. A light, portable sampling and monitoring device was designed that would preclude the use of large built-in filters and their time- consuming operation. The filter was formed from 20 layers of gauze sewn together making a pad of 25mm dia. This pad filtered out only 50% of the aerosol particles, but its air resistance was 10 times less than conventional types, allowing it to be attached to an ordinary vacuum clean;r. A gas flow meter, installed between the pad and the vacuum cleaner, showed that 1 m/sup 3/ air passed through the pad in approximates 5 min. The filter samples were assayed for radioactivity with a 25-mm dia G-M tube. When the results were checked against a 99.8% effective Sovietmade filter, the 20-layer gauze filter compared favorably. When measurements were made in rooms of patients treated with I/sup 131/, the samples showed that the activity decreased much more rapidly than the normal 8-day half life of I/sup 131/. Since there was no other isotope pollution in the area tested, the only explanation for this atmospheric activity is the rapid sublimation of iodine. The first 24 hours following I/sup 131/ administration showed a generally higher air pollution level than had been assumed. Average measurements showed 10/sup -9/ mu C/m/sup 3/ before the rooms were ventilated. The activity measurements were about the same during treatment with I/sup 131/, P/sup 32/, Au/sup 198/, and Na/sup 24/. Airing the rooms thoroughly three times a day is considered absolutely necessary, as this decreased the atmospheric pollution considerably. (BBB)

Bozoky, L.

1962-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine (NMCIM) is to support research, education and service missions of the UNM College of Pharmacy Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program (COP RSP) and the Cancer Research and Treatment Center (CRTC). NMCIM developed and coordinated unique translational research in cancer radioimaging and radiotherapy agents based on novel molecules developed at UNM and elsewhere. NMCIM was the primary interface for novel radioisotopes and radiochemistries developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for SPECT/PET imaging and therapy. NMCIM coordinated the use of the small animal imaging facility with the CRTC provided support services to assist investigators in their studies. NMCIM developed education and training programs that benefited professional, graduate, and postdoctoral students that utilized its unique facilities and technologies. UNM COP RSP has been active in writing research and training grants, as well as supporting contract research with industrial partners. The ultimate goal of NMCIM is to bring new radiopharmaceutical imaging and therapeutic agents into clinical trials that will benefit the health and well being of cancer and other patients in New Mexico and the U.S.

Burchiel, Scott W.

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

Mcdonough, William F.

430

Regional and National Estimates of the PotentialEnergy Use, Energy Cost, and CO{sub 2} Emissions Associated with Radon Mitigation by Sub-slab Depressurization  

SciTech Connect

Active sub-slab depressurization (SSD) systems are an effective means of reducing indoor radon concentrations in residential buildings. However, energy is required to operate the system fan and to heat or cool the resulting increased building ventilation. We present regional and national estimates of the energy requirements, operating expenses, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with using SSD systems at saturation (i.e., in all U.S. homes with radon concentrations above the EPA remediation guideline and either basement or slab-on-grade construction). The primary source of uncertainty in these estimates is the impact of the SSD system on house ventilation rate. Overall, individual SSD system operating expenses are highest in the Northeast and Midwest at about $99 y{sup -1}, and lowest in the South and West at about $66 y{sup -1}. The fan consumes, on average, about 40% of the end-use energy used to operate the SSD system and accounts for about 60% of the annual expense. At saturation, regional impacts are largest in the Midwest because this area has a large number of mitigable houses and a relatively high heating load. We estimate that operating SSD systems in U.S. houses where it is both appropriate and possible (about 2.6 million houses), will annually consume 1.7 x 10{sup 4} (6.4 x 10{sup 3} to 3.9 x 10{sup 4}) TJ of end-use energy, cost $230 (130 to 400) million (at current energy prices), and generate 2.0 x 10{sup 9} (1.2 x 10{sup 9} to 3.5 x 10{sup 9}) kg of CO{sub 2}. Passive or energy efficient radon mitigation systems currently being developed offer opportunities to substantially reduce these impacts.

Riley, W.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Donval, J. P. , 2005. Chlorine isotopic compositions ofand Davis, S. , 1984. Natural chlorine isotope variations.precision measurement of chlorine stable isotope ratios.

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues  

SciTech Connect

Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose chemical compositions and magnesium and silicon isotopic compositions have been previously measured.

Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

EAS 6216 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2012 TuTh 9:35-10:55, 1229 ES&T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Applications, 3rd edition, Wiley. Recommended Textbooks: Dickin, Alan. P. 1995. Radiogenic isotope geology/6 Carbon isotopes in the biosphere 11/8 Carbon isotopes in the geologic record 11/13 "Clumped" isotopes1 EAS 6216 ­ Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2012 TuTh 9:35-10:55, 1229 ES&T Instructor

Weber, Rodney

434

EAS 6216 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2010 TuTh 3:05-4:25, 1229 ES&T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Recommended Textbooks: Dickin, Alan. P. 1995. Radiogenic isotope geology. Cambridge University Press. Hoefs isotopes 11/9 Carbon isotopes in the biosphere 11/11 Carbon isotopes in the geologic record 11/16 "Clumped1 EAS 6216 ­ Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Fall 2010 TuTh 3:05-4:25, 1229 ES&T Instructor: Kim

Black, Robert X.

435

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Search Product Search Step 1 - Enter your search criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

436

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Request a New Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request a New Product Request a New Product Step 1 - Enter the new product's criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

437

Kinetic Isotopic Fractionation During Diffusion of Ionic Speciesin Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments specifically designed to measure the ratio of the diffusivities of ions dissolved in water were used to determine D{sub Li}/D{sub K}, D{sub 7{sub Li}}/D{sub 6{sub Li}}, D{sub 25{sub Mg}}/D{sub 24{sub Mg}}, D{sub 26{sub Mg}}/D{sub 25{sub Mg}}, and D{sub 37{sub Cl}}/D{sub 35{sub Cl}}. The measured ratio of the diffusion coefficients for Li and K in water (D{sub Li}/D{sub K} = 0.6) is in good agreement with published data, providing evidence that the experimental design being used resolves the relative mobility of ions with adequate precision to also be used for determining the fractionation of isotopes by diffusion in water. In the case of Li we found measurable isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of dissolved LiCl (D{sub 7{sub Li}}/D{sub 6{sub Li}} = 0.99772 {+-} 0.00026). This difference in the diffusion coefficient of {sup 7}Li compared to {sup 6}Li is significantly less than reported in an earlier study, a difference we attribute to the fact that in the earlier study Li diffused through a membrane separating the water reservoirs. Our experiments involving Mg diffusing in water found no measurable isotopic fractionation (D{sub 25{sub Mg}}/D{sub 24{sub Mg}} = 1.00003 {+-} 0.00006). Cl isotopes were fractionated during diffusion in water (D{sub 37{sub Cl}}/D{sub 35{sub Cl}} = 0.99857 {+-} 0.00080) whether or not the co-diffuser (Li or Mg) was isotopically fractionated. The isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of ions in water is much smaller than values we found previously for the isotopic fractionation of Li and Ca isotopes by diffusion in molten silicate liquids. A major distinction between water and silicate liquids is that water, being a polar liquid, surrounds dissolved ions with hydration shells, which very likely play an important but still poorly understood role in reducing isotopic fractionation associated with diffusion.

Richter, Frank M.; Mendybaev, Ruslan A.; Christensen, John; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Williams, Ross W.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Beloso Jr.,Abelardo D.

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

438

Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

Eversole, R.E.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Geological Sciences

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as fission product other or actinide other. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quantum instanton evaluation of the kinetic isotope effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general quantum-mechanical method for computing kinetic isotope effects is presented. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant and on the path integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. It computes the kinetic isotope effect directly, using a thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotope, thus avoiding the more computationally expensive process of computing the individual rate constants. The method is more accurate than variational transition-state theories or the semiclassical instanton method since it does not assume a single reaction path and does not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. While the general Monte-Carlo implementation makes the method accessible to systems with a large number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the collinear and full three-dimensional isotope variants of the hydrogen exchange reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}+H. In all seven test cases, for temperatures between 250 K and 600 K, the error of the quantum instanton approximation for the kinetic isotope effects is less than {approx}10%.

Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.; Castillo, Jesus F.; Aoiz, F.Javier

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Oak Ridge Isotope Production Cyclotron Facility and Target Handling  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee issued in August 2009 an Isotopes Subcommittee report that recommended the construction and operation of a variable-energy, high-current, multiparticle accelerator for producing medical radioisotopes. To meet the needs identified in the report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a technical concept for a commercial 70 MeV dual-port-extraction, multiparticle cyclotron to be located at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The conceptual design of the isotope production facility as envisioned would provide two types of targets for use with this new cyclotron. One is a high-power target cooled by water circulating on both sides, and the other is a commercial target cooled only on one side. The isotope facility concept includes an isotope target vault for target irradiation and a shielded transfer station for radioactive target handling. The targets are irradiated in the isotope target vault. The irradiated targets are removed from the target vault and packaged in an adjoining shielded transfer station before being sent out for postprocessing. This paper describes the conceptual design of the target-handling capabilities required for dealing with these radioactive targets and for minimizing the contamination potential during operations.

Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Egle, Brian [ORNL; Binder, Jeffrey L [ORNL; Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Tatum, B Alan [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Devore, Joe [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rennich, Mark [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Saltmarsh, Michael John [ORNL; Caldwell, Benjamin Cale [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Isotope dilution study of exchangeable oxygen in premium coal samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A difficulty with improving the ability to quantitate water in coal is that truly independent methods do not always exist. The true value of any analytical parameter is always easier to determine if totally independent methods exist to determine that parameter. This paper describes the possibility of using a simple isotope dilution technique to determine the water content of coal and presents a comparison of these isotope dilution measurements with classical results for the set of Argonne coals from the premium coal sample program. Isotope dilution is a widely used analytical method and has been applied to the analysis of water in matrices as diverse as chicken fat, living humans, and coal. Virtually all of these applications involved the use of deuterium as the diluted isotope. This poses some problems if the sample contains a significant amount of exchangeable organic hydrogen and one is interested in discriminating exchangeable organic hydrogen from water. This is a potential problem in the coal system. To avoid this potential problem /sup 18/O was used as the diluted isotope in this work.

Finseth, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Isotope Production and Distribution Program`s Fiscal Year 1997 financial statement audit  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Isotope Production and Distribution Program mission is to serve the national need for a reliable supply of isotope products and services for medicine, industry and research. The program produces and sells hundreds of stable and radioactive isotopes that are widely utilized by domestic and international customers. Isotopes are produced only where there is no U.S. private sector capability or other production capacity is insufficient to meet U.S. needs. The Department encourages private sector investment in new isotope production ventures and will sell or lease its existing facilities and inventories for commercial purposes. The Isotope Program reports to the Director of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. The Isotope Program operates under a revolving fund established by the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act and maintains financial viability by earning revenues from the sale of isotopes and services and through annual appropriations. The FY 1995 Energy and Water Appropriations Act modified predecessor acts to allow prices charged for Isotope Program products and services to be based on production costs, market value, the needs of the research community, and other factors. Although the Isotope Program functions as a business, prices set for small-volume, high-cost isotopes that are needed for research purposes may not achieve full-cost recovery. As a result, isotopes produced by the Isotope Program for research and development are priced to provide a reasonable return to the U.S. Government without discouraging their use. Commercial isotopes are sold on a cost-recovery basis. Because of its pricing structure, when selecting isotopes for production, the Isotope Program must constantly balance current isotope demand, market conditions, and societal benefits with its determination to operate at the lowest possible cost to U.S. taxpayers. Thus, this report provides a financial analysis of this situation.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine recharge for the system Notes Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta18O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is

446

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for age determinations - not indicated is useful for exploration. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal

447

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

448

Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for age determinations - not indicated is useful for exploration. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Woldegabriel_%26_Goff,_1992)&oldid=510971"

449

Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fact Sheet: Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.11.08 Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National

450

HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of ... Fact Sheet HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear

451

Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

452

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

453

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

454

Isotope correlation studies relative to high enrichment test reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect

Several correlations of fission product isotopic ratios with atom percent fission and neutron flux, for highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel irradiated in two different water moderated thermal reactors, have been evaluated. In general, excellent correlations were indicated for samples irradiated in the same neutron spectrum; however, significant differences in the correlations were noted with the change in neutron spectrum. For highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel, the correlation of the isotopic ratio /sup 143/Nd//sup 145 +146/Nd with atom percent fission has wider applicability than the other fission product isotopic ratio evaluated. The /sup 137/Cs//sup 135/Cs atom ratio shows promise for correlation with neutron flux. Correlations involving heavy element ratios are very sensitive to the neutron spectrum.

Maeck, W.J.; Tromp, R.L.; Duce, F.A.; Emel, W.A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Isotopic Bias and Uncertainty for Burnup Credit Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of burnup credit requires calculating the isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel. The depletion calculation simulates the burnup of the fuel under reactor operating conditions. The result of the depletion analysis is the predicted isotopic composition, which is ultimately input to a criticality analysis to determine the system multiplication factor (k{sub eff}). This paper demonstrates an approach for calculating the isotopic bias and uncertainty in k{sub eff} for commercial spent nuclear fuel burnup credit. This paper covers 74 different radiochemical assayed spent fuel samples from 22 different fuel assemblies that were irradiated in eight different pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The samples evaluated span an enrichment range of 2.556 wt% U-235 through 4.67 wt% U-235, and burnups from 6.92 GWd/MTU through 55.7 GWd/MTU.

J.M. Scaglione

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Determination of Actinide Isotope Ratios Using Glow Discharge Optogalvanic Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Diode-laser excited optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) of a glow discharge has been utilized to measure U-235/U-235 + U-238 isotope ratios. This ``optical mass spectrometric`` measurement has been demonstrated for a number of samples including uranium oxide, fluoride, and metal. Various diode-laser accessible atomic transitions in the 775 to 835 nm region have been evaluated; these transitions were chosen by considering OGS sensitivity and isotope shift. Using the 831.84 nm uranium line, for example, it was possible to measure the U-235/U-235 + U-238 isotope ratio (0.0026) of depleted uranium samples. A prototypical field instrument to make these measurements has been assembled and demonstrated. A U-236 spectral line was identified in a sample of enriched uranium, and an abundance sensitivity was measured.

Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.; Barshick, C.M.; Ramsey, J.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

Hooker, Jacob Matthew (Port Jefferson, NY); Schonberger, Matthias (Mains, DE); Schieferstein, Hanno (Aabergen, DE); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

458

Molecular isotopic effects on coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes  

SciTech Connect

A full quantum treatment shows that coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes exhibit a strong sensitivity to a small mass change in a vibrating molecule. This has been exemplified with the existing isotopes of H{sub 2}{sup +} as well as few fictitious ones. We find that the fluxes undergo a significant change as one goes from one isotope of reduced mass {mu} to another. Other well-defined observables are likewise affected. It turns out that as a general rule, the heavier the isotope, the larger the flux, the smaller the dispersion, and the longer the revival period. While we were able to confirm analytically that the time at the first turning point scales as {radical}({mu}) and that the revival period changes linearly with {mu}, the mechanism of other observables remains subtle as the result of quantum interference highlighted by the pronounced difference observed on the dispersion pattern.

Kenfack, A.; Paulus, B. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Barth, I. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Marquardt, F. [Visualisierung und Datenanalyse, Zuse Institut Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Mathematik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS)  

SciTech Connect

A unique, large release of radiocarbon occurred near the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, TN in July/August 1999. Measurements of 14C in tree ring cellulose throughout the ORR area demonstrate that the 1999 release was unprecedented in its uptake by vegetation. We are taking advantage of the whole-ecosystem isotopic label generated by this release to address five outstanding issues in the terrestrial carbon cycle: (1) partitioning of soil respiration between autotrophic and heterotrophic sources, and quantification of that partitioning seasonally and inter-annually, (2) partitioning of heterotrophic respiration sources between above-ground litter decomposition and below-ground root detritus decomposition, (3) identification of pathways leading from leaf and root detritus to long-term stabilization of soil organic matter, including the role of soil fauna, (4) the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport in distributing carbon within the soil profile, and (5) the longevity and turnover time of fine roots. The first four issues are being addressed through a reciprocal litter transplant experiment set up at four sites on the ORR encompassing two soil types and two levels of 14C exposure in 1999. The fifth issue, longevity and turnover of fine roots, is being addressed by tracing the radiocarbon label through the fine root pool over time. With a combination of incubation, soil surface chamber and soil CO2 profiles, and continuous measurements of soil temperature and moisture controls, we are tracking changes in soil respiration partitioning over several years. The nature and source of organic matter pools that reside in soils for years to decades are being tracked with differently labeled root and surface litter, and experiments to exclude soil fauna have been initiated to elucidate their role in vertical transport. Periodic sampling of soils and soil solutions and the use of inert tracers, allow us to investigate the chemical nature and form of DOC and its transport in surface soil horizons. Results from these field observations will be used to parameterize and refine existing carbon dynamics models. Such models will then be used to quantitatively address the long-term fate of ecosystem carbon inputs and the potential for ecosystem carbon sequestration.

Paul J. Hanson; Susan Trumbore; Chris Swanston; Margaret Torn; Julie Jastrow; William A. Parton; Wilfred M. Post; Mats J. Frberg; Laura J. Hainsworth; Markus Kleber; Christiane Kramer; Roser Matamala-Paradeda; Charles T. Garten Jr.

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.5 Uranium Isotope Ratio Measurements . . . . . .4.32 Uranium sputtered from three U-rich materials of varying uranium isotopic

Isselhardt, Brett Hallen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radon thoron isotopic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Isotope enrichment by frequency-tripled temperature tuned neodymium laser photolysis of formaldehyde  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Enrichment of carbon, hydrogen and/or oxygen isotopes by means of isotopically selective photo-predissociation of formaldehyde is achieved by irradiation provided by a frequency-tripled, temperature tuned neodymium laser.

Marling, John B. (Livermore, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99...

463

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat-source containment materials; (3) isotope brayton system materials support; and (4) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Carbonate clumped isotope compositions of modern marine mollusk and brachiopod shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, leaving the oxygen isotope paleother- mometer underdetermined in most geologic applicationsCarbonate clumped isotope compositions of modern marine mollusk and brachiopod shells Gregory A, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA b Department of Geological & Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

Grossman, Ethan L.

466

An experimental study of magnesium-isotope fractionation in chlorophyll-a photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616. whcasey@ucdavis.edu keywords: photosynthesis, magnesium isotopes,Isotope Fractionation in Chlorophyll-a Photosynthesis Jay R. Black Department of Chemistry Department of Geology,

Black, J R; Yin, Q Z; Casey, W H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A Microdrop Generator for the Calibration of a Water Vapor Isotope Ratio Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microdrop generator is described that produces water vapor with a known isotopic composition and volume mixing ratio for the calibration of a near-infrared diode laser water isotope ratio spectrometer. The spectrometer is designed to measure in ...

Rosario Q. Iannone; Daniele Romanini; Samir Kassi; Harro A. J. Meijer; Erik R. Th Kerstel

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Stable Isotopes as Validation Tools for Global Climate Model Predictions of the Impact of Amazonian Deforestation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines changes in isotopic abundances for 18O and deuterium in precipitation over the Amazon basin based on data in the Global Network on Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/...

A. Henderson-Sellers; K. McGuffie; H. Zhang

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Isotopic Composition of Present-Day Antarctic Snow in a Lagrangian Atmospheric Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of present-day Antarctic snow is simulated for the period September 1980August 2002 using a Rayleigh-type isotope distillation model in combination with backward trajectory calculations with 40-yr European Centre for ...

M. M. Helsen; R. S. W. Van de Wal; M. R. Van den Broeke

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z