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1

ARM - Datastreams - mwrp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmwrp Datastreamsmwrp Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025254 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : MWRP Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals Active Dates 2004.02.19 - 2014.01.01 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MWRP) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Azimuth angle degrees azimuth Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time

2

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

Caddeau, MP

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

3

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

4

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jensen, Mike

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Retrieval of Hydrometeor Profiles in Tropical Cyclones and Convection from Combined Radar and Radiometer Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of understanding the global energy and water cycles by providing four-dimensional distributions of latent heat- ing related to latent heating, ice water content (IWC) and liquid water content (LWC) have implications A retrieval algorithm is described to estimate vertical profiles of precipitation ice water content and liquid

Jiang, Haiyan

6

Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

Morris, VR

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Spectro-Radiometer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectro-Radiometer Spectro-Radiometer Spectro-Radiometer spectro-radiometer Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer The spectro-radiometer is used to measure the light output of a light source at each wavelength. The part that looks like a video camera (to the far right in the picture) can look at each wavelength separately. The spectro-radiometer can also be used as a standard light meter and measure all visible wavelengths at once to obtain the total light output of a source. The console portion of the spectro-radiometer is used to display the meter readings and also to adjust measurement settings like the sensitivity. The computer is interfaced with the spectro-radiometer and is used to send commands to the machine and receive, store, and analyze the data.

8

Characterization and calibration of 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system for SST-1 tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system (74–86 GHz) is designed, characterized, and calibrated to measure the radial electron temperature profile by measuring Electron Cyclotron Emission spectrum at SST-1 Tokamak. The developed radiometer has a noise equivalent temperature of 1 eV and sensitivity of 5 × 10{sup 9} V/W. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperature, a calibration measurement of the radiometer system is performed using hot-cold Dicke switch method, which confirms the system linearity.

Siju, Varsha; Kumar, Dharmendra; Shukla, Praveena; Pathak, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Spectroscopy with Multichannel Correlation Radiometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlation radiometers make true differential measurements in power with high accuracy and small systematic errors. This receiver architecture has been used in radio astronomy for measurements of continuum radiation for over 50 years; this article examines spectroscopy over broad bandwidths using correlation techniques. After general discussions of correlation and the choice of hybrid phase, experimental results from tests with a simple laboratory multi-channel correlation radiometer are shown. Analysis of the effect of the input hybrid's phase shows that a 90 degree hybrid is likely to be the best general choice for radio astronomy, depending on its amplitude match and phase flatness with frequency. The laboratory results verify that the combination of the correlation architecture and an analog lag correlator is an excellent method for spectroscopy over very wide bandwidths.

A. I. Harris

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

GVR (G-Band Vapor Radiometer) M.P. Cadeddu and J.C. Liljegren Argonne Natl. Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MWR status MWR status M.P. Cadeddu New radiometers New radiometers ECO-00664 (MWR procurement) open Specifications have been written and submitted Draft of specifications sent to vendors last month A few changes were incorporated after vendors feedback. Final specification document will be sent next week. ECO-00664 (MWR procurement) open Specifications have been written and submitted Draft of specifications sent to vendors last month A few changes were incorporated after vendors feedback. Final specification document will be sent next week. PWV-LWP: 12 2-channel MWR Temperature-humidity profile: 2 profilers operating Low LWP-PWV: 2 183-GHz radiometers Low LWP: 2 90/150-GHz radiometers PWV-LWP: 12 2-channel MWR Temperature-humidity profile: 2 profilers

11

Simultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to simultaneously retrieve the vertical profile of precipitation and the near-surface wind speed. ResultsSimultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements simultaneously estimates the over ocean near-surface wind speed and rain rate profile using data from a 10.7 GHz

Ruf, Christopher

12

Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 90/150-GHz Vapor Radiometer provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

Caddedu, MP

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

DeGrado, Timothy R. [Mayo Clinic] [Mayo Clinic (United States)

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements and Radiosonde Comparisons During the WVIOP2000 Field Experiment D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquil, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Y. Han Science System Applications National Aeronautics Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland S. Keihm Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California Introduction During September to October 2000, a water vapor intensive operational period (WVIOP) was conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and

15

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrument Cross-Comparisons and Automated Quality Instrument Cross-Comparisons and Automated Quality Control of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data S. Moore and G. Hughes ATK Mission Research Santa Barbara, California Introduction Within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) instrument network, several different systems often measure the same quantity at the same site. For example, several ARM instruments measure time- series profiles of the atmosphere that were previously available only from balloon-borne radiosonde systems. These instruments include the Radar Wind Profilers (RWP) with Radio-Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS), the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), the Microwave Radiometer Profiler (MWRP), and the Raman Lidar (RL). ARM researchers have described methods for direct

16

Crookes's radiometers: a train of thought manifest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiant molecular energy of solar masses may at last be found...considered viscosity of the residual gas, and one of the Royal Society...He then described a little turbine radiometer not blacked at all...the warmer side, while the gas creeps around the edges from...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

183-GHz Radiometer Handbook - November 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer (GVR) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from four double sideband channels centered at ± 1, ± 3, ± 7, and ± 14 GHz around the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. The 183.31 ± 14-GHz channel is particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from this nstrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm).

MP Cadeddu

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electrically calibrated absolute radiometer suitable for measurement automation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New electrically calibrated absolute radiometers (ESRs) were developed having fast response and high responsivity; these ESRs are specially useful for measurement automation. They are...

Boivin, Louis-Philippe; McNeely, Francis T

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: radiometer standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

Estey, R.S.; Seaman, C.H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Correlation of globe thermometer response and a YSI radiometer response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOWARD FRANKNECHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subjects Industrial Hygiene CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOMARD FRANKNECHT Approved as to sty1e and content by: C'6~& . ~ Chairman of Committee ead...

Franknecht, Robert Howard

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calibrations of filter radiometers for determination of atmospheric optical depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric optical depths are determined by relating ground-based measurements of direct solar radiation to the extraterrestrial value, I0, that a filter radiometer would read outside the atmosphere. Usually I0 is determined by the Langley extrapolation technique from a high-altitude site, where clear and highly stable atmospheric conditions may be found. Alternatively, I0 can be measured in situ from a stratospheric balloon experiment. We have employed both methods and found agreement to better than 1 %. Filter radiometers tend to change over time, especially when used operationally outdoors. Absolute calibrations in the laboratory are used to monitor the radiometric stability of filter radiometers at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD/WRC, Switzerland). A spectral calibration facility based on a calibrated trap detector from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) is used to relate the filter radiometer to an accurate and long-term traceable standard. An FEL-lamp-based standard, previously used for several years, was compared with the new trap standard via a filter radiometer at four wavelengths between 368 nm and 862 nm and revealed a systematic difference of the order of 5 %. The link between radiometric and I0 calibration is the value of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum at the filter radiometer wavelengths which can be determined from these two calibrations and compared with published values.

Ch Wehrli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

Cadeddu, MP

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Differential Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

25

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ARM - Measurement - Virtual temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVirtual temperature govMeasurementsVirtual temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Virtual temperature The virtual temperature Tv = T(1 + rv/{epsilon}), where rv is the mixing ratio, and {epsilon} is the ratio of the gas constants of air and water vapor ( 0.622). Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RWP : Radar Wind Profiler

29

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ten channel background alpha radiometer for nondestructive analysis of low activity samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The description of a ten-channel alpha-radiometer based on large-area semiconductor detectors is presented in this paper. The radiometer is intended for determination of soil pollution by alpha-active radionuclides using thick samples. The analysis of isotopes is also provided. The concentrations of Pu and Am isotopes in soil samples are determined.

Pugatch, V.M.; Pavlenko, Y.N.; Vasiliev, Y.O.; Nenakhov, A.N.; Tkatch, N.M.; Barabash, L.I.; Berdnichenko, S.V.; Litovchenko, P.G.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Zinets, O.S. (Inst. for Nuclear Research, Kiev (USSR))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Calibration of a Solar Absolute Cavity Radiometer with Traceability to the World Radiometric Reference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the present method of establishing traceability of absolute cavity radiometers to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) through the process employed in the International Pyrheliometer Comparisons (IPC). This method derives the WRR reduction factor for each of the participating cavity radiometers. An alternative method is proposed, described, and evaluated as a way to reduce the uncertainty in the comparison process. The two methods are compared using a sample of data from the recent IPC-VIII conducted from September 25th to October 13th, 1995 at the World Radiation Center in Davos, Switzerland. A description of absolute cavity radiometers is also included, using a PMO-6 as an example of active cavity radiometers, and a HF as an example of passive cavity radiometers.

Reda, I.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

33

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

34

MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN THE ARCTIC Cadeddu, Maria Argonne National Laboratory Category: Instruments A new G-band (183 GHz) vapor radiometer (GVR), developed and built by Prosensing Inc. (http://www.prosensing.com), was deployed in Barrow, Alaska, in April 2005. The radiometer was deployed as part of the ongoing Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's effort to improve water vapor retrievals in the cold, dry Arctic environment. The instrument measures brightness temperatures from four double sideband channels centered at 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz from the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. The GVR will remain in Barrow

35

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network M. A. Miller, R. M. Reynolds, and J. J. Bartholomew Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction A network of ship-mounted marine fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) and broadband radiometers have been deployed over the fast four years on several backbone ships, funded jointly by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Studies (SIMBIOS). These radiometers operate continuously and automatically during daylight hours. There fundamental measurements made by the FRSRs in the network are the direct-normal irradiance

36

Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Xiao, J. S.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Fusion and Advanced Electromagnetic Technology Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Phillips, P. E.; Huang, H.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer David A in atmospheric water vapor that distort the phase coherence of incoming celestial signals. The signal received water vapor, this paper presents results obtained with a second generation IRMA operating at the James

Naylor, David A.

39

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Outgassing, Temperature Gradients and the Radiometer Effect in LISA: A Torsion Pendulum Investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal modeling of the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) includes such effects as outgassing from the proof mass and its housing and the radiometer effect. Experimental data in conditions emulating the LISA GRS are required to confidently predict the GRS performance. Outgassing and the radiometer effect are similar in characteristics and are difficult to decouple experimentally. The design of our torsion balance allows us to investigate differential radiation pressure, the radiometer effect, and outgassing on closely separated conducting surfaces with high sensitivity. A thermally controlled split copper plate is brought near a freely hanging plate-torsion pendulum.We have varied the temperature on each half of the copper plate and have measured the resulting forces on the pendulum. We have determined that to first order the current GRS model for the radiometer effect, outgassing, and radiation pressure are mostly consistent with our torsion balance measurements and therefore these thermal effects do not appear to be a large hindrance to the LISA noise budget. However, there remain discrepancies between the predicted dependence of these effects on the temperature of our apparatus.

Scott E Pollack; Stephan Schlamminger; Jens H Gundlach

2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Using a cold radiometer to measure heat loads and survey heat leaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed an inexpensive cold radiometer for use in thermal/vacuum chambers to measure heat loads, characterize emissivity and specularity of surfaces and to survey areas to evaluate stray heat loads. We report here the results of two such tests for the James Webb Space Telescope to measure heat loads and effective emissivities of 2 major pieces of optical ground support equipment that will be used in upcoming thermal vacuum testing of the Telescope.

DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Hait, T.; Shirron, P. [Cryogenics and Fluids Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Partial Discharge Location using Unsynchronized Radiometer Network for Condition Monitoring in HV Substations - A Proposed Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A location estimation system for online Partial Discharge (PD) detection is proposed as a low-cost approach to real-time condition monitoring, asset management and operation optimization in future smart grid. Some early progress in the development of subsystems (specifically the antenna, radiometer device, PD emulator and PD generator) for a proof-of-principle prototype system is described. The proposed PD Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) uses a novel approach to PD location which obviates the need for synchronization between sensors thereby improving scalability.

J M R de Souza Neto (IEEE member); E C T de Macedo; J S da Rocha Neto (IEEE senior member); E G da Costa; S A Bhatti; I A Glover

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) for remote sensing cloud studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) has been developed as are relatively inexpensive ({approximately}$IM/copy), well-calibrated,imaging radiometer for aircraft studies of cloud properties. The instrument is designed to fly on an Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) platform at altitudes from the surface up to 20 km. MPIR is being developed to support the Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle portion of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurements program (ARM/UAV). Radiation-cloud interactions are the dominant uncertainty in the current General Circulation Models used for atmospheric climate studies. Reduction of this uncertainty is a top scientific priority of the US Global Change Research Program and the ARM program. While the DOE`s ARM program measures a num-ber of parameters from the ground-based Clouds and Radiation Testbed sites, it was recognized from the outset that other key parameters are best measured by sustained airborne data taking. These measurements are critical in our understanding of global change issues as well as for improved atmospheric and near space weather forecasting applications.

Phipps, G.S.; Grotbeck, C.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

People Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Is NIF? How NIF Works Seven Wonders Beamline NIF Construction Who Works for NIF & PS? People Profiles Management Awards Honors Fellows Who Partners with NIF? FAQs Visit Us...

46

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates V. Mattioli and P. Basili Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction In recent years the Global Positioning System (GPS) has proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring precipitable water vapor (PWV) (Bevis et al. 1992), offering an independent source of information on water vapor when compared with microwave radiometers (MWRs), and/or radiosonde

47

Retrieval of Optical And Size Parameters of Aerosols Utilizing a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and MICROTOPS Sun Photometer Antonio Aguirre Radiometer (MFRSR) and comparing with data from a CIMEL Sun Photometer and a MICROTOPS Sun Photometer. Using the inverse cosine of the angle between the sun and the vertical. A Langley plot provides a linear regression

48

Validation of Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers M. M. Khaiyer and J. Huang Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis, B. Lin, and W. L. Smith, Jr. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia A. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia A. Rapp Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Satellites are useful for monitoring climatological parameters over large domains. They are especially useful for measuring various cloud microphysical and radiative parameters where ground-based instruments are not available. The geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) has been used to retrieve cloud and radiative properties over an extended domain centered on the Atmospheric

49

Modification of the collective Thomson scattering radiometer in the search for parametric decay on TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strong scattering of high-power millimeter waves at 140 GHz has been shown to take place in heating and current-drive experiments at TEXTOR when a tearing mode is present in the plasma. The scattering signal is at present supposed to be generated by the parametric decay instability. Here we describe the heterodyne detection system used to characterize the newly discovered signal measured at TEXTOR, and we present spectral shapes in which the signal can appear under different conditions. The radiation is collected by the receiver through a quasi-optical transmission line that is independent of the electron cyclotron resonance heating transmission line, and so the scattering geometry is variable. The signal is detected with 42 frequency channels ranging from 136 to 142 GHz. We demonstrate that the large signal does not originate from gyrotron spurious radiation. The measured signal agrees well with independent backscattering radiometer data.

Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P.; Stejner, M. [Association EURATOM - DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Risoe Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bongers, W.; Moseev, D.; Westerhof, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM - FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oosterbeek, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics, Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

Long, Charles N.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mentee Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

52

Mentor Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

53

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scan...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scanning Radiometer Data D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction A system of two scanning radiometers has been developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) and deployed on the NOAA Ron H. Brown (RHB) Research Vessel (RV) during the Nauru99 cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific,

54

On the challenges of tomography retrievals of a 2D water vapor field using ground-based microwave radiometers: An observation system simulation experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-dimensional water vapor fields were retrieved by simulated measurements from multiple ground-based microwave radiometers using a tomographic approach. The goal of this paper was to investigate how the various aspects of the instrument set-up (...

Véronique Meunier; David D. Turner; Pavlos Kollias

55

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site C. M. R. Platt and R. T. Austin Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado C. M. R. Platt and J. A. Bennett Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Abstract The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (CSIRO/ARM) Program Mark II infrared (IR) filter radiometer operated continuously at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site for a period of five weeks. Data of high quality were obtained by remote operation and data transfer with no evidence of spurious

56

Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

Myers, D. R.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A reactionless, bearingless linear shutter mechanism for the multispectral pushbroom imaging radiometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program is a multi-laboratory, interagency program as part of DOE`s principal entry into the US Global Change Research Program. Two issues addressed are the radiation budget and its spectral dependence, and radiative and other properties of clouds. Measures of solar flux divergence and energy exchanges between clouds, the earth, its oceans, and the atmosphere through various altitudes are sought. Additionally, the program seeks to provide measurements to calibrate satellite radiance products and validate their associated flux retrieval algorithms. Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles fly long, extended missions. MPIR is one of the primary instruments on the ARM-UAV campaigns. A shutter mechanism has been developed and flown as part of an airborne imaging radiometer having application to spacecraft or other applications requiring low vibration, high reliability, and long life. The device could be employed in other cases where a reciprocating platform is needed. Typical shutters and choppers utilize a spinning disc, or in very small instruments, a vibrating vane to continually interrupt incident light or radiation that enters the system. A spinning disk requires some sort of bearings that usually have limited life, and at a minimum introduce issues of reliability. Friction, lubrication and contamination always remain critical areas of concern, as well as the need for power to operate. Dual vibrating vanes may be dynamically well balanced as a set and are frictionless. However, these are limited by size in a practical sense. In addition, multiples of these devices are difficult to synchronize.

Krumel, L.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

The R/V Discoverer cruise to Manus Island. The BNL Portable Radiometer Package (PRP) evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory installed and operated a Portable Radiation Package (PRP) on the NOAA ship R/V DISCOVERER as part of the Combined Sensor Program cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean. The DISCOVERER transported a collection of radiation and atmospheric instrumentation to positions offshore of manus Island to compare cloud and radiation fields to like instruments measured from a station on the island. The ship sailed NW from Pago Pago, American Samoa, on 14 March 1996 to a latitude of 1{degree}S then due West until it approached manus Island (2{degree}S and 148{degree}E) on approximately 7 April. The ship then turned SW and approached Manus Island in three steps. This route was reversed during the ship`s return to Hawaii. The PRP package is a compact low-power integration of simple sensors that measure long- and short-wave irradiance from moving platforms. A rapid rotating shadowband radiometer that is designed to provide good estimates of diffuse (sky) radiation even from moving buoys or ships was being evaluated. The PRP provided the only means of making diffuse (sky) radiation measurements from the ship. The CSP cruise provided an excellent opportunity to intercompare the PRP with other like instruments in the TWP locale. The unit was located on the starboard flying bridge which was fully exposed to direct sunlight during the ship`s westward transit. When the ship was at its closest approach to manus, the PRP was moved to the island where careful intercomparison with the Manus instrumentation was conducted.

Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

62

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

63

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

64

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

65

Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

User_TalentProfile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

67

Validation of Geolocation of Measurements of the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) Scanning Radiometers aboard Three Spacecraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument is a scanning radiometer for measuring Earth-emitted and -reflected solar radiation to understand Earth’s energy balance. One CERES instrument was placed into orbit aboard the ...

G. Louis Smith; Kory J. Priestley; Phillip C. Hess; Chris Currey; Peter Spence

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

GVR (G-Band Vapor Radiometer) M.P. Cadeddu and J.C. Liljegren Argonne Natl. Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM 90/150 GHz data at ARM 90/150 GHz data at COPS M.P. Cadeddu, A. Vogelmann, D.D. Turner, S. Crewell, U. Lönhert MWRHF (90/150) data Data available at archives from 06/22 to 12/31 Challenges associated with instrument: New instrument - new technology We still need to learn about calibration Spectral region (WV continuum) still uncertain in models Data available at archives from 06/22 to 12/31 Challenges associated with instrument: New instrument - new technology We still need to learn about calibration Spectral region (WV continuum) still uncertain in models Weather conditions were not ideal for the initial testing of the instrument. The radiometer did not calibrate from 06/30 until 10/13 The few calibrations in June may have been affected by dew formation Calibration of summer data is

69

LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profiles Shea Mosby: Lighting the way for nuclear science discoveries By Diana Del Mauro ADEPS Communications Photos by Richard Robinson, IRM-CAS Shea Mosby Cradling a heavy...

70

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

71

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7-26-2013. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal agency under the Department of Energy. BPA markets wholesale electrical power...

72

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

73

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment V. Mattioli Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Morris Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are widely used to measure atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid path (CLP). Comparisons of PWV derived from MWRs with water vapor retrievals from instruments like radiosondes, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Raman

74

Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the full wave information of the mm-wave signals under investigation. The system is based on directly digitizing the IF band after down conversion. The enabling technology consists of a fast multi-giga sample analog to digital converter that has recently become available. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) are implemented to accomplish versatile real-time data analysis. A prototype system has been developed and tested and its performance has been compared with conventional electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrometer systems. On the TEXTOR Tokamak a proof of principle shows that ECE, together with high power injected and scattered radiation, becomes amenable to measurement by this device. In particular, its capability to measure the phase of coherent signals in the spectrum offers important advantages in diagnostics and control. One case developed in detail employs the FPGA in real-time fast Fourier transform (FFT) and additional signal processing. The major benefit of such a FFT-based system is the real-time trade-off that can be made between frequency and time resolution. For ECE diagnostics this corresponds to a flexible spatial resolution in the plasma, with potential application in smart sensing of plasma instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and sawtooth instabilities. The flexible resolution would allow for the measurement of the full mode content of plasma instabilities contained within the system bandwidth.

Bongers, W. A.; Beveren, V. van; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; Berg, M. A. van den; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Thoen, D. J. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Nuij, P. J. W. M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baar, M. R. de; Donne, A. J. H.; Hennen, B. A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kantor, M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Forschungszentrum Juelich GMBH, Institute of Energy and Climate research, Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint-Petersburg, 195256 (Russian Federation)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

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Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

76

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Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

77

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

78

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Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

79

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Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

80

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Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

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81

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Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

82

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

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Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

83

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

84

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

85

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

86

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

87

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

88

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

89

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

90

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

91

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

92

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

93

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

94

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

95

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

96

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

97

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

98

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

99

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

100

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

102

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

103

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

104

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

105

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

106

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

107

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

108

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

109

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

110

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

111

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

112

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

113

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

114

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

115

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

116

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

117

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

118

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

119

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

120

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

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121

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

122

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

123

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

124

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

125

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

126

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

127

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

128

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

129

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

130

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

131

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

132

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

133

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

134

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

135

profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profiles profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

136

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

137

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

138

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

139

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

140

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

142

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

143

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

144

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

145

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

146

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

147

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

148

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

149

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

150

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

151

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

152

Profiling for Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance and profiling are critical words in our everyday conversations in the office where I work, in our engagements with clients, and in our teaching. Both words apply equally well to all aspec...

Ron Crisco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

154

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

155

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

156

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

157

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

158

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

159

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

160

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

162

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

163

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

164

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

165

Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, and liquid water path. The instrument consists of photodiode sensors positioned beneath two narrow metal bands that occult the sun by moving alternately from horizon to horizon. Measurements from the narrowband 415-nm channel were used to demonstrate a retrieval of the cloud properties of interest. With the proven operation of the relatively inexpensive TCRSR instrument, its usefulness for retrieving aerosol properties under cloud-free skies and for ship-based observations is discussed.

Bartholomew M. J.; Reynolds, R. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Min, Q.; Edwards, R.; Smith, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 vii Major Findings This edition of Performance Profiles reviews financial and operating data for the calendar year 2009 and discusses important trends and emerging issues relevant to U.S. energy company operations. Major U.S.-based oil and natural gas producers and petroleum refiners submit the data in this report annually on Form EIA-28, the Financial Reporting System (FRS). FRS companies' net income declined to the lowest level since 2002.  Net income fell 66 percent (in constant 2009 dollars) to $30 billion in 2009 from $88 billion in 2008. Substantial reductions in oil and natural gas prices in 2009 slowed revenue growth. FRS companies cut operating costs but by less than the decline in revenue, resulting in a 69-percent drop in operating income.

167

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

168

MWRRET (Microwave Radiometer Retrievals)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plus Plus Plus Andy Vogelmann, Dave Turner Andy Vogelmann, Dave Turner & Jennifer Comstock & Jennifer Comstock Min Min Susanne Crewell Susanne Crewell Ulrich L Ulrich L ö ö rnard rnard Jim Liljegren Jim Liljegren John Ogre John Ogre . Y. Matrosov . Y. Matrosov Sally McFarlane Sally McFarlane Warren Wiscombe, Christine Chiu, Sasha Marshak, Maria Warren Wiscombe, Christine Chiu, Sasha Marshak, Maria Cadeddu, Qilong Min, Susanne Crewell, Ulrich L Cadeddu, Qilong Min, Susanne Crewell, Ulrich L ö ö hnert, Mandy hnert, Mandy M. Khaiyer, Greg McFarquhar , Chuck Long, Bill O M. Khaiyer, Greg McFarquhar , Chuck Long, Bill O ' ' Hirok, Bin Hirok, Bin Lin, Connor Flynn, Eli Mlawer, Graham Feingold, Jim Barnard, Lin, Connor Flynn, Eli Mlawer, Graham Feingold, Jim Barnard,

169

Radiometer Calibration Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wilcox, T. L. Stoffel, and D. R. Myers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Calibrations of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) broadband...

170

Inexpensive photovoltaic solar radiometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a solar cell as a sensor a low?cost instrument can be constructed which measures both the instantaneous and integrated value of solar flux. The process of constructing and calibrating the instrument constitutes an excellent undergraduate experimental project affording the student an opportunity to examine a variety of aspects associated with solar energy measurements.

Fritz Kissner

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

172

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

173

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

174

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

175

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

176

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

177

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

178

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

179

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

180

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

182

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

183

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

184

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

185

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

186

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

187

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

188

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

189

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

190

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

191

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

192

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

193

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

194

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

195

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

196

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

197

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

198

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

199

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

200

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

202

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

203

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

204

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

205

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

206

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

207

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

208

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

209

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

210

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

211

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

212

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

213

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

214

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

06) 06) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 December 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division, Financial

215

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

216

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

217

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

Tokarz, R.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING by J.K. Shultis Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering College of Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Dec. 2003 #12;Notes on Neutron Depth Profiling J. Kenneth Shultis December 2003 1 Introduction The purpose of neutron depth profiling

Shultis, J. Kenneth

219

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MWRP deployed at the ARM NSA CF in Barrow, Alaska. The IR (10-micrometer wavelength) thermometer mounted on the MWRP provides an estimate of cloud base temperature, which is used...

220

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The BOOMERANG North America Instrument: A Balloon-borne Bolometric Radiometer Optimized for Measurements of Cosmic Background Radiation Anisotropies from 03 to 4°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the BOOMERANG North America instrument, a balloon-borne bolometric radiometer designed to map the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation with 03 resolution over a significant portion of the sky. This receiver employs new technologies in bolometers, readout electronics, millimeter-wave optics and filters, cryogenics, scan, and attitude reconstruction. All these subsystems are described in detail in this paper. The system has been fully calibrated in flight using a variety of techniques, which are described and compared. Using this system, we have obtained a measurement of the first peak in the CMB angular power spectrum in a single, few hour long balloon flight. The instrument described here was a prototype of the BOOMERANG Long Duration Balloon experiment.

F. Piacentini; P. A. R. Ade; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. Boscaleri; P. Cardoni; B. P. Crill; P. de Bernardis; H. Del Castillo; G. De Troia; P. Farese; M. Giacometti; E. F. Hivon; V. V. Hristov; A. Iacoangeli; A. E. Lange; S. Masi; P. D. Mauskopf; L. Miglio; C. B. Netterfield; P. Palangio; E. Pascale; A. Raccanelli; S. Rao; G. Romeo; J. Ruhl; F. Scaramuzzi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

175 pounds of nitrogen, 80 pounds of phosphorus, and 80 pounds of potassium. Potassium is generally not needed in the High Plains, although many growers apply it. Texas Crop Profile P O T A T O E S E-19 3-00 Prepared by Kent D. Hall, Rodney L. Holloway..., following drag-off or after potato plants have fully emerged. Controls weeds by disrupting growth process during germination. Does not control established weeds. State Contacts Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

224

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

225

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

226

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

227

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

228

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

229

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

230

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

231

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

232

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

233

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

234

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

235

Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A deep-water approximation of the Stokes drift velocity profile is explored as an alternative to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profile investigated relies on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, namely, the ...

Øyvind Breivik; Peter A. E. M. Janssen; Jean-Raymond Bidlot

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001b.htm06/07/2004 13:02:41 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001d.htm06/07/2004 13:02:52 #12;5 Year

237

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0029.htm06/07/2004 13:01:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_002d.htm06/07/2004 13:01:34 #12;5 Year

238

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0067.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_006b.htm06/07/2004 13:04:46 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

239

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0079.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_007b.htm06/07/2004 13:05:59 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

240

Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information Name: ____________________________________ Address) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Work Experience: List most recent job first Employer/Company Name _______________________________________________________________ Reference: Name and telephone _____________________________________________ Employer/Company Name

Mather, Patrick T.

242

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

243

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004b.htm06/07/2004 12:57:08 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004d.htm06/07/2004 12:57:19 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

245

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008b.htm06/07/2004 12:51:21 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008d.htm06/07/2004 12:51:31 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

246

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010b.htm06/07/2004 10:57:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010d.htm06/07/2004 12:40:15 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

247

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities Income Breakdown Expenditure Breakdown http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005b.htm06/07/2004 13:00:29 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005c.htm06

248

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE REPORT Epping, New Hampshire April 14, 2007 #12;TABLE ............................................................................................. 21 6. Community Services, Facilities and Utilities........................................................................................................................... 38 1. Natural Resources & Environment 2. Communication 3. Infrastructure & Public Safety 4

New Hampshire, University of

249

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys 10.1073/pnas.0603953103 Nick Zagorski As one of the great contributors to modern genetics...the forensic sciences. That achievement alone is worthy of merit, contributing to Jeffreys' receiving three high distinctions...

Nick Zagorski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Neuropsychological Profile of Stuttering Children  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the cognitive profile of stuttering children. A sample of 290 children was ... classified as stutterers. In general, performance in stuttering children was similar to the ...

Alfredo Ardila; Mónica Rosselli…

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Energy Consumption Profile for Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

317 Chapter 12 Energy Consumption Profile for Energy Harvested WSNs T. V. Prabhakar, R Venkatesha.............................................................................................318 12.2 Energy Harvesting ...................................................................................318 12.2.1 Motivations for Energy Harvesting...............................................319 12

Langendoen, Koen

252

Vibration of Tethered Microstructure Profilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although loosely tethered turbulence profilers have many advantages, they are prone to resonant vibrations at frequencies in the dissipation range when they are falling rapidly or when the tether is strummed. Using the Advanced Microstructure ...

Jack B. Miller; M. C. Gregg; Vernon W. Miller; Gordon L. Welsh

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

254

Phenotype MicroArray Profiling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MicroArray MicroArray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 Barry Bochner & Vanessa Gomez & Michael Ziman & Shihui Yang & Steven D. Brown Received: 22 May 2009 / Accepted: 26 October 2009 # The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray(tm) (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format.

255

Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Profile Industry Profile Industry Profile November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The largest energy consuming industrial sectors account for the largest share of CHP capacity; namely: Chemicals (30%), Petroleum Refining (17%), and Paper Products (14%). Other industrial sectors include: Commercial/Institutional (12%), Food (8%), Primary Metals (5%), Other Manufacturing (8%), and Other Industrial (6%). Combined heat and power (CHP)-sometimes referred to as cogeneration-involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

256

gprof Profiling Tools | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] gprof Profiling Tools Contents Introduction Profiling on the Blue Gene Enabling Profiling Collecting Profile Information Profiling Threaded Applications Using gprof Routine Level Flat Profile Line Level Flat Profile Call Graph Analysis Routine Execution Count List Annotated Source Listing Issues in Interpreting Profile Data Profiling Concepts Programs in Memory

257

Central Appalachia: Coal industry profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central Appalachia, the most complex and diverse coal-producing region in the United States, is also the principal source of very low sulfur coal in the East. This report provides detailed profiles of companies and facilities responsible for about 90% of the area's production, conveying a unique view of the aggregate industry as well as its many parts.

McMahan, R.L.; Kendall, L.K. (Resource Data International, Inc., Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

259

Turfgrass Disease Profiles Brown Patch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turfgrass Disease Profiles Brown Patch Richard Latin, Professor of Plant Pathology Brown patch to algae and moss infestation. Even mild brown patch outbreaks can spoil the appearance of golf greens and perennial ryegrass) also may sustain damage from brown patch infection. Disease Characteristics and Symptom

260

MODELING OF CHANGING ELECTRODE PROFILES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

Prentice, Geoffrey Allen

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Definition: Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Configurations Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical profiling is a DC resistivity survey which aims to trace lateral variations in the apparent resistivity structure of the subsurface. Traditionally, electrical profiling provides qualitative information of relative apparent resistivity values in order to detect anomalous geological features.[1] Also Known As Electrical mapping References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Electric-Borehole-Geophysics-Geochemistry/dp/0444529942 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Electrical_Profiling_Configurations&oldid=596184" Category: Definitions

262

IPM Profiling Tool at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IPM IPM IPM Description and Overview IPM is a portable profiling infrastructure which provide a high level report on the execution of a parallel job. IPM reports hardware counters data, MPI function timings, and memory usage. It provides a low overhead means to generate scaling studies or performance data for ERCAP submissions. When you run a job using the IPM module you will get a performance summary (see below) to stdout as well as a web accessible summary of all your IPM jobs. The two main objectives of IPM are ease-of-use and scalability in performance analysis. Usage % module load ipm On HPC architectures that support shared libraries that's all you need to do. Once the module is loaded you can run as you normally and get a performance profile once the job has successfully completed. You do not

263

Benchmarking optimization software with performance profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: We propose performance profiles -- probability distribution functions for a performance metric -- as a tool for benchmarking and comparing optimization ...

Elizabeth Dolan

264

EQPT: Ecological Quality Profiling Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EQPT uses"Habitat Value Units" to assess the ecological quality of selected areas. A Habitat Value Unit is equal to one unit area of pristine or desired habitat. The proximity of waste reduces the value of the habitat. The GIS uses a proximity-based iterative algorithm to aggregate similarly classified waste sites. A variable size buffering algorithm is then used to approximate the effects of the waste on the environmental quality of the surrounding areas. The user designated areas are analyzed, and the resulting quality profiles are presented quantitatively in tabular summaries and graphically as grids on vector base maps.

Tzemos, Spyridon (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sackschewsky, Michael R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bilyard, Gordon R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

265

Texas Crop Profile: Sweet Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is between 120 to 135 days. Texas Crop Profile S W E E T P O T A T O E S E-22 3-00 Prepared by Rodney L. Holloway, Kent D. Hall and Dudley T. Smith 1 In collaboration with James V. Robinson, George Philley and Marvin Baker 2 1 Extension Specialist, Extension... Command will not. Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843-2488 979-845-3849 rholloway@tamu.edu Kent D. Hall Extension Associate 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843-2488 979-845-3849 kd-hall@tamu.edu Dudley Smith...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

J.M. Acaglione

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Abstract--In electrically substituted radiometers, the ultra low noise control of the temperature is required. In this framework, we present results dedicated to the temperature regulation of copper plates, 3 cm diameter and 1 mm thick, using YBa2Cu3O7-d  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--In electrically substituted radiometers, the ultra low noise control of the temperature wide band absolute thermometers, with mK accuracy, also needs very efficient but convenient control of the sample holder. A temperature resolution well below the mK has to be reached in that case. We present here

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentss-band-profiler govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 2006.01.21 - 2006.02.13 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available

269

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

270

Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Logos of the University of...

271

Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System...

272

Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Thermoelectric Power Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power MIT logo The Rohsenow-Kendall Heat Transfer Lab at Massachusetts Institute of...

273

Plant Energy Profiler | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Profiler Pumping System Assessment Tool Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Steam System Modeler Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research &...

274

TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory sameer@cs.uoregon.edu Tuning and Analysis Utilities http:www.acl.lanl.govtau TAU Profiling Team Members (In alphabetical order) Peter...

275

Parent and Teacher Report: Comparing Results from the Sensory Profile and the Sensory Profile School Companion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBJECTIVE. This study investigated the similarities and differences between parent and teacher report on the Sensory Profile and the Sensory Profile School Companion (School Companion). METHOD. Using data gathered during ...

Clark, Jessica Saiter

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

A framework for nonparametric profile monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Control charts have been widely used for monitoring the functional relationship between a response variable and some explanatory variable(s) (called profile) in various industrial applications. In this article, we propose an easy-to-implement framework ... Keywords: B-spline, Block bootstrap, Confidence band, Curve depth, Nonparametric profile monitoring

Shih-Chung Chuang; Ying-Chao Hung; Wen-Chi Tsai; Su-Fen Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Research profiling for `standardization and innovation'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the profiling of research papers on `standardization and innovation'--exploring major topics and arguments in this field. Drawing on 528 papers retrieved from the database, Web of Science, we employed trend, factor, and clustering ... Keywords: Bibliometrics, Clustering analysis, Innovation, Publication analysis, Research profiling, Standardization, Taxonomy

Dong Geun Choi; Heesang Lee; Tae-Kyung Sung

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be advanced--among patients, health care providers, and the community at large. This workA PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress

Hayes, Jane E.

279

TOF Profile function used at POWGEN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TOF Profile function used at POWGEN: TOF Profile function used at POWGEN: Powgen uses a TOF profile function which is a variation on the standard profile function originally derived by VonDreele, Jorgensen and Windsor (VonDreele RB, Jorgensen JD and Windsor CG, "Rietveld Refinement with Spallation Neutron Powder Diffraction Data", J. Appl. Cryst. 15, 581 (1982). This function is implemented in GSAS (profile function 3, 4 & 5) and Fullprof NPROF 9 and is most applicable to diffractometers viewing ambient polyethylene or water moderators. The POWGEN diffractometer, however, views a poisoned cryogenic H 2 (liquid) moderator. The variation in peak shape and peak position with TOF (or d-spacing d) is calculated using a more complex function related to thermal and epithermal components of the neutron spectrum that was

280

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

282

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

283

Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

284

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

load profile | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL Files: applicationzip icon System Advisor Model Tool for Downloading Load Data...

286

Longitudinal profile of channels cut by springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple theory for the longitudinal profile of channels incised by groundwater flow. The aquifer surrounding the stream is represented in two dimensions through Darcy's law and the Dupuit approximation. The ...

Devauchelle, O.

287

Automatic program timing profiles with FTN4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design of a scheme for producing execution timing profiles of FORTRAN programs automatically is proposed with a recommendation to implement it as an option to the compiler. An experimental implementation on the LBL 7600 is also described. 1 figure.

Friedman, R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

289

Analysis Methodology for Industrial Load Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR INDUSTRIAL LOAD PROFILES Thomas W. Reddoch Executive Vice President Eleclrolek Concepts, Inc. Knoxvillc, Tennessee ABSTRACT A methodology is provided for evaluating the impact of various demand-side management... (OSM) options on industrial customers. The basic approach uses customer metered load profile data as a basis for the customer load shape. OSM technologies are represented as load shapes and are used as a basis for altering the customers existing...

Reddoch, T. W.

290

Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

Marvinney, Robert

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry (November 2007) ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry...

292

ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in...

293

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date...

294

Dynamic user profiles for web personalisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Web personalisation systems are used to enhance the user experience by providing tailor-made services based on the user’s interests and preferences which are typically stored in user profiles. For such systems to remain effective, the profiles need to be able to adapt and reflect the users’ changing behaviour. In this paper, we introduce a set of methods designed to capture and track user interests and maintain dynamic user profiles within a personalisation system. User interests are represented as ontological concepts which are constructed by mapping web pages visited by a user to a reference ontology and are subsequently used to learn short-term and long-term interests. A multi-agent system facilitates and coordinates the capture, storage, management and adaptation of user interests. We propose a search system that utilises our dynamic user profile to provide a personalised search experience. We present a series of experiments that show how our system can effectively model a dynamic user profile and is capable of learning and adapting to different user browsing behaviours.

Ahmad Hawalah; Maria Fasli

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Debugging & Profiling | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Debugging & Profiling Debugging & Profiling Allinea DDT Core File Settings Determining Memory Use Using VNC with a Debugger bgq_stack gdb Coreprocessor TotalView on BG/Q Systems Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Debugging & Profiling Initial setups Core file settings - this page contains some environment variables that allow you to control code file creation and contents. Using VNC with a Debugger - when displaying an X11 client (e.g. Totalview) remotely over the network, interactive response is typically slow. Using the VNC server can often help you improve the situation.

296

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profiles Profiles Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the Profiles archive, sorted by date. Instrumentation for Dummies Sunday, September 29, 2013 By Alexis Powers If your head spins at the thought of 105 sensors collecting 12 data points every 15 minutes for all 19 houses competing in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013, you might want to pay a visit to Miss Barbara. This bodiless mannequin acts as the student liaison for the instrumentation team. Perhaps the steadiest head on the competition site, Miss Barbara helps student decathletes locate the instrumentation trailer when questions arise about measured contests. Photo of a mannequin's head looking out of a construction trailer's window. The unwavering gaze of Miss Barbara serves as a beacon for decathletes who

297

Beam profile effects on NPB performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison of neutral particle beam (NPB) brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on the target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts.

Leclaire, R.J. Jr.; Bunker, W.J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Commercial Building Profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Profiles Building Profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset includes simulation results from a national-scale study of the commercial buildings sector. Electric load profiles contain the hour-by-hour demand for electricity for each building. Summary tables describe individual buildings and their overall annual energy performance. The study developed detailed EnergyPlus models for 4,820 different samples in 2003 CBECS. Simulation output is available for all and organized by CBECS's identification number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and the stock if rebuilt using maximum efficiency technology (with typical weather). The following reports describe how the dataset was developed:

300

Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview of market assessments of large CHP sector profiles of the chemicals, food, and pharmaceuticals sectors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compton profiles of LiF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-ray Compton profiles of LiF with the scattering vector along the , , and axes are reported. Both the absolute profiles and their anisotropy are derived from a tight-binding model and compared with experiments. The overall agreement between theory and experiment is found to be satisfactory for all three directions. Recent calculations of Euwema et al. are compared with the present work and found to predict incorrect anisotropies, particularly at small momentum transfers. It is also shown that momentum distributions can be orders of magnitude more sensitive to anisotropy in the electron distributions than x-ray structure factors, at least in materials where overlap of the wave functions is small.

K. -F. Berggren; F. Martino; P. Eisenberger; W. A. Reed

1976-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Phoenix, AZ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Viscosity profile of the lower mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......October 1985 research-article Articles Viscosity profile of the lower mantle Kirk Ellsworth...determine the variation of effective viscosity across the lower mantle from models of...consistent with recent estimates of mantle viscosity from post-glacial rebound and true......

Kirk Ellsworth; Gerald Schubert; Charles G. Sammis

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Route profile analysis system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for recording terrain profile information is disclosed. The system accurately senses incremental distances traveled by a vehicle along with vehicle inclination, recording both with elapsed time. The incremental distances can subsequently be differentiated with respect to time to obtain acceleration. The computer acceleration can then be used to correct the sensed inclination.

Mullenhoff, D.J.; Wilson, S.W.

1982-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

MATLAB Functions for Profiled Estimation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Functions for Profiled Estimation of Differential Equations Giles Hooker June 23, 2010: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 Example: FitzHugh-Nagumo Equations 5 3 MATLAB Objects Needed for the Estimation. 6 3.1 Cell is designed to accompany a Matlab software package that esti- mates the parameters in differential equation

Keinan, Alon

307

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Child and Family Poverty Saskatchewan Profile 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Child and Family Poverty Saskatchewan Profile 2008 Summary 19.9% of Saskatchewan's children under Saskatchewan's child poverty rate is the second· highest in the country, following only British Columbia.1% in Canada and 21.7% in Saskatchewan (Chart 1). Seventeen years later, in 2006, the national child poverty

Argerami, Martin

309

utility functions scaling profiles utility-fair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bandwidth utility functions scaling profiles utility-fair I. INTRODUCTION The emerging MPEG-4 video. This can result in a significant increase in the utilization of network capacity [1]. These techniques. Bandwidth utility functions [9] can be used to characterize an application's capability to adapt over

Chang, Shih-Fu

310

An Economic Profile of the Biosciences Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Profile of the Biosciences Industry in West Virginia1 February 2008 By Anthony C. Gregory & Tom S. Witt Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West are the responsibility of the authors. Mr. Gregory is a graduate research assistant, Bureau of Business and Economic

Mohaghegh, Shahab

311

Triangular-profile single-mode fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A low-loss triangular-profile single-mode fiber is reported. The fiber loss at 1.3–1.55-?m wavelengths is below 0.4 dB/km, and its zero-chromatic-dispersion wavelength is 1.402 ?m.

Saifi, M A; Cohen, L G; Stone, J; Jang, S J

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Chemical Depth Profiling from Neutron Reflectometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The material profile of a thin film can be analyzed by placing the film on a substrate and by sending a neutron beam onto it at various angles of incidence. Technically, the scattering length density of the film needs to be determined as a function of depth. A reflectometer is used to measure the amount of reflection (reflectivity) as a function of the angle of incidence. Mathematically, this is equivalent to sending the neutron beam onto the film at every energy but at a fixed angle of incidence. The film profile needs to be recovered from the measured reflectivity data. Unfortunately, the unique recovery is impossible, and many distinct unrelated profiles may correspond to the same reflectivity data. In our DOE/EPSCoR sponsored research, we have developed an analytical method to uniquely recover the profile of a thin film from the measured reflectivity data. We have shown that by taking reflectivity measurements with two different substrates, one can uniquely determine the film profile. Previously, it was known that one could uniquely recover the profile by taking reflectivity measurements with three different substrates, and our findings indicate that the same goal can be accomplished by using fewer measurements. At Mississippi State University we started an informal weekly seminar (called ''the reflectometry meeting'') at to attract various undergraduate and graduate students into the field. There were about 3 undergraduate students, 6 graduate students, and 2 faculty members attending these seminars. The PI has collaborated with Dr. Norm Berk at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on various aspects of neutron reflectometry, from which various interesting problems of theoretical and practical importance have arisen. One of these problems is closely related to the important mathematical problem known as analytic extrapolation. Under appropriate conditions (known to hold in neutron reflectometry), the reflection data taken in a finite interval of neutron energies uniquely determines the data at all energies. Even though the uniqueness is assured mathematically, there are currently no available methods for analytic extrapolation. Currently, we are working on this problem as it arises in neutron reflectometry and looking for mathematical and numerical methods to extrapolate reflection data to higher and lower neutron energies. A solution to this problem is expected to have a big impact not only in neutron reflectometry, but in many areas of physics and engineering. The PI has collaborated with Prof. Paul Sacks of Iowa State University, Prof. Daniil Sarkissian of Mississippi State University, and Prof. Levon Babadzanjanz of St. Petersburg State University, Russia on mathematical and numerical aspects of neutron reflectometry. These researchers jointly worked with the PI towards the preparation of numerical routines to extract the film profile from the reflection data. We have prepared a Mathematica interface running Fortran 95 algorithms to produce reflection data from a given profile. These Fortran 95 algorithms have been prepared by updating and modifying Prof. Sacks' Fortran 77 routine and by updating Dr. Gian Felcher's (of Argonne National Laboratory) Fortran 77 routine. We are also preparing similar algorithms written in Mathematica so that they can be used without needing Fortran. We are also working towards preparing algorithms in Fortran 95 and in Mathematica to produce the film profile from the given sets of reflectivity data.

Tuncay Aktosun

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Balance Engineering - Eli Lilly Teaming Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial SPP / Partner Teaming Profile Industrial SPP / Partner Teaming Profile UService/Product Provider Balance Engineering Inc. 3711 East Carmel Drive Carmel, IN 46033 Business: Consulting Engineering Jack F. Staley President Phone: 317-844-3178 Email: HTUjack@balanceeng.comUT U I ndustrial Partner Eli Lilly and Company Lilly Corporate Center Indianapolis, IN 46285 Business: Pharmaceuticals David S. Drzewiecki Group Leader, Energy & Utilities Phone: 317-433-0336 Email: HTUDrzewiecki_David_S@Lilly.comUT Balance Engineering identifies $3 million in energy savings at Lilly facility Project Scope Balance Engineering conducted a facility energy assessment of the Eli Lilly Clinton Laboratories, a large multi-building pharmaceutical campus. The goals of the assessment were to determine the major uses of

314

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

'Profiles' 'Profiles' Instrumentation for Dummies Sunday, September 29, 2013 By Alexis Powers If your head spins at the thought of 105 sensors collecting 12 data points every 15 minutes for all 19 houses competing in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013, you might want to pay a visit to Miss Barbara. This bodiless mannequin acts as the student liaison for the instrumentation team. Perhaps the steadiest head on the competition site, Miss Barbara helps student decathletes locate the instrumentation trailer when questions arise about measured contests. Photo of a mannequin's head looking out of a construction trailer's window. The unwavering gaze of Miss Barbara serves as a beacon for decathletes who are searching for answers related to monitored performance-and baked

315

Experiment Profile: MINERvA NAME:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profile: MINERvA Profile: MINERvA NAME: Main Injector Experiment for v-A, or MINERvA ORIGIN OF THE NAME: The Main Injector is the name of the link in the Fermilab accelerator chain that takes protons and accelerates them before "injecting" them in a beamline to hit a target. Nuclear physics uses the term "v-A" as shorthand for atomic number studies. WHAT WILL MINERvA TELL US ABOUT THE WORLD? * MINERvA opens a new window for seeing how matter evolved from simple particles to more complex composites of particles, which eventually created everything you see. * Data from MINERvA provides crucial first steps so that current and future neutrino experiments can answer the following questions: * Were neutrinos key to the evolution of the galaxy by allowing

316

Industrial SSP Partner Teaming Profile SWEPCO Intertape  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial SPP / Partner Teaming Profile Industrial SPP / Partner Teaming Profile Industrial Partner Intertape Polymer Group 1101 Eagle Springs Rd. Danville, VA 24540 Business: Specialized Polyolefin Plastic/Paper Products Mike Jones Manager of Engineering Phone: 434-797-8359 Email: mbjones@itape.com Service/Product Provider Southwestern Petroleum Corporation 534 N. Main St Fort Worth, TX 76164 Business: High Performance Lubricants Paul J. Dickerson Senior Vice President & COO Phone: 817-348-7275 Email: pjd@swepcousa.com Southwestern Petroleum Corporation (SWEPCO) captures "low-hanging fruit" with superior lubricants for Intertape Polymer Project Scope SWEPCO analyzed four problematic gear boxes at the Intertape Polymer Group facility in Danville, VA, which over-heated and tripped the circuit due to high amperage overload. SWEPCO implemented

317

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

318

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

319

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

320

Vertical profiles of halocarbons in the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stratospheric air samples collected between 10 and 35 km altitude by means of a cryogenic sampler were analyzed by gaschromatography. Thus vertical profiles of source gases for halogen radicals were derived, such as CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CClF3, CF4, C2F3Cl3, C2F4Cl2, C2F5Cl, C2F6, CH3Cl, CH3CCl3, CHF2Cl, CH3Br, CBrF3, and CBrCl2F. Systematic discrepancies between measured and modelled halocarbon profiles point to deficiencies of present one- and two-dimensional models. Measurements of fully halogenated hydrocarbons provide a tool for systematically studying these deficiencies and thus improving the models. 40 references.

Fabian, P.; Borchers, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Compton profiles of Ne, Ar, and Kr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compton profiles of Ne, Ar, and Kr are calculated from ground-state energies and wave functions with full correlation contributions included. The latter is carried out by regarding atoms as inhomogeneous interacting electron-gas systems using the Kohn-Sham self-consistent scheme in the local-density approximation. The calculated values are brought closer to the experimental values from Hartree-Fock results. There are numerical problems for large atoms.

B. Y. Tong and L. Lam

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Surface skeleton generation based on 360-degree profile scan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A rapid prototyping method is invented, which works on a specific data structure produced by an optical metrology technique: 360-degree surface profile scanning. A computer algorithm takes an object profile data, restructure ...

Chen, Lujie

323

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes Many Building America...

324

STAMP: statistical analysis of taxonomic and functional profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......White et al., 2009) are provided for comparing profiles organized into two groups. STAMP implements the ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H-test for comparing three or more groups of profiles. Statistically significant features can be further examined......

Donovan H. Parks; Gene W. Tyson; Philip Hugenholtz; Robert G. Beiko

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Turbulence Patch Identification in Potential Density or Temperature Profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Thorpe analysis is a recognized method used to identify and characterize turbulent regions within stably stratified fluids. By comparing an observed profile of potential temperature or potential density to a reference profile obtained by ...

Richard Wilson; Hubert Luce; Francis Dalaudier; Jacques Lefrère

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Activity-based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic enzyme...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic enzyme activity dynamics in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, NG14, and RUT-C30 Activity-based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic...

327

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

328

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Starts; Microwave Radiometer Profiler Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Starts; Microwave Radiometer Profiler Deployed Bookmark and Share Some of the instruments collecting data during the Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP include ARM's microwave radiometer profiler (left) and microwave radiometer (right), and NOAA's ground-based scanning radiometer (middle). Some of the instruments collecting data during the Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP include ARM's microwave radiometer profiler (left) and microwave radiometer (right), and NOAA's ground-based scanning radiometer (middle). The Arctic Winter Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a collaborative effort with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, began on March 10 in Barrow, Alaska. The major goal of the Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

330

Thermohaline convection with nonlinear salt profiles N. J. Balmfortha)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tem- perature and salinity; the background temperature gradient is constant, while the salt profile tangent profile is presented. It is shown that nonlinearity in the background salinity profile leads of temperature and salinity. Hence we need to jus- tify our study of the stability of this background

Julien, Keith

331

.Heat Generation Patterns and Temperature Profiles in_ Electroslag Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l .Heat Generation Patterns and Temperature Profiles in_ Electroslag Welding ) · T. DEBROY, J process parameters such as the voltage profiles, heat generation patterns and temperature profiles with equivalent slag, electrode and other geometrical variable; Calcu- 0 lations show that the heat generation

Eagar, Thomas W.

332

A forensic STR profiling system for the Eurasian badger: A framework for developing profiling systems for wildlife species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A forensic STR profiling system for the Eurasian badger: A framework for developing profiling short tandem repeat (STR) profiling systems for forensic identification is complicated in animal species and a lack of developed STR markers can make adhering to human forensic guidelines difficult. Furthermore

Thorpe, Roger Stephen

333

Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The density profiles of hot galactic halo gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extended gas haloes around galaxies are a ubiquitous prediction of galaxy formation scenarios. However, the density profiles of this hot halo gas is virtually unknown, although various profiles have been suggested on theoretical grounds. In order to quantitatively address the gas profile, we compare galaxies from direct cosmological simulations with analytical solutions of the underlying gas equations. We find remarkable agreement between simulations and theoretical predictions. We present an expression for this gas profile with a non-trivial dependence on the total mass profile. This expression is useful when setting up equilibrium galaxy models for numerical experiments.

Steen H. Hansen; Jesper Sommer-Larsen

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

336

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

Not Available

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

Category:Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques page? For detailed information on Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques, click here. Category:Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Add.png Add a new Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Technique Pages in category "Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques" This category contains only the following page. F Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Electromagnetic_Profiling_Techniques&oldid=689835"

338

State Nuclear Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear Reports Nuclear Reports State Nuclear Profiles Data for 2010 | Release Date: April 26, 2012 | Next Release: April 2014 | full report Archived State Nuclear Profiles Choose a Year: Select a Year 2009 Go State Net summer capacity (megawatts) Rank Net generation (thousand megawatthours) Rank Alabama 5,043 5 37,941 7 Arizona 3,937 12 31,200 11 Arkansas 1,835 19 15,023 19 California 4,390 8 32,201 10 Connecticut 2,103 18 16,750 17 Florida 3,924 13 23,936 15 Georgia 4,061 10 33,512 8 Illinois 11,441 1 96,190 1 Iowa 601 31 4,451 31 Kansas 1,160 27 9,556 26 Louisiana 2,142 16 18,639 16 Maryland 1,705 20 13,994 20 Massachusetts 685 29 5,918 29 Michigan 3,947 11 29,625 12 Minnesota 1,594 21 13,478 21 Mississippi 1,251 23 9,643 25

339

Test profiles for stationary energy storage applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of battery and other energy storage technologies for stationary uses is progressing rapidly toward application-specific testing that uses computer-based data acquisition and control equipment, active electronic loads and power supplies, and customized software, to enable sophisticated test regimes that simulate actual use conditions. These simulated-use tests provide more accurate performance and life evaluations than simple constant resistance or current testing regimes. Some of the tests use stepped constant-power charge and discharge regimes to simulate conditions created by electric utility applications such as frequency regulation and spinning reserve. Other test profiles under development simulate conditions for the energy storage component of Remote Area Power Supplies (RAPS) that include renewable and/or fossil-fueled generators. Various RAPS applications have unique sets of service conditions that require specialized test profiles. However, almost all RAPS tests and many tests that represent other stationary applications need to simulate significant time periods during which storage devices operate at low-to-medium states-of-charge without full recharge. Consideration of these and similar issues in simulated-use test regimes is necessary to effectively predict the responses of the various types of batteries in specific stationary applications. This paper describes existing and evolving stationary applications for energy storage technologies and test regimes that are designed to simulate them. The paper also discusses efforts to develop international testing standards.

Butler, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, J.F. [International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Taylor, P.A. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. II. INNER PROFILE SLOPES, DYNAMICAL PROFILES, AND /3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated dark matter halos better than a Navarro- Frenk-WhiteYlike model with an equal number of parameters]) density profiles of simulated dark matter halos (Navarro et al. 2004). Intriguingly, this function was shown to provide a better fit than thethree-parameter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW)Ylike model

Terzi, BalÂ?a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building Technologies Program - Funding Profile by Subprogram  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy/ Efficiency and Renewable Energy/ Building Technologies FY 2013 Congressional Budget Building Technologies Program Funding Profile by Subprogram Non-Comparable Structure (Dollars in Thousands) FY 2011 Current a FY 2012 Enacted FY 2013 Request Building Technologies Program Commercial Buildings Integration 37,308 31,913 61,079 Emerging Technologies 75,694 84,694 108,344 Equipment and Buildings Standards 35,000 58,302 98,250 Residential Buildings Integration 37,308 31,282 35,872 Technology Validation and Market Introduction 22,000 8,500 0 SBIR/STTR 0 4,513 6,455 Total, Building Technologies Program 207,310 219,204 310,000 Comparable Structure (Dollars in Thousands) FY 2011 Current a FY 2012 Enacted FY 2013 Request Building Technologies Program

342

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, Chief of

343

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); White, A. E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L. [University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-7099 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); McKee, G. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

US EIA Country Energy Profiles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US EIA Country Energy Profiles US EIA Country Energy Profiles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: US EIA Country Energy Profiles Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: United States Energy Information Agency Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Website: tonto.eia.doe.gov/country/index.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/country-energy-profiles-website Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. References: US EIA Country Energy Profiles[1] This reegle website provides comprehensive energy profiles for all countries with information from reliable sources such as UN or the World

346

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Project Profiles |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Project Profiles Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Project Profiles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Project Profiles Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Green Building Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Case studies/examples User Interface: Website Website: www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=1721 Cost: Free The LEED Project Profile (page) is repository of LEED certified projects which provides profiles for specific projects, including strategies which were included in the project. This page can be used to generate ideas for various building types through a community. Overview The LEED Project Profile (page) is repository of LEED certified projects

347

Category:Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Electrical Profiling Configurations page? For detailed information on Electrical Profiling Configurations as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Electrical Profiling Configurations Add.png Add a new Electrical Profiling Configurations Technique Pages in category "Electrical Profiling Configurations" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. D DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse)

348

Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators JPL logo The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with funding from the 2012 SunShot...

349

Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation University of South Florida logo...

350

Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

351

Project Profile: Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in Promoting the Diffusion of Solar Energy Project Profile: Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in Promoting the Diffusion of Solar...

352

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inhomogeneity in terms of ice crystal sizes and shapes. The vertical variation of ice crystal size can alter the radiative heatingcooling profiles in cirrus cloudy...

353

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings.

354

Characterizing Ion Profiles in Dynamic Junction Light-Emitting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

advantage in applications such as light-emitting devices, transistors, and electrochromic devices, among others. Evidence suggests that the profiles of ions and...

355

Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

356

Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

resolution of atmospheric humidity profiles. We show preliminary results and discuss advantages and limitations related to this technique. Basic Principles The role of ground-based...

357

Project Profile: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Related Links FAQs Contact Us Offices You are here Home Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based...

358

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentratin...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Power Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power University of Connecticut logo The University of Connecticut, under the Thermal...

359

2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Auburn University Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Auburn University Profile, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy website.

360

Coke profile and effect on methane/ethylene conversion process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to investigate the coke profile with respect to time on stream and the change of product distribution due to… (more)

Al-Solami, Bandar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Design and Implementation of an Ion Beam Profiling System.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The work describes the development of a reliable device for profiling anion beam in the intensity cross section. A sensor head consisting of a… (more)

Stude, Joan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power...

363

Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of...

364

LIMITATIONS ON MEASURING A TRANSVERSE PROFILE OF ULTRA- DENSE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LIMITATIONS ON MEASURING A TRANSVERSE PROFILE OF ULTRA- DENSE ELECTRON BEAMS WITH SCINTILLATORS A. Murokh * , J. Rosenzweig, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547,...

365

Relativistic formulation for the Doppler-broadened line profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Profiles of spectral lines due to the thermal motion of light-emitting particles are formulated based on the classical and the relativistic Doppler effects, respectively. For the classical case, the well-known Doppler-broadened line profile is reproduced. For the relativistic case, the line profile obtained is asymmetrically broadened with increasing temperature. However, the peak frequency remains unshifted, in contrast to blueshifted, as has been predicted in the current literature. Reasoning is given as to why the relativistic Doppler-broadened line profile currently accepted is probably invalid.

Huang, Young-Sea; Chiue, Juang-Han; Huang, Yi-Chi; Hsiung, Te-Chih [Department of Physics, Soochow University, Shih-Lin, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan (China)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Project Profile: Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids Halotechnics...

367

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey.

368

Project Profile: Next-Generation Parabolic Trough Collectors...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Trough Collectors and Components for CSP Applications Project Profile: Next-Generation Parabolic Trough Collectors and Components for CSP Applications Abengoa logo Abengoa...

369

CP-Violating Profile of the Electroweak Bubble Wall  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......November 1995 research-article Articles CP-Violating Profile of the Electroweak Bubble...electroweak baryogenesis, the profile of the CP violating bubble wall, created at the first-order...solutions. Two of them smoothly connect the CP-violating broken phase and the symmetric......

Koichi Funakubo; Akira Kakuto; Shoichiro Otsuki; Kazunori Takenaga; Fumihiko Toyoda

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Security-oriented Data Grids for Microarray Expression Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security-oriented Data Grids for Microarray Expression Profiles Richard SINNOTT a,1 Christopher and comparison of microarray experiment results. Keywords. Microarray Expression Profiles, Grid security shedding light and understanding for ex- ample on biological processes. The BBSRC funded Grid enabled

Glasgow, University of

371

Identifying trait clusters by linkage profiles: application in genetical genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......point, s.p., mapping or CIM), and reject when , are derived...the LOD score profiles with CIM, and then using those new profiles...processes, as determined by Gene Ontology (GO) annotations (see Supplementary...experimental results with Gene Ontology (GO) annotations show that......

Joshua N. Sampson; Steven G. Self

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Continuous Seismic Reflexion Profiles in the Red Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1970 research-article Continuous Seismic Reflexion Profiles in the Red Sea J. D. Phillips D. A. Ross Twenty continuous seismic reflexion profiles have been made across...in the deeper axial trough. A strong seismic reflector is observed at depths up to...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Doppler Radar Wind Profiles Iwan Holleman (holleman@knmi.nl)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is required before it can be presented to users or assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models Institute (KNMI), The Netherlands ABSTRACT Doppler weather radars can be employed to determine wind profiles profiles has been performed at KNMI. The verification results indicate that weather radars can provide high

Stoffelen, Ad

374

Domain boundary prediction based on profile domain linker propensity index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful prediction of protein domain boundaries provides valuable information not only for the computational structure prediction of multi-domain proteins but also for the experimental structure determination. In this work, a novel index at the profile ... Keywords: Domain, Domain linker, Profile

Qiwen Dong; Xiaolong Wang; Lei Lin; Zhiming Xu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Lithium intercalated graphite : experimental Compton profile for stage one  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-301 Lithium intercalated graphite : experimental Compton profile for stage one G. Loupias, J différence des profils Compton est compatible avec un transfert total de l'électron de conduction du lithium électronique due à l'insertion. Abstract. 2014 Electron momentum distribution of the first stage lithium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

Analyis of Path Profiling Information Generated with Performance Monitoring Hardware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to exploit hardware Performance Monitoring Units (PMUs) present in modern microprocessors. The Itanium-2 PMU can be correlated into full paths. As sta- tistically hot paths are most likely to occur in PMU sam techniques carry a high overhead, a PMU-based path profiler represents an ef- fective lightweight profiling

Colorado at Boulder, University of

377

Using Dublin Core application profiles to manage diverse metadata developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of Dublin Core application profiles at the British Library as part of a resource discovery strategy. It shows how they can be used to control the proliferation of metadata formats in digitisation activity and provide interoperability ... Keywords: British library, Dublin Core application profiles, SRU, Z39.50, gateway, interoperability, metadata formats, resource discovery strategy

Robina Clayphan; Bill Oldroyd

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) 2000.03.01 - 2006.02.28 Site(s) SGP General Description The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties

379

Method and apparatus for measuring irradiated fuel profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new apparatus is used to substantially instantaneously obtain a profile of an object, for example a spent fuel assembly, which profile (when normalized) has unexpectedly been found to be substantially identical to the normalized profile of the burnup monitor Cs-137 obtained with a germanium detector. That profile can be used without normalization in a new method of identifying and monitoring in order to determine for example whether any of the fuel has been removed. Alternatively, two other new methods involve calibrating that profile so as to obtain a determination of fuel burnup (which is important for complying with safeguards requirements, for utilizing fuel to an optimal extent, and for storing spent fuel in a minimal amount of space). Using either of these two methods of determining burnup, one can reduce the required measurement time significantly (by more than an order of magnitude) over existing methods, yet retain equal or only slightly reduced accuracy.

Lee, David M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Graphic profile In the event of problems of interpretation or differences between the Swedish and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profile? 1.1 Brand strategy 2 Basic concepts 2.1 The graphic profile ­ elements and rules 2.2 Name 2 and image. Our graphic profile and logotype comprise important parts of our communication. Background We. The graphic profile Our graphic profile is based on extensive work on our identity and image and helps us give

Johannesson, Henrik

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Water Energy Load Profiling (WELP) Tool Agency/Company /Organization: California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Sector: Energy, Water Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Embodied Energy, Water Conservation Phase: Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Background analysis

382

Physician Cost Profiling — Reliability and Risk of Misclassification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and reliability the proportion of variability in a measure that is due to real differences in performance. The use of episode-grouping tools is accepted as a valid means of constructing clinically homogeneous cost groups. With respect to cost profiling, validity indicates whether the method of assigning... Some insurance companies are offering patients incentives to choose lower-cost physicians. This study shows that the current methods used to generate physicians' cost profiles do not have high reliability and that the systems using these cost profiles to identify lower-cost physicians will incorrectly classify many physicians.

Adams J.L.Mehrotra A.Thomas J.W.McGlynn E.A.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

384

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business Travel Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business Travel October 7, 2013 - 1:27pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To evaluate a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile, most of the information required to support air travel demand management is currently available through Federal agency-level travel information systems, such as GovTrip. However, that information may not be distributed to programs, regional offices, and sites, which are in the best position to evaluate opportunities to reduce travel. Considerations that may help the agency determine the level at which data should be collected and analyzed include: Where are budgets and policies regarding travel made and modified?

385

Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas profile for employee commuting, use survey data on employee home location and arrival/departure times to identify geographic areas to target for vanpool and carpool ride-matching efforts. Those who live in close proximity or en route to the workplace and with similar hours may be clustered to determine which locations might represent the best candidates for ride-share matching. As illustrated in Figure 1, areas with higher concentrations of employees that live farther from the worksite might be good candidate locations for targeted carpool and vanpool

386

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:47pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey. The default survey methodology in the Federal GHG Accounting Guidance is designed to collect the minimum data for emissions calculations. Additional information may be necessary to determine which trip reduction strategies are best suited for specific employee populations. The optional questions in the advanced survey methodology or data gathered through an agency-defined employee commute survey can provide this understanding.

387

Project Profile: Commercial Development of an Advanced Linear...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Development of an Advanced Linear-Fresnel-Based CSP Concept Project Profile: Commercial Development of an Advanced Linear-Fresnel-Based CSP Concept SkyFuel logo SkyFuel,...

388

Project Profile: Low-Cost Heliostat Development | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost Heliostat Development Project Profile: Low-Cost Heliostat Development HiTek logo HiTek Services, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is conducting fundamental parametric analyses of...

389

Institutional Investors, Managerial Incentives, and Firms' Risk Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Vega). Instead, I find that institutional investors appear to influence the risk profile of firm through the firm’s investment, financing and diversification policy choices even after I control for the CEO’s compensation structure. The results suggest...

Celil, Hursit S

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality…………… Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical noise directional density function versus depth. 93 Measured and acoustically estimated wind speeds.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

What's the Gist? Privacy-Preserving Aggregation of User Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) its overhead is appreciably low. 1 Introduction The digital footprint of Internet users is growing consumer profiles [45], and governments might abuse their surveillance power [17, 18] by obtaining datasets

392

Change of energy profiles for muons upon lattice relaxation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic calculations of potentials for muons and protons in various simple metals have...?SR are discussed. The modification of the energy profiles with lattice relaxation is studied in...

S. Estreicher; P. F. Meier

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Considering the potential of criminal profiling to combat hacking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper outlines the results of a case study focusing upon hacking incidents in Germany. This work aims to ... of a Criminal Profile. Therefore cases of hacking incidents have been studied to find commonalitie...

Jörg Preuß; Steven M. Furnell; Maria Papadaki

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Comparison of instruments for measuring step heights and surface profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data for step heights and surface profiles obtained using two commercially available instruments are compared. It is shown that step height data obtained with the Dektak IIA are good...

Bennett, Jean M

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effect of Adhesive Tape on the Velocity Profile of Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fully developed turbulent flow in order to discover the effect on the velocity profile of roughening the channel bed by sticking sand grains of various known dimensions to it by means ...

ALAN E. COSSAR

1970-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

Guide to the Use of Researcher Profile Safety Coordinators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Help Desk. Simply select the Researcher Profiles tab in the green navigation area at the top of the "My-- Use this communication tool as specified by the EHS staff. Checkbox for Safety Training Participant

397

TH.D. STUDENT PROFILES 2006 Entering Class  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TH.D. STUDENT PROFILES 2006 Entering Class Jeff Conklin-Miller Primary Concentration: Theology ecclesiology, drawing on insights of John Howard Yoder, Rowan Williams, and the Wesleyan tradition. Tommy

Reif, John H.

398

Functional Consequences in Metabolic Pathways from Phylogenetic Profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phylogenetic profiling is an ingenious computational method for identifying functional linkage between proteins. It is based on the assumption that a set of proteins involved in a common pathway or composing a structural complex tends to evolve in a ...

Yonatan Bilu; Michal Linial

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Project Profile: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Collector Project Profile: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector SunTrough Energy logo SunTrough, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing a new class of solar...

400

Recovery of SIMS depth profiles with account for nonstationary effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work we consider a method of accounting for the nonstationary effects in recovery of SIMS depth profiles. The depth resolution function (DRF) is described by Hofmann's nonstationary MRI (mixing-roughness-information depth) model using the depth-dependent parameters. The effects in question include the nonstationary atomic mixing and development of surface roughness. A mathematical description of the nonstationary depth profiling process by the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is proposed. The inverse problem is solved using an algorithm based on the Tikhonov regularization method. The proposed nonstationary recovery method is tested on both model and real structures. The development of surface roughness in SIMS depth profiling of the real structure was observed. Grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (XRR) technique was used to verify the results of SIMS profiles restoration for periodic structure containing thin Ge layers in the Si matrix. The advantages of the proposed recovery algorithm to allow for the nonstationary effects are shown.

Pavel Andreevich Yunin; Yurii Nikolaevich Drozdov; Mikhail Nikolaevich Drozdov; Dmitry Vladimirovich Yurasov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Molecular Depth Profiling of Sucrose Films: A Comparative Study...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cs and O Ions. Abstract: Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling of sucrose thin films were investigated using 10 keV C60+, 20 keV...

402

Comparison Between Simulated And Experimental Au-ion Profiles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

irradiation. The Au ion profiling was measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and compared to the Au ion distribution predicted by the Stopping and Range of Ions in...

403

STAMP: statistical analysis of taxonomic and functional profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......package that provides statistical hypothesis tests and exploratory plots for analysing taxonomic and functional profiles. It supports tests for comparing pairs of samples or samples...assessment of the biological relevancy of test results. A user-friendly graphical interface......

Donovan H. Parks; Gene W. Tyson; Philip Hugenholtz; Robert G. Beiko

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Summer temperature profiles within supraglacial debris on Khumbu Glacier, Nepal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer temperature profiles within supraglacial debris on Khumbu Glacier, Nepal H. CONWAY, and L. A Glacier, Nepal show a strong diurnal signal that diffused downward into the debris with decreasing

Rasmussen, L.A.

405

[NeII] emission line profiles from photoevaporative disc winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I model profiles of the [NeII] forbidden emission line at 12.81um, emitted by photoevaporative winds from discs around young, solar-mass stars. The predicted line luminosities (~ 1E-6 Lsun) are consistent with recent data, and the line profiles vary significantly with disc inclination. Edge-on discs show broad (30-40km/s) double-peaked profiles, due to the rotation of the disc, while in face-on discs the structure of the wind results in a narrower line (~10km/s) and a significant blue-shift (5-10km/s). These results suggest that observations of [NeII] line profiles can provide a direct test of models of protoplanetary disc photoevaporation.

R. D. Alexander

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Theoretical X-ray Line Profiles from Colliding Wind Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical X-ray line profiles from a range of model colliding wind systems. In particular, we investigate the effects of varying the stellar mass-loss rates, the wind speeds, and the viewing orientation. We find that a wide range of theoretical line profile shapes is possible, varying with orbital inclination and phase. At or near conjunction, the lines have approximately Gaussian profiles, with small widths (HWHM ~ 0.1 v_infty) and definite blue- or redshifts (depending on whether the star with the weaker wind is in front or behind). When the system is viewed at quadrature, the lines are generally much broader (HWHM ~ v_infty), flat-topped and unshifted. Local absorption can have a major effect on the observed profiles - in systems with mass-loss rates of a few times 10^{-6} Msol/yr the lower energy lines (E wind of the primary. The orbital variation ...

Henley, D B; Pittard, J M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti{sub 3}Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am{sup 241} source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

Vyas, V.; Sharma, G. [Department of Physics, Banasthali University, Banasthali-304022 (India); Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004 (India); Joshi, K. B. [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L.Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313 002 (India)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells in the Southwestern Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lithologic...

409

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings. When using renewable energy in buildings, the approach for evaluating GHG emissions involves evaluating the renewable energy resource potential and determining what type of renewable energy technology to use in a building. To help determine renewable energy resource potential at a site, see FEMP's information on Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools. Also see Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation.

410

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Profile Emissions Profile Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile October 7, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. While the data required for annual GHG reporting are sufficient to establish an agency's overall emission inventory, these data are not typically enough information for effectively managing emissions. A detailed, bottom-up assessment can provide the foundation for much more robust Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans. Because detailed analyses of all assets can be time-intensive, strategic planning helps the

411

High speed switching between arbitrary spatial light profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex images, inscribed into the spatial profile of a laser beam or even a single photon, offer a highly efficient method of data encoding. Here we present a prototype system which...

Radwell, N; Brickus, D; Clark, T W; Franke-Arnold, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Microsoft Word - Managing Your iSupplier Profile Job Aid R12 05092012.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Contents of Contents Summary of Your iSupplier Profile...........................................................................................................................2 Accessing Your Account for the First Time.............................................................................................................2 Navigating to Your Profile.........................................................................................................................................3 Company Information (a.k.a. Profile Management)............................................................................................4 Organization...............................................................................................................................................................5

413

Turbulent Patch Identification in Microstructure Profiles: A Method Based on Wavelet Denoising and Thorpe Displacement Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method based on wavelet denoising and the analysis of Thorpe displacements dT profiles is presented for turbulent patch identification. Thorpe profiles are computed by comparing the observed density profile ?(z) and the monotonic density ...

Jaume Piera; Elena Roget; Jordi Catalan

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Profiled spectral lines generated in the field of Kerr superspinars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

String Theory suggests existence of primordial Kerr superspinars, extremely compact objects with external spacetime described by the Kerr naked singularity geometry. The primordial Kerr superspinars have to be converted to a near-extreme black hole due to accretion, but they could survive to the era of highly redshifted quasars. We study the shape of the profiled spectral lines generated by radiating rings or the innermost parts of Keplerian discs orbiting the Kerr superspinars. Influence of the superspinar surface location on the profiled lines is also considered. We demonstrate strong difference of the character of the profiled lines generated by radiating rings for all values of the superspinar spin and all values of the inclination angles of the observer when compared to those generated in the field of Kerr black holes. For small and mediate inclination angles there are large quantitative differences in the extension and position of the lines. For large inclination angles even strong qualitative difference appears as the profiled lines have a clear doubled character. The smaller, redshifted region of the profiled line is related to the photons reaching the regions near the superspinar surface. Strong differences are obtained also for profiled lines generated by the innermost parts of Keplerian discs especially in the shape of the line. The influence of the superspinar surface location is reflected in the intermediate parts of the the profiled lines. The line profiles can give a clear signature of the presence of a Kerr superspinar and in principle enable estimates of its surface location since the signatures of the superspinar surface location are of different character as those corresponding to the presence of the black hole horizon.

Schee, Jan; Stuchlík, Zdenek, E-mail: jan.schee@fpf.slu.cz, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezru?ovo nám. 13, Opava (Czech Republic)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ANALYTICAL CALCULATION OF STOKES PROFILES OF ROTATING STELLAR MAGNETIC DIPOLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observation of the polarization emerging from a rotating star at different phases opens up the possibility to map the magnetic field in the stellar surface thanks to the well-known Zeeman-Doppler imaging. When the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, the circular and linear polarization profiles locally in each point of the star are proportional to the first and second derivatives of the unperturbed intensity profile, respectively. We show that the weak-field approximation (for weak lines in the case of linear polarization) can be generalized to the case of a rotating star including the Doppler effect and taking into account the integration on the stellar surface. The Stokes profiles are written as a linear combination of wavelength-dependent terms expressed as series expansions in terms of Hermite polynomials. These terms contain the surface-integrated magnetic field and velocity components. The direct numerical evaluation of these quantities is limited to rotation velocities not larger than eight times the Doppler width of the local absorption profiles. Additionally, we demonstrate that in a rotating star, the circular polarization flux depends on the derivative of the intensity flux with respect to the wavelength and also on the profile itself. Likewise, the linear polarization depends on the profile and on its first and second derivatives with respect to the wavelength. We particularize the general expressions to a rotating dipole.

Martinez Gonzalez, M. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Asensio Ramos, A. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

Models of Forbidden Line Emission Profiles from Axisymmetric Stellar Winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of strong infrared forbidden lines have been observed in several evolved Wolf-Rayet star winds, and these are important for deriving metal abundances and testing stellar evolution models. In addition, because these optically thin lines form at large radius in the wind, their resolved profiles carry an imprint of the asymptotic structure of the wind flow. This work presents model forbidden line profile shapes formed in axisymmetric winds. It is well-known that an optically thin emission line formed in a spherical wind expanding at constant velocity yields a flat-topped emission profile shape. Simulated forbidden lines are produced for a model stellar wind with an axisymmetric density distribution that treats the latitudinal ionization self-consistently and examines the influence of the ion stage on the profile shape. The resulting line profiles are symmetric about line centre. Within a given atomic species, profile shapes can vary between centrally peaked, doubly peaked, and approximately flat-topped in appearance depending on the ion stage (relative to the dominant ion) and viewing inclination. Although application to Wolf-Rayet star winds is emphasized, the concepts are also relevant to other classes of hot stars such as luminous blue variables and Be/B[e] stars.

Richard Ignace; Adam Brimeyer

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continued Evaluation of the Microwave Radiometer Profiler Liljegren, J.C., Argonne National Laboratory Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Final...

418

ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband upwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer RAD : Radiation...

419

Profile of teen mothers in a Salt Lake County school district;.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this descriptive study was to profile young women currently enrolled in a Salt Lake Count school district Young Parent Program. This profile… (more)

Wanlass, Bonnie J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Theoretical X-ray Line Profiles from Colliding Wind Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical X-ray line profiles from a range of model colliding wind systems. In particular, we investigate the effects of varying the stellar mass-loss rates, the wind speeds, and the viewing orientation. We find that a wide range of theoretical line profile shapes is possible, varying with orbital inclination and phase. At or near conjunction, the lines have approximately Gaussian profiles, with small widths (HWHM ~ 0.1 v_\\infty) and definite blue- or redshifts (depending on whether the star with the weaker wind is in front or behind). When the system is viewed at quadrature, the lines are generally much broader (HWHM ~ v_\\infty), flat-topped and unshifted. Local absorption can have a major effect on the observed profiles - in systems with mass-loss rates of a few times 10^{-6} Msol/yr the lower energy lines (E wind of the primary. The orbital variation of the line widths and shifts is reduced in a low inclination binary. The extreme case is a binary with i = 0 degrees, for which we would expect no line profile variation.

D. B. Henley; I. R. Stevens; J. M. Pittard

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Long range constant force profiling for measurement of engineering surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new instrument bridging the gap between atomic force microscopes (AFMs) and stylus profiling instruments is described. The constant force profiler is capable of subnanometer resolution over a 15??m vertical range with a horizontal traverse length of 50 mm. This long traverse length coupled with the possibilities of utilizing standard radius diamondmeasurement styli make the force profiler more compatible with existing profiling instrument standards. The forces between the specimen and a diamond stylus tipped cantilever spring are sensed as displacements using a capacitance bridge. This displacement signal is then fed through a proportional plus integral controller to a high stability piezoelectric actuator to maintain a constant tip?to?sample force of approximately 100 nN. Much of the sensor head and traverse mechanism is made of Zerodur glass?ceramic to provide the thermal stability needed for long travel measurements. Profiles of a 30?nm silica step height standard and an 8.5??m step etched on Zerodur are presented.

L. P. Howard; S. T. Smith

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Testing gravity with halo density profiles observed through gravitational lensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new test of the modified gravity endowed with the Vainshtein mechanism with the density profile of a galaxy cluster halo observed through gravitational lensing. A scalar degree of freedom in the galileon modified gravity is screened by the Vainshtein mechanism to recover Newtonian gravity in high-density regions, however it might not be completely hidden on the outer side of a cluster of galaxies. Then the modified gravity might yield an observational signature in a surface mass density of a cluster of galaxies measured through gravitational lensing, since the scalar field could contribute to the lensing potential. We investigate how the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism affects the surface mass density observed through gravitational lensing, assuming that the density profile of a cluster of galaxies follows the original Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, the generalized NFW profile and the Einasto profile. We compare the theoretical predictions with observational results of the surface mass density reported recently by other researchers. We obtain constraints on the amplitude and the typical scale of the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism in a subclass of the generalized galileon model.

Narikawa, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, E-mail: narikawa@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Systems Genetics Approach to Evaluate Serum Cytokine Expression Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluate Serum Cytokine Expression Profiles Evaluate Serum Cytokine Expression Profiles in 10 cGy-Irradiated Mice: Possible Connection to Susceptibility/Resistance to Cancer E.A. Blakely Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: To use a systems-genetics approach to evaluate serum cytokine expression profiles in 10 cGy-whole-body-irradiated mice (BALB/c and Spret/EiJ parental strains, and their F1 offspring backcrossed (F1Bx) to female BALB/c). Background and Significance: Even low doses of ionizing radiation (∼10 cGy) can alter the composition of the tissue microenvironment by rapidly affecting cytokine production and activities, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, and the expression of receptors that mediate cell-to-cell interactions (1). The stroma in mammary glands is constantly changing

424

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Prophet Load Profiler  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prophet Load Profiler Prophet Load Profiler Prophet Load Profiler logo. Internet-enabled software that empowers business energy customers to manage energy and reduce costs. Valuable to facility managers, energy managers and energy service companies, the Prophet web-based service delivers real-time and near-real-time energy information on energy consumption and demand for any size facility. A number of facilities can be managed using consumption data gathered in 15 minute, 30 minute, 60 minute, daily, weekly and monthly intervals. Users can immediately view and analyze data with an eye toward load shedding, cost avoidance strategies, energy budget management, utility cost validation and energy forecasting. All tools are contained within the Prophet Web application and enabled via the internet using a standard web

425

Recovery Act Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles Recovery Act Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles DOE is working with regional and local utilities and co-ops across the nation to improve the reliability of the grid and helping communities recover faster when disruptions occur. Case studies are available from several grant recipients describing how Smart Grid Investment Grants are making an impact. Additional information is available on SmartGrid.gov, including impact metrics, tracking data, and specifics on all projects. Case Study - Oklahoma Gas and Electric - Using Time-Based Rate Program to Reduce Peak Demand - April 2013 Case Study - Idaho Power Company - Smart Grid Savings and Grid Integration of Renewables - April 2013 Case Study - Powder River Energy Corp - Providing Grid Flexibility in WY

426

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Strategic planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings requires an understanding of a Federal agency's buildings portfolio, including which programs, building types, and sites contribute the most to the agency's emissions. The data described in Table 1 below will support this type of analysis. It is recommended that this information be collected at the agency and program level. Programs refer to major operating units within the agency where there is a significant degree of autonomy in planning and decision-making. In many cases, the type of data required for portfolio planning may already

427

EcoCAR Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech EcoCAR Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech Addthis Description Since childhood, Lynn Gantt has had a deep seeded passion for cars and the mechanics that drive them. The Virginia native spent his weekends rebuilding antique tractors with his dad to race at tractor pulls across the state, and now the Virginia Tech graduate student is the proud team co-leader of Virginia Tech's EcoCAR Challenge team -- the winners of the three-year long competition, as announced last night at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C.. Speakers Lynn Gantt Duration 1:43 Topic Alternative Fuel Vehicles Fuel Economy Batteries Consumption Credit Energy Department Video LYNN GANTT: My name is Lynn Gantt and I'm the team leader for the Virginia Tech EcoCAR team.

428

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

429

Edge profile measurements using Thomson scattering on the KSTAR tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the KSTAR Tokamak, a “Tangential Thomson Scattering” (TTS) diagnostic system has been designed and installed to measure electron density and temperature profiles. In the edge system, TTS has 12 optical fiber bundles to measure the edge profiles with 10–15 mm spatial resolution. These 12 optical fibers and their spatial resolution are not enough to measure the pedestal width with a high accuracy but allow observations of L-H transition or H-L transitions at the edge. For these measurements, the prototype ITER edge Thomson Nd:YAG laser system manufactured by JAEA in Japan is installed. In this paper, the KSTAR TTS system is briefly described and some TTS edge profiles are presented and compared against the KSTAR Charge Exchange Spectroscopy and other diagnostics. The future upgrade plan of the system is also discussed in this paper.

Lee, J. H., E-mail: jhleel@nfri.re.kr; Ko, W. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, S.; Lee, W. R.; Kim, K. P.; Lee, K. D.; Jeon, Y. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Cho, K. W. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Hatae, T.; Yatsuka, E.; Ono, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Hong, J. H. [Department of Physics, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Combining data mining and machine learning for effective user profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the automatic design of methods for detecting fraudulent behavior. Much of the design is accomplished using a series of machine learning methods. In particular, we combine data mining and constructive induction with more standard machine learning techniques to design methods for detecting fraudulent usage of cellular telephones based on profiling customer behavior. Specifically, we use a rule-learning program to uncover indicators of fraudulent behavior from a large database of cellular calls. These indicators are used to create profilers, which then serve as features to a system that combines evidence from multiple profilers to generate high-confidence alarms. Experiments indicate that this automatic approach performs nearly as well as the best hand-tuned methods for detecting fraud.

Fawcett, T.; Provost, F. [NYNEX Science and Technology, White Plains, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (915RWP) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 915 MHz radar wind profiler/radio acoustic sounding system (RWP/RASS) measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 0.1 km and 5 km and virtual temperature profiles between 0.1 km and 2.5 km. It operates by transmitting electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. Virtual temperatures are recovered by transmitting an acoustic signal vertically and measuring the electromagnetic energy scattered from the acoustic wavefront. Because the propagation speed of the acoustic wave is proportional to the square root of the virtual temperature of the air, the virtual temperature can be recovered by measuring the Doppler shift of the scattered electromagnetic wave.

Coulter, R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first ever Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2} is presented in this paper. The measurement of polycrystalline sample of ZnBr{sub 2} is performed using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from an {sup 241}Am radioisotope. Theoretical calculations are performed following the Ionic model calculations for a number of configurations Zn{sup +x}Br{sub 2}{sup -x/2}(0.0{<=}x{<=}2.0 in step of 0.5) utilizing free atom profiles. The ionic model suggest transfer of 2.0 electrons from 4 s state of Zn to 4 p state of two Br atoms. The autocorrelation function B(z) is also derived from experiment and the most favoured ionic valence Compton profiles.

Dhaka, M. S. [Department of Physics, Engineering College Bikaner, Bikaner, 334004, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, G. [Department of Physics, Bansthali University, Bansthali, 304022, Rajasthan (India); Mishra, M. C.; Kothari, R. K.; Sharma, B. K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, 302004, Rajasthan (India)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Profile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Profile Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, once employee commuting survey data are collected and priority worksites have been identified, the survey responses should be analyzed for each major worksite to establish a behavior baseline. Depending on the agency's size and where it places accountability for GHG commuting emissions reduction goals, it may be to most appropriate to have individual programs or operating units assess their own employee commute data. Exceptions should be made when programs share facilities. For example, at a headquarters office building, a single program may take

434

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

435

Optically-initiated silicon carbide high voltage switch with contoured-profile electrode interfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved photoconductive switch having a SiC or other wide band gap substrate material with opposing contoured profile cavities which have a contoured profile selected from one of Rogowski, Bruce, Chang, Harrison, and Ernst profiles, and two electrodes with matching contoured-profile convex interface surfaces.

Sullivan, James S.; Hawkins, Steven A.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Armstrong International & Pfizer Teaming Profile | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pfizer Teaming Profile Pfizer Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

437

Armstrong International & Pepsi Americas Teaming Profile | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pepsi Americas Teaming Profile Pepsi Americas Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

438

Rockwell Automation & General Mills Teaming Profile | ENERGY STAR Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rockwell Automation & General Mills Teaming Profile Rockwell Automation & General Mills Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

439

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile | ENERGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

440

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Delamere, Jennifer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Troyan, David Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Shippert, Timothy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Long, Chuck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Heck, Patrick University of Wisconsin Rutan, David Analytical Services & Materials, Inc.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

VIMOS total transmission profiles for broad-band filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIMOS is a wide-field imager and spectrograph mounted on UT3 at the VLT, whose FOV consists of four 7'x8' quadrants. Here we present the measurements of total transmission profiles -- i.e. the throughput of telescope + instrument -- for the broad band filters U, B, V, R, I, and z for each of its four quadrants. Those measurements can also be downloaded from the public VIMOS web-page. The transmission profiles are compared with previous estimates from the VIMOS consortium.

S. Mieske; M. Rejkuba; S. Bagnulo; C. Izzo; G. Marconi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

442

Development of a low-profile portable concrete barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low-profile portable concrete barrier (PCB) has been developed for use in low-speed (approximately 45 mph [73 km/h] or less) work zones. The purpose of the low-profile barrier is to shield the work zone and redirect errant vehicles while.... SEQUENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHS OF CRASH TESTS APPENDIX D. ACCELEROMETER TRACES AND PLOTS OF ROLL, PITCH AND YAW RATES APPENDIX E. TEST VEHICLE PROPERTIES VITA Page 6 8 8 10 10 13 13 17 18 19 20 24 29 29 41 50 52 53 63 68 73 82 85 LIST...

Guidry, Todd Randall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Probing the Universal Critical-Adsorption Profile by Neutron Reflectometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of a neutron-reflectivity study of the universal critical-adsorption profile near the liquid-vapor interface of a binary-liquid mixture (methanol + deuterated cyclohexane) near criticality. As the critical temperature is approached from the one-phase region, we observed an abrupt decrease in the intensity of the specularly reflected neutron beam near the total-reflection edge. By interpreting the observation as the expected neutron-reflectivity discontinuity associated with a slowly decaying power-law profile, we evaluated the power-law exponent ( ?/?=0.50±0.05).

Hong Zhao; Anne Penninckx-Sans; Lay-Theng Lee; Daniel Beysens; Gérard Jannink

1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

Optimira Energy, Inc. & Subaru Teaming Profile- Optimira Energy, Inc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optimira Energy, Inc. & Subaru Teaming Profile- Optimira Energy, Optimira Energy, Inc. & Subaru Teaming Profile- Optimira Energy, Inc. formerly Cinergy Solutions ...providing total energy solutions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing

445

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW) MONTH HE1 HE2 HE3 HE4 HE5 HE6 HE7 HE8 HE9 HE10 HE11 HE12 HE13 HE14 HE15 HE16 HE17 HE18 HE19 HE20 HE21 HE22 HE23 HE24...

446

17PANTHER EYES Part of a series profiling undergraduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17PANTHER EYES Part of a series profiling undergraduate researchers provided by University enough to buy an undergraduate a little cachet. Of course, if the car is 22 years old, sporting patches, a patina," says Lambert of the car, which he describes as a "big, old, bulletproof diesel Mercedes

Jiang, Huiqiang

447

Probing the Temperature Profile of Energy Production in the Sun  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The particle kinetic energies of thermonuclear pp fusion in the Sun (Gamow energy) produce small changes in the energies of pp solar neutrinos relative to those due only to exothermal energetics. This effect may be observable via the unique tools of the LENS solar neutrino detector. The temperature profile of energy production in the Sun may thus be directly probed for the first time.

Christian Grieb and R. S. Raghavan

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

Characterizing Vertical Mass Flux Profiles in Aeolian Saltation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*) - 0.4133 (r^2=0.65). The values of beta ranged from 6.11 ? 17.83 for all the experiments. The Rouse profiles calculated using this approach predict very similar vertical distributions to the observed data and predicted 86% and 81% of the observed...

Farrell, Eugene

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

449

STUDENT PROFILE A junior in biomedical engineering, Caroline plans to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT PROFILE A junior in biomedical engineering, Caroline plans to use her education her come to NC State to study engineering. Her Dean's Merit Scholarship has given her the opportunity been an Engineering Ambassador, volunteered with Habitat for Humanity during a spring break trip

450

Leaching induced concentration profiles in the solid phase of cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the solid phase of portland cement specimens by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry before and after leaching provided elemental profiles within the cement. Releases of potassium were calculated from the solid phase profiles and were compared to releases determined from leachate analyses of potassium and cesium-137. The fraction of potassium released in the leachate was found to correlate closely to that of cesium-137 under varying time and temperature conditions, despite the different manner in which each was originally contained in the cement. Agreement was obtained among potassium releases as determined from the solid, potassium in the leachate and cesium-137 in the leachate. These correlations allowed the use of potassium as an analog for cesium-137 in cement. Profiles of potassium in the solid showed varying degrees of depletion. A specimen, sectioned immediately after leaching for 471 days, showed complete removal of potassium to 9 mm depth from the specimens surface. From 9 mm to the center of the specimen, an apparently linear increase in concentration was observed. Specimens that had been air dried prior to sectioning had profiles that were produced by evaporative transport of dissolved species toward the surface. Carbonation of the surface appears to have retarded migration of the dissolved material. This prevented it from reaching the outer edge and resulted in increased potassium concentrations several mm inside the surface. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Jordan: A Refugee Haven ---Country Profile Graldine Chatelard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jordan: A Refugee Haven --- Country Profile Géraldine Chatelard August 2010, Migration Information Jordan since the Palestinian exodus of 1948 has played a key role in the country's politics, economy's Hashemite monarchy to ensure its own stability. Jordan is a case in point for how various forms of mobility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

452

1. How To Get Access Complete Your Company Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. How To Get Access Complete Your Company Profile Go to www.niu.edu/careerservices In the center you notify us otherwise. 3. Search Resume Books Log into your eRecruiting account Select Resume majors. You can choose to search resumes by using the Resume Key Words search or break down your search

Kostic, Milivoje M.

453

Profiles of heating in turbulent coronal magnetic loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context: The location of coronal heating in magnetic loops has been the subject of a long-lasting controversy: does it occur mostly at the loop footpoints, at the top, is it random, or is the average profile uniform? Aims: We try to address this question in model loops with MHD turbulence and a profile of density and/or magnetic field along the loop. Methods: We use the ShellAtm MHD turbulent heating model described in Buchlin & Velli (2006), with a static mass density stratification obtained by the HydRad model (Bradshaw & Mason 2003). This assumes the absence of any flow or heat conduction subsequent to the dynamic heating. Results: The average profile of heating is quasi-uniform, unless there is an expansion of the flux tube (non-uniform axial magnetic field) or the variation of the kinetic and magnetic diffusion coefficients with temperature is taken into account: in the first case the heating is enhanced at footpoints, whereas in the second case it is enhanced where the dominant diffusion coefficient is enhanced. Conclusions: These simulations shed light on the consequences on heating profiles of the complex interactions between physical effects involved in a non-uniform turbulent coronal loop.

E. Buchlin; P. J. Cargill; S. J. Bradshaw; M. Velli

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Student Profile Application Form 2014 Page 1 VTAC Number:__________________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

):______________________________________ Bachelor of Applied Science (Outdoor Recreation and Ecotourism) Student Profile Application Form 2014 IMPORTANT INFORMATION · We recommend that you put the Outdoor Recreation and Ecotourism course as your first. Address your application to: Outdoor Recreation and Ecotourism Course School of Environmental Sciences

Thomas, Richard C.

455

College of Engineering Profile The College of Engineering at Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Engineering Profile 2007-2008 The College of Engineering at Colorado State has a strong tradition of excellence in science and engineering. The vision of the College of Engineering services, and outreach. We will serve society by solving problems of global importance and through

456

Charged-species profiles in electronegative radio-frequency plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The negative ion density profile in a low pressure oxygen rf plasma has been measured by a photodetachment technique. At an rf power of 10 W and a neutral pressure of 10 mTorr, a parabolic negative ion density profile is obtained with a peak density of 8×1015 m-3 and a maximum ratio of negative ion to electron densities n-/ne?18. Under these conditions, the most abundant positive ion, determined by ion mass spectrometry, is O2+ with O+ being less than 10% of the positive ion density. The most abundant negative ion is O- with O2- and O3- being less than 20% of the total negative charge density. The maximum in the density profile of negative ions shifts closer to the powered rf electrode as the pressure is increased in the asymmetric system. Comparison of the results to theory indicates that the asymmetry follows from an enhancement of the ionization rate near the powered electrode sheath. The parabolic profile is also obtained in CCl2F2 at low pressure. Simulations and measurements show a rapid drop in ion density near the sheath that may be related to the recently discussed ‘‘stratification’’ phenomenon in electronegative plasmas.

D. Vender; W. W. Stoffels; E. Stoffels; G. M. W. Kroesen; F. J. de Hoog

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Random Profiles of Laser Marks S. Saloomeh Shariati1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the random profile of laser marks that are engraved on the surface or in the bulk of physical objects. Given is Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tag that contains digital identifier used to authenticate a credit card and serves as an identification tag. For a more in-depth view of PUF and its use

Nesterov, Yurii

458

Dynamic modeling and learning user profile in personalized news agent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to changing user interests. In this thesis, a novel scheme is proposed to learn user profile. The proposed scheme is designed to handle multiple domains of long-term and short-term users' interests simultaneously, which are learned through positive...

Widyantoro, Dwi Hendratmo

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report reviews the patterns of foreign ownership interest in US energy enterprises, exclusive of portfolio investment (<10% ownership of a US enterprise). It profiles the involvement of foreign-affiliated US companies in the following areas: domestic petroleum production (including natural gas), reserve holdings, refining and marketing activities, coal production, and uranium exploration and development.

Not Available

1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Profile of party supporters in the 2011 Saskatchewan provincial election  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Profile of party supporters in the 2011 Saskatchewan provincial election: A research brief December 2011 Saskatchewan Election Study team Dr. Michael Atkinson, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy Dr. David McGrane, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan Dr. Loleen Berdahl

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiometer profiler mwrp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing caused by direct solar insolation and benefit from the cooling effects of wind caused by evaporative, as well as benefits from the cooling effects of wind. Eastern Red Bat Lasiurus borealis Roost trees

New Hampshire, University of

462

ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES AND DRUG ACTIVITY PATTERNS BY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are more related to the kind of cancer than to drug activity patterns. Dependency analysis using Bayesian1 11 ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES AND DRUG ACTIVITY PATTERNS BY CLUSTERING AND BAYESIAN of data produced from up- to-date biological experimental processes needs appropriate data mining

463

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at cloud base is the most relevant measure of the aerosol that influences droplet formation in clouds. Since the CCN concentration depends on supersaturation, a more general measure of the CCN concentration is the CCN spectrum (values at multiple supersaturations). The CCN spectrum is now measured at the surface at several fixed ARM sites and by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), but is not measured at the cloud base. Rather than rely on expensive aircraft measurements for all studies of aerosol effects on clouds, a way to project CCN measurements at the surface to cloud base is needed. Remote sensing of aerosol extinction provides information about the vertical profile of the aerosol, but cannot be directly related to the CCN concentration because the aerosol extinction is strongly influenced by humidification, particularly near cloud base. Ghan and Collins (2004) and Ghan et al. (2006) propose a method to remove the influence of humidification from the extinction profiles and tie the “dry extinction” retrieval to the surface CCN concentration, thus estimating the CCN profile. This methodology has been implemented as the CCN Profile (CCNPROF) value-added product (VAP).

McFarlane, S; Sivaraman, C; Ghan, S

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

464

Profiling the Thermoelectric Power of Semiconductor Junctions with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources realize energy conversion between heat and electricity without the use of moving me- chanical the thermoelectric power, band struc- tures, and carrier concentrations of semiconductor junctions that constitute S is governed by local carrier statistics, SThEM allows us to profile precise elec- tronic junction locations

465

PARTNERSHIP PROFILE: THE GAVI ALLIANCE | 1 About the GAVI Alliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARTNERSHIP PROFILE: THE GAVI ALLIANCE | 1 APRIL 2014 About the GAVI Alliance The GAVI Alliance (also known as "GAVI,"and formerly called the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation in the poorest countries. The Alliance brings together governments of industrialized and developing coun- tries

Klein, Ophir

466

Calibrated nanoscale dopant profiling using a scanning microwave microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scanning microwave microscope is used for calibrated capacitance spectroscopy and spatially resolved dopant profiling measurements. It consists of an atomic force microscope combined with a vector network analyzer operating between 1-20 GHz. On silicon semiconductor calibration samples with doping concentrations ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3}, calibrated capacitance-voltage curves as well as derivative dC/dV curves were acquired. The change of the capacitance and the dC/dV signal is directly related to the dopant concentration allowing for quantitative dopant profiling. The method was tested on various samples with known dopant concentration and the resolution of dopant profiling determined to 20% while the absolute accuracy is within an order of magnitude. Using a modeling approach the dopant profiling calibration curves were analyzed with respect to varying tip diameter and oxide thickness allowing for improvements of the calibration accuracy. Bipolar samples were investigated and nano-scale defect structures and p-n junction interfaces imaged showing potential applications for the study of semiconductor device performance and failure analysis.

Huber, H. P.; Hochleitner, M.; Hinterdorfer, P. [University of Linz, Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Altenbergerstrasse 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Humer, I.; Smoliner, J. [Technical University of Vienna, Institute for Solid State Electronics, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Fenner, M.; Moertelmaier, M.; Rankl, C.; Tanbakuchi, H.; Kienberger, F. [Agilent Technologies, Inc., 5301 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara, California 95051 (United States); Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Kabos, P. [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Electromagnetic Division, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States); Kopanski, J. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Semiconductor Measurements Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Profile-based adaptive anomaly detection for network security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As information systems become increasingly complex and pervasive, they become inextricably intertwined with the critical infrastructure of national, public, and private organizations. The problem of recognizing and evaluating threats against these complex, heterogeneous networks of cyber and physical components is a difficult one, yet a solution is vital to ensuring security. In this paper we investigate profile-based anomaly detection techniques that can be used to address this problem. We focus primarily on the area of network anomaly detection, but the approach could be extended to other problem domains. We investigate using several data analysis techniques to create profiles of network hosts and perform anomaly detection using those profiles. The ''profiles'' reduce multi-dimensional vectors representing ''normal behavior'' into fewer dimensions, thus allowing pattern and cluster discovery. New events are compared against the profiles, producing a quantitative measure of how ''anomalous'' the event is. Most network intrusion detection systems (IDSs) detect malicious behavior by searching for known patterns in the network traffic. This approach suffers from several weaknesses, including a lack of generalizability, an inability to detect stealthy or novel attacks, and lack of flexibility regarding alarm thresholds. Our research focuses on enhancing current IDS capabilities by addressing some of these shortcomings. We identify and evaluate promising techniques for data mining and machine-learning. The algorithms are ''trained'' by providing them with a series of data-points from ''normal'' network traffic. A successful algorithm can be trained automatically and efficiently, will have a low error rate (low false alarm and miss rates), and will be able to identify anomalies in ''pseudo real-time'' (i.e., while the intrusion is still in progress, rather than after the fact). We also build a prototype anomaly detection tool that demonstrates how the techniques might be integrated into an operational intrusion detection framework.

Zhang, Pengchu C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Durgin, Nancy Ann

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Profiling an application for power consumption during execution on a compute node  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for profiling an application for power consumption during execution on a compute node that include: receiving an application for execution on a compute node; identifying a hardware power consumption profile for the compute node, the hardware power consumption profile specifying power consumption for compute node hardware during performance of various processing operations; determining a power consumption profile for the application in dependence upon the application and the hardware power consumption profile for the compute node; and reporting the power consumption profile for the application.

Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Peters, Amanda E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

470

Indiana - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

471

Iowa - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

472

Mississippi - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

473

Alaska - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

474

Minnesota - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

475

Longitudinal bunch profile and electron beam energy spread  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnets and Power Supplies Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Magnets and Power Supplies Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Storage Ring Operation Modes Longitudinal bunch profile and electron beam energy spread Longitudinal bunch profile depends mainly on the single bunch charge (or single bunch current). Every APS operating mode has different single bunch current and therefore has different bunch length. The plot below shows measured bunch length dependence on the single bunch current between 1 mA and 18 mA and the fit that uses the formula shown below the plot. The bunch length in this plot is shorter than it was quoted before. Earlier numbers were obtained using a Gaussian fit, present numbers are calculated as true standard deviation. \includegraphics[width=0.8\textwidth]{otherFiles/bunchLength.eps} The following formula obtained by fitting the log of the data above can be

476

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

477

NREL Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006): Technology Profiles |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006): Technology Profiles Power Technologies Energy Data Book (2006): Technology Profiles Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on renewable energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting market and performance data for over a dozen technologies from publications from 1997 - 2004. The technologies covered are: biomass, geothermal, concentrating solar power (CSP), wind, hydro, solar buildings, reciprocating engines, microturbines, fuel cells, batteries, advanced energy storage, and super conducting power technology. Depending on the technology, data may go as far back as 1980 and projections may go as far into the future as 2020.

478

Genetic profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines sensitive to low dose  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines sensitive to low dose profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines sensitive to low dose radiation David Rocke University of California Davis Abstract Previous study from our laboratory has identified pathways associated with low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) in vivo that is consistent across individuals. Furthermore, gene expression patterns have revealed genetic variation between individuals, which may play a role in individual sensitivity to LDIR. The aim is to evaluate microRNA and mRNA expression patterns in lymphoblast cell lines that exhibit sensitivity to radiation. Human lymphoblastoid cell lines were screened for low dose radiation sensitivity by apoptosis, cellular proliferation, and colony forming assay. Cells were irradiated with 5cGy and 10cGy and analyzed at multiple time

479

Oklahoma - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

480

Strategies for Spectral Profile Inversion using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores three different strategies for the inversion of spectral lines (and their Stokes profiles) using artificial neural networks. It is shown that a straightforward approach in which the network is trained with synthetic spectra from a simplified model leads to considerable errors in the inversion of real observations. This problem can be overcome in at least two different ways that are studied here in detail. The first method makes use of an additional pre-processing auto-associative neural network to project the observed profile into the theoretical model subspace. The second method considers a suitable regularization of the neural network used for the inversion. These new techniques are shown to be robust and reliable when applied to the inversion of both synthetic and observed data, with errors typically below $\\sim$100 G.

H. Socas-Navarro

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from the propagation of polarised emission in the pulsar magnetosphere and the interstellar medium. The predictions of magnetospheric birefringence in pulsars have been tested using spectra of the pulse width and fractional polarisation from multifrequency data. The derived spectra offer only partial support for the expected effects of birefringence on the polarisation properties, with only about half of our sample being consistent with the model's predictions. It is noted that for some pulsars these measurements are contaminated by the effects of interstellar scattering. For a number of pulsars in our sample, we have observed significant variations in the amount of Faraday rotation as a function of pulse phase, which is possi...

Noutsos, A; Kondratiev, V I; Weltevrede, P; Verbiest, J P W; Karastergiou, A; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Alexov, A; Breton, R P; Bilous, A V; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Hessels, J W T; Keane, E F; Os?owski, S; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; Stappers, B W; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Zagkouris, K; Anderson, K; Bähren, L; Bell, M; Broderick, J; Carbone, D; Cendes, Y; Coenen, T; Corbel, S; Eislöffel, J; Fender, R; Garsden, H; Jonker, P; Law, C; Marko, S; Masters, J; Miller-Jones, J; Molenaar, G; Osten, R; Pietka, M; Rol, E; Rowlinson, A; Scheers, B; Spreeuw, H; Staley, T; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J; Wijers, R; Wijnands, R; Wise, M; Zarka, P; van der Horst, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Modeling boron profiles in silicon after pulsed excimer laser annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we investigated four possible mechanisms which were candidates to explain the shape of boron profiles after ion implantation and melting excimer laser annealing in silicon. A laser with a wavelength of 308 nm and a pulse duration of {approx}180 ns was used. To simulate this process, an existing model for the temperature and phase evolution was complemented with equations for the migration of dopants. Outdiffusion, thermodiffusion, segregation, and adsorption were investigated as possible mechanisms. As a result, we found that outdiffusion and segregation can be excluded as major mechanisms. Thermodiffusion as well as adsorption could both reproduce the build-up at low melt depths, but only adsorption the one at deeper melt depths. In both cases, ion beam mixing during SIMS measurement had to be taken into account to reproduce the measured profiles.

Hackenberg, M.; Huet, K.; Negru, R.; Venturini, J.; Fisicaro, G.; La Magna, A.; Pichler, P. [Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Excico, 13-21 Quai des Gresillons, 92230 Gennevilliers (France); CNR IMM, Z.I VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany) and Chair of Electron Devices, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

484

An atlas of synthetic line profiles of planetary nebulae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have constructed a grid of photoionization models of spherical, elliptical and bipolar planetary nebulae. Assuming different velocity fields, we have computed line profiles corresponding to different orientations, slit sizes and positions. The atlas is meant both for didactic purposes and for the interpretation of data on real nebulae. As an application, we have shown that line profiles are often degenerate, and that recovering the geometry and velocity field from observations requires lines from ions with different masses and different ionization potentials. We have also shown that the empirical way to measure mass-weighted expansion velocities from observed line widths is reasonably accurate if considering the HWHM. For distant nebulae, entirely covered by the slit, the unknown geometry and orientation do not alter the measured velocities statistically. The atlas is freely accessible from internet. The Cloudy_3D suite and the associated VISNEB tool are available on request.

C. Morisset; G. Stasinska

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Calculation of density profiles in tandem mirrors fueled by pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have modified the LLNL radial transport code TMT to model reactor regime plasmas, fueled by pellets. The source profiles arising from pellet fueling are obtained from existing pellet ablation models. Because inward radial diffusion due to inverted profiles must compete with trapping of central cell ions in the transition region for tandem mirrors, pellets must penetrate fairly far into the plasma. In fact, based on our radial calculations, a pellet with a velocity of 10 km/sec cannot sustain the central flux tubes; a velocity more like 100 km/sec will be necessary. We also find that the central cell radial diffusion must exceed classical by about a factor of 100.

Campbell, R.B.; Gilmore, J.M.

1983-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

486

High gain photoconductive semiconductor switch having tailored doping profile zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photoconductive semiconductor switch with tailored doping profile zones beneath and extending laterally from the electrical contacts to the device. The zones are of sufficient depth and lateral extent to isolate the contacts from damage caused by the high current filaments that are created in the device when it is turned on. The zones may be formed by etching depressions into the substrate, then conducting epitaxial regrowth in the depressions with material of the desired doping profile. They may be formed by surface epitaxy. They may also be formed by deep diffusion processes. The zones act to reduce the energy density at the contacts by suppressing collective impact ionization and formation of filaments near the contact and by reducing current intensity at the contact through enhanced current spreading within the zones.

Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Zutavern, Fred J (Albuquerque, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Edgewood, NM); O'Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); Denison, Gary J. (Sandia Park, NM); Brown, Darwin J. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, Charles T. (Albuquerque, NM); Hou, Hong Q. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Kansas - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

488

Washington - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

489

Microsoft Word - Final Sample Participant Profile November 2008.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SUPERVISORY/SITE REVIEW OF FEDERAL PROJECT DIRECTOR COMPETENCIES FOR PMCDP CERTIFICATION AND PMCDP PROFILE SUPERVISORY/SITE REVIEW OF FEDERAL PROJECT DIRECTOR COMPETENCIES FOR PMCDP CERTIFICATION AND PMCDP PROFILE Site/Line Managers are requested to critically assess incumbent federal project directors' and candidate project directors' competencies leading to certification. It is expected that site/line managers will review appropriate documentation, conduct interviews as necessary, and/or consult with appropriate persons at site or program offices to adequately determine that candidates meet required competencies for federal project director certification within DOE/NNSA. Supervisory review of project director competencies should be evaluated using PMCDP Certification Equivalency Guidelines, which list detailed knowledge and skill requirements. By signing off on these

490

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicles and Mobile Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To gain a good understanding of a Federal agency's Scope 1 vehicle and mobile equipment greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency must first collect the necessary data to profile any emissions sources then analyze the data in a way that will clarify the most viable strategies and alternatives. Emissions cannot be managed until they are measured. Through the use of fleet/vehicle management information systems, as well as reporting to the Federal Energy Management Program and General Services Administration, agencies are increasingly collecting and documenting useful data elements at the headquarters-and sometimes at specific site -levels.

491

Profil de poste Reprsentant de l'IRD en Egypte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Profil de poste N°3999 Représentant de l'IRD en Egypte Catégorie A - Directeur de recherche détachement sur un emploi de chercheur1 AFFECTATION STRUCTURELLE Le représentant de l'IRD en Egypte est déléguées. AFFECTATION GEOGRAPHIQUE Le représentant de l'IRD en Egypte sera affecté au Caire à compter du 1

492

Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data �º Ð 1 ¸ � � �¹ � Ý�¹� � 2 1 to measure fish swimming speeds. This is possible when fish form schools that are large enough so that the multiple Doppler sonar beams are sampling the fish speeds at the same time. In situations where fish

deYoung, Brad

493

Equation of State of Supercooled Water from the Sedimentation Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To study the coexistence of two liquid states of water within one simulation box, we implement an equilibrium sedimentation method--which involves applying a gravitational field to the system and measuring/calculating the resulting density profile in equilibrium. We simulate a system of particles interacting via the ST2 potential, a model for water. We detect the coexistence of two liquid phases at low temperature.

M. Yamada; H. E. Stanley; F. Sciortino

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

494

Quantifying forested stands with the pulsed airborne laser profiler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) red H. Smeins (Member) Peter T Sprinz (Member) J ~ (Head aries Lee f Departmen ) May 1986 ABSTRACT Quantifying Forested Stands with the Pulsed Airborne Laser Profiler. (May 1986) Michael Craig Whatley, B. S. , Texas A&M University... Digital Data CONCLUSIONS. 48 51 PALP Capabilities and Opportunities in Basal Area Estimation. 53 REFERENCES' APPENDIX A APPENDIX B. VITA. 54 57 78 90 viii LIST OF TASLES Table Page Prediction equations of predicted ground tree height from...

Whatley, Michael Craig

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Business Travel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Developing a Federal agency's business travel greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile first involves getting a better understanding of the nature and patterns of travel within the organization. Not all travel can be avoided or effectively substituted with information technology solutions. By understanding where people are traveling by air, the purpose of travel, and what parts of the organization travel most frequently, the agency will be in a better position to develop solutions and program-level targets.

496

Alternative Methods for Human Identification: Mitochondrial DNA Base Composition Profiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Profiling by ESI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Kevin Kiesler Research Biologist, Applied Genetics Group Forensics · Why use Mass Spectrometry? · Abbott / Ibis Biosciences PLEX-ID Instrument · PLEX-ID mtDNA 2.0 Assay://remf.dartmouth.edu/images/mammalianLungTEM/source/8.html #12;Applied Genetics mtDNA Genotyping for Human I.D. · Mutations in mtDNA occur naturally

Perkins, Richard A.

497

EFFECTS OF LOCAL DISSIPATION PROFILES ON MAGNETIZED ACCRETION DISK SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present spectral calculations of non-LTE accretion disk models appropriate for high-luminosity stellar mass black hole X-ray binary systems. We first use a dissipation profile based on scaling the results of shearing box simulations of Hirose et al. to a range of annuli parameters. We simultaneously scale the effective temperature, orbital frequency, and surface density with luminosity and radius according to the standard {alpha}-model. This naturally brings increased dissipation to the disk surface layers (around the photospheres) at small radii and high luminosities. We find that the local spectrum transitions directly from a modified blackbody to a saturated Compton scattering spectrum as we increase the effective temperature and orbital frequency while decreasing midplane surface density. Next, we construct annuli models based on the parameters of a L/L{sub Edd} = 0.8 disk orbiting a 6.62 solar mass black hole using two modified dissipation profiles that explicitly put more dissipation per unit mass near the disk surface. The new dissipation profiles are qualitatively similar to the one found by Hirose et al., but produce strong near power-law spectral tails. Our models also include physically motivated magnetic acceleration support based once again on scaling the Hirose et al. results. We present three full-disk spectra, each based on one of the dissipation prescriptions. Our most aggressive dissipation profile results in a disk spectrum that is in approximate quantitative agreement with certain observations of the steep power-law spectral states from some black hole X-ray binaries.

Tao, Ted [Department of Physics, St. Mary's College of Maryland, St. Mary's City, MD 20686 (United States); Blaes, Omer [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

498

Probing the Temperature Profile of Energy Production in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The particle kinetic energies of pp fusion in the sun (Gamow Energy) produce small changes in the energies of pp solar neutrinos relative to those due only to exothermal energetics. Observation of this effect may be possible via the unique tools of the upcoming LENS solar neutrino detector. The temperature profile of energy production in the sun may thus be directly probed for the first time.

Christian Grieb; R. S. Raghavan

2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

499

Host and pathogen transcriptional profiles of acute Brucella melitensis infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOST AND PATHOGEN TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES OF ACUTE Brucella melitensis INFECTION A Dissertation by CARLOS ALBERTO ROSSETTI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... ROSSETTI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, L. Garry Adams Committee Members, Ren?e M...

Rossetti, Carlos Alberto

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne profiling laser Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiling laser Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: airborne profiling laser Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 This special issue ofThis...