National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for radiometric geophysical signatures

  1. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Promoting and supporting high-quality, cutting-edge science in...

  2. Radiometrics At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  3. Radiometrics At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  4. Signature

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  5. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a rapidly evolving Earth science discipline that integrates environmental microbiology, geomicrobiology, biogeochemistry, and geophysics to investigate interactions that ...

  6. Geophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Geophysics We perform research using seismology, infrasound, ground-shock modeling, and acoustics to address critical needs in energy, seismic hazards, threat detection and reduction, earthquake prediction, and subsurface imaging. Contact Us Group Leader David Coblentz Email Deputy Group Leader (acting) TJ Ulrich Email Profile pages header Search our Profile pages Wave geophysics researcher Paul Johnson holds a block of acrylic plastic used in studying cracked solids EES-17 geophysicist Paul

  7. Signature of Edward Bruce Held Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  8. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  9. Radiometrics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prospects In Northern Nevada Radiometrics At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Petersen, 1975) Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area 1975 1975 Geology and Geothermal...

  10. ARM - SGP Radiometric Calibration Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiometric Calibration Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Radiometric Calibration Facility The Radiometric Calibration Facility (RCF) provides shortwave radiometer calibrations traceable

  11. ANALYSIS WITH RADIOACTIVE REAGENTS AND RADIOMETRIC TITRATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    & Separations Chemistry-- Radiometric & Radiochemical Procedures; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; COMPLEXES; DETERMINATION; PRECIPITATION; RADIOISOTOPES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TITRATION...

  12. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trends in the future. Cover feature (jpg) Feature article Student opportunities SAGE sage logo Space Weather Summer School Student Programs Documents Climate Brochure (pdf)...

  13. Original Signatures on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signatures on File

  14. Original Signatures on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Original Signatures on File

  15. Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data have also complemented other remote sensors such as K-band cloud Doppler radar and Doppler lidar. In addition, radiometric observations compose a database of ground- truth...

  16. Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Charles Spencer Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Willie Wilson Signature of Willie Wilson Signature of Willie Wilson Signature of Jill Albaugh

  17. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  18. Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods Magnetic Methods Gravity Methods Radiometric Methods Seismic methods dominates oil and gas exploration, and probably accounts for over 80% of exploration dollars spent...

  19. Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Doug Dearolph

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Doug Dearolph Signature of Doug Dearolph Signature of John Temple Signature of John Temple Signature of Carol Elliott Signature of Carol Elliott

  20. Signature of George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams Signature of Alice Williams Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson

  1. Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Penrose Albright Signature of Kimberly A Davis Signature of Kimberly A Davis Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson

  2. Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole

  3. Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of R. Wallis Spangler Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J. Dearolph Signature of Douglas J. DearolphSignature of Douglas J.

  4. Signature of Darby Dietrich Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Darby Dietrich Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Steven Lawrence

  5. Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of James Eanes Signature of James Eanes Signature of James Eanes Signature of JoAnn Wright

  6. Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Raymond Juzaitis Signature of Steven Lawrence Signature of Darby Dietrich Signature of Darby Dietrich

  7. Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Dennis Donati Signature of Douglas Dearolph

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Douglas Dearolph

  8. Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B. Held Signature of Edward B.

  9. Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Held Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward Held Signature of Edward

  10. Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer

  11. Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on File Signature on File 5/29/08

  12. Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Geoffrey Beausoleil Signature of Geoffrey Beausoleil Signature of James Eanes Signature of James Eanes Signature of JoAnn Wright

  13. Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Paul Hommert Signature of Patty Wagner Signature of Jerry McDowell Signature of Jerry McDowell Signature of Kimberly Davis Signature of Kimberly Davis Signature of Kimberly Sawyer Signature of Kimberly Sawyer Signature of Richard Sena Signature of Richard Sena

  14. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    microbiological techniques, and possibly in remote environments such as the deep ocean. ... on biogeophysics in order to define the current state of the science, identify the ...

  15. Soil Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  16. Soil Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  17. Field Mapping At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  18. Field Mapping At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  19. Posters Radiometric Sounding System C. D. Whiteman, G. A. Anderson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Posters Radiometric Sounding System C. D. Whiteman, G. A. Anderson, J. M. Alzheimer, and W. J. Shaw Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Vertical...

  20. Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity...

  1. Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  2. Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L....

  3. Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Christopher C. Gentile Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark L. Holecek Signature of Mark L. HolecekSignature of Mark

  4. Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Ralph B Tennants II

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mark Holecek Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Ralph B Tennants II Signature of Ralph B Tennants II

  5. Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area 1977 1977 Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Raft River Geothermal Area Document Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal...

  6. Generic Geophysical Permit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generic Geophysical Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Generic Geophysical Permit Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not...

  7. Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geophysical Techniques page? For detailed information on...

  8. Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) 2016 - Our 34 rd Year! SAGE is a 3-4 week research and education program in exploration geophysics for graduate, undergraduate students, and working professionals based in Santa Fe, NM, U.S.A. Application deadline March 27, 2016, 5:00pm MDT SAGE students, faculty, teaching assistants, and visiting scientists acquire, process and interpret reflection/refraction seismic, magnetotelluric (MT)/electromagnetic (EM), ground penetrating radar (GPR),

  9. Science of Signatures - Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Science of Signatures - Past Programs Science of Signatures Program Science of Signatures - Past Programs Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860...

  10. Science of Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures Science of Signatures (SoS) The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar Champion Nancy Sauer Email Pillar Contact Gene Peterson Email Science of Signatures (SoS) Overview In its broadest and simplest sense, a "signature" is any information that is unique, recognizable, and useful. A handwritten mark as a means of demonstrating authenticity is a familiar example, as is the pattern variation

  11. Radiometrics At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase I) Notes Fugro, Inc. performed an airborne geophysical survey using the DIGHEM (Digital Helicopter ElectroMagnetics) aircraft over a 937 km2 survey grid. Airborne gamma...

  12. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

    2009-08-15

    Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

  13. Original Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Original Signature on File Page8 of 8 M. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 1. The owneroperator must maintain an adequately trained onsite RCRA emergency coordinator to direct emergency...

  14. Geophysical Exploration Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ,"rectangles":,"locations":"text":"Geophysical,GeologicandGeoche...

  15. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  16. Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Paul J. HommertSignature of Paul J. Hommert Signature of Geoffrey L. BeausoleilSignature of Geoffrey L. Beausoleil Signature of Geoffrey L. BeausoleilSignature of Geoffrey L. Beausoleil Signature of Geoffrey L.

  17. 2014 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email 2014 Science of Signatures Program Agenda 2014 Projects and Teams 2014 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart Template ER Proposal Template...

  18. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures Program Agenda (PDF) 2015 Projects and Teams 2015 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart Template (PDF) ER Proposal Template (PDF)...

  19. Interim progress report addendun - environmental geophysics: Building E5032 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground, January 1994 resurvey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Benson, M.A.; Borden, H.M.; Padar, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Geophysical surveying around Building E5032 using three new continuously recording geophysical instruments - two types of electromagnetic induction instruments and a cesium vapor magnetometer that were unavailable at the time of the original survey - has provided additional information for defining the location of buried debris, vaults, tanks, and the drainage/sump system near the building. The dominant geophysical signature around Building E5032 consists of a complex pattern of linear magnetic, electrical-conductivity, and electromagnetic field anomalies that appear to be associated with drainage/sewer systems, ditches, past railway activity, the location for Building T5033 (old number 99A), and the probable location of Building 91. Integrated analysis of data acquired using the three techniques, plus a review of the existing ground-penetrating-radar data, allow a more thorough definition of the sources for the observed anomalies.

  20. Sandia Research Aims to Enhance Understanding of Radiometric Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aims to Enhance Understanding of Radiometric Instruments - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  1. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and modeling of geophysical data are PC and workstation-based, using state-of-the-art software. Modern field equipment and vehicles are provided by various academic...

  2. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  3. Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Steven Erhart

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of John Woolery Signature of John Woolery 2 Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) Pantex Plant Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC Contract No. DE-AC54-00AL66620 October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012 A. Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Contract, this Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) sets forth the criteria upon which the Contractor's performance of work under the contract will

  4. Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Charles F. McMillan Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly Davis Lebak Signature of Kimberly Davis LebakSignature of Kimberly

  5. Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Raymond J. JuzaitisSignature of Raymond J. Juzaitis Signature of Steven J. LawrenceSignature of Steven J. Lawrence

  6. MCA 82-1-1 Geophysical Exploration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MCA 82-1-1 Geophysical ExplorationLegal Abstract Montana statute governing the procedures and permission required prior to conducting geophysical exploration activities....

  7. Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center Author...

  8. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geophysical monitoring of foam used to ...

  9. Help:Signatures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    articles. Default signature options There are three default options. Four tildes are standard (full signature). Typing three tildes results in a username-only signature...

  10. Millimeter-Wavelength Forward-Model Comparisons Based on Ground-Based Radiometric Data Taken During the 1999 NSA/AO Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Millimeter-Wavelength Forward-Model Comparisons Based on Ground-Based Radiometric Data Taken During the 1999 NSA/AAO Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater and M. A. Klein Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Racette National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland D. Cimini University of L'Aquila

  11. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  12. Signature of Bret E Knapp Signature of Kimberly Davis-Lebak

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bret E Knapp Signature of Kimberly Davis-Lebak Signature of Homer Williamson

  13. Science of Signatures Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Application Form Do not use MAC Preview tool to edit this form as it corrupts the data. Application deadline is February 21, 2016 5:00 PM (US Mountain Standard) A complete application package includes: * This Application Form * Cover Letter - 1 page cover letter describing your describing your interest in participating as an Advanced Studies Scholar and of your professional goals. * CV (resume) * One (1) Letter of Recommendation from a Reference Applicant

  14. Original Signature On File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signature On File Department of Energy Carl sbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 8822 1 June 10, 2009 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of CBFO Final Audit Report A-09-12 , Los Alamos National Laboratory Central Characterization Project TRU Waste Characterization and Certification Dear Mr. Zappe: Enclosed is the Carlsbad Field Office

  15. Uncertainty Estimation of Radiometric Data using a Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, Aron

    2015-06-25

    This presentation summarizes uncertainty estimation of radiometric data using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty (GUM) method.

  16. Borehole Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Geophysical Methods Author Carole D. Johnson Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not...

  17. Borehole Geophysical Logging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Geophysical Logging Authors Hager-Richter Geoscience and Inc. Published Publisher Not...

  18. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site:...

  19. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  20. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  1. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization | Department of Energy 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon geophysical_imaging_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for

  2. The Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Science of Signatures Program Application Process How to Apply Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818...

  3. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Projects and Teams 2015 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart TemplateER Proposal Template RELATED LINKS Apply Here Solicitation Flyer...

  4. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  5. Science of Signatures - Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures - Past Programs Science of Signatures Program View program resources from previous years. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email 2014 2015 RELATED LINKS Staff Publications UCSD Engineering

  6. Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F.; Mandell, W.A.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-07-01

    Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.

  7. Advanced signal processing in geophysical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witten, A.J.; King, W.C.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes advanced signal processing methods which have improved the capabilities to detect and image the subsurface environment with geophysical remote sensing techniques. Field results are presented showing target detection, subsurface characterizations, and imaging of insitu waste treatment processes, all previously unachievable with such tools as ground penetrating radar, magnetometry and seismic.

  8. Advanced signal processing in geophysical remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witten, A.J. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes advanced signal processing methods which have improved the capabilities to detect and image the subsurface environment with geophysical remote sensing techniques. Field results are presented showing target detection, subsurface characterizations, and imaging of insitu waste treatment processes, all previously unachievable with such tools as ground penetrating radar, magnetometry and seismic.

  9. An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern...

  10. Environmental geophysics at the Southern Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1995-05-01

    Geophysical studies have been conducted at five sites in the southern Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The goals of the studies were to identify areas containing buried metallic objects and to provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework of the site. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea level resulted in a complex pattern of channel-fill deposits. Paleochannels of various sizes and orientations have been mapped throughout the study area by means of ground-penetrating radar and EM-31 techniques. The EM-31 paleochannel signatures are represented onshore either by conductivity highs or lows, depending on the depths and facies of the fill sequences. A companion study shows the features as conductivity highs where they extend offshore. This erosional and depositional system is environmentally significant because of the role it plays in the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Magnetic and electromagnetic anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the areas surveyed. On the basis of geophysical measurements, large-scale (i.e., tens of feet) landfilling has not been found in the southern Bush River Peninsula, though smaller-scale dumping of metallic debris and/or munitions cannot be ruled out.

  11. Role of Geological and Geophysical Data in Modeling a Southwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    actual computer time necessary for model calibration was minimal. The conceptually straightforward approach for parameter estimation utilizing existing hydrological, geophysical,...

  12. Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  13. Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  14. Temperature effects on airgun signatures (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Temperature effects on airgun signatures Experiments in an 850 liter water tank were performed in order to study temperature effects on airgun signatures, and to...

  15. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  16. The Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Science of Signatures Program Application Process How to Apply for 2016 Science of Signatures Program Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email Interested students should email the following documents to SOS-ASI-Apply@lanl.gov: Application Form (pdf) CV, including GPA Brief (1 page) synopsis of your professional goals and interest in participating as an

  17. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Apply Who Qualifies Special Undergrad Information Contributors Faculty Past Programs Photo Gallery NSEC » CSES » SAGE SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience Application deadline: March 27, 2016, 5:00 pm MDT Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email Application process for SAGE 2016 is now open. U.S.

  18. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report provides details on a technique to describe molecules on a computer, called Signature, as well as the computer-aided molecule design algorithm built around Signature. Two applications are provided of the CAMD algorithm with Signature. The first describes the design of green solvents based on data in the GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Solvent Selection Guide. The second provides novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor ligands with some optimally predicted properties. In addition to using the CAMD algorithm with Signature, it is demonstrated how to employ Signature in a high-throughput screening study. Here, after classifying both active and inactive inhibitors for the protein Factor XIa using Signature, the model developed is used to screen a large, publicly-available database called PubChem for the most active compounds.

  19. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  20. SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Signals in the Subsurface | Department of Energy SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface PDF icon Grand Challenge Workshop -Imaging Subsurface.pdf More Documents & Publications AGU SubTER Town Hall Presentation 2015 SubTER Fact Sheet SubTER Presentation at Town Hall - American Geophysical Union

  1. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    combine a suite of high resolution geophysical and geochemical techniques to reduce exploration risk by characterizing hydrothermal alteration, fault geometries and relationships. ...

  2. The Geophysical Environment Around Waunita Hot Springs | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Report: The Geophysical Environment Around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Organization Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department...

  3. An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An introduction to electrical resistivity...

  4. Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department...

  5. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  6. New Mars rover findings revealed at American Geophysical Union...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars rover findings revealed at AGU conference New Mars rover findings revealed at American Geophysical Union conference A group of scientists revealed that the Curiosity rover...

  7. Amitava Bhattacharjee Elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amitava Bhattacharjee Elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union By Raphael Rosen September 18, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL Physicist Amitava...

  8. Amitava Bhattacharjee Elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amitava Bhattacharjee Elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union By Raphael Rosen September 18, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (Photo by Photo Credit:...

  9. Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  10. Monitoring DNAPL pumping using integrated geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.; Daily, W.D.; Kyle, K.R.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1996-11-01

    The removal of DNAPL during pumping has been monitored using integrated in situ geophysical techniques. At Hill Air Force Base in Utah, a free-product DNAPL plume (consisting predominantly of TCE) is pooled in water-wet soil on a thick clay aquitard. Groundwater pumping at Operable Unit 2 (OU 2) began in 1994; to date, nearly 30,000 gallons of DNAPL have been recovered from the site. From September, 1994 through September, 1995, changes in the basin during DNAPL pumping were monitored using an integrated geophysical system. Fiber optic sensors and neutron logs verify the presence of DNAPL in the vicinity of three boreholes which form a cross section from the perimeter of the basin to its center. Cross borehole electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images the changes in formation electrical properties due to the removal of DNAPL, extending the understanding of DNAPL removal between the boreholes. During pumping, electrical resistivities decreased; we suggest that these decreases are directly caused by the reduction in DNAPL. During ground water pumping, water with relatively low resistivity replaces some of the DNAPL pockets as the highly insulating DNAPL is removed. The results suggest that, as DNAPL is pumped from a nearby well, product slowly drains along the top of an aquitard and into the pump well, where it collects.

  11. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse spacetime superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for eddy-permitting mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  12. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While still over-parametrized, this choice of model space contains far fewer parameters than before, thus easing the computational burden, in some cases, of the optimization problem. And most importantly, the associated finite element discretization is aligned with the abrupt changes in material properties associated with lithologic boundaries as well as the interface between buried cultural artifacts and the surrounding Earth. In section 4, algorithms and tools are described that associate a smooth interface surface to a given triangulation. In particular, the tools support surface refinement and coarsening. Section 5 describes some preliminary results on the application of interface identification methods to some model problems in geophysical inversion. Due to time constraints, the results described here use the GNU Triangulated Surface Library for the manipulation of surface meshes and the TetGen software library for the generation of tetrahedral meshes.

  13. Expedited Site Characterization geophysics: Geophysical methods and tools for site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report covers five classes of geophysical technologies: Magnetics; Electrical/electromagnetic; Seismic reflection; Gamma-ray spectrometry; and Metal-specific spectrometry. Except for radiometry, no other classes of geophysical tedmologies are specific for direct detection of the types of contaminants present at the selected sites. For each of the five classes covered, the report gives a general description of the methodology, its field use, and its general applicability to the ESC Project. In addition, the report gives a sample of the most promising instruments available for each class, including the following information: Hardware/software attributes; Purchase and rental costs; Survey rate and operating costs; and Other applicable information based on case history and field evaluations.

  14. Detecting Weak Explosions at Local Distances by Fusing Multiple Geophysical Phenomenologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Nemzek, Robert J.; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.; Sentz, Kari

    2015-03-23

    Comprehensive explosion monitoring requires the technical capability to identify certain signatures at low signal strengths. For particularly small, evasively conducted explosions, conventional monitoring methods that use single geophysical phenomenologies may produce marginal or absent detections. To address this challenge, we recorded coincident acoustic, seismic and radio-frequency emissions during the above-ground detonation of ~ 2-12 kg solid charges and assessed how waveform data could be fused to increase explosion-screening capability. Our data provided identifiable explosion signatures that we implemented as template-events in multichannel correlation detectors to search for similar, matching waveforms. We thereby observed that these highly sensitive correlation detectors missed explosive events when applied separately to data streams that were heavily contaminated with noise and signal clutter. By then adding the p-values of these statistics through Fishers combined probability test, we correctly identified the explosion signals at thresholds consistent with the false alarm rates of the correlation detectors. This resulting Fisher test thereby provided high-probability detections, zero false alarms, and higher theoretical detection capability. We conclude that inclusion of these fusion methods in routine monitoring operations will likely lower both detection thresholds for small explosions, while reducing false attribution rates.

  15. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  16. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal ...

  17. A Geological and Geophysical Study of Chena Hot Springs, Alaksa...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaksa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library M.Sc. Thesis: A Geological and Geophysical Study of Chena Hot Springs, AlaksaThesisDissertation...

  18. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Authors Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace and T.L. Published Journal Geophysics, 21...

  19. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  20. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical logging case history of the...

  1. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  2. Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signature techniques directly tie to the science that was developed during that time. The body of scientific knowledge that grew from these origins is foundational today to our...

  3. Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering Citation Details In-Document...

  4. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA); Gosnell, Tom B. (Moraga, CA); Ham, Cheryl (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight (Livermore, CA); Wong, James (Dublin, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  5. Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection...

  6. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrasonic signatures...

  7. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D.

    2010-03-09

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  8. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    within the vadose zone (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Authors: Wu, Y. ; Hubbard, S. S. ; Wellman, D. Publication Date: 2012-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1212441 Report Number(s): LBNL-5702E Journal ID: ISSN 1539--1663 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource

  9. American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting December 14, 2015 8:00AM EST to December 18, 2015 6:00PM EST With nearly 24,000 attendees, AGU Fall Meeting is the largest Earth and space science meeting in the world. Now in its 48th year, AGU Fall Meeting is the best place to present your research; hear about the latest discoveries, trends, and challenges in the field; and network and make connections that can enhance your career. AGU Fall Meeting

  10. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  11. Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory Projects that involve signatures are taking place in every corner of the Laboratory. Top. One of the world's most powerful computers, Cielo is a Cray Computing system and a project of ACES, the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale, a joint project of Sandia and Los Alamos na- tional laboratories. Cielo is the next-generation capability-class platform for the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, and it allows signa- ture modeling

  12. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  13. Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manhattan Project » Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. New! Manhattan Project National Historical Park New! K-25 Virtual Museum The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight

  14. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  15. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  16. Radiometric and geometric analysis of hyperspectral imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hruska, Ryan; Mitchell, Jessica; Anderson, Matthew; Glenn, Nancy F.

    2012-09-17

    During the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).

  17. A Methodology for Calculating Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Marc Louis; Wilcox, Trevor; Bathke, Charles G.; James, Michael R.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous formalism is presented for calculating radiation signatures from both Special Nuclear Material (SNM) as well as radiological sources. The use of MCNP6 in conjunction with CINDER/ORIGEN is described to allow for the determination of both neutron and photon leakages from objects of interest. In addition, a description of the use of MCNP6 to properly model the background neutron and photon sources is also presented. Examinations of the physics issues encountered in the modeling are investigated so as to allow for guidance in the user discerning the relevant physics to incorporate into general radiation signature calculations. Furthermore, examples are provided to assist in delineating the pertinent physics that must be accounted for. Finally, examples of detector modeling utilizing MCNP are provided along with a discussion on the generation of Receiver Operating Curves, which are the suggested means by which to determine detectability radiation signatures emanating from objects.

  18. Energy Signatures: a proposed new design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1986-04-01

    Energy Signatures is a proposed new technique for aiding a designer in selecting and sizing passive solar elements on a building. Hourly heat flux profiles for each candidate design element are determined. These profiles are then matched to the hourly energy requirement of the space accounting for weather conditions, internal heat profiles of the space, and the mass characteristics of the building. Simulation analysis techniques are used to determine the Energy Signatures, the load profiles, and check the final result. Least-squares techniques are used to determine the optimum mix of strategies. Examples are given to illustrate development of the method up to the present. Future directions and possibilities are outlined.

  19. Sandians Participate in 46th Annual American Geophysical Union (AGU)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference Participate in 46th Annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) Conference - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  20. Amitava Bhattacharjee Elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Amitava Bhattacharjee Elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union By Raphael Rosen September 18, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL Physicist Amitava Bhattacharjee (Photo by Elle Starkman) PPPL Physicist Amitava Bhattacharjee Amitava Bhattacharjee, head of the Theory Department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University, has been elected a fellow of the American

  1. Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20

    A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

  2. SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface The Grand Challenge SubTER Panel (Dr. Marcia McNutt, Chair) DOE Leads: Margaret Coleman, Julio Friedmann, Doug Hollett, and Harriet Kung Introduction The future of the world's energy production and deployment is closely tied to our understanding of the subsurface, as well as our capabilities in subsurface or geologic engineering. Developments over the past ten years, including the growth of natural

  3. Padlock and RCA signature predication software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-24

    This software predicts DNA signatures compatible with padlock probe and rolling circle amplification (RCA) platforms. Specifically, the software takes a multiple sequence alignment, generates a consensus of conserved bases, and from these conserved regions selects forward and reverse primers that are immediately adjacent to one another, which is the desired orientation for assays such as padlock probes and RCA.

  4. Radiometric and geometric analysis of hyperspectral imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hruska, Ryan; Mitchell, Jessica; Anderson, Matthew; Glenn, Nancy F.

    2012-09-17

    During the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis.more » The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).« less

  5. Estimation of the cloud transmittance from radiometric measurements at the ground level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Dario; Mares, Oana

    2014-11-24

    The extinction of solar radiation due to the clouds is more significant than due to any other atmospheric constituent, but it is always difficult to be modeled because of the random distribution of clouds on the sky. Moreover, the transmittance of a layer of clouds is in a very complex relation with their type and depth. A method for estimating cloud transmittance was proposed in Paulescu et al. (Energ. Convers. Manage, 75 690697, 2014). The approach is based on the hypothesis that the structure of the cloud covering the sun at a time moment does not change significantly in a short time interval (several minutes). Thus, the cloud transmittance can be calculated as the estimated coefficient of a simple linear regression for the computed versus measured solar irradiance in a time interval ?t. The aim of this paper is to optimize the length of the time interval ?t. Radiometric data measured on the Solar Platform of the West University of Timisoara during 2010 at a frequency of 1/15 seconds are used in this study.

  6. Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC Authors: Fox, Patrick J. ; ...

  7. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, Aaron A. (Richland, WA); Samuel, Todd J. (Pasco, WA); Valencia, Juan D. (Kennewick, WA); Gervais, Kevin L. (Richland, WA); Tucker, Brian J. (Pasco, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Reid, Larry D. (Benton City, WA); Munley, John T. (Benton City, WA); Pappas, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Wright, Bob W. (West Richland, WA); Panetta, Paul D. (Richland, WA); Thompson, Jason S. (Richland, WA)

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  8. Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection community. As part of our national security mission, and in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we are producing unique test objects for passive gamma ray signature analysis. Y-12 is fabricating new Highly Enriched Uranium Equivalent Radiological Signature Training Devices, tools that use an innovative

  9. Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chicago Office | Department of Energy Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office PDF icon Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of Science Chicago Office More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National

  10. Energy Signatures: A passive solar design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Lekov, A.B.

    1987-12-01

    Energy signatures is a new technique for aiding a designer in selecting and sizing passive solar elements in a building. Hourly heat flux profiles for each candidate design element are determined. These profiles are then matched to the hourly energy requirement of the space accounting for weather conditions, internal heat profiles of the space, and the mass characteristics of the building. Simulation analysis techniques are used to determine the energy signatures and the building load profile, and to check the final result. Least-squares techniques are used to determine the optimum mix of strategies. Examples are given to illustrate development of the method up to the present time. In addition, future directions and possibilities are outlined. 5 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics 1993 annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M. [eds.

    1994-06-15

    This report contains brief papers on the research being conducted at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics in 1993 in Geosciences, High-Pressure sciences, and Astrophysics.

  12. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  13. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  14. Radiometric measurements on the fabrication of non-destructive assay standards for WIPP-Performance Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, A.S.; Marshall, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The Inorganic Elemental Analysis Group of LANL has prepared several different sets of working reference materials (WRMs). These WRMs are prepared by blending quantities of nuclear materials (plutonium, americium, and enriched uranium) with diatomaceous earth. The blends are encapsulated in stainless steel cylinders. These WRMs are being measured as blind controls in neutron and gamma based non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments. Radiometric measurements on the blending homogeneity and verification on a set of sixty three plutonium based WRMs are discussed in this paper.

  15. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for large-scale, highly-efficient efforts to identify and verify infection-specific host NA signatures in human populations.

  16. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  17. Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic...

  18. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S.; Poyé, A.; Yagi, M.; Garbet, X.; Sen, A.

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  19. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  20. Genetic algorithms and their use in Geophysical Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Paul B.

    1999-04-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs), global optimization methods that mimic Darwinian evolution are well suited to the nonlinear inverse problems of geophysics. A standard genetic algorithm selects the best or ''fittest'' models from a ''population'' and then applies operators such as crossover and mutation in order to combine the most successful characteristics of each model and produce fitter models. More sophisticated operators have been developed, but the standard GA usually provides a robust and efficient search. Although the choice of parameter settings such as crossover and mutation rate may depend largely on the type of problem being solved, numerous results show that certain parameter settings produce optimal performance for a wide range of problems and difficulties. In particular, a low (about half of the inverse of the population size) mutation rate is crucial for optimal results, but the choice of crossover method and rate do not seem to affect performance appreciably. Optimal efficiency is usually achieved with smaller (< 50) populations. Lastly, tournament selection appears to be the best choice of selection methods due to its simplicity and its autoscaling properties. However, if a proportional selection method is used such as roulette wheel selection, fitness scaling is a necessity, and a high scaling factor (> 2.0) should be used for the best performance. Three case studies are presented in which genetic algorithms are used to invert for crustal parameters. The first is an inversion for basement depth at Yucca mountain using gravity data, the second an inversion for velocity structure in the crust of the south island of New Zealand using receiver functions derived from teleseismic events, and the third is a similar receiver function inversion for crustal velocities beneath the Mendocino Triple Junction region of Northern California. The inversions demonstrate that genetic algorithms are effective in solving problems with reasonably large numbers of free parameters and with computationally expensive objective function calculations. More sophisticated techniques are presented for special problems. Niching and island model algorithms are introduced as methods to find multiple, distinct solutions to the nonunique problems that are typically seen in geophysics. Finally, hybrid algorithms are investigated as a way to improve the efficiency of the standard genetic algorithm.

  1. Geophysical methods for fracture characterization in and around potential sites for nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majer, E.L.; Lee, K.H. ); Morrison, H.F. )

    1992-08-01

    Historically, geophysical methods have been used extensively to successfully explore the subsurface for petroleum, gas, mineral, and geothermal resources. Their application, however, for site characterization, and monitoring the performance of near surface waste sites or repositories has been somewhat limited. Presented here is an overview of the geophysical methods that could contribute to defining the subsurface heterogeneity and extrapolating point measurements at the surface and in boreholes to volumetric descriptions in a fractured rock. In addition to site characterization a significant application of geophysical methods may be in performance assessment and in monitoring the repository to determine if the performance is as expected.

  2. 31 TAC, part 1, chapter 9, rule 9.11 Geophysical and Geochemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9, rule 9.11 Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration Permits Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 31 TAC, part...

  3. NMAC 19.2.17 Geophysical Exploration on Unleased State Trust...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2.17 Geophysical Exploration on Unleased State Trust Lands Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NMAC 19.2.17...

  4. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. The primary objective of this project is to combine a suite of high resolution geophysical and geochemical techniques to reduce exploration risk by characterizing hydrothermal alteration, fault geometries and relationships.

  5. Starry messages: Searching for signatures of interstellar archaeology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology. The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archaeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is used to evaluate the relative challenges of finding various sources. With few exceptions interstellar archaeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  6. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using...

  7. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES OF HYPERACCRETING COLLAPSAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Harikae, Seiji

    2012-08-20

    By performing two-dimensional special relativistic (SR) magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study possible signatures of gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of the collapsar model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts. In our SR simulations, the central black hole is treated as an absorbing boundary. By doing so, we focus on the GWs generated by asphericities in neutrino emission and matter motions in the vicinity of the hyperaccreting disks. We compute nine models by adding initial angular momenta and magnetic fields parametrically to a precollapse core of a 35 M{sub Sun} progenitor star. As for the microphysics, a realistic equation of state is employed and the neutrino cooling is taken into account via a multi-flavor neutrino leakage scheme. To accurately estimate GWs produced by anisotropic neutrino emission, we perform a ray-tracing analysis in general relativity by a post-processing procedure. By employing a stress formula that includes contributions from both magnetic fields and SR corrections, we also study the effects of magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms. We find that the GW amplitudes from anisotropic neutrino emission show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are much larger than those from matter motions of the accreting material. We show that the increasing trend of the neutrino GWs stems from the excess of neutrino emission in the direction near parallel to the spin axis illuminated from the hyperaccreting disks. We point out that a recently proposed future space-based interferometer like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these GW signals within Almost-Equal-To 100 Mpc.

  9. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D. (Kingston, TN); Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  10. Methyl-CpG island-associated genome signature tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a method for analyzing the organismic complexity of a sample through analysis of the nucleic acid in the sample. In the disclosed method, through a series of steps, including digestion with a type II restriction enzyme, ligation of capture adapters and linkers and digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme, genome signature tags are produced. The sequences of a statistically significant number of the signature tags are determined and the sequences are used to identify and quantify the organisms in the sample. Various embodiments of the invention described herein include methods for using single point genome signature tags to analyze the related families present in a sample, methods for analyzing sequences associated with hyper- and hypo-methylated CpG islands, methods for visualizing organismic complexity change in a sampling location over time and methods for generating the genome signature tag profile of a sample of fragmented DNA.

  11. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boundaries in YBCO cuprates. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is the pseudogap

  12. Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental signatures of phase interference and subfemtosecond time dynamics on the incident energy axis of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering Authors: Wray, L. Andrew ; Huang, Shih-Wen ; Xia,

  13. Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules using multi-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. No abstract prepared. Authors: Nelson, Thomas Robert ; Urayama, Junji

  14. Built-in-test by signature inspection (bitsi)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergeson, Gary C.; Morneau, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for fault detection for electronic circuits. A stimulus generator sends a signal to the input of the circuit under test. Signature inspection logic compares the resultant signal from test nodes on the circuit to an expected signal. If the signals do not match, the signature inspection logic sends a signal to the control logic for indication of fault detection in the circuit. A data input multiplexer between the test nodes of the circuit under test and the signature inspection logic can provide for identification of the specific node at fault by the signature inspection logic. Control logic responsive to the signature inspection logic conveys information about fault detection for use in determining the condition of the circuit. When used in conjunction with a system test controller, the built-in test by signature inspection system and method can be used to poll a plurality of circuits automatically and continuous for faults and record the results of such polling in the system test controller.

  15. A Method to Estimate Uncertainty in Radiometric Measurement Using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) Method; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Radiometric data with known and traceable uncertainty is essential for climate change studies to better understand cloud radiation interactions and the earth radiation budget. Further, adopting a known and traceable method of estimating uncertainty with respect to SI ensures that the uncertainty quoted for radiometric measurements can be compared based on documented methods of derivation.Therefore, statements about the overall measurement uncertainty can only be made on an individual basis, taking all relevant factors into account. This poster provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements from radiometers. The approach follows the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). derivation.Therefore, statements about the overall measurement uncertainty can only be made on an individual basis, taking all relevant factors into account. This poster provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements from radiometers. The approach follows the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM).

  16. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  17. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Michael P. (Albquuerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator.

  18. High temperature millimeter wave radiometric and interferometric measurements of slag-refractory interaction for application to coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2011-09-17

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments) such as in slagging coal gasifiers, where sensors have been identified as a key enabling technology need for process optimization. We present a state-of-the-art dual-channel MMW heterodyne radiometer with active interferometric capability that allows simultaneous radiometric measurements of sample temperature, emissivity, and flow dynamics to over 1873 K. Interferometric capability is supplied via a probe signal originating from the 137 GHz radiometer local oscillator (LO). The interferometric 'video' channels allow measurement of additional parameters simultaneously, such as volume expansion, thickness change, and slag viscosity along with temperature or emissivity. This capability has been used to demonstrate measurement of temperature and simulated coal slag infiltration into a chromia refractory brick sample as well as slag flow down a vertically placed refractory brick. Observed phenomena include slag melting and slumping, slag reboil and foam with oxygen evolution, and eventual failure of the alumina crucible through corrosion by the molten slag. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters from operating slagging coal gasifiers, providing valuable information for process efficiency, control, and increased productivity.

  19. Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhdanov; Michael S.

    2008-01-29

    Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

  20. Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Hardin, E.L.; Nelson, P.H.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Experimental study of viscosity effects on air-gun signatures (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Experimental study of viscosity effects on air-gun signatures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental study of viscosity effects on air-gun signatures In computer modeling of air guns the theory is often based on the assumption of an ideal freely oscillating spherical air bubble in an ideal fluid. Theoretical and experimental air-gun signatures do not match perfectly. Synthetic signatures are underdamped compared to real signatures. Several physical

  2. Relative Infrared (IR) and Terahertz (THz) Signatures of Common Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Atkinson, David A.

    2006-11-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has recently recorded the infrared (IR) and far-infrared (sometimes called the terahertz, THz) spectral signatures of four common explosives, in the condensed phase. The signatures of RDX, PETN, TNT and Tetryl were recorded both in the infrared and the THz domains, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Samples consisted of thin films and were made by depositing and subsequent evaporation of an acetone-explosive mixture. The complete spectrum spanned the range from 4,000 to 8 cm-1 at 2.0 cm-1 spectral resolution. Preliminary results in the infrared agree with those of previous workers, while the THz signatures are one order of magnitude weaker than the strongest IR bands.

  3. Exoatmospheric intercept - A gold mine for signature and impact data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katechis, J.C.; Caldwell, J.M. Teledyne Brown Engineering, Huntsville, AL )

    1992-03-01

    Exoatmospheric intercepts of ballistic missile reentry vehicles (RVs) by ground launched interceptors performed in the framework of the Ground Based Interceptor (GBI) Project are discussed. GBI comprises the functional technology validation (FTV) flight tests and a series of GBI Dem/Val flight tests. A variety of sensors including the interceptor itself (prior to impact), a fly-along observer package, two different types of aircraft, and radars provided both broad spectrum of data and backup capabilities. The target signature data across the electromagnetic spectrum were derived from preimpact data which can be used for validation of various signature generation codes. Impact signatures and characterization of the debris clouds were obtained from the postimpact data and can be used in terms of RV lethality, kill assessment, and space debris interaction.

  4. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A.; Hunter, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A resolution analysis of two geophysical imaging methods for characterizing and monitoring hydrologic conditions in the Vadose zone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, James Robert; Hammond, Gary.; Alumbaugh, David L.; La Brecque, D.J.

    2007-06-01

    This research project analyzed the resolution of two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR), for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. The study was based on petrophysical conversion of moisture contents and solute distributions obtained from unsaturated flow forward modeling. This modeling incorporated boundary conditions from a potable water and a salt tracer infiltration experiment performed at the Sandia-Tech Vadose Zone (STVZ) facility, and high-resolution spatial grids (6.25-cm spacing over a 1700-m domain) and incorporated hydraulic properties measured on samples collected from the STVZ. The analysis process involved petrophysical conversion of moisture content and solute concentration fields to geophysical property fields, forward geophysical modeling using the geophysical property fields to obtain synthetic geophysical data, and finally, inversion of this synthetic data. These geophysical property models were then compared to those derived from the conversion of the hydrologic forward modeling to provide an understanding of the resolution and limitations of the geophysical techniques.

  6. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in...

  7. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  8. A new geophysical contribution to the study of the Campidano Geothermal area (Sardinia, Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balia, R. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in order to achieve a better definition of the geothermal potential in the area of the Campidano graben (Sardinia, Italy), where there are some thermal springs, a multi-methodological geophysical survey has been combined with recent surface and subsurface geological information. New gravity and magnetic stations, distributed over the northern part of the area (Campidano of Oristano), have been measured to complement already published data for the central-southern part of the graben. Deep dipole-dipole geoelectrical soundings have also been performed along two profiles perpendicular to the strike of the graben. The geological interpretation of the geophysical data allows us to conclude that no shallow, exploitable, geothermal reservoir exists in the survey area.

  9. Visit us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec 14-18th us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, Booth#1211 | Dec 14-18th - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  10. Subsurface geological and geophysical study of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, D.J.; van de Kamp, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    The subsurface investigation of the Cerro Prieto field and surrounding area is described including the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal alteration, and reservoir properties for use in designing reservoir simulation models and planning development of the field. Insights into the depositional, tectonic, and thermal history of the area are presented. The following types of data were used: well sample descriptions and analyses, well logs, geophysical surveys; physiography, and regional geology. (MHR)

  11. Clear Skies T. J. Kulp and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. J. Kulp and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction Completion of the Experimental Apparatus The experimental apparatus used to make our measurements consists of the multipass cell and its chamber, the FTIR spectrometer, the TDLAS system, and the necessary data collection apparatus. This equipment was assembled and the chamber was constructed during the first year of our project. The primary thrust of that

  12. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  13. Signature candidate of quantum chaos far from the semiclassical regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shang-Bin, E-mail: shbli@ustc.edu.cn; Xu, Zhengyuan [School of Information Science and Technology, and Optical Wireless Communication and Network Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)] [School of Information Science and Technology, and Optical Wireless Communication and Network Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-03-15

    We numerically investigated the entanglement product in the simplest coupled kicked top model with the spin j?=?1. Different from the dynamical pattern of entanglement in the semiclassical regime, two similar initial states may have discordant entanglement oscillations. A candidate of the quantum signature of this classical chaotic system was proposed. The potential antimonotonic relation between the rank correlation coefficient qualifying the concordant of two entanglement evolutions and the stationary entanglement was preliminarily revealed.

  14. Signatures of quantum chaos in Wigner and Husimi representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.B.; Feit, M.D. (Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States) Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis/Livermore, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1993-06-01

    In this paper, we study the quantum manifestations of classical chaos in phase space using Wigner and Husimi distribution functions. We test the claim that Husimi represents the correspondence better than Wigner does. The results show the claim is valid. We also use a quantum dissipation scheme empirically for classically damped motions often characterized by strange attractors. We believe quantum resemblance to classical distributions can be regarded as signatures of quantum chaos in phase space.

  15. Experiments Provide First Direct Signatures of a Topological Insulator - a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Phase of Quantum Matter Experiments Provide First Direct Signatures of a Topological Insulator - a New Phase of Quantum Matter It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gap and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of quantum matter called a topological insulator [1,2]. This exotic phase of matter is a subject of intense research because it is predicted to give rise to dissipationless spin currents [3], quantum entanglements and novel macroscopic behavior

  16. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie; Lumley, David; Sherlock, Don; Daley, Tom; Lawton, Don; Masters, Ron; Verliac, Michel; White, Don

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  17. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  18. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  19. Geophysical monitoring of active hydrologic processes as part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is conducting the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project (DUSP), an integrated project demonstrating the use of active thermal techniques to remove subsurface organic contamination. Complementary techniques address a number of environmental restoration problems: (1) steam flood strips organic contaminants from permeable zones, (2) electrical heating drives contaminants from less permeable zones into the more permeable zones from which they can be extracted, and (3) geophysical monitoring tracks and images the progress of the thermal fronts, providing feedback and control of the active processes. The first DUSP phase involved combined steam injection and vapor extraction in a ``clean`` site in the Livermore Valley consisting of unconsolidated alluvial interbeds of clays, sands and gravels. Steam passed rapidly through a high-permeability gravel unit, where in situ temperatures reached 117{degree}C. An integrated program of geophysical monitoring was carried out at the Clean Site. We performed electrical resistance tomography (ERT), seismic tomography (crossborehole), induction tomography, passive seismic monitoring, a variety of different temperature measurement techniques and conventional geophysical well logging.

  20. Geophysical monitoring of active hydrologic processes as part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is conducting the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project (DUSP), an integrated project demonstrating the use of active thermal techniques to remove subsurface organic contamination. Complementary techniques address a number of environmental restoration problems: (1) steam flood strips organic contaminants from permeable zones, (2) electrical heating drives contaminants from less permeable zones into the more permeable zones from which they can be extracted, and (3) geophysical monitoring tracks and images the progress of the thermal fronts, providing feedback and control of the active processes. The first DUSP phase involved combined steam injection and vapor extraction in a clean'' site in the Livermore Valley consisting of unconsolidated alluvial interbeds of clays, sands and gravels. Steam passed rapidly through a high-permeability gravel unit, where in situ temperatures reached 117{degree}C. An integrated program of geophysical monitoring was carried out at the Clean Site. We performed electrical resistance tomography (ERT), seismic tomography (crossborehole), induction tomography, passive seismic monitoring, a variety of different temperature measurement techniques and conventional geophysical well logging.

  1. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

    2009-09-24

    This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

  2. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong; Leung, Suet Yi; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-10-29

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer andmore » demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.« less

  3. Detailed Geophysical Fault Characterization in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore H. Asch; Donald Sweetkind; Bethany L. Burton; Erin L. Wallin

    2009-02-10

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Between the years 1951 and 1992, 659 underground nuclear tests took place in Yucca Flat; most were conducted in large, vertical excavations that penetrated alluvium and the underlying Cenozoic volcanic rocks. Radioactive and other potential chemical contaminants at the NTS are the subject of a long-term program of investigation and remediation by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, under its Environmental Restoration Program. As part of the program, the DOE seeks to assess the extent of contamination and to evaluate the potential risks to humans and the environment from byproducts of weapons testing. To accomplish this objective, the DOE Environmental Restoration Program is constructing and calibrating a ground-water flow model to predict hydrologic flow in Yucca Flat as part of an effort to quantify the subsurface hydrology of the Nevada Test Site. A necessary part of calibrating and evaluating a model of the flow system is an understanding of the location and characteristics of faults that may influence ground-water flow. In addition, knowledge of fault-zone architecture and physical properties is a fundamental component of the containment of the contamination from underground nuclear tests, should such testing ever resume at the Nevada Test Site. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a detailed understanding of the geometry and physical properties of fault zones in Yucca Flat. This study was designed to investigate faults in greater detail and to characterize fault geometry, the presence of fault splays, and the fault-zone width. Integrated geological and geophysical studies have been designed and implemented to work toward this goal. This report describes the geophysical surveys conducted near two drill holes in Yucca Flat, the data analyses performed, and the integrated interpretations developed from the suite of geophysical methodologies utilized in this investigation. Data collection for this activity started in the spring of 2005 and continued into 2006. A suite of electrical geophysical surveys were run in combination with ground magnetic surveys; these surveys resulted in high-resolution subsurface data that portray subsurface fault geometry at the two sites and have identified structures not readily apparent from surface geologic mapping, potential field geophysical data, or surface effects fracture maps.

  4. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and imagination of many LANL staff and managers and resulted in a strategy which focuses on our strengths while recognizing that the science of signatures is dynamic. This report highlights the interdependence between SoS, advances in materials science, and advances in information technology. The intent is that SoS shape and inform Los Alamos investments in nuclear forensics, nuclear diagnostics, climate, space, energy, and biosurveillence; the areas of leadership that you will read about in this strategy document. The Science of Signatures is still a relatively new strategic direction for the Laboratory. The primary purpose of this document is tell Laboratory staff how SoS is being managed and give them a chance to get involved. A second important purpose is to inform the Department of Energy and our customers of our capability growth in this important scientific area. Questions concerning the SoS strategy and input to it are welcomed and may be directed to any member of the SoS Leadership Council or to the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Science Directorate Office.

  5. Experimental observation of signature changes in bulk soil electrical conductivity in response to engineered surface CO2 leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou X.; Wielopolski L.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Apple, M.; Dobeck, L. M.; Gullickson, K.; Shaw, J. A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L. H.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental observations of signature changes of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) due to CO{sub 2} leakage were carried out at a field site at Bozeman, Montana, to investigate the change of soil geophysical properties in response to possible leakage of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The dynamic evolution of bulk soil EC was measured during an engineered surface leakage of CO{sub 2} through in situ continuous monitoring of bulk soil EC, soil moisture, soil temperature, rainfall rate, and soil CO{sub 2} concentration to investigate the response of soil bulk EC signature to CO{sub 2} leakage. Observations show that: (1) high soil CO{sub 2} concentration due to CO{sub 2} leakage enhances the dependence of bulk soil EC on soil moisture. The bulk soil EC is a linear multivariate function of soil moisture and soil temperature, the coefficient for soil moisture increased from 2.111 dS for the non-leaking phase to 4.589 dS for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase; and the coefficient for temperature increased from 0.003 dS/C for the non-leaking phase to 0.008 dS/C for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase. The dependence of bulk soil EC on soil temperature is generally weak, but leaked CO{sub 2} enhances the dependence, (2) after the CO{sub 2} release, the relationship between soil bulk EC and soil CO{sub 2} concentration observes three distinct CO{sub 2} decay modes. Rainfall events result in sudden changes of soil moisture and are believed to be the driving forcing for these decay modes, and (3) within each mode, increasing soil CO{sub 2} concentration results in higher bulk soil EC. Comparing the first 2 decay modes, it is found that the dependence of soil EC on soil CO{sub 2} concentration is weaker for the first decay mode than the second decay mode.

  6. Fractal fidelity as a signature of quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, Franco [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Montangero, Simone [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    We analyze the fidelity of a quantum simulation and we show that it displays fractal fluctuations if and only if the simulated dynamics is chaotic. This analysis allows us to investigate a given simulated dynamics without any prior knowledge. In the case of integrable dynamics, the appearance of fidelity fractal fluctuations is a signal of a highly corrupted simulation. We conjecture that fidelity fractal fluctuations are a signature of the appearance of quantum chaos. Our analysis can be realized already by a few-qubit quantum processor.

  7. Geophysical exploration and hydrologic impact of the closed Gracelawn landfill in Auburn, ME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisniewski, D. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Several geophysical methods were used over portions of the Gracelawn landfill, in Auburn, Maine to determine the surface boundaries and subsurface structure of this closed landfill, and to determine the landfill's effects on groundwater quality. The landfill was originally a sand and gravel pit excavated in the 1950's and early 1960's, and was used as a landfill from 1964--1977. The site is unlined, has a clay cap, and has been graded and developed as a baseball park. Two seismic refraction lines were performed to obtain a minimum depth to bedrock of 80 m. Seismic velocities of methane gas-saturated trash ranged from 250 to 340 m/s, and sand velocities are approximately 800 m/s. Two electrical resistivity Wenner surveys over the trash yielded the depth to saturated material and thickness of the trash layers. Resistivity values for dry refuse ranged from 1,000-2,000 [Omega]*m. A third electrical resistivity survey yielded the thickness of unsaturated and saturated sands bordering the landfill. Dry sands were found to have a resistivity of 1,000 [Omega]*m, and saturated sands a resistivity of 500 [Omega]*m. Gravity and magnetic survey grids across the site revealed anomalies which were mapped to illustrate the irregular morphology of the buried trash as well as its surface boundaries. Residual magnetic anomalies are on the order of 2,000 nT. Residual gravity anomalies are up to 5 mGal. Groundwater elevations determined by the geophysical survey, combined with a survey of existing water monitoring well logs, indicate that the groundwater flow in the sand and gravel aquifer is to the southeast, away from the public water supply, Lake Auburn, which lies to the north of the site. However, correlations between the bedrock fracture analysis and the geophysical survey illustrate that there is potential for contamination of Lake Auburn via the bedrock aquifer.

  8. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryter, R.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process ''downstream'' of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given. 1 ref., 13 figs.

  9. Domain-Specific Languages for Composing Signature Discovery Workflows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Ferosh; Gray, Jeff; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-10-23

    Domain-agnostic signature discovery entails investigation across multiple scientific disciplines. The breadth and cross-disciplinary nature of this work requires that existing executables be integrated with new capabilities into workflows, representing a wide range of user tasks. An algorithm may be written in multiple programming languages for various hardware platforms, and so workflow composition requires integrating executables from any number of remote hosts. This raises an engineering issue on how to generate web service wrappers for these heterogeneous executables and to compose them into a scientific workflow environment (e.g., Taverna). In this paper, we introduce two simple Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) to automate these processes. Our Service Description Language (SDL) describes key elements of a signature discovery service and automatically generates its implementation code. The Workflow Description Language (WDL) describes the pipeline of services and generates deployable artifacts for the Taverna workflow management system. We demonstrate our approach with a real-world workflow composed of services wrapping remote executables.

  10. The signature of single-degenerate accretion-induced collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2014-10-10

    The accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a white dwarf to a neutron star has long been suggested as a natural theoretical outcome in stellar evolution, but there has never been a direct detection of such an event. This is not surprising since the small amount of radioactive nickel synthesized (?10{sup 3} M {sub ?}) implies a relatively dim optical transient. Here we argue that a particularly strong signature of an AIC would occur for an oxygen-neon-magnesium (ONeMg) white dwarf accreting from a star that is experiencing Roche-lobe overflow as it becomes a red giant. In such cases, the ?10{sup 50} erg explosion from the AIC collides with and shock-heats the surface of the extended companion, creating an X-ray flash lasting ?1 hr followed by an optical signature that peaks at an absolute magnitude of ? 16 to 18 and lasts for a few days to a week. These events would be especially striking in old stellar environments where hydrogen-rich supernova-like transients would not normally be expected. Although the rate of such events is not currently known, we describe observing strategies that could be utilized with high cadence surveys that should either detect these events or place strong constraints on their rates.

  11. Selecting surface geophysical methods for geological, hydrological, geotechnical, and environmental investigation: The rationale for the ASTM provisional guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, W.; Benson, R.; Snelgrove, F.; Soloyanis, S.

    1999-07-01

    The ASTM Provisional Guide (PS 78-97) for Selecting Surface Geophysical Methods was developed as a guide for project managers, contractors, geologists, and geophysicists to assist in selecting the most likely geophysical method or methods to conduct specific subsurface investigations. Numerous surface geophysical methods and techniques exist that can be used to determine subsurface soil and rock properties and their distribution. These same methods are also widely used to investigate and locate manmade structures such as buried objective and landfills. This paper discusses the general uses of surface geophysics and the use of the provisional guide. This paper is not intended to be used as he guide. The ASTM Provisional Guide provides direction in selecting the most appropriate geophysical method or methods for a specific application under general site conditions. Secondary methods are also proposed that, under certain circumstances, should be evaluated before a final selection is made. Some typical conditions under which a primary or secondary method might or might not provide satisfactory results are given in the provisional guide. references for further information about selected methods and to method-specific ASTM guides are also provided. Secondary methods usually have less than desired performance, higher cost, or greater labor requirements as compared to the primary methods.

  12. Hiereachical Bayesian Model for Combining Geochemical and Geophysical Data for Environmental Applications Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    Development of a hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of aqueous geochemical parameters associated with in-situ bioremediation using surface spectral induced polarization (SIP) data and borehole geochemical measurements collected during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium-contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado. The SIP data are first inverted for Cole-Cole parameters including chargeability, time constant, resistivity at the DC frequency and dependence factor, at each pixel of two-dimensional grids using a previously developed stochastic method.more » Correlations between the inverted Cole-Cole parameters and the wellbore-based groundwater chemistry measurements indicative of key metabolic processes within the aquifer (e.g. ferrous iron, sulfate, uranium) were established and used as a basis for petrophysical model development. The developed Bayesian model consists of three levels of statistical sub-models: 1) data model, providing links between geochemical and geophysical attributes, 2) process model, describing the spatial and temporal variability of geochemical properties in the subsurface system, and 3) parameter model, describing prior distributions of various parameters and initial conditions. The unknown parameters are estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. By combining the temporally distributed geochemical data with the spatially distributed geophysical data, we obtain the spatio-temporal distribution of ferrous iron, sulfate and sulfide, and their associated uncertainity information. The obtained results can be used to assess the efficacy of the bioremediation treatment over space and time and to constrain reactive transport models.« less

  13. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; Spane, Frank A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  14. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; et al

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number ofmore » geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.« less

  15. Geophysical interpretations west of and within the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grauch, V.J.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    This report focuses on interpretation of gravity and new magnetic data west of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and within the northwestern part of NTS. The interpretations integrate the gravity and magnetic data with other geophysical, geological, and rock property data to put constraints on tectonic and magmatic features not exposed at the surface. West of NTS, where drill hole information is absent, these geophysical data provide the best available information on the subsurface. Interpreted subsurface features include calderas, intrusions, basalt flows and volcanoes, Tertiary basins, structurally high pre-Tertiary rocks, and fault zones. New features revealed by this study include (1) a north-south buried tectonic fault east of Oasis Mountain, which the authors call the Hogback fault; (2) an east striking fault or accommodation zone along the south side of Oasis Valley basin, which they call the Hot Springs fault; (3) a NNE striking structural zone coinciding with the western margins of the caldera complexes; (4) regional magnetic highs that probably represent a thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks; and (5) two probable buried calderas that may be related to the tuffs of Tolicha Peak and of Sleeping Butte, respectively.

  16. Three-Dimensional Surface Geophysical Exploration of the 200-Series Tanks at the 241-C Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crook, N.; McNeill, M.; Dunham, Ralph; Glaser, Danney R.

    2014-02-26

    A surface geophysical exploration (SGE) survey using direct current electrical resistivity was conducted within the C Tank Farm in the vicinity of the 200-Series tanks at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This survey was the second successful SGE survey to utilize the Geotection(TM)-180 Resistivity Monitoring System which facilitated a much larger survey size and faster data acquisition rate. The primary objective of the C Tank Farm SGE survey was to provide geophysical data and subsurface imaging results to support the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation, as outlined in the Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation / Corrective Measures work plan RPP-PLAN-39114.

  17. Signature Product Code for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-25

    The SigProdV1.0 software consists of four programs which together allow the prediction of protein-protein interactions using only amino acid sequences and experimental data. The software is based on the use of tensor products of amino acid trimers coupled with classifiers known as support vector machines. Essentially the program looks for amino acid trimer pairs which occur more frequently in protein pairs which are known to interact. These trimer pairs are then used to make predictionsmore » about unknown protein pairs. A detailed description of the method can be found in the paper: S. Martin, D. Roe, J.L. Faulon. "Predicting protein-protein interactions using signature products," Bioinformatics, available online from Advance Access, Aug. 19, 2004.« less

  18. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu

    2014-12-01

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV . Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  19. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2014-12-18

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV. Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  20. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of a $q$-$\\bar q$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $\\Delta y$ falling within the window of $|\\Delta y | morethe near side at $(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $(\\Delta \\phi$$\\sim$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$\\sim$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $|\\Delta y | 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.less

  1. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  2. Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2011-09-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4+ production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  3. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods forMonitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-07-01

    Because of their wide application within the petroleumindustry it is natural to consider geophysical techniques for monitoringof CO2 movement within hydrocarbon reservoirs, whether the CO2 isintroduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic sequestration.Among the available approaches to monitoring, seismic methods are by farthe most highly developed and applied. Due to cost considerations, lessexpensive techniques have recently been considered. In this article, therelative merits of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) methods as monitoringtools for geological CO2 sequestration are examined for two syntheticmodeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhancedoil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, theSchrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The secondscenario is a simplified model of a brine formation at a depth of 1,900m.

  4. Delineating Bukit Bunuh impact crater boundary by geophysical and geotechnical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azwin, I. N. Rosli, S.; Nordiana, M. M.; Ragu, R. R.; Mark, J.; Mokhtar, S.

    2015-03-30

    Evidences of crater morphology and shock metamorphism in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Malaysia were found during the archaeological research conducted by the Centre for Global Archaeological Research Malaysia, Universiti Sains Malaysia. In order to register Bukit Bunuh as one of the world meteorite impact site, detailed studies are needed to verify the boundary of the crater accordingly. Geophysical study was conducted utilising the seismic refraction and 2-D electrical resistivity method. Seismic refraction survey was done using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph with 14Hz geophones and 40kg weight drop while 2-D electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode selector with pole-dipole array. Bedrock depths were digitized from the sections obtained. The produced bedrock topography map shows that there is low bedrock level circulated by high elevated bedrock and interpreted as crater and rim respectively with diameter approximately 8km. There are also few spots of high elevated bedrock appear at the centre of the crater which interpreted as rebounds zone. Generally, the research area is divided into two layers where the first layer with velocity 400-1100?m/s and resistivity value of 10-800 Om predominantly consists of alluvium mix with gravel and boulders. Second layer represents granitic bedrock with depth of 5-50m having velocity >2100?m/s and resistivity value of >1500 Om. This research is strengthen by good correlation between geophysical data and geotechnical borehole records executed inside and outside of the crater, on the rim, as well as at the rebound area.

  5. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  6. Solving Inverse Detection Problems Using Passive Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Vaquer, Pablo A.

    2012-08-15

    The ability to reconstruct an unknown radioactive object based on its passive gamma-ray and neutron signatures is very important in homeland security applications. Often in the analysis of unknown radioactive objects, for simplicity or speed or because there is no other information, they are modeled as spherically symmetric regardless of their actual geometry. In these presentation we discuss the accuracy and implications of this approximation for decay gamma rays and for neutron-induced gamma rays. We discuss an extension of spherical raytracing (for uncollided fluxes) that allows it to be used when the exterior shielding is flat or cylindrical. We revisit some early results in boundary perturbation theory, showing that the Roussopolos estimate is the correct one to use when the quantity of interest is the flux or leakage on the boundary. We apply boundary perturbation theory to problems in which spherically symmetric systems are perturbed in asymmetric nonspherical ways. We apply mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithms to object reconstructions. We present a benchmark test set that may be used to quantitatively evaluate inverse detection methods.

  7. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ? 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  9. Signatures of Planck corrections in a spiralling axion inflation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2015-05-08

    The minimal sub-Planckian axion inflation model accounts for a large scalar-to-tensor ratio via a spiralling trajectory in the field space of a complex field Φ. Here we consider how the predictions of the model are modified by Planck scale-suppressed corrections. In the absence of Planck corrections the model is equivalent to a ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model. Planck corrections become important when the dimensionless coupling ξ of |Φ|{sup 2} to the topological charge density of the strongly-coupled gauge sector FF{sup ~} satisfies ξ∼1. For values of |Φ| which allow the Planck corrections to be understood via an expansion in powers of |Φ|{sup 2}/M{sub Pl}{sup 2}, we show that their effect is to produce a significant modification of the tensor-to-scalar ratio from its ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation value without strongly modifying the spectral index. In addition, to leading order in |Φ|{sup 2}/M{sub Pl}{sup 2}, the Planck modifications of n{sub s} and r satisfy a consistency relation, Δn{sub s}=−Δr/16. Observation of these modifications and their correlation would allow the model to be distinguished from a simple ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model and would also provide a signature for the influence of leading-order Planck corrections.

  10. EINSTEIN'S SIGNATURE IN COSMOLOGICAL LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Wands, David

    2014-10-10

    We show how the nonlinearity of general relativity generates a characteristic nonGaussian signal in cosmological large-scale structure that we calculate at all perturbative orders in a large-scale limit. Newtonian gravity and general relativity provide complementary theoretical frameworks for modeling large-scale structure in ?CDM cosmology; a relativistic approach is essential to determine initial conditions, which can then be used in Newtonian simulations studying the nonlinear evolution of the matter density. Most inflationary models in the very early universe predict an almost Gaussian distribution for the primordial metric perturbation, ?. However, we argue that it is the Ricci curvature of comoving-orthogonal spatial hypersurfaces, R, that drives structure formation at large scales. We show how the nonlinear relation between the spatial curvature, R, and the metric perturbation, ?, translates into a specific nonGaussian contribution to the initial comoving matter density that we calculate for the simple case of an initially Gaussian ?. Our analysis shows the nonlinear signature of Einstein's gravity in large-scale structure.

  11. A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF THE EUROPA ATMOSPHERE AND LIMITS ON GEOPHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Liu, X.; Yoshii, J.; Yung, Y. L.; Hansen, C. J.; Hendrix, A. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-20

    Deep extreme ultraviolet spectrograph exposures of the plasma sheet at the orbit of Europa, obtained in 2001 using the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph experiment, have been analyzed to determine the state of the gas. The results are in basic agreement with earlier results, in particular with Voyager encounter measurements of electron density and temperature. Mass loading rates and lack of detectable neutrals in the plasma sheet, however, are in conflict with earlier determinations of atmospheric composition and density at Europa. A substantial fraction of the plasma species at the Europa orbit are long-lived sulfur ions originating at Io, with ?25% derived from Europa. During the outward radial diffusion process to the Europa orbit, heat deposition forces a significant rise in plasma electron temperature and latitudinal size accompanied with conversion to higher order ions, a clear indication that mass loading from Europa is very low. Analysis of far ultraviolet spectra from exposures on Europa leads to the conclusion that earlier reported atmospheric measurements have been misinterpreted. The results in the present work are also in conflict with a report that energetic neutral particles imaged by the Cassini ion and neutral camera experiment originate at the Europa orbit. An interpretation of persistent energetic proton pitch angle distributions near the Europa orbit as an effect of a significant population of neutral gas is also in conflict with the results of the present work. The general conclusion drawn here is that Europa is geophysically far less active than inferred in previous research, with mass loading of the plasma sheet ?4.5 10{sup 25} atoms s{sup 1} two orders of magnitude below earlier published calculations. Temporal variability in the region joining the Io and Europa orbits, based on the accumulated evidence, is forced by the response of the system to geophysical activity at Io. No evidence for the direct injection of H{sub 2}O into the Europa atmosphere or from Europa into the magnetosphere system, as has been observed at Enceladus in the Saturn system, is obtained in the present investigation.

  12. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

    2011-06-17

    A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

  13. Observational characteristics of coronal mass ejections without low-coronal signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Huys, E.; Seaton, D. B.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2014-11-01

    Solar eruptions are usually associated with a variety of phenomena occurring in the low corona before, during, and after the onset of eruption. Though easily visible in coronagraph observations, so-called stealth coronal mass ejections (CMEs) do not obviously exhibit any of these low-coronal signatures. The presence or absence of distinct low-coronal signatures can be linked to different theoretical models to establish the mechanisms by which the eruption is initiated and driven. In this study, 40 CMEs without low-coronal signatures occurring in 2012 are identified. Their observational and kinematic properties are analyzed and compared to those of regular CMEs. Solar eruptions without clear on-disk or low-coronal signatures can lead to unexpected space weather impacts, since many early warning signs for significant space weather activity are not present in these events. A better understanding of their initiation mechanism(s) will considerably improve the ability to predict such space weather events.

  14. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2013-01-25

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  15. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H.; Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E.

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  16. (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone

  17. (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the effective field theory of inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry in the effective field theory of inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete shift symmetry in the effective field theory of inflation We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone boson π is

  18. (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete Shift Symmetry in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone boson {pi} is

  19. A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

    1999-06-15

    The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

  20. Geophysical features of major structural and lithostratigraphic elements in the southeastern United States: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costain, J.K.; Coruh, C. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    In the Alleghany Plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces, the quality of shallow and deep vibroseis reflection seismic data acquired where carbonate rocks do not crop out at the surface is generally excellent for depths up to 10 km. One interpretation of heat flow data from granitoids that are exposed east of the central Piedmont is that heat-producing crust is tectonically truncated at a depth of ca. 8 km. Seismic data over the Blue Ridge (BR) and Inner Piedmont (IP) from northwestern SC to central VA image the upward ramping (to the northwest) of the BR master decollement over a distance of at least 600 km. Strikingly similar seismic signatures near this ramp are interpreted to be from thrust nappes composed of an Early Paleozoic( ) volcanic( ) protolith. Similar signatures but from an apparently less deformed protolith have been obtained from the IP in SC. New reprocessing and interpretation of a regional seismic line in VA indicate that the easternmost extent of Paleozoic shelf strata is not far east of the surface exposure of the BR-IP boundary. Large antiforms have been imaged in central VA, COCORP Lines 5 (Kiokee antiform), and Line 8 (beneath the Coastal Plain). Eastward-dipping reflections have been recorded beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain from VA to GA. Reflections from Coastal Plain sediments are generally excellent. Faulted sediments of Cretaceous and younger age have been clearly imaged on reflection data in VA and SC. In some cases, these faults are upward continuations of fault-bounded Mesozoic rift basins. In the James River seismic zone, there is a good correlation between hypocenters and the roof of the antiform and structures above that are imaged in seismic reflection sections. In other areas of the southeastern US, the seismicity is more diffuse; however, it suggests that the Hydroseismicity hypothesis might be a viable trigger mechanism for intraplate earthquakes.

  1. Development of Asset Fault Signatures for Prognostic and Health Management in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Randall Bickford; Richard Rusaw

    2014-06-01

    Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using the Electric Power Research Institute’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. The FW-PHM Suite is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The FW-PHM Suite has four main modules: Diagnostic Advisor, Asset Fault Signature (AFS) Database, Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and Remaining Useful Life Database. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures to assess the health status of generator step-up generators and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. At the most basic level, fault signatures are comprised of an asset type, a fault type, and a set of one or more fault features (symptoms) that are indicative of the specified fault. The AFS Database is populated with asset fault signatures via a content development exercise that is based on the results of intensive technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The developed fault signatures capture this knowledge and implement it in a standardized approach, thereby streamlining the diagnostic and prognostic process. This will support the automation of proactive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  2. Fall 2007 American Geophysical Union Meeting Student Travel Support for Environmental Nanomaterials Session (#B35) (December 10-14, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Hochella, Jr.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of award no. DE-FG02-08ER15925 was to fund travel for students to present at the Fall 2007 American Geophysical Meeting. This was done successfully, and five students (Bin Xie, Qiaona Hu, Katie Schreiner, Daria Kibanova, and Frank-Andreas Weber) gave excellent oral and poster presentations at the meeting. Provided are the conference abstracts for their presentations.

  3. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA_Appendix 4_Geophysical Survey Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30

    CR Environmental, Inc. (CR) was contracted by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA) to perform hydrographic and geophysical surveys of an approximately 3.35 square mile area off the eastern shore of Hull, Massachusetts. Survey components included: Single-beam bathymetry; 100-kHz and 500-kHz side scan sonar; Magnetometry; and Low to mid-frequency sub-bottom profiling.

  4. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank, Brian D.; Smith, Nicole

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag, seismic, and gravity data sets are in good agreement, illustrating two or more major range-bounding faults and buried northwest trending faults. The intersections of these fault systems provide the primary targets for drilling.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  7. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty members (from both UC and other institutions) on sabbatical leave. To focus attention on areas of topical interest i

  8. AUTOMATED LEAK DETECTION OF BURIED TANKS USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CALENDINE S; SCHOFIELD JS; LEVITT MT; FINK JB; RUCKER DF

    2011-03-30

    At the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State, the Department of Energy oversees the containment, treatment, and retrieval of liquid high-level radioactive waste. Much of the waste is stored in single-shelled tanks (SSTs) built between 1943 and 1964. Currently, the waste is being retrieved from the SSTs and transferred into newer double-shelled tanks (DSTs) for temporary storage before final treatment. Monitoring the tanks during the retrieval process is critical to identifying leaks. An electrically-based geophysics monitoring program for leak detection and monitoring (LDM) has been successfully deployed on several SSTs at the Hanford site since 2004. The monitoring program takes advantage of changes in contact resistance that will occur when conductive tank liquid leaks into the soil. During monitoring, electrical current is transmitted on a number of different electrode types (e.g., steel cased wells and surface electrodes) while voltages are measured on all other electrodes, including the tanks. Data acquisition hardware and software allow for continuous real-time monitoring of the received voltages and the leak assessment is conducted through a time-series data analysis. The specific hardware and software combination creates a highly sensitive method of leak detection, complementing existing drywell logging as a means to detect and quantify leaks. Working in an industrial environment such as the Hanford site presents many challenges for electrical monitoring: cathodic protection, grounded electrical infrastructure, lightning strikes, diurnal and seasonal temperature trends, and precipitation, all of which create a complex environment for leak detection. In this discussion we present examples of challenges and solutions to working in the tank farms of the Hanford site.

  9. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.

  10. An iterative particle filter approach for coupled hydro-geophysical inversion of a controlled infiltration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Rossi, Matteo; Pasetto, Damiano; Deiana, Rita; Ferraris, Stefano; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2015-02-15

    The modeling of unsaturated groundwater flow is affected by a high degree of uncertainty related to both measurement and model errors. Geophysical methods such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) can provide useful indirect information on the hydrological processes occurring in the vadose zone. In this paper, we propose and test an iterated particle filter method to solve the coupled hydrogeophysical inverse problem. We focus on an infiltration test monitored by time-lapse ERT and modeled using Richards equation. The goal is to identify hydrological model parameters from ERT electrical potential measurements. Traditional uncoupled inversion relies on the solution of two sequential inverse problems, the first one applied to the ERT measurements, the second one to Richards equation. This approach does not ensure an accurate quantitative description of the physical state, typically violating mass balance. To avoid one of these two inversions and incorporate in the process more physical simulation constraints, we cast the problem within the framework of a SIR (Sequential Importance Resampling) data assimilation approach that uses a Richards equation solver to model the hydrological dynamics and a forward ERT simulator combined with Archie's law to serve as measurement model. ERT observations are then used to update the state of the system as well as to estimate the model parameters and their posterior distribution. The limitations of the traditional sequential Bayesian approach are investigated and an innovative iterative approach is proposed to estimate the model parameters with high accuracy. The numerical properties of the developed algorithm are verified on both homogeneous and heterogeneous synthetic test cases based on a real-world field experiment.

  11. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more » into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  12. Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-07-24

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

  13. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  14. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  15. ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES We examine the effects of time dilation on the temporal profiles of gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses. By using prescriptions for the shape and evolution of prompt gamma-ray spectra, we can generate a simulated population of single-pulsed GRBs at a variety of redshifts and observe how

  16. Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observing Signatures of Cosmic Rays Using High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Authors: Reimer, Olaf ; /Innsbruck U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park Publication Date: 2013-06-20 OSTI Identifier: 1084282 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15629 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: PoS

  17. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Authors: Kocevski, Daniel ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Petrosian, Vahe ; /Stanford U., Space Sci. Astrophys. Ctr. Publication Date: 2013-02-28 OSTI Identifier: 1074191 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15382 arXiv:1110.6175 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515

  18. Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

    2010-05-17

    Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

  19. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Authors: Kocevski, Daniel ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Petrosian, Vahe ; /Stanford U., Space Sci. Astrophys. Ctr. Publication Date: 2013-02-28 OSTI Identifier: 1074191 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15382 arXiv:1110.6175 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515

  20. On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Lack of Time Dilation Signatures in Gamma-ray Burst Light Curves × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information

  1. Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    p-Wave Superconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral p-Wave Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral p-Wave Superconductor A class of topological excitations--the odd-winding number vortices--in a spinless 2D chiral p-wave (p{sub x}+ip{sub y}) superconductor traps Majorana fermion states in the vortex cores. For a dilute gas of

  2. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP - REPORT ON GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING CO2 MOVEMENT DURING SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2005-10-01

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  3. Signatures for Right-Handed Neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huitu, Katri; Rai, Santosh Kumar; Khalil, Shaaban; Okada, Hiroshi

    2008-10-31

    We explore possible signatures for right-handed neutrinos in a TeV scale B-L extension of the standard model at the Large Hadron Collider. The studied four lepton signal has a tiny standard model background. We find the signal experimentally accessible at the LHC for the considered parameter regions.

  4. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the chemical signature of fluid inclusions between open and closed fractures as well as differences in the chemical signature of open fractures between geothermal systems. Our hypothesis is that open fracture systems can be identified by their FIS chemical signature; that there are differences based on the mineral assemblages and geology of the system; and that there are chemical precursors in the wall rock above open, large fractures. Specific goals for this project are: (1) To build on the preliminary results which indicate that there are differences in the FIS signatures between open and closed fractures by identifying which chemical species indicate open fractures in both active geothermal systems and in hot, dry rock; (2) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the geology of the fields; (3) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the mineral assemblages in the fracture; and (4) To determine if there are specific chemical signatures in the wall rock above open, large fractures. This method promises to lower the cost of geothermal energy production in several ways. Knowledge of productive fractures in the boreholes will allow engineers to optimize well production. This information can aid in well testing decisions, well completion strategies, and in resource calculations. It will assist in determining the areas for future fracture enhancement. This will develop into one of the techniques in the 'tool bag' for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems.

  5. Signatures and Methods for the Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders at Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Mace, Emily K.; Misner, Alex C.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-08-08

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facilitys entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Such a station would use sensors that can be operated in an unattended mode at an industrial facility: medium-resolution scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy (e.g., NaI(Tl)) and moderated He-3 neutron detectors. This sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures beyond the traditional 185-keV emission from U-235: neutrons produced from F-19(?,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U 234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 8 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. This paper describes a study of these non-traditional signatures for the purposes of cylinder enrichment verification. The signatures and the radiation sensors designed to collect them are described, as are proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analyses. Key sources of systematic uncertainty in the non-traditional signatures are discussed, and the potential benefits of utilizing these non-traditional signatures, in concert with an automated form of the traditional 185-keV-based assay, are discussed.

  6. Toward Robust Climate Baselining: Objective Assessment of Climate Change Using Widely Distributed Miniaturized Sensors for Accurate World-Wide Geophysical Measurements

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Teller, E.; Leith, C.; Canavan, G.; Marion, J.; Wood, L.

    2001-11-13

    A gap-free, world-wide, ocean-, atmosphere-, and land surface-spanning geophysical data-set of three decades time-duration containing the full set of geophysical parameters characterizing global weather is the scientific perquisite for defining the climate; the generally-accepted definition in the meteorological community is that climate is the 30-year running-average of weather. Until such a tridecadal climate baseline exists, climate change discussions inevitably will have a semi-speculative, vs. a purely scientific, character, as the baseline against which changes are referenced will at least somewhat uncertain.

  7. Stable isotope signatures for characterising the biological stability of landfilled municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimmer, Bernhard; Hrad, Marlies; Huber-Humer, Marion; Watzinger, Andrea; Wyhlidal, Stefan; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ? The isotopic signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates is linked to the reactivity of MSW. ? Isotopic signatures of leachates depend on aerobic/anaerobic conditions in landfills. ? In situ aeration of landfills can be monitored by isotope analysis in leachate. ? The isotopic analysis of leachates can be used for assessing the stability of MSW. ? ?{sup 13}C-DIC of leachates helps to define the duration of landfill aftercare. - Abstract: Stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates are influenced by processes within municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills mainly depending on the aerobic/anaerobic phase of the landfill. We investigated the isotopic signatures of ?{sup 13}C, ?{sup 2}H and ?{sup 18}O of different leachates from lab-scale experiments, lysimeter experiments and a landfill under in situ aeration. In the laboratory, columns filled with MSW of different age and reactivity were percolated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In landfill simulation reactors, waste of a 25 year old landfill was kept under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lysimeter facility was filled with mechanically shredded fresh waste. After starting of the methane production the waste in the lysimeter containments was aerated in situ. Leachate and gas composition were monitored continuously. In addition the seepage water of an old landfill was collected and analysed periodically before and during an in situ aeration. We found significant differences in the ?{sup 13}C-value of the dissolved inorganic carbon (?{sup 13}C-DIC) of the leachate between aerobic and anaerobic waste material. During aerobic degradation, the signature of ?{sup 13}C-DIC was mainly dependent on the isotopic composition of the organic matter in the waste, resulting in a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of ?20 to ?25. The production of methane under anaerobic conditions caused an increase in ?{sup 13}C-DIC up to values of +10 and higher depending on the actual reactivity of the MSW. During aeration of a landfill the aerobic degradation of the remaining organic matter caused a decrease to a ?{sup 13}C-DIC of about ?20. Therefore carbon isotope analysis in leachates and groundwater can be used for tracing the oxidationreduction status of MSW landfills. Our results indicate that monitoring of stable isotopic signatures of landfill leachates over a longer time period (e.g. during in situ aeration) is a powerful and cost-effective tool for characterising the biodegradability and stability of the organic matter in landfilled municipal solid waste and can be used for monitoring the progress of in situ aeration.

  8. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  9. Applications of Geophysical and Geological Techniques to Identify Areas for Detailed Exploration in Black Mesa Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, S.; Reeves, T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, M.

    1999-04-29

    A recent report submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (NIPER/BDM-0226) discussed in considerable detail, the geology, structure, tectonics, and history of oil production activities in the Black Mesa basin in Arizona. As part of the final phase of wrapping up research in the Black Mesa basin, the results of a few additional geophysical studies conducted on structure, stratigraphy, petrophysical analysis, and oil and gas occurrences in the basin are presented here. A second objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of relatively inexpensive, noninvasive techniques like gravity or magnetic in obtaining information on structure and tectonics in sufficient detail for hydrocarbon exploration, particularly by using the higher resolution satellite data now becoming available to the industry.

  10. Empirical signatures of quantum phase transitions and universal properties of critical point descriptions and dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, R. F.; Bonatsos, Dennis; McCutchan, E. A.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, a new signature for quantum phase transitional regions has been discussed. This signature, based on degeneracies of yrast and intrinsic excitations, can distinguish first and second order phase transitions, and is valid not only at or near the analytic critical points described by X(5) and E(5), but along the phase transitional line connecting them as well. In addition, a study of a number of recent analytic solutions to the Bohr Hamiltonian and of the dynamical symmetries of the IBA Hamiltonian has revealed a set of extremely simple and general analytic formulas that describe the energies of 0{sup +} states. For the case of flat-bottomed geometrical potentials, the formula depends solely on the number of relevant dimensions. For the IBA (large boson number limit) a single formula describes all three dynamical symmetries.

  11. Domain-Specific Languages For Developing and Deploying Signature Discovery Workflows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Ferosh; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Gray, Jeff

    2013-12-02

    Domain-agnostic Signature Discovery entails scientific investigation across multiple domains through the re-use of existing algorithms into workflows. The existing algorithms may be written in any programming language for various hardware architectures (e.g., desktops, commodity clusters, and specialized parallel hardware platforms). This raises an engineering issue in generating Web services for heterogeneous algorithms so that they can be composed into a scientific workflow environment (e.g., Taverna). In this paper, we present our software tool that defines two simple Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) to automate these processes: SDL and WDL. Our Service Description Language (SDL) describes key elements of a signature discovery algorithm and generates the service code. The Workflow Description Language (WDL) describes the pipeline of services and generates deployable artifacts for the Taverna workflow management system. We demonstrate our tool with a landscape classification example that is represented by BLAST workflows composed of services that wrap original scripts.

  12. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  13. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  14. Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures Jay Johnson 1 and Jack Kang 2 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA 2 Sensata Technologies, Attleboro, MA, USA ABSTRACT Abstract - The 2011 National Electrical Code® Article 690.11 requires photovoltaic systems on or penetrating a building to include a DC arc-fault protection device. In order to satisfy this requirement, new Arc-Fault Detectors (AFDs) are being developed by multiple

  15. UCRGJC-119213 PREPRINT Signatures of Testing: On-Site. Inspection Technologies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    e n UCRGJC-119213 PREPRINT Signatures of Testing: On-Site. Inspection Technologies J.J. Zucca, C. Carrigan, P. Goldstein, S.P. Jarpe, J. Sweeney, W.L. Pickles Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory B. Wright Los Alamos National Laboratory This was repared for submittal to the North 1 tlantic Treaty Organization Advanced Study Institute Meeting Alvor, Algarue, Portugal Janua y 23-Februa y 2,1995 Tanuarv 1995 This isa preprintof apaper intended forpublication ina journalorproceedings. Since

  16. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  17. Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional Chiral p-Wave Superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sumanta; Zhang Chuanwei; Das Sarma, S.; Nayak, Chetan; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2008-01-18

    A class of topological excitations--the odd-winding number vortices--in a spinless 2D chiral p-wave (p{sub x}+ip{sub y}) superconductor traps Majorana fermion states in the vortex cores. For a dilute gas of such vortices, the lowest energy fermionic eigenstates are intrinsically nonlocal. We predict two testable signatures of this unusual quantum nonlocality in quasiparticle tunneling experiments. We discuss why the associated teleportationlike phenomenon does not imply the violation of causality.

  18. Angular Signatures of Dark Matter in the Diffuse Gamma Ray Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    Dark matter annihilating in our Galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this article, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation. Pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, we discuss the effect of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own Galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton-Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if {approx} 10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies down to the 0.1% level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

  19. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, , 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the FA models serve as source materials for the pre- and postelectrorefining models to be reported in Parts 2 and 3.

  20. Integration of geophysics within the Argonne expedited site characterization Program at a site in the southern High Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, B.; Hildebrandt, G.; Meyer, T.; Saunders, W.; Burton, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    An Argonne National Laboratory Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) program was carried out at a site in the central United States. The Argonne ESC process emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach in which all available information is integrated to produce as complete a picture as possible of the geologic and hydrologic controls on contaminant distribution and transport. As part of this process, all pertinent data that have been collected from previous investigations are thoroughly analyzed before a decision is made to collect additional information. A seismic reflection program recently concluded at the site had produced inconclusive results. Before we decided whether another acquisition program was warranted, we examined the existing data set to evaluate the quality of the raw data, the appropriateness of the processing sequence, and the integrity of the interpretation. We decided that the field data were of sufficient quality to warrant reprocessing and reinterpretation. The main thrust of the reprocessing effort was to enhance the continuity of a shallow, low-frequency reflection identified as a perching horizon within the Ogallala formation. The reinterpreted seismic data were used to locate the boundaries of the perched aquifer, which helped to guide the Argonne ESC drilling and sampling program. In addition, digitized geophysical well log data from previous drilling programs were reinterpreted and integrated into the geologic and hydrogeologic model.

  1. Environmental geophysics of the Pilot Plant on the west branch of Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.; Benson, M.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-05-01

    Plans to demolish and remediate the Pilot Plant complex in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground have served to initiate a series of nonintrusive, environmental-geophysical studies. The studies are assisting in the location and identification of pipes, tanks, trenches, and liquid waste in the subsurface. Multiple databases have been integrated to provide support for detection of underground utilities and to determine the stratigraphy and lithology of the subsurface. The studies were conducted within the double security fence and exterior to the double fence, down gradient toward the west branch of Canal Creek. To determine if contaminants found in the creek were associated with the Pilot Plant, both the east and west banks were included in the study area. Magnetic, conductivity, inductive emf, and ground-penetrating-radar anomalies outline buried pipes, trenches, and various pieces of hardware associated with building activities. Ground-penetrating-radar imagery also defines a paleovalley cut 30 ft into Potomac Group sediments of Cretaceous age. The paleovalley crosses the site between Building E5654 and the Pilot Plant fence. The valley is environmentally significant because it may control the pathways of contaminants. The Pilot Plant complex was used to manufacture CC2 Impregnite and incapacitating agents; it also served as a production facility for nerve agents.

  2. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  3. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  4. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the optical emission produced thereby is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  5. An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Category: Aerosols Continuing observations of aerosol and cloud optical property have been made using MFRSR and MWR at the ARM SGP site since

  6. Microsoft Word - 01-3199 Rev 6 Final w_o signature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP 01-3199 Recertification Project Plan Revision 6 February 2013 This document supersedes DOE/WIPP 01-3199, Revision 5. U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office 2 Recertification Project Plan Revision 6 February 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office //signature on file// 02/14/2013 Jose R. Franco / Date Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Recertification Project Plan DOE/WIPP 01-3199, Rev. 6 3 This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  7. Security analysis of boolean algebra based on Zhang-Wang digital signature scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jinbin

    2014-10-06

    In 2005, Zhang and Wang proposed an improvement signature scheme without using one-way hash function and message redundancy. In this paper, we show that this scheme exits potential safety concerns through the analysis of boolean algebra, such as bitwise exclusive-or, and point out that mapping is not one to one between assembly instructions and machine code actually by means of the analysis of the result of the assembly program segment, and which possibly causes safety problems unknown to the software.

  8. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-00X-2016_Coupled Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Data for Improved Prediction of Subsur

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coupled Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Data for Improved Prediction of Subsurface CO 2 Migration 28 January 2016 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-004-2016 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

  9. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouz, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clment; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R.; Llovet, Josep M.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1 amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factorspecific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.

  10. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  11. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; et al

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1more » amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.« less

  12. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kimball, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Dunbar, R.

    2015-12-04

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzedmorein CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as ?47 values. We analyzed ?47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured ?47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between ?47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between ?47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct ?47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite, although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect that crystals may attain nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures only under conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological "vital-effect" influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological "vital" effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on ?47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.less

  13. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  14. Education and Strategic Research Collaborations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centers, Institutes Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Information Science & Technology Institute Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures...

  15. Chaos concepts as diagnostic tools for assessing rotating machinery vibration signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, M.L.; Loparo, K.A.

    1996-06-01

    Chaos content in measured vibration signals is of some practical importance in rotordynamical systems. Of particular interest is the relationship between the occurrence of determinsite chaos and the diagnosis of mechanical failures in rotating machinery. Two nonlinear rotordynamical systems were studied using simulation and various forms of subharmonic, quasiperiodic and chaotic vibrations were observed. Different routes into and out of chaos show important signs for wear assessment and failure prediction. Experimental test facilities are currently under development and the next steps involve experimental verification of the simulation results and the development of signal processing techniques for extracting the dynamical features of the vibration signatures from measured time series data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Portable microfluidic raman system for rapid, label-free early disease signature detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Hatch, Anson

    2015-09-01

    In the early stages of infection, patients develop non-specific or no symptoms at all. While waiting for identification of the infectious agent, precious window of opportunity for early intervention is lost. The standard diagnostics require affinity reagents and sufficient pathogen titers to reach the limit of detection. In the event of a disease outbreak, triaging the at-risk population rapidly and reliably for quarantine and countermeasure is more important than the identification of the pathogen by name. To expand Sandia's portfolio of Biological threat management capabilities, we will utilize Raman spectrometry to analyze immune subsets in whole blood to rapidly distinguish infected from non-infected, and bacterial from viral infection, for the purpose of triage during an emergency outbreak. The goal of this one year LDRD is to determine whether Raman spectroscopy can provide label-free detection of early disease signatures, and define a miniaturized Raman detection system meeting requirements for low- resource settings.

  17. CYCLIC THERMAL SIGNATURE IN A GLOBAL MHD SIMULATION OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2013-11-10

    Global magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar convection zone have recently achieved cyclic large-scale axisymmetric magnetic fields undergoing polarity reversals on a decadal time scale. In this Letter, we show that these simulations also display a thermal convective luminosity that varies in-phase with the magnetic cycle, and trace this modulation to deep-seated magnetically mediated changes in convective flow patterns. Within the context of the ongoing debate on the physical origin of the observed 11 yr variations in total solar irradiance, such a signature supports the thesis according to which all, or part, of the variations on decadal time scales and longer could be attributed to a global modulation of the Sun's internal thermal structure by magnetic activity.

  18. The 21 cm signature of shock heated and diffuse cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernndez, Oscar F.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on G? from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions G? > 2.5 10{sup ?8}.

  19. Spin ice: magnetic excitations without monopole signatures using muon spin rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunsiger, Sarah [Technical University, Munich, Germany; Aczel, Adam A. [McMaster University; Arguello, Carlos [Columbia University; Dabkowska, H. A. [McMaster University; Dabkowski, A [McMaster University; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL; Goko, Tatsuo [Columbia University; Javanparast, B [University of Waterloo, Canada; Lin, T [University of Waterloo, Canada; Ning, F. L. [McMaster University; Noad, H. M. [McMaster University; Singh, David J [ORNL; Williams, T.J. [McMaster University; Uemura, Yasutomo J. [Columbia University; Gingras, M.P.J. [University of Waterloo, Canada; Luke, Graeme M. [McMaster University

    2011-01-01

    Theory predicts the low temperature magnetic excitations in spin ices consist of deconfined magnetic charges, or monopoles. A recent transverse-field (TF) muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) experiment [S.T. Bramwell et al., Nature (London) 461 956 (2009)] reports results claiming to be consistent with the temperature and magnetic field dependence anticipated for monopole nucleation - the so-called second Wien effect. We demonstrate via a new series of {mu}SR experiments in Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} that such an effect is not observable in a TF {mu}SR experiment. Rather, as found in many highly frustrated magnetic materials, we observe spin fluctuations which become temperature independent at low temperatures, behavior which dominates over any possible signature of thermally nucleated monopole excitations.

  20. OBSERVABLE SIGNATURES OF PLANET ACCRETION IN RED GIANT STARS. I. RAPID ROTATION AND LIGHT ELEMENT REPLENISHMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu E-mail: cunha@noao.edu

    2012-10-01

    The orbital angular momentum of a close-orbiting giant planet can be sufficiently large that, if transferred to the envelope of the host star during the red giant branch (RGB) evolution, it can spin-up the star's rotation to unusually large speeds. This spin-up mechanism is one possible explanation for the rapid rotators detected among the population of generally slow-rotating red giant stars. These rapid rotators thus comprise a unique stellar sample suitable for searching for signatures of planet accretion in the form of unusual stellar abundances due to the dissemination of the accreted planet in the stellar envelope. In this study, we look for signatures of replenishment in the Li abundances and (to a lesser extent) {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C, which are both normally lowered during RGB evolution. Accurate abundances were measured from high signal-to-noise echelle spectra for samples of both slow and rapid rotator red giant stars. We find that the rapid rotators are on average enriched in lithium compared to the slow rotators, but both groups of stars have identical distributions of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C within our measurement precision. Both of these abundance results are consistent with the accretion of planets of only a few Jupiter masses. We also explore alternative scenarios for understanding the most Li-rich stars in our sample-particularly Li regeneration during various stages of stellar evolution. Finally, we find that our stellar samples show non-standard abundances even at early RGB stages, suggesting that initial protostellar Li abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C may be more variable than originally thought.

  1. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K., E-mail: sklai@coll.phy.ncu.edu.tw [Complex Liquids Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Central University, Chungli 320 Taiwan (China); Molecular Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Cheong, S. A. [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with ? helix and ? hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein folding dynamics.

  2. at American Geophysical Union

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are often associated with environments that provide excellent support for microbial life. Because of this, the science team agreed to make a rare backtrack to investigate it...

  3. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  4. Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J.D.; Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

  5. Beowawe geothermal-resource assessment. Final report. Shallow-hole temperature survey geophysics and deep test hole Collins 76-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, N.O.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal resource investigation field efforts in the Beowawe Geysers Area, Eureka County, Nevada are described. The objectives included acquisition of geotechnical data for understanding the nature and extent of the geothermal resource boundaries south of the known resource area. Fourteen shallow (<500 feet) temperature-gradient holes plus geophysics were used to select the site for a deep exploratory well, the Collins 76-17, which was completed to a total depth of 9005 feet. Maximum downhole recorded temperature was 311/sup 0/F, but no flow could be induced.

  6. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF B & BX & BY TANK FARMS AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MYERS DA

    2007-09-28

    This report documents the results of preliminary surface geophysical exploration activities performed between October and December 2006 at the B, BX, and BY tank farms (B Complex). The B Complex is located in the 200 East Area of the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. The objective of the preliminary investigation was to collect background characterization information with magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction to understand the spatial distribution of metallic objects that could potentially interfere with the results from high resolution resistivity survey. Results of the background characterization show there are several areas located around the site with large metallic subsurface debris or metallic infrastructure.

  7. Category:Radiometrics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Categories: Geothermal Passive Sensors...

  8. Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts second) were also recorded at each soil sample station. At the...

  9. Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2009-10-29

    This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

  10. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  11. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-27

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  12. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  13. Cosmological signatures of tilted isocurvature perturbations: reionization and 21cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Silk, Joseph E-mail: hiroyuki.tashiro@asu.edu E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-03-01

    We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2?

  14. SIGNATURE OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN SUN-AS-A-STAR Ca II K MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertello, L.; Pietarila, A.; Pevtsov, A. A. E-mail: apietarila@nso.edu

    2012-12-10

    The characterization of solar surface differential rotation (SDR) from disk-integrated chromospheric measurements has important implications for the study of differential rotation and dynamo processes in other stars. Some chromospheric lines, such as Ca II K, are very sensitive to the presence of activity on the disk and are an ideal choice for investigating SDR in Sun-as-a-star observations. Past studies indicate that when the activity is low, the determination of Sun's differential rotation from integrated-sunlight measurements becomes uncertain. However, our study shows that using the proper technique, SDR can be detected from these type of measurements even during periods of extended solar minima. This paper describes results from the analysis of the temporal variations of Ca II K line profiles observed by the Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer during the declining phase of Cycle 23 and the rising phase of Cycle 24, and discusses the signature of SDR in the power spectra computed from time series of parameters derived from these profiles. The methodology described is quite general, and could be applied to photometric time series of other main-sequence stars for detecting differential rotation.

  15. ON THE POLARIMETRIC SIGNATURE OF EMERGING MAGNETIC LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viticchie, B.

    2012-03-10

    The abundance of Stokes V profiles dominated by one lobe at the locations of emergence of {Omega}-shaped magnetic loops is evaluated. The emergence events were found in Hinode Solar Optical Telescope/spectro-polarimeter time sequences of quiet-Sun regions. Such a study has the aim of confirming a prediction based on the basic geometrical and physical properties of emerging magnetic loops: Stokes V profiles dominated by one lobe are possibly the main polarimetric signature of these structures. In agreement with this prediction, 47% of the Stokes V profiles analyzed have an amplitude asymmetry |{delta}a| > 0.3, while in the quiet Sun the abundance is of about 30%. This excess with respect to the quiet Sun is found consistently for any value of the threshold on the amplitude asymmetry. Such a result proves the goodness of the physical scenarios so far proposed for the interpretation of loop emergence events and may prompt the use of Stokes V profiles dominated by one lobe as a new proxy for their identification in observations with a good spectral sampling.

  16. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANLs FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  17. High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijhout, Falko P.

    2015-07-09

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. Moreover, a range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes are instantaneously detected. The result is identification and species level classification based on the entire DART-MS spectrum. In this paper, we illustrate how the method can be used to: (1) distinguishmore » between endangered woods regulated by the Convention for the International Trade of Endangered Flora and Fauna (CITES) treaty; (2) assess the origin and by extension the properties of biodiesel feedstocks; (3) determine insect species from analysis of puparial casings; (4) distinguish between psychoactive plants products; and (5) differentiate between Eucalyptus species. An advantage of the hierarchical clustering approach to processing of the DART-MS derived fingerprint is that it shows both similarities and differences between species based on their chemotypes. Furthermore, full knowledge of the identities of the constituents contained within the small molecule profile of analyzed samples is not required.« less

  18. SIGNATURES OF ILLICIT NUCLEAR PROCUREMENT NETWORKS: AN OVERVIEW OF PRELIMINARY APPROACHES AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, Jennifer B.; Erikson, Luke E.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Best, Daniel M.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2014-05-12

    The illicit trafficking of strategic nuclear commodities (defined here as the goods needed for a covert nuclear program excluding special nuclear materials) poses a significant challenge to the international nuclear nonproliferation community. Export control regulations, both domestically and internationally, seek to inhibit the spread of strategic nuclear commodities by restricting their sale to parties that may use them for nefarious purposes. However, export controls alone are not sufficient for preventing the illicit transfer of strategic nuclear goods. There are two major pitfalls to relying solely on export control regulations for the deterrence of proliferation of strategic goods. First, export control enforcement today relies heavily on the honesty and willingness of participants to adhere to the legal framework already in place. Secondly, current practices focus on the evaluation of single records which allow for the necessary goods to be purchased separately and hidden within the thousands of legitimate commerce transactions that occur each day, disregarding strategic information regarding several purchases. Our research presents two preliminary data-centric approaches for investigating procurement networks of strategic nuclear commodities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been putting significant effort into nonproliferation activities as an institution, both in terms of the classical nuclear material focused approach and in the examination of other strategic goods necessary to implement a nuclear program. In particular, the PNNL Signature Discovery Initiative (SDI) has codified several scientific methodologies for the detection, characterization, and prediction of signatures that are indicative of a phenomenon of interest. The methodologies and tools developed under SDI have already been applied successfully to problems in bio-forensics, cyber security and power grid balancing efforts and they have now made the nonproliferation of strategic goods into a challenge problem for testing their methodology and tools. As a first step towards the detection and characterization of illicit procurement networks, our research examines procurement networks as defined by a system of entities (people or companies) that enter into transactions of specific items with one another. Once we have defined such networks, we are interested in answering questions about the behavior and characterization of such networks. The questions we wish to answer regarding procurement networks are, first, Can we detect networks within large, noisy datasets? and second, To what extent can we compare multiple networks and identify their similarities? As procurement networks can be naturally viewed as a graph, we have employed several graph analytic tools to aid in these tasks. In particular, Graphscape, an SDI tool, uses a novel method to approximate edit distance, a graph distance measure based on the number of changes needed to transform one graph into another, in order to measure how similar two given graphs are to each other. Given a set of graphs where vertices represent companies and edges represent a shipment from company A to company B, we can calculate an all-for-all comparison of graphs. In this way, we are able to determine which graphs are most similar, and which require more changes to transform one into the other. The set of graphs to be compared can be further specialized to provide more insight, e.g., using different time periods to explore events in a company life cycle.

  19. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. Housekeeping genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  20. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. Housekeeping genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  1. Searching for chemical signatures of multiple stellar populations in the old, massive open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, C1400, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bernath, Peter F. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, 4541 Hampton Boulevard, Norfolk, VA 23529-0126 (United States); Brooke, James S. A.; Ram, Ram S., E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: eugenio.carretta@oabo.inaf.it, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: raffaele.gratton@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu, E-mail: jsabrooke@gmail.com, E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    Galactic open and globular clusters (OCs, GCs) appear to inhabit separate regions of the age-mass plane. However, the transition between them is not easily defined because there is some overlap between high-mass, old OCs and low-mass, young GCs. We are exploring the possibility of a clear-cut separation between OCs and GCs using an abundance feature that has been found so far only in GCs: (anti)correlations between light elements. Among the coupled abundance trends, the Na-O anticorrelation is the most widely studied. These anticorrelations are the signature of self-enrichment, i.e., of a formation mechanism that implies multiple generations of stars. Here we concentrate on the old, massive, metal-rich OC NGC 6791. We analyzed archival Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 NGC 6791 main-sequence turnoff and evolved stars, concentrating on the derivation of C, N, O, and Na abundances. We also used WIYN/Hydra spectra of 21 evolved stars (one is in common). Given the spectral complexity of the very metal-rich NGC 6791 stars, we employed spectrum synthesis to measure most of the abundances. We confirmed the cluster super-solar metallicity and abundances of Ca and Ni that have been derived in past studies. More importantly, we did not detect any significant star-to-star abundance dispersion in C, N, O, and Na. Based on the absence of a clear Na-O anticorrelation, NGC 6791 can still be considered a true OC, hosting a single generation of stars and not a low-mass GC.

  2. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesismore » of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.« less

  3. A hybrid hydrologic-geophysical inverse technique for the assessment and monitoring of leachates in the vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Glass, R.J.; Yeh, T.C.; LaBrecque, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from electric resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity of the vadose zone (from the ERT measurements) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related. As of the 21st month of a 36-month project, a three-dimensional stochastic hydrologic inverse model for heterogeneous vadose zones has been developed. This model employs pressure and moisture content measurements under both transient and steady flow conditions to estimate unsaturated hydraulic parameters. In this model, an innovative approach to sequentially condition the estimate using temporal measurements has been incorporated. This allows us to use vast amounts of pressure and moisture content information measured at different times while keeping the computational effort manageable. Using this model the authors have found that the relative importance of the pressure and moisture content measurements in defining the different vadose zone parameters depends on whether the soil is wet or dry. They have also learned that pressure and moisture content measurements collected during steady state flow provide the best characterization of heterogeneity compared to other types of hydrologic data. These findings provide important guidance to the design of sampling scheme of the field experiment described below.'

  4. GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

    2011-01-14

    Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the vadose zone (i.e., 79 m [260 ft] bgs) within the footprint of the Crib, and (b) 15 to 30 m (50 to 100 ft) east of the Crib footprint, where contaminants are inferred to have migrated through relatively permeable soils. Confirmation of the presence of contamination in historic boreholes correlates well with mapping from the 2010 survey, and serves as a basis to site future characterization boreholes that will likely intersect contamination both laterally and at depth.

  5. Fracture Propagation, Fluid Flow, and Geomechanics of Water-Based Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Systems and Electromagnetic Geophysical Monitoring of Fluid Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Um, Evan; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fracture propagation induced by hydraulic fracturing with water injection, using numerical simulation. For rigorous, full 3D modeling, we employ a numerical method that can model failure resulting from tensile and shear stresses, dynamic nonlinear permeability, leak-off in all directions, and thermo-poro-mechanical effects with the double porosity approach. Our numerical results indicate that fracture propagation is not the same as propagation of the water front, because fracturing is governed by geomechanics, whereas water saturation is determined by fluid flow. At early times, the water saturation front is almost identical to the fracture tip, suggesting that the fracture is mostly filled with injected water. However, at late times, advance of the water front is retarded compared to fracture propagation, yielding a significant gap between the water front and the fracture top, which is filled with reservoir gas. We also find considerable leak-off of water to the reservoir. The inconsistency between the fracture volume and the volume of injected water cannot properly calculate the fracture length, when it is estimated based on the simple assumption that the fracture is fully saturated with injected water. As an example of flow-geomechanical responses, we identify pressure fluctuation under constant water injection, because hydraulic fracturing is itself a set of many failure processes, in which pressure consistently drops when failure occurs, but fluctuation decreases as the fracture length grows. We also study application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods, because these methods are highly sensitive to changes in porosity and pore-fluid properties due to water injection into gas reservoirs. Employing a 3D finite-element EM geophysical simulator, we evaluate the sensitivity of the crosswell EM method for monitoring fluid movements in shaly reservoirs. For this sensitivity evaluation, reservoir models are generated through the coupled flow-geomechanical simulator and are transformed via a rock-physics model into electrical conductivity models. It is shown that anomalous conductivity distribution in the resulting models is closely related to injected water saturation, but not closely related to newly created unsaturated fractures. Our numerical modeling experiments demonstrate that the crosswell EM method can be highly sensitive to conductivity changes that directly indicate the migration pathways of the injected fluid. Accordingly, the EM method can serve as an effective monitoring tool for distribution of injected fluids (i.e., migration pathways) during hydraulic fracturing operations

  6. USING 3D COMPUTER MODELING, BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS, AND HIGH CAPACITY PUMPS TO RESTORE PRODUCTION TO MARGINAL WELLS IN THE EAST TEXAS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Bassett

    2003-06-09

    Methods for extending the productive life of marginal wells in the East Texas Field were investigated using advanced computer imaging technology, geophysical tools, and selective perforation of existing wells. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy, TENECO Energy and Schlumberger Wireline and Testing. Drillers' logs for more than 100 wells in proximity to the project lease were acquired, converted to digital format using a numerical scheme, and the data were used to create a 3 Dimensional geological image of the project site. Using the descriptive drillers' logs in numerical format yielded useful cross sections identifying the Woodbine Austin Chalk contact and continuity of sand zones between wells. The geological data provided information about reservoir continuity, but not the amount of remaining oil, this was obtained using selective modern logs. Schlumberger logged the wells through 2 3/8 inch tubing with a new slimhole Reservoir Saturation Tool (RST) which can measure the oil and water content of the existing porosity, using neutron scattering and a gamma ray spectrometer (GST). The tool provided direct measurements of elemental content yielding interpretations of porosity, lithology, and oil and water content, confirming that significant oil saturation still exists, up to 50% in the upper Woodbine sand. Well testing was then begun and at the end of the project new oil was being produced from zones abandoned or bypassed more than 25 years ago.

  7. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the timespace domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  8. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  9. Using hyperspectral plant signatures for CO2 leak detection during the 2008 ZERT CO2 sequestration field experiment in Bozeman, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Male, E.J.; Pickles, W.L.; Silver, E.A.; Hoffmann, G.D.; Lewicki, J.; Apple, M.; Repasky, K.; Burton, E.A.

    2009-11-01

    Hyperspectral plant signatures can be used as a short-term, as well as long-term (100-yr timescale) monitoring technique to verify that CO2 sequestration fields have not been compromised. An influx of CO2 gas into the soil can stress vegetation, which causes changes in the visible to nearinfrared reflectance spectral signature of the vegetation. For 29 days, beginning on July 9th, 2008, pure carbon dioxide gas was released through a 100-meter long horizontal injection well, at a flow rate of 300 kg/day. Spectral signatures were recorded almost daily from an unmown patch of plants over the injection with a ''FieldSpec Pro'' spectrometer by Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc. Measurements were taken both inside and outside of the CO2 leak zone to normalize observations for other environmental factors affecting the plants.

  10. Looking for Auger signatures in III-nitride light emitters: A full-band Monte Carlo perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertazzi, Francesco Goano, Michele; Zhou, Xiangyu; Calciati, Marco; Ghione, Giovanni; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-02-09

    Recent experiments of electron emission spectroscopy (EES) on III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown a correlation between droop onset and hot electron emission at the cesiated surface of the LED p-cap. The observed hot electrons have been interpreted as a direct signature of Auger recombination in the LED active region, as highly energetic Auger-excited electrons would be collected in long-lived satellite valleys of the conduction band so that they would not decay on their journey to the surface across the highly doped p-contact layer. We discuss this interpretation by using a full-band Monte Carlo model based on first-principles electronic structure and lattice dynamics calculations. The results of our analysis suggest that Auger-excited electrons cannot be unambiguously detected in the LED structures used in the EES experiments. Additional experimental and simulative work are necessary to unravel the complex physics of GaN cesiated surfaces.

  11. Gamma-Ray Signatures for State-Of-Health Analysis and Monitoring of Widely-Arrayed Radiation Portal Monitor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Angel, Linda K.; Wright, Ingrid H.; Eslinger, Melany A.; Pospical, A. Jill; Ellis, John E.

    2008-05-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has deployed a large array of radiation portal monitors for the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection. These portal monitors scan incoming vehicles crossing the U.S. border and shipping containers leaving international ports for radioactive material via gamma-ray and neutron detection. Data produced and captured by these systems are recorded for every vehicle related to radiation signature, sensor/system status, and local background, as well as a host of other variables. Within the Radiation Portal Monitor Project at PNNL, state-of-health observation and analysis for the whole RPM system using these data to determine functionality and performance is being developed. (PIET-43741-TM-492)

  12. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  13. ARM - Instrument Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DatastreamsRadiometric

  14. ARM - Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsRadiometric

  15. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsRadiometric

  16. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}NH?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 20002800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic studies of peptides and proteins.

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report – DE-EE0002960 Recovery Act. Detachment faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation of Pearl Hot Spring, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockli, Daniel F.

    2015-11-30

    The Pearl Host Spring Geothermal Project funded by the DoE Geothermal Program was a joint academic (KU/UT & OU) and industry collaboration (Sierra and Ram Power) to investigate structural controls and the importance of low-angle normal faults on geothermal fluid flow through a multifaceted geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigation in west-central Nevada. The study clearly showed that the geothermal resources in Clayton Valley are controlled by the interplay between low-angle normal faults and active deformation related to the Walker Lane. The study not only identified potentially feasible blind geothermal resource plays in eastern Clayton Valley, but also provide a transportable template for exploration in the area of west-central Nevada and other regional and actively-deforming releasing fault bends. The study showed that deep-seated low-angle normal faults likely act as crustal scale permeability boundaries and could play an important role in geothermal circulation and funneling geothermal fluid into active fault zones. Not unique to this study, active deformation is viewed as an important gradient to rejuvenated fracture permeability aiding the long-term viability of blind geothermal resources. The technical approach for Phase I included the following components, (1) Structural and geological analysis of Pearl Hot Spring Resource, (2) (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and geothermometry, (3) detailed gravity data and modeling (plus some magnetic and resistivity), (4) Reflection and Refraction Seismic (Active Source), (5) Integration with existing and new geological/geophysical data, and (6) 3-D Earth Model, combining all data in an innovative approach combining classic work with new geochemical and geophysical methodology to detect blind geothermal resources in a cost-effective fashion.

  18. Indirect and direct signatures of Higgs portal decaying vector dark matter for positron excess in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, P.; Park, Wan-Il; Tang, Yong E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr E-mail: ytang@kias.re.kr

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the indirect signatures of the Higgs portal U(1){sub X} vector dark matter (VDM) X{sub ?} from both its pair annihilation and decay. The VDM is stable at renormalizable level by Z{sub 2} symmetry, and thermalized by Higgs-portal interactions. It can also decay by some nonrenormalizable operators with very long lifetime at cosmological time scale. If dim-6 operators for VDM decays are suppressed by 10{sup 16} GeV scale, the lifetime of VDM with mass ? 2 TeV is just right for explaining the positron excess in cosmic ray observed by PAMELA and AMS02 Collaborations. The VDM decaying into ?{sup +}?{sup ?} can fit the data, evading various constraints on cosmic rays. We give one UV-complete model as an example. This scenario for Higgs portal decaying VDM with mass around ? 2 TeV can be tested by DM direct search at XENON1T, and also at the future colliders by measuring the Higgs self-couplings.

  19. Submit IGPPS Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Assistant Georgia D. Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)...

  20. New Mexico Consortium (NMC) Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signatures Applied Geophysical Experiences Materials Design Calendar NSEC New Mexico Consortium (NMC) Office New Mexico Consortium (NMC) Office Explore the multiple...

  1. Supernovae with two peaks in the optical light curve and the signature of progenitors with low-mass extended envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Piro, Anthony L. [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a 'standard' density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  2. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  3. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ``ideal system,`` could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  4. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ideal system,'' could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  5. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerberich, Heather Kay; /Duke U.

    2004-07-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use {approx} 202 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section {sigma}({bar p}p {yields} ee* {yields} ee{gamma}) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (M{sub e*}) and the compositeness energy scale ({Lambda}). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find M{sub e*} < 906 GeV is excluded for M{sub e*} = {Lambda}. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the M{sub e*} versus the phenomenological coupling f/{Lambda} parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. In comparison, other experiments have excluded M{sub e*} < 280 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}.

  6. Original Signature On File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    audit report, please contact CBFO Quality Assurance Director, Ava L. Holland , at (575) 234-7423 . Enclosure CBFO:QA:DSM:KBS :091545:UFC 2300.00 Sincerely, David C. Moody Manager...

  7. Science of Signatures Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Recommendation from a Reference Applicant Information: Name (Last, First, MI) Citizenship* Best Contact Phone Number Email Address University enrolled in Advisor Name...

  8. Signature ESO-CERN

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le Prof.Gregory parle du commencement de la collaboration entre directoires et gens de l'organisation; d'autres personnalités prennent la parole

  9. Signature-Dependent Electromagnetic Transition Rates in the {pi}h{sub 11/2} Rotational Sequence of {sub 73}{sup 167}Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Chapman; K.-M. Spohr; M.B. Smith; R.A. Bark; G.J. Campbell; G.B. Hagemann; N. Keeley; D.J. Middleton; H. Ryde; P.O. Tjom

    1999-12-31

    Excited states in {sup 167}Ta, populated in the {sup 141}Pr({sup 30}Si, 4n){sup 167}Ta reaction, have been studied using the NORDBALL Ge detector array. For the {pi}h{sub 11/2}[514]{sub 2}{sup 9}{sup -} decay sequence, strong signature-dependent effects in the transition quadrupole moment ratio, Q{sub 1}(I {yields} I - 1)/Q{sub 2}(I {yields} I - 2), have been observed over the spin range {sub 2}{sup 21}{<=}I{<=}{sub 2}{sup 39} which encompasses a BC neutron alignment. This is interpreted as strong evidence for departure from axial symmetry.

  10. Signature-dependent electromagnetic transition rates in the {pi}h{sub 11/2} rotational sequence of {sub 73}{sup 167}Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R.; Spohr, K.-M.; Smith, M. B.; Campbell, G. J.; Middleton, D. J.; Bark, R. A.; Ryde, H.; Hagemann, G. B.; Keeley, N.; Tjoem, P. O.

    1999-11-16

    Excited states in {sup 167}Ta, populated in the {sup 141}Pr({sup 30}Si,4n){sup 167}Ta reaction, have been studied using the NORDBALL Ge detector array. For the {pi}h{sub 11/2}[514]9/2{sup -} decay sequence, strong signature-dependent effects in the transition quadrupole moment ratio, Q{sub 1}(I{yields}I-1)/Q{sub 2}(I{yields}I-2), have been observed over the spin range 21/2{<=}I{<=}39/2 which encompasses a BC neutron alignment. This is interpreted as strong evidence for departure from axial symmetry.

  11. Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates(greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman L.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.

    2011-04-26

    We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

  12. The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science ...

  13. Radiometrics At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Deal, Et Al....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    G., Elston, W.E., Erb, E. E., Peterson, S. L., & Reiter, D. E. (1978) Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico...

  14. Radiometrics At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    precipitation and the susceptibility of NaCl to remobilization in meteoric water at low temperature. Remote sensing methods for identifying regional-scale zoning of these...

  15. Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty Estimation of Radiometric Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.; Andreas, A.; Konings, J.

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating the performance of photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays that form large solar deployments relies on accurate measurements of the available solar resource. Therefore, determining the accuracy of these solar radiation measurements provides a better understanding of investment risks. This paper provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements by radiometers using methods that follow the International Bureau of Weights and Measures Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty (GUM). Standardized analysis based on these procedures ensures that the uncertainty quoted is well documented.

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Millimeter-wave Radiometric Arctic Winter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westwater Scanning-O2 Radiometer Order Data Racette Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) Order Data Han Corrected ARM MWR data Order Data Michalsky Rotating Shadowband...

  17. Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrical problem of January 30 persisted to February 1, raising the global horizontal signal above empirical limits for much of the day: DQR Guide cases 1-8 (see Table 2.). The...

  18. Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors R.F. Marvin and S.W. Dobson Published New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, 1979 Report Number IsochronWest no. 26 DOI Not...

  19. Search for New Physics with a Dijet plus Missing Transverse Energy Signature in p-pbar Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    We present results of a signature-based search for new physics using a dijet plus missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) data sample collected in 2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe no significant event excess with respect to the standard model prediction and extract a 95% C.L. upper limit on the cross section times acceptance for a potential contribution from a non-standard model process. Based on this limit the mass of a potential first or second generation scalar leptoquark is constrained to be above 187 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Geothermal Data via the Virginia Tech and DMME Portal to the National Geothermal Data System for the Eastern and Southeastern United States from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The former title for this record was "Geothermal Data for the Eastern and Southeastern U.S. from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Tech." The content originally referenced is still available. It includes geothermal maps of seven southeastern states with accompanying data tables. The seven states are: New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Caroline, and Georgia. Data types include geothermal data, seismic data, and magnetic and gravity data. Typical geothermal data may include tables of temperature versus depth data, plots of temperature/gradient versus depth, tables of thermal conductivity data, and tables of gamma log data. Other resources available from the RGL provide information about hot springs in the southeastern U.S., temperatures for Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments, and deep fracture permeability in crystalline rocks in the eastern and southeastern U.S. Recently, this website and its collection of geothermal data has been renamed and reorganized as a portal into the National Geothermal Data System, a move that makes far more data both available and integrated.

  1. Quantitative understanding of Forbush decrease drivers based on shock-only and CME-only models using global signature of February 14, 1978 event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghav, Anil; Lotekar, Ajay; Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Yadav, Virendra E-mail: ankushbhaskar@gmail.com E-mail: vicharegeeta@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the Forbush decrease (FD) event that occurred on February 14, 1978 using 43 neutron monitor observatories to understand the global signature of FD. We have studied rigidity dependence of shock amplitude and total FD amplitude. We have found almost the same power law index for both shock phase amplitude and total FD amplitude. Local time variation of shock phase amplitude and maximum depression time of FD have been investigated which indicate possible effect of shock/CME orientation. We have analyzed rigidity dependence of time constants of two phase recovery. Time constants of slow component of recovery phase show rigidity dependence and imply possible effect of diffusion. Solar wind speed was observed to be well correlated with slow component of FD recovery phase. This indicates solar wind speed as possible driver of recovery phase. To investigate the contribution of interplanetary drivers, shock and CME in FD, we have used shock-only and CME-only models. We have applied these models separately to shock phase and main phase amplitudes respectively. This confirms presently accepted physical scenario that the first step of FD is due to propagating shock barrier and second step is due to flux rope of CME/magnetic cloud.

  2. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; Berndt, Markus; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Coon, Ethan; Moulton, John D.; Painter, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about the mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.

  3. LANL | Solid Earth Geophysics | EES-17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to monitor underground explosions, maintain our ability to conduct tests, and develop the Yucca Mountain Project. In addition, we study the nonlinear properties of earth materials,...

  4. Mesh infrastructure for coupled multiprocess geophysical simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garimella, Rao V.; Perkins, William A.; Buksas, Mike W.; Berndt, Markus; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Coon, Ethan; Moulton, John D.; Painter, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated mesh infrastructure capability to support large scale multiphysics simulations such as subsurface flow and reactive contaminant transport at storage sites as well as the analysis of the effects of a warming climate on the terrestrial arctic. These simulations involve a wide range of coupled processes including overland flow, subsurface flow, freezing and thawing of ice rich soil, accumulation, redistribution and melting of snow, biogeochemical processes involving plant matter and finally, microtopography evolution due to melting and degradation of ice wedges below the surface. In addition to supporting the usual topological and geometric queries about themore » mesh, the mesh infrastructure adds capabilities such as identifying columnar structures in the mesh, enabling deforming of the mesh subject to constraints and enabling the simultaneous use of meshes of different dimensionality for subsurface and surface processes. The generic mesh interface is capable of using three different open source mesh frameworks (MSTK, MOAB and STKmesh) under the hood allowing the developers to directly compare them and choose one that is best suited for the application's needs. We demonstrate the results of some simulations using these capabilities as well as present a comparison of the performance of the different mesh frameworks.« less

  5. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Author G.P. Eaton Conference Basin and Range Symposium and Great Basin Field Conference; Denver,...

  6. Characterization Of Geothermal Resources Using New Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the preparation of the final report submitted to Amp Resources Authors Jerry Montgomery, Roger L. Bowers and Val Kofoed Published GRC, 2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  7. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in a shallow geothermal aquifer and support effective development of the low temperature reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets. These surveys and the drilling...

  8. Monitoring DNAPL pumping using integrated geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The removal of DNAPL during pumping was monitored. At Hill AFB in Utah, a free-product DNAPL plume (predominantly TCE, with some TCA, PCE, methylene chloride) is pooled in water-wet soil on a thick clay aquitard. Groundwater pumping at Operable Unit 2 began in 1994; to date, nearly 30,000 gal DNAPL have been recovered. From Sept. 1994 through Sept. 1995, changes in the basin during DNAPL pumping were monitored using fiber optic chemical sensors, neutron logs, and electrical resistance tomography (ERT). The first two sensor types verify the presence of DNAPL in vicinity of 3 boreholes which form a cross section from the perimeter of the basin to its center. Cross borehole ERT images the changes in formation electrical properties due to removal of DNAPL, extending the understanding of DNAPL removal between the boreholes. During pumping, electrical resistivities decreased; we suggest these decreases are directly caused by the reduction in DNAPL. During ground water pumping, water with relatively low resistivity replaces some of the DNAPL pockets as the highly insulating DNAPL is removed. Results suggest that, as DNAPL is pumped from a nearby well, product slowly drains along the top of an aquitard and into the pump well, where it collects.

  9. Institute of geophysics and planetary physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.; Budwine, C.M.

    1991-05-10

    This report contains brief discussions on topics of high-pressure sciences, astrophysics, and geosciences. (LSP)

  10. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    2012-11-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  11. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  12. Signature of Edward Bruce Held Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  13. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic documentaries. Patrick Brewick Patrick Brewick earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2009 and his Ph.D. from the Department of...

  14. Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  15. Signature of Christopher Gentile Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Therese LeBlanc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tennant

  16. Signature of Christopher Gentile Signature of Mark Holecek Signature of Therese LeBlanc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B Tennant II

  17. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  18. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  19. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  20. Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon Signature of Madelyn Creedon

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  1. The Macolumn - the Mac gets geophysical. [A review of geophysical software for the Apple Macintosh computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busbey, A.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Seismic Processing Workshop, a program by Parallel Geosciences of Austin, TX, is discussed in this column. The program is a high-speed, interactive seismic processing and computer analysis system for the Apple Macintosh II family of computers. Also reviewed in this column are three products from Wilkerson Associates of Champaign, IL. SubSide is an interactive program for basin subsidence analysis; MacFault and MacThrustRamp are programs for modeling faults.

  2. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on plant parameters and the pump electrical signatures. Additionally, the reactor simulation is being used to generate normal operation data and data with instrumentation faults and process anomalies. A frequency controller was interfaced with the motor power supply in order to vary the electrical supply frequency. The experimental flow control loop was used to generate operational data under varying motor performance characteristics. Coolant leakage events were simulated by varying the bypass loop flow rate. The accuracy of motor power calculation was improved by incorporating the power factor, computed from motor current and voltage in each phase of the induction motor.- A variety of experimental runs were made for steady-state and transient pump operating conditions. Process, vibration, and electrical signatures were measured using a submersible pump with variable supply frequency. High correlation was seen between motor current and pump discharge pressure signal; similar high correlation was exhibited between pump motor power and flow rate. Wide-band analysis indicated high coherence (in the frequency domain) between motor current and vibration signals. - Wide-band operational data from a PWR were acquired from AMS Corporation and used to develop time-series models, and to estimate signal spectrum and sensor time constant. All the data were from different pressure transmitters in the system, including primary and secondary loops. These signals were pre-processed using the wavelet transform for filtering both low-frequency and high-frequency bands. This technique of signal pre-processing provides minimum distortion of the data, and results in a more optimal estimation of time constants of plant sensors using time-series modeling techniques.

  3. Determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer quantum dots via spectral analysis of optical signature of the Aharanov-Bohm excitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Roy, Bidisha; Kuskovsky, Igor L.; Shuvayev, Vladimir; Deligiannakis, Vasilios; Tamargo, Maria C.; Ludwig, Jonathan; Smirnov, Dmitry; Wang, Alice

    2014-10-28

    For submonolayer quantum dot (QD) based photonic devices, size and density of QDs are critical parameters, the probing of which requires indirect methods. We report the determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer QDs, based on spectral analysis of the optical signature of Aharanov-Bohm (AB) excitons, complemented by photoluminescence studies, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and numerical calculations. Numerical calculations are employed to determine the AB transition magnetic field as a function of the type-II QD radius. The study of four samples grown with different tellurium fluxes shows that the lateral size of QDs increases by just 50%, even though tellurium concentration increases 25-fold. Detailed spectral analysis of the emission of the AB exciton shows that the QD radii take on only certain values due to vertical correlation and the stacked nature of the QDs.

  4. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H+(H2O)n=2 28 Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-07-09

    In this Article, we review the role of gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H+(H2O)n, in the analysis of the microscopic mechanics responsible for the behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. We extend upon previous studies of the smaller, two-dimensional sheet-like structures to larger (n?10) assemblies with three-dimensional cage morphologies which better mimic the bulk environment. Indeed, clusters in which a complete second solvation shell forms around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield vibrational spectra where the signatures of the proton defect display strikingly similar positions and breadth to those observed in dilute acids. We investigate effects of the local structure and intermolecular interactions on the large red shifts observed in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth using various theoretical methods. We show that, in addition to sizeable anharmonic couplings, the position of the excess proton vibration can be traced to large increases in the electric field exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. MAJ acknowledges support from the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02- 06ER15800 as well as the facilities and staff of the Yale University Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Center, and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS 08-21132 that partially funded acquisition of the facilities. SMK and SSX acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Radiometric characterization of a high temperature blackbody in the visible and near infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubert, R. D.; Hollandt, J.

    2013-09-11

    At the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt the radiance temperature in the range from 962 C to 3000 C is disseminated by applying a high temperature blackbody (HTBB) with a directly heated pyrolytic graphite cavity. The thermodynamic radiance temperature of the HTBB was measured in the temperature range from 1000 C to 3000 C by applying almost simultaneously absolutely calibrated silicon photodiode based filter radiometers with centre wavelengths at 476 nm, 676 nm, 800 nm, 900 nm and 1000 nm and InGaAs photodiode based filter radiometers with centre wavelengths at 1300 nm, 1550 nm and 1595 nm. The results demonstrate that, expressed in terms of irradiance, within an uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) in a broad wavelength range the thermodynamic radiance temperature of the HTBB is wavelength independent in the investigated temperature interval.

  6. Solar Radiometric Data Quality Assessment of SIRS, SKYRAD and GNDRAD Measurements (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Gotseff, P.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    Solar radiation is the driving force for the earth's weather and climate. Understanding the elements of this dynamic energy balance requires accurate measurements of broadband solar irradiance. Since the mid-1990's the ARM Program has deployed pyrheliometers and pyranometers for the measurement of direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradiance (GHI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and upwelling shortwave (US) radiation at permanent and mobile field research sites. This poster summarizes the basis for assessing the broadband solar radiation data available from the SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD measurement systems and provides examples of data inspections.

  7. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of blind geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the Best Geophysics Paper at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the fault zones is constrained by geological, drilling, and geothermal production data. The objective is to determine interpretation techniques for evaluating structural controls of fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The conclusions are: directions of MT polarization and anisotropy and MEQ S-splitting correlate. Polarization and anisotropy are caused by fluid filled fractures at the base of the clay cap. Microearthquakes occur mainly on the boundary of low resistivity within the fracture zone and high resistivity in the host rock. Resistivity is lowest within the core of the fracture zone and increases towards the margins of the fracture zone. The heat source and the clay cap for the hydrothermal have very low resistivity of less than 5?m. Fracture porosity imaged by resistivity indicates that it varies between 45-5% with most between 10-20%, comparable to values from core samples in volcanic areas in Kenya and Iceland. For resistivity values above 60?m, the porosity reduces drastically and therefore this might be used as the upper limit for modeling fracture porosity from resistivity. When resistivity is lower than 5?m, the modeled fracture porosity increases drastically indicating that this is the low resistivity limit. This is because at very low resistivity in the heat source and the clay cap, the resistivity is dominated by ionic conduction rather than fracture porosity. Microearthquakes occur mainly above the heat source which is defined by low resistivity at a depth of 3-4.5 km at the Krafla hydrothermal system and 4-7 km in the Longonot hydrothermal system. Conversions of S to P waves occur for microearthquakes located above the heat source within the hydrothermal system. Shallow microearthquakes occur mainly in areas that show both MT and S-wave anisotropy. S-wave splitting and MT anisotropy occurs at the base of the clay cap and therefore reflects the variations in fracture porosity on top of the hydrothermal system. In the Krafla hydrothermal system in Iceland, both MT polarization and MEQ splitting directions align with

  8. The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-01

    We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set at 4.9 times the expected standard model cross section. We announce that the combination of this trilepton VH {yields} VWW Higgs boson search and the previous CDF dilepton H {yields} WW search achieves an expected median limit of 1.00 at 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. The expected median limit of 1.00 indicates we anticipate a 50% probability of ruling out the existence of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first time a single hadron collider experiment has achieved sensitivity to the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson. We do not see evidence for a significant signal of Higgs bosons in the data and place observed limits on the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of 165 GeV/c{sup 2} at 1.08 times Standard Model production cross section.

  9. Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... at three sites: Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico. ... Manhattan Project Learn about the history of the Manhattan Project on this interactive ...

  10. W${'}$ signatures with odd Higgs particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Peterson, Andrea D.

    2014-08-13

    We point out that W' bosons may decay predominantly into Higgs particles associated with their broken gauge symmetry. We demonstrate this in a renormalizable model where the W' and W couplings to fermions differ only by an overall normalization. This "meta-sequential" W' boson decays into a scalar pair, with the charged one subsequently decaying into a W boson and a neutral scalar. These scalars are odd under a parity of the Higgs sector, which consists of a complex bidoublet and a doublet. Finally, the W' and Z' bosons have the same mass and branching fractions into scalars, and may show up at the LHC in final states involving one or two electroweak bosons and missing transverse energy.

  11. W$${'}$$ signatures with odd Higgs particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Peterson, Andrea D.

    2014-08-13

    We point out that W' bosons may decay predominantly into Higgs particles associated with their broken gauge symmetry. We demonstrate this in a renormalizable model where the W' and W couplings to fermions differ only by an overall normalization. This "meta-sequential" W' boson decays into a scalar pair, with the charged one subsequently decaying into a W boson and a neutral scalar. These scalars are odd under a parity of the Higgs sector, which consists of a complex bidoublet and a doublet. Finally, the W' and Z' bosons have the same mass and branching fractions into scalars, and may showmore » up at the LHC in final states involving one or two electroweak bosons and missing transverse energy.« less

  12. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  13. National Nanotechnology Initiative's Signature Initiative Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NIST, NSF, OSHA, USDAFS Goal: Establish manufacturing technologies for economical and sustainable integration of nanoscale building blocks into complex, large scale systems. ...

  14. Contaminant signature at Los Alamos firing sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.; Irvine, J.

    1996-01-01

    During a dynamic weapons test, a weapons component is either explosively detonated or impacted against a target in the open air environment. This results in both the production of a wide size range of depleted uranium particles as well as particle scattering over a considerable distance away from the firing pad. The explosive detonation process which creates aerial distribution over a watershed distinguishes this contaminant transport problem from others where the source term is spatially discrete. Investigations of this contamination began in 1983 with collection of onsite soils, sediments, and rock samples to establish uranium concentrations. The samples were analyzed for total uranium to evaluate the magnitude of transport of uranium away from firing sites by airborne and surface water runoff mechanisms. This data was then used to define a firing site.

  15. Intrusion Detecting Using Secure Signatures - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current systems use public notice, patches, or a description of how to detect the security vulnerability, that may grant computer crackers information on the dangerous...

  16. Symmetry Methods for a Geophysical Mass Flow Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrisi, Mariano; Tracina, Rita

    2011-09-14

    In the framework of symmetry analysis, the class of 2 x 2 PDE systems to whom belong the Savage and Hutter model and the Iverson model is considered. New classes of exact solutions are found.

  17. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks Authors Williams, P.L.; Mabey, D.R.; Pierce, K.L.; Zohdy, A.A.R.; Ackermann, H.; Hoover and D.B. Published U....

  18. Neutrinos from Hell: the Dawn of Neutrino Geophysics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Seismic waves have been for long time the only messenger reporting on the conditions deep inside the Earth. While global seismology provides amazing details about the structure of our planet, it is only sensitive to the mechanical properties of rocks and not to their chemical composition. In the last 5 years KamLAND and Borexino have started measuring anti-neutrinos produced by Uranium and Thorium inside the Earth. Such "Geoneutrinos" double the number of tools available to study the Earth's interior, enabling a sort of global chemical analysis of the planet, albeit for two elements only.I will discuss the results of these new measurements and put them in the context of the Earth Sciences."

  19. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon geophysicalimagingpeer2013.pdf More...

  20. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  1. SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... rountable, for technical reasons, in the interest of economic access to the subsurface, ... actual impact, making the transition from theory to practice--so often missing in ...

  2. A Summary of the Geology, Geochemistry, and Geophysics of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area, Utah Authors S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan and J. R. Bowman Published Journal...

  3. Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault-controlled permeability and larger volumes of permeable rocks. Authors Richard P. Smith, Kenneth W. Wisianz and David D. BlackweIl Published GRC, 2001 DOI Not Provided Check...

  4. Geophysics, Geology and Geothermal Leasing Status of the Lightning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leasing Status of the Lightning Dock KGRA, Animas Valley, New Mexico Author C. Smith Published New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  5. Geophysical Study of Basin-Range Structure Dixie Valley Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    net tilting. Authors George A. Thompson, Laurent J. Meister, Alan T. Herring, Thomas E. Smith, Dennis B. Burke, Robert L. Kovach, Robert O. Burford, Iraj A. Salehi and M. Darroll...

  6. Visit us at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... hear about the latest discoveries, trends, and challenges in the field; and network ... and space science community for discussions of emerging trends and the latest research. ...

  7. BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    report that magnetic, and vibroseismic data indicate that a large normal fault 5 kilometers east of the power plant and trending from northwest to southeast is the Cottonwood...

  8. Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a modern technology that uses complex data-acquisition systems and high-performance computers for enhanced data modeling and interpretation. Not only the methods and equipment...

  9. A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    half. A 40-mgal gravity minimum over the caldera is due mostly to the relatively low-density volcanics and sediments that fill the caldera and probably bears no relation to...

  10. An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bounds characterizing axisymmetric bodies from a set of gravity data. Bounds on the density contrast as a function of depth to the top and thickness of the anomalous source are...

  11. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sup 0C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot...

  12. Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  13. Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a half-graben basin. This basin-bounding fault serves as the primary conduit for deep water circulation. Potential field, electrical, and seismic data characterize this major...

  14. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on upper crustal structure. We used results from surface geological mapping, drill hole data from water wells and geothermal exploration wells, KRISP 85 seismic data for a...

  15. Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on the gravity data to remove the strong regional overprint caused by the large density contrast between the low density alluvium within the valley versus the near-surface...

  16. Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    controlled and that the drillhole itself was strongly influenced by structural zones. Water chemistry indicates that this geothermal resource is a hot-water rather than a...

  17. Technical Sessions M. C. MacCracken Atmospheric amj Geophysical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... system, including treatment of the deep ocean and horizontal transport by ocean currents 4 Separate, uncoupled, and limited treatment of atmospheric composition, chemical ...

  18. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2012-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1212441 Report Number(s): LBNL-5702E Journal ID: ISSN 1539--1663 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Journal Article...

  19. Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the location of the geothermal prospect and the spatially associated epithermal gold depositon the western flank of Blue Mountain. Other epithermal gold deposits in...

  20. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    All current commercially productive geothermal reservoirs have high temperature and permeability over an economically significant volume and so geothermal exploration programs are...

  1. Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing...

  2. SubTER Presentation at Town Hall- American Geophysical Union

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subter, the Subsurface Crosscut at the Energy Department, conducted a Town Hall meeting to share information and create a dialogue regarding the grand challenges of energy production and storage in the subsurface.

  3. An Initial Value of Information (VOI) Framework for Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration of Geothermal Energy Abstract We present a value of information (VOI) methodology for the exploration geothermal problem. VOI quantifies how relevant any particular...

  4. Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the reservoir is based on much less corroborative evidence. Extensive use was made of computer plotting techniques to arrive at some interpretations.Both the stratigraphic...

  5. Geophysical Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Colwell, Et Al., 2012) Micro-Earthquake At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Nichols & Cole, 2010) Paleomagnetic Measurements At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (London, 2011)...

  6. New Mexico Consortium (NMC) Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Contact Courses Summer School Engineering Information Science, Technology Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Applied Geophysical Experiences Materials Design Calendar NSEC » New Mexico Consortium (NMC) Office New Mexico Consortium (NMC) Office Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Program Administrator Juanita Martinez National

  7. Energy Security Council

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Contact Courses Summer School Engineering Information Science, Technology Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Applied Geophysical Experiences Materials Design Calendar NSEC » Energy Security Council Energy Security Council Reliable, secure, sustainable carbon energy solutions for the nation. Contact Albert Migliori (505) 663-5627 Email David Morris (505) 665 6487 Email David Watkins (50)5 665-1144 Email Energy Security Council The Los Alamos National Laboratory Energy Security

  8. Center for Nonlinear Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Contact Courses Summer School Engineering Information Science, Technology Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Applied Geophysical Experiences Materials Design Calendar NSEC » Center for Nonlinear Studies Center for Nonlinear Studies Serving as an interface between mission critical research at LANL and the outside research community. Contact Director Robert Ecke (505) 667-6733 Email Deputy Director Aric Hagberg (505) 665-4958 Email Executive Administrator Elissa (Ellie) Vigil (505)

  9. Center for Space and Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Center for Space and Earth Science Promoting and supporting high-quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. Contact Director Reiner Friedel (505) 665-1936 Email Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email Astophysics and Cosmology Hui Li (505) 665-3131 Email Climate Keeley Costigan (505) 665-4788 Email Geophysics David Coblentz (505)

  10. Summer Schools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Offices Energy Security Council New Mexico Consortium Coordination Office Postdoc Program Students/Internships Centers, Institutes Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Information Science & Technology Institute Center for Space and Earth Science Institute for Materials Science Seaborg Institute Summer Schools Engineering Institute Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Events NSEC » Summer Schools Summer Schools Offering various 8 to 12-week programs

  11. Education and Strategic Research Collaborations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Offices Energy Security Council New Mexico Consortium Coordination Office Postdoc Program Students/Internships Centers, Institutes Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Information Science & Technology Institute Center for Space and Earth Science Institute for Materials Science Seaborg Institute Summer Schools Engineering Institute Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Events Collaborations for education and strategic research, student opportunities

  12. Education and Strategic Research Collaborations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Offices Energy Security Council New Mexico Consortium Coordination Office Postdoc Program Students/Internships Centers, Institutes Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Information Science & Technology Institute Center for Space and Earth Science Institute for Materials Science Seaborg Institute Summer Schools Engineering Institute Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Events Collaborations for education and strategic research, student opportunities

  13. Events, Tours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Offices Energy Security Council New Mexico Consortium Coordination Office Postdoc Program Students/Internships Centers, Institutes Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Information Science & Technology Institute Center for Space and Earth Science Institute for Materials Science Seaborg Institute Summer Schools Engineering Institute Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Events NSEC » Events, Tours Events, Tours The Summer Lecture Series is designed to

  14. Education and Strategic Research Collaborations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Offices Energy Security Council New Mexico Consortium Coordination Office Postdoc Program Students/Internships Centers, Institutes Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Information Science & Technology Institute Center for Space and Earth Science Institute for Materials Science Seaborg Institute Summer Schools Engineering Institute Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, Signatures Events Collaborations for education and strategic research, student opportunities

  15. Application of non-radiometric methods to the determination of plutonium. Literature review conducted for the Buried Waste Integrated Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C.

    1992-03-05

    This literature review was motivated by discussions that took place during a review of contamination control technologies proposed for INEL (buried waste). It should be a useful tool in identifying non-radiation measurement techniques for Pu and Am such as ICP-MS, which should fulfill the following criteria: apparatus must be field deployable; up to 100 samples per day; and lower levels of detection and required time must be listed. The sensitivity of ICP and RIMS is compared against that needed for contamination monitoring at INEL. Only Pu-241, with a required detection limit of 400 ppt, would challenge the sensitivity of ICP-MS; Pu-238 would be easily determined. The need to determine Pu-238 and Am-241 in the presence of U-238 and Pu-241 seems to preclude the possibility of using laser ablation ICP-MS for Pu monitoring. ICP-AES and -LEAFS methods may not have enough sensitivity to determine Pu-238 at 2 ppb level with confidence, but RIMS (resonance ionization mass spectroscopy) should be adequate. 47 refs, figs.

  16. Microsoft Word - FY16 Call for Research Proposals v4.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSES 2016 Call for Proposals Released February 8, 2016 Reiner Friedel - Center for Space and Earth Science (CSES) National Science Education Center (NSEC) - LANL 2 CSES 2 016 C all f or P roposals 1 Announcing t he C enter f or S pace a nd E arth S cience ( CSES) Formerly the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics and Signatures (IGPPS) New website at http://www.lanl.gov/projects/national-security-education-center/space- earth-center/index.php The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary

  17. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is ...

  18. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerd-Durn, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, Jos A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ? 0.1yr{sup 1}.

  19. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  20. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipp, M; Jackson, D; Cynn, H; Aracne, C; Evans, W; McMahan, A

    2008-05-23

    X-ray diffraction measurements of cerium in the vicinity of the isostructural {gamma}-{alpha} transition have been performed with high precision and accuracy from room temperature to almost 800 K. The disputed location of the critical point has been found to occur at 1.5 {+-} 0.1 GPa and 480 {+-} 10 K. The data is well fit by the Kondo volume collapse model plus a quasiharmonic representation of the phonons. The resultant free energy is validated against data for the thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter, and beyond the dominant spin fluctuation contribution, indicates a dramatic change in the lattice Grueneisen parameter across the transition.

  1. Microsoft Word - Final Report with Greg Electronic Signature

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA for approval was consistent with DEAR 970.5227-3, Conflicts of Interest-Technology Transfer, since the specific language of the approval request stated "In accordance with...

  2. 10 Questions for a Signature Scientist: Nathan Baker

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how he’s working to advance the innovative application of data analytics and algorithms to real-world challenges, ranging from smart grids and bioforensics to nuclear non-proliferation and medical treatments.

  3. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ringmore » motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may link proton transfer to ring compliance.« less

  4. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, R. M. da; Domnguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  5. Microsoft Word - 11-0656 _signature on file_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RU:MAG:11-0656:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 17, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste...

  6. Transport signatures of quantum critically in Cr at high pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaramillo, R.; Feng, Y.; Wang, J.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-08-03

    The elemental antiferromagnet Cr at high pressure presents a new type of naked quantum critical point that is free of disorder and symmetry-breaking fields. Here we measure magnetotransport in fine detail around the critical pressure, P{sub c} {approx} 10 GPa, in a diamond anvil cell and reveal the role of quantum critical fluctuations at the phase transition. As the magnetism disappears and T {yields} 0, the magntotransport scaling converges to a non-mean-field form that illustrates the reconstruction of the magnetic Fermi surface, and is distinct from the critical scaling measured in chemically disordered Cr:V under pressure. The breakdown of itinerant antiferromagnetism only comes clearly into view in the clean limit, establishing disorder as a relevant variable at a quantum phase transition.

  7. Microsoft Word - 11-0434 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solids waste and S5000 debris waste. The audit team also evaluated, for initial certification, activities related to the real-time radiography Unit 4 to characterize the...

  8. Microsoft Word - 11-0607 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    debris waste. In addition, the audit report contains the results of the initial certification audit for Summary Category Group S3000 homogeneous solid waste. The audit team...

  9. Signature Page-Prime Contract Extension 30APR2016.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. Microsoft Word - LBL-ISM-2013 Signature-31July2013 ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-AC02-05CH11231 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PUB-3140 Integrated Safety Management System Description Revision 8 i July 2013 Integrated Safety* Management...

  11. Freeze-In dark matter with displaced signatures at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Co, Raymond T.; D’Eramo, Francesco; Hall, Lawrence J.; Pappadopulo, Duccio

    2015-12-11

    Dark matter, X, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature T{sub R}≪ TeV. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle B of the thermal bath, B→X. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any m{sub X} in the range keV

  12. Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - Tour Tracker Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

  13. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters, vol. 101, na, October 17, 2008, pp. 165703; Journal ...

  14. Testable Signatures of Quantum Nonlocality in a Two-Dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 21020950 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 100; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: ...

  15. (Small) resonant non-gaussianities: signatures of a discrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Park, CA 94025 (United States) School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 79 ASTROPHYSICS, ...

  16. Signatures of a companion star in type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: keiichi.maeda@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Although type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as precise cosmological distance indicators, their progenitor systems remain unresolved. One of the key questions is whether there is a nondegenerate companion star at the time of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf. In this paper, we investigate whether an interaction between the SN ejecta and the companion star may result in observable footprints around the maximum brightness and thereafter, by performing multidimensional radiation transfer simulations based on hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction. We find that such systems result in variations in various observational characteristics due to different viewing directions, and the predicted behaviors (redder and fainter for the companion direction) are the opposite of what were suggested by the previous study. The variations are generally modest and within observed scatters. However, the model predicts trends between some observables different from those observationally derived, so a large sample of SNe Ia with small calibration errors may be used to constrain the existence of such a companion star. The variations in different colors in optical band passes can be mimicked by external extinctions, so such an effect could be a source of scatter in the peak luminosity and derived distance. After the peak, hydrogen-rich materials expelled from the companion will manifest themselves in hydrogen lines, but H? is extremely difficult to identify. Alternatively, we find that P{sub ?} in postmaximum near-infrared spectra can potentially provide a powerful diagnostic.

  17. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is...

  18. Extracting vibrational beat signatures in spectrally dense molecules...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource ... Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; ...

  19. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy signatures of the glass transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, K. L. .M.; Myers, J. A.; Fuller, F.; Tekavec, P. F.; Ogilvie, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of solvation dynamics. Using a pump–probe geometry with a pulse shaper [ Optics Express 15 (2007), 16681-16689; Optics Express 16 (2008), 17420-17428], we present temperature dependent 2D spectra of laser dyes dissolved in glass-forming solvents. At low waiting times, the system has not yet relaxed, resulting in a spectrum that is elongated along the diagonal. At longer times, the system loses its memory of the initial excitation frequency, and the 2D spectrum rounds out. As the temperature is lowered, the time scale of this relaxation grows, and the elongation persists for longermore » waiting times. This can be measured in the ratio of the diagonal width to the anti-diagonal width; the behavior of this ratio is representative of the frequency–frequency correlation function [ Optics Letters 31 (2006), 3354–3356]. Near the glass transition temperature, the relaxation behavior changes. Understanding this change is important for interpreting temperature-dependent dynamics of biological systems.« less

  20. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Nortek Signature55 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Current Meter Nortek Aquadopp Profiler MIDAS WTR Wave and Tide Recorder TRDI Sentinel V ... further results Directional Spectra (Wave) (6) Nortek Acoustic Wave and Current...

  1. Chicago Office Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  2. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, WillieR.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may link proton transfer to ring compliance.

  3. Merger signatures in the galaxy cluster A98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paterno-Mahler, R.; Blanton, E. L.; Randall, S. W.; Bulbul, E.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.; Johnson, R. E. E-mail: eblanton@bu.edu E-mail: ebulbul@head.cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: cjones@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: rjohnson@gettysburg.edu

    2014-08-20

    We present results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of Abell 98 (A98), a galaxy cluster with three major components: a relatively bright subcluster to the north (A98N), a disturbed subcluster to the south (A98S), and a fainter subcluster to the far south (A98SS). We find evidence for surface brightness and temperature asymmetries in A98N consistent with a shock-heated region to the south, which could be created by an early stage merger between A98N and A98S. Deeper observations are required to confirm this result. We also find that A98S has an asymmetric core temperature structure, likely due to a separate ongoing merger. Evidence for this is also seen in optical data. A98S hosts a wide-angle tail radio source powered by a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We find evidence for a cavity in the intracluster medium that has been evacuated by one of the radio lobes, suggesting that AGN feedback is operating in this system. Examples of cavities in non-cool core clusters are relatively rare. The three subclusters lie along a line in projection, suggesting the presence of a large-scale filament. We observe emission along the filament between A98N and A98S, and a surface brightness profile shows emission consistent with the overlap of the subcluster extended gas halos. We find the temperature of this region is consistent with the temperature of the gas at similar radii outside this bridge region. Lastly, we examine the cluster dynamics using optical data. We conclude A98N and A98S are likely bound to one another with a 67% probability, while A98S and A98SS are not bound at a high level of significance.

  4. Finite formation time of hadrons: the QGP signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, S. M.

    2012-07-15

    In order to investigate the possible emergence of guark-gluon plasma, it is necessary to understand the properties of multiparticle production mechanisms in a more simple case than in relativistic collisions of heavy ions. The purpose of this article is to discuss some problems of the role of zone formation effectwhich are under active investigation nowadays. The formation length of hadron from particle-nucleus collision is derived and compared with those from relativistic ion collisions.

  5. Microsoft Word - eMST report - for signature.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2-00193 Revision 0 Testing and Characterization of Engineered Forms of Monosodium Titanate (MST) K. M. L. Taylor-Pashow C. A. Nash D. T. Hobbs May 2012 Savannah River National...

  6. Experimental signatures of localization in Langmuir wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D.; Bezzerides, B.

    1988-01-01

    Features in certain laser-plasma and ionospheric experiments are identified with the basic properties of Langmuir wave turbulence. Also, a model of caviton nucleation is presented which leads to certain novel scaling predictions. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  7. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  8. Thermal Signatures of the Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  9. Multiclass cancer diagnosis using tumor gene expression signatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramaswamy, S.; Tamayo, P.; Rifkin, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Yeang, C. -H.; Angelo, M.; Ladd, C.; Reich, M.; Latulippe, E.; Mesirov, J. P.; et al

    2001-12-11

    The optimal treatment of patients with cancer depends on establishing accurate diagnoses by using a complex combination of clinical and histopathological data. In some instances, this task is difficult or impossible because of atypical clinical presentation or histopathology. To determine whether the diagnosis of multiple common adult malignancies could be achieved purely by molecular classification, we subjected 218 tumor samples, spanning 14 common tumor types, and 90 normal tissue samples to oligonucleotide microarray gene expression analysis. The expression levels of 16,063 genes and expressed sequence tags were used to evaluate the accuracy of a multiclass classifier based on a supportmore » vector machine algorithm. Overall classification accuracy was 78%, far exceeding the accuracy of random classification (9%). Poorly differentiated cancers resulted in low-confidence predictions and could not be accurately classified according to their tissue of origin, indicating that they are molecularly distinct entities with dramatically different gene expression patterns compared with their well differentiated counterparts. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of accurate, multiclass molecular cancer classification and suggest a strategy for future clinical implementation of molecular cancer diagnostics.« less

  10. Microsoft Word - 11-0434 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    434:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 February 1, 2011 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Audit Report for the Savannah River Site Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-11-01 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the audit report for the Carlsbad Field Office

  11. Microsoft Word - 11-0607 _signature on file_ _2_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KBS:11-0607:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 June 20, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Materials Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of Audit Report for the Hanford Site Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-11-10 Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is the Audit Report for the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  12. Microsoft Word - 11-0656 _signature on file_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RU:MAG:11-0656:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 August 17, 2011 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for CBFO Audit A-11-13 of the INL/CCP Analytical Laboratories Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Audit A-11-13 of the processes

  13. Microsoft Word - 13-2308 (WORD FORMAT) Signature on File

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    308:UFC 2300.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 December 9, 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Dr. Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Recertification Audit A-14-01 of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  14. Microsoft Word - 2007 NESHAP Final with Signature page.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161-0002 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

  15. Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Department of Geophysics

    2008-06-30

    Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

  16. Microsoft Word - finalMOU-4-signature1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM...

  17. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Contract 12-09-09 blackline signature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be deemed unreasonable for BPA to require credit security from an assignee with a Moody's credit rating below "A", or the equivalent if rated by another credit rating agency. No...

  18. Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    analysis systems. less Authors: Staton, Alan W. ; Simonson, Robert Joseph ; Adkins, Douglas Ray ; Rawlinson, Kim Scott ; Robinson, Alex Lockwood ; Hance, Bradley G. ; Manginell,...

  19. Microsoft Word - TQP 1 31 Final w signatures.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Los Alamos Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration January 10-13, 2011 This page intentionally blank Los Alamos Site Office TQP Self-Assessment Report (1/28/11) i January 10-13, 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .......................................................................................................... 1 INTRODUCTION

  20. (Small) Resonant non-Gaussianities: Signatures of a Discrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We apply the Effective Field Theory of Inflation to study the case where the continuous shift symmetry of the Goldstone boson pi is softly broken to a discrete subgroup. This ...

  1. Signatures of initial state modifications on bispectrum statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P Daniel; Schaar, Jan Pieter van der; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano E-mail: j.p.vanderschaar@uva.nl

    2009-05-15

    Modifications of the initial-state of the inflaton field can induce a departure from Gaussianity and leave a testable imprint on the higher order correlations of the CMB and large scale structures in the Universe. We focus on the bispectrum statistics of the primordial curvature perturbation and its projection on the CMB. For a canonical single-field action the three-point correlator enhancement is localized, maximizing in the collinear limit, corresponding to enfolded or squashed triangles in comoving momentum space. We show that the available local and equilateral template are very insensitive to this localized enhancement and do not generate noteworthy constraints on initial-state modifications. On the other hand, when considering the addition of a dimension 8 higher order derivative term, we find a dominant rapidly oscillating contribution, which had previously been overlooked and whose significantly enhanced amplitude is independent of the triangle under consideration. Nevertheless, the oscillatory nature of (the sign of) the correlation function implies the signal is nearly orthogonal to currently available observational templates, strongly reducing the sensitivity to the enhancement. Constraints on departures from the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum state can be derived, but also depend on the next-to-leading terms. We emphasize that the construction and application of especially adapted templates could lead to CMB bispectrum constraints on modified initial states already competing with those derived from the power spectrum.

  2. Microsoft Word - 2007 NESHAP Final with Signature page.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161-0002 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

  3. Center for Space and Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Call for Proposals Submit Proposals Research Subject Areas Types of Proposals Funding for Projects Evaluation and Selection Acceptance and Rejection Events, Deadlines Partnerships NSEC » CSES Center for Space and Earth Science Formerly known as the Institute for Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) Contact Director Reiner Friedel (505) 665-1936 Email Professional Staff Assistant Georgia D. Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email Science Discipline Leaders Astrophysics & Cosmology Hui

  4. Using {sup 222}Rn as a tracer of geophysical processes in underground environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacerda, T.; Anjos, R. M.; Silva, A. A. R. da; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-11-11

    Radon levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina, are reported and analyzed. These mines are today used for touristic visitation. Our goal was to assess the potential use of such radioactive noble gas as tracer of geological processes in underground environments. CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used during the winter and summer seasons. The findings show that the significant radon concentrations reported in this environment are subject to large seasonal modulations, due to the strong dependence of natural ventilation on the variations of outside temperature. The results also indicate that radon pattern distribution appear as a good method to localize unknown ducts, fissures or secondary tunnels in subterranean environments.

  5. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  6. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, 1992. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M.

    1993-06-14

    This report contains brief discussions on topics in the following areas: High-pressure sciences; astrophysics; and geosciences.

  7. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a...

  8. An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that other similar geothermal reservoirs may be found in the island. Authors M. Fytikas, J. D. Garnish, V. R. S. Hutton, E. Staroste and J. Wohlenberg Published Journal...

  9. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  10. Feasibility of Geophysical Monitoring of Carbon-Sequestrated Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallick, Subhashis; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2013-09-30

    As carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is sequestered from the bottom of a brine reservoir and allowed to migrate upward, the effects of the relative permeability hysteresis due to capillary trapping and buoyancy driven migration tend to make the reservoir patchy saturated with different fluid phases over time. Seismically, such a patchy saturated reservoir induces an effective anisotropic behavior whose properties are primarily dictated by the nature of the saturation of different fluid phases in the pores and the elastic properties of the rock matrix. By combining reservoir flow simulation and modeling with seismic modeling, it is possible to derive these effective anisotropic properties, which, in turn, could be related to the saturation of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir volume any time during the post-injection scenario. Therefore, if time-lapse seismic data are available and could be inverted for the effective anisotropic properties of the reservoir, they, in combination with reservoir simulation could potentially predict the CO{sub 2} saturation directly from the time-lapse seismic data. It is therefore concluded that the time-lapse seismic data could be used to monitor the carbon sequestrated saline reservoirs. But for its successful implementation, seismic modeling and inversion methods must be integrated with the reservoir simulations. In addition, because CO{sub 2} sequestration induces an effective anisotropy in the sequestered reservoir and anisotropy is best detected using multicomponent seismic data compared to single component (P-wave) data, acquisition, processing, and analysis is multicomponent seismic data is recommended for these time-lapse studies. Finally, a successful implementation of using time-lapse seismic data for monitoring the carbon sequestrated saline reservoirs will require development of a robust methodology for inverting multicomponent seismic data for subsurface anisotropic properties.

  11. Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

  12. Geology and geophysics of Proterozoic basement rocks in the eastern midcontinent of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidiak, E.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Upper crustal Proterozoic rocks of the eastern midcontinent of the U.S. are part of the transcontinental Proterozoic province, a 3,000 km-long belt of anorogenic igneous rocks that extends from western Ohio to southern California. Regional magnetic and gravity anomaly maps reveal a variety of prominent anomalies and gradients that reflect major basement or intrabasement structures. Widespread are pronounced (10--20 km diameter), high-amplitude (600--700 gamma) circular to elliptical positive magnetic anomalies that are associated with magnetite-series granites and coeval rhyolites. Also present (in Indiana) are a series of ring-shaped magnetic anomalies that have a diameter of about 50 km and form circular to elliptical patterns of narrow positive anomalies bordered by negative anomalies and ringing a central minimum. Modeling of the anomalies suggests that they may be ring dike complexes associated with calderas. Two prominent circular gravity lows associated with large granitic batholiths have also been identified. The larger of these, the Wisconsin gravity minimum, has a diameter of about 250 km and an amplitude of about [minus]65 mgals and is associated with the Wolf River batholith. The second gravity low has a diameter of about 75 km and an amplitude of about [minus]25 mgals and is in east-central Kentucky. Several major rift zones are present in the eastern midcontinent. The most prominent of these is the New Madrid rift complex, a failed-arm structure that extends into the craton beneath the Mississippi embayment. Also present are linear arrays of positive magnetic and gravity anomalies that are associated with basaltic rift zones. These include the mid-Michigan rift and the Ft. Wayne rift, as well as with possible rifts associated with the mid-Tennessee and Louisville positive anomalies.

  13. 188795.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    John Woolery Signature of John Woolery Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein

  14. SRS-Tritium FY12 PEP_Redacted.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Douglas Dearolph Signature of Dennis Donati

  15. Geophysical methods for coal seam variability detection in front of mining face. Report No. 1, state of the art report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakolski, R.

    1980-07-01

    Problems in detecting geologic faults or washouts in coal seams by the use of seismic waves are considered. For transmission, the shot point should not be greater than 500 m from the detection point. A minimum thickness of the seam for transmission is equivalent to the lower limit of thickness for mining. The interpretation of the results is more difficult for thick seams (25 m) and the resolution is lower. The throw of a fault should be equal to the seam thickness or greater; throws of half the thickness can be detected only in favorable conditions; the fault must not be parallel to the propagation. The nature of the fault or washout cannot usually be determined. Problems are even greater when use is made of reflected waves: shorter distances (< 250 m), inclination to seam plane must be 25 to 30/sup 0/ and angle of incidence at a plane of the seam is equal to the angle of reflection. The theory of such measurements is given, the use of models for interpretation considered; the availability of equipment; and the processing of the data are discussed. (LTN)

  16. Investigations on the Structure Tectonics, Geophysics, Geochemistry, and Hydrocarbon Potential of the Black Mesa Basin, Northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Colin; Carroll, Herbert; Erickson, Richard; George, Steve; Guo, Genliang; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, Michael; Volk, Len

    1999-04-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has instituted a basin-analysis study program to encourage drilling in underexplored and unexplored areas and increase discovery rates for hydrocarbons by independent oil companies within the continental United States. The work is being performed at the DOE's National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by the Exploration and Drilling Group within BDM-Oklahoma (BDM), the manager of the facility for DOE. Several low-activity areas in the Mid-Continent, west, and southwest were considered for the initial study area (Reeves and Carroll 1994a). The Black Mesa region in northwestern Arizona is shown on the U.S. Geological Survey 1995 oil and gas map of the United States as an undrilled area, adapted from Takahashi and Gautier 1995. This basin was selected by DOE s the site for the initial NIPER-BDM survey to develop prospects within the Lower-48 states (Reeves and Carroll 1994b).

  17. A digital seismogram archive of nuclear explosion signals, recorded at the Borovoye Geophysical Observatory, Kazakhstan, from 1966 to 1996

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Vadim A.; Ovtchinnikov, Vladimir M.; Kaazik, Pyotr B.; Adushkin, Vitaly V.; Sokolova, Inna N.; Aleschenko, Iraida B.; Mikhailova, Natalya N.; Kim, Won -Young; Richards, Paul G.; Patton, Howard J.; et al

    2015-03-27

    Seismologists from Kazakhstan, Russia, and the United States have rescued the Soviet-era archive of nuclear explosion seismograms recorded at Borovoye in northern Kazakhstan during the period 1966–1996. The signals had been stored on about 8000 magnetic tapes, which were held at the recording observatory. After hundreds of man-years of work, these digital waveforms together with significant metadata are now available via the project URL, namely http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/Monitoring/Data/ as a modern open database, of use to diverse communities. Three different sets of recording systems were operated at Borovoye, each using several different seismometers and different gain levels. For some explosions, more thanmore » twenty different channels of data are available. A first data release, in 2001, contained numerous glitches and lacked many instrument responses, but could still be used for measuring accurate arrival times and for comparison of the strengths of different types of seismic waves. The project URL also links to our second major data release, for nuclear explosions in Eurasia recorded in Borovoye, in which the data have been deglitched, all instrument responses have been included, and recording systems are described in detail. This second dataset consists of more than 3700 waveforms (digital seismograms) from almost 500 nuclear explosions in Eurasia, many of them recorded at regional distances. It is important as a training set for the development and evaluation of seismological methods of discriminating between earthquakes and underground explosions, and can be used for assessment of three-dimensional models of the Earth’s interior structure.« less

  18. A digital seismogram archive of nuclear explosion signals, recorded at the Borovoye Geophysical Observatory, Kazakhstan, from 1966 to 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Vadim A.; Ovtchinnikov, Vladimir M.; Kaazik, Pyotr B.; Adushkin, Vitaly V.; Sokolova, Inna N.; Aleschenko, Iraida B.; Mikhailova, Natalya N.; Kim, Won -Young; Richards, Paul G.; Patton, Howard J.; Scott Phillips, W.; Randall, George; Baker, Diane

    2015-03-27

    Seismologists from Kazakhstan, Russia, and the United States have rescued the Soviet-era archive of nuclear explosion seismograms recorded at Borovoye in northern Kazakhstan during the period 19661996. The signals had been stored on about 8000 magnetic tapes, which were held at the recording observatory. After hundreds of man-years of work, these digital waveforms together with significant metadata are now available via the project URL, namely http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/Monitoring/Data/ as a modern open database, of use to diverse communities. Three different sets of recording systems were operated at Borovoye, each using several different seismometers and different gain levels. For some explosions, more than twenty different channels of data are available. A first data release, in 2001, contained numerous glitches and lacked many instrument responses, but could still be used for measuring accurate arrival times and for comparison of the strengths of different types of seismic waves. The project URL also links to our second major data release, for nuclear explosions in Eurasia recorded in Borovoye, in which the data have been deglitched, all instrument responses have been included, and recording systems are described in detail. This second dataset consists of more than 3700 waveforms (digital seismograms) from almost 500 nuclear explosions in Eurasia, many of them recorded at regional distances. It is important as a training set for the development and evaluation of seismological methods of discriminating between earthquakes and underground explosions, and can be used for assessment of three-dimensional models of the Earths interior structure.

  19. A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

    2011-08-31

    The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

  20. Sediment facies of Enewetak Atoll lagoon. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardlaw, B.R.; Henry, T.W.; Martin, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two sets of benthic (bottom-surface) samples were taken from the lagoon on Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, during the PEACE Program (1984-1985). These samples were collected to (1) familiarize project geologists with the distribution of sediment types and facies within Enewetak lagoon, (2) increase understanding of the distribution of modern microfaunas in the lagoon, and (3) supplement studies of the sea-floor features both within and near OAK and KOA craters. The benthic sample studies aided both evaluation of the stratigraphic sequence penetrated during the Drilling Phase and interpretation of the litho- and biostratigraphic framework used in analysis of OAK and KOA.