Sample records for radiometer precipitable water

  1. MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

  2. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cadeddu, Maria

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  3. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  4. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  5. Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caddedu, MP

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The 90/150-GHz Vapor Radiometer provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  6. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  7. Estimation of precipitable water from surface observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahan, Archie Marion

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for estimating the precipitable water at Lake Charles, Louisiana. P red ic tors employed were surface vapor p re s ? sure, ceiling, cloud cover , cloud type, wind, pressure change and iv season. E rrors of estimate averaged approximately one tenth o f... of the photocells and the intense radiation of the noon sun leads one to accept the reality of a ce ll temperature greater than the ambient air temperature. The ce lls are, in effect, miniature green ? houses, The epoxy resin cylinder encasing the crysta l...

  8. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  9. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  10. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caddeau, MP

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

  11. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

  12. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-122 G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-15022252 G-Band

  13. Broadband radiometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cannon, T.W.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband radiometer is disclosed including (a) an optical integrating sphere having generally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample. 8 figs.

  14. Polar Precipitation Measurement Mission A Mission Concept for Earth Explorer 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regional and global energy-water cycle budgets. Measurement of precipitation at the high latitudes the middle to high latitudes. To improve global precipitation estimates through the synergistic use of space borne radar and radiometer measurements. Orbital characteristics To achieve full sensitivity an orbit

  15. Ocean Water Vapor and Cloud Burden Trends Derived from the Topex Microwave Radiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    algorithm is a log-linear regression algorithm with coefficients that are stratified by wind speed and water. TMR OBSERVATIONS The TMR flew in a 10-day non-sun-synchronous exact repeat orbit with an inclination

  16. Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterim DataCooling -INTEGRATINGIntegration

  17. Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we need them most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we inferences of air pollution suppressing precipitation lead us to investigate historical climate records precipitation, decreases with time in the polluted regions and remains unchanged where no pollution sources were

  18. Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGrado, Timothy R. [Mayo Clinic] [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

  19. atmospheric precipitable water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: a crucial role in Earth's energy and water cycles through absorbing solar and infrared radiation, releasing latent heat, transporting water, and forming...

  20. Information content and reliability of TOVS estimates of precipitable water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Min

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of water vapor in the atmosphere has been accomplished by satellite sensors in both the infrared (IR) and microwave spectral regions. The radiance will be high if either the atmospheric temperature is high or the water vapor content is low. Among... hours apart. On board each satellite are channels of High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS2), Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU). Two infrared channels are essentially sensitive to water vapor. PW derived...

  1. Kinetics of metal-arsenate precipitate formation at the goethite-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    GEOC 25 Kinetics of metal-arsenate precipitate formation at the goethite-water interface Markus mg goethite L-1 (ppm). Sorption in the 1000ppm suspensions was rapid with Zn (II) sorption increasing thereafter beyond 500hrs. Initial EXAFS experiments of the 1000ppm goethite suspension system showed

  2. Formation of Metal-Arsenate Precipitates at the Goethite-Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Formation of Metal-Arsenate Precipitates at the Goethite-Water Interface M A R K U S G R A¨ F E. This study investigated the cosorption of As(V) and Zn on goethite at pH 4 and 7 as a function of final environment of As and Zn at the goethite-water interface. Macroscopic sorption studies revealed that As

  3. Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  4. drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate, 647 (1964). 6. W. J. Drury, Water Environ. Res. 71, 1244 (1999). 7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Current Drinking Water Standards (2000). 8

  5. Stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.; Gestin, J.F.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to new rigid chelating structures, to methods for preparing these materials, and to their use in preparing radiometal labeled immunoconjugates. These new chelates include cyclohexyl EDTA monohydride, the trans forms of cyclohexyl DTPA and TTHA, and derivatives of these cyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate materials. No Drawings

  6. Christopher RUF EXTERNAL SPONSORED RESEARCH FUNDING HISTORY 06/30/1992 to 04/30/1996; "GEOSAT Follow-On water vapor radiometer engineering support,"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Calibration Standard for Interferometric and Polarimetric Microwave Radiometers," EMAG Technologies, Inc., Ann Cloud Radar Studies," Dept. of Energy; $500,000 ($75,000/yr to Ruf); Co-I (PI is T. Ackermann, PSU Dept/30/2000; "Conical-Scanning Microwave Imager/Sounder Development Program," Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation

  7. Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere -- in the Metric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eihle, W. O.; Powers, R. J.; Clark, R.A.

    TR-16 1968 Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere?in the Metric System W.O. Eihle R.J. Powers R.A. Clark...

  8. Orographic Precipitation and Water Vapor Fractionation over the Southern Andes RONALD B. SMITH AND JASON P. EVANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Orographic Precipitation and Water Vapor Fractionation over the Southern Andes RONALD B. SMITH (Smith and Barstad 2004) to predict the patterns of orographic pre- Corresponding author address: Ronald B. Smith, Depa

  9. High-frequency precipitation and stream water quality time series from Plynlimon, Wales: an openly accessible data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    High-frequency precipitation and stream water quality time series from Plynlimon, Wales: an openly Colin Vincent,6 Kathryn Lehto,6 Simon Grant,2 Jeremy Williams,7 Margaret Neal,1 Heather Wickham,1 Sarah-element high- frequency water quality data set that is openly accessible to the research community. The data

  10. Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal Solar ThermalJul 13 1 2 3

  11. Recent Climate Changes in Precipitable Water in the Global Tropics as Revealed in NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    1 Recent Climate Changes in Precipitable Water in the Global Tropics as Revealed in NCEP: 1 (808) 956-2877 Email: chu@hawaii.edu #12;2 Abstract For the first time, long-term climate changes/NCAR Reanalysis Igor I. Zveryaev and Pao-Shin Chu* P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, Moscow, Russia

  12. Observations of tropical cirrus properties in the pilot radiation observation experiment using lidar and the CSIRO ARM filter radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.J.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow beam fast filter radiometer has been developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The radiometer is intended to operate alongside a lidar at ARM sites in a lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) configuration. The radiometer detects in three narrow bands at 8.62-, 10.86-, and 12.04-m central wavelengths in the atmospheric window. In addition, it has a variable field aperture that varies the radiance incident on the detector and also allows the field of view to be tailored to that of a lidar used in the LIRAD technique. The radiometer was deployed in the ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) at Kavieng, Papua New Guinea in January-February 1993. The radiometer worked satisfactorily and appeared to be very stable. The radiometer was compared with a previous CSIRO radiometer and the improved performance of the ARM instrument was very evident. The ARM radiometer was also compared with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratories (ETL) interferometer and gave closely equivalent radiances. The LIRAD method was used at Kavieng to obtain the optical properties of cirrus clouds. Continuous observations of water vapor path obtained by the NOAA ETL microwave radiometer were employed to allow for the strong tropical water vapor absorption and emission. Cirrus cells that developed on one morning, independent of other clouds, had measured infrared emittances varying from <0.1 to 1.0.

  13. Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

  14. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010), The surface water and ocean topography mission:and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (

  15. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  16. Drought and Precipitation Monitoring for Enhanced Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    in the Caribbean Adrian Trotman1 , Bano Mehdi2 , Apurva Gollamudi2 , Catherine Senecal2 Climate change is expected to have some serious implications for water resources in the Caribbean. One of the greatest concerns effectively to the challenges of climate-related events. The Caribbean Water Initiative (CARIWIN), jointly

  17. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for assessing aerosol effects on cold season precipitation in California.

  18. Water vapor variability in the tropics and its links to dynamics and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    dioxide doubling [e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2001]. This uncertainty stems P. P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia Richard P. Allan to understanding feedbacks and processes operating within the climate system. Column-integrated water vapor (CWV

  19. Macroscale water fluxes 1. Quantifying errors in the estimation of basin mean precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October 2002. [1] Developments in analysis and modeling of continental water and energy balances of gauges therein. Neither index requires restrictive statistical assumptions (such as spatial homogeneity (median area of 51,000 km2 ) river basins of the world for which contemporaneous, continuous (missing

  20. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  1. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  2. Correlation between water-vapor transport from the Gulf of Mexico and precipitation in the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John Vinson

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation inland, are very much appreciated. There is little doubt that the Gulf has a great influence on the amount and character of precipit. tion that does occur in the eastern United States, i. e. , the area generally east of the Rocky Mountains... moisture flux. Cobb found that precipitation which is signif icantly greater than normal did not occur when the flux of moisture was unusually small, and that a large moisture flux does not result in abnormally high precipitation if it is associated...

  3. ARM - Measurement - Precipitable water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiancenumber

  4. A radiometer for stochastic gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan W. Ballmer

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration recently reported a new upper limit on an isotropic stochastic background of gravitational waves obtained based on the data from the 3rd LIGO science Run (S3). Now I present a new method for obtaining directional upper limits that the LIGO Scientific Collaboration intends to use for future LIGO science runs and that essentially implements a gravitational wave radiometer.

  5. Sequential precipitation of a new goethitecalcite nanocomposite and its possible application in the removal of toxic ions from polluted water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France h i g h l i g h t s " A simple and innovative synthesis route for goethite a c t This study proposes a simple and innovative synthesis route for a goethite­calcite nanocompositeSequential precipitation of a new goethite­calcite nanocomposite and its possible application

  6. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  7. active cavity radiometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in North America from long-term records of the advanced very high resolution radiometer Geosciences Websites Summary: Interannual changes of active fire detectability in...

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Microwave Radiometer Profiler Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) CampaigngovCampaignsMicrowave Radiometer Profiler

  9. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 â�� 300 �¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  10. MICROWAVE RADIOMETER INTER-CALIBRATION USING THE VICARIOUS CALIBRATION METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    MICROWAVE RADIOMETER INTER-CALIBRATION USING THE VICARIOUS CALIBRATION METHOD Darren McKague Chris Ruf John J. Puckett University of Michigan ABSTRACT The vicarious cold and warm calibration methods of Ruf, and Brown and Ruf, have been used to assess the calibration of the WindSat radiometer as well

  11. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  12. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, Tom; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Anderberg, Mary; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  13. Vertical structure of tropical oceanic convective clouds and its relation to precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    data are collocated with precipitation rates from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR high tops that are nearly two km deeper than moderately raining or non- raining high clouds. Rain rate.1029/2007GL032811. 1. Introduction [2] Tropical convection plays an important role in the energy and moisture

  14. Observational Analysis of Cloud and Precipitation in Midlatitude Cyclones: Northern versus Southern Hemisphere Warm Fronts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System Extratropical cyclones produce the bulk of the cold- season precipitation in middle and high latitudes and are key contributors to the meridional transport of energy between the equator and the poles. Though

  15. Corrigendum to Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust published in Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 81–101, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, A.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper “Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust” by J. Fan et al., wrong versions of Fig. 8 and Fig. 12 were published. Please find the correct figures below.

  16. Sequential precipitation of a new goethite-calcite nanocomposite and its1 possible application in the removal of toxic ions from polluted water2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for a goethite-calcite2 nanocomposite. This synthesis is summarized by three sequential precipitation reactions1 Sequential precipitation of a new goethite-calcite nanocomposite and its1 possible application.1016/j.cej.2012.10.050 #12;2 Abstract1 This study proposes a simple and innovative synthesis route

  17. Surface soil moisture estimation with the electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theis, Sidney Wayne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that is important in determining the ability of a plant to uptake water and that determines the state of saturation of a soil. Matric potential is very important for crop modeling and runoff prediction. Roe et al. (1971) observed that the emissivity of a mooth... that were approximately 15 to 20 cm high. For an area covered with thick turfted grass to a height of 20 cm, Barton (1978) obtained a poor relationship between soil moisture and emissivity for both the ESHR and a 2. 65-cm radiometer. The ESHR response...

  18. Response of METEOSAT water vapour channel (*) M. Roulleau, M.-M. Poc, N. Scott and A. Chedin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    which connects the radiative energy received by the radiometer to the meteoro- logical parameters in the spectral range covered by the radiometer filter, this model determines high resolution transmissionBCm METEOSAT radiometer (water vapour channel) and the numerical parameters associated to each point

  19. Understanding and Predicting Changes in Precipitation and Water Availability Under the Influence of Large-Scale Circulation Patterns: Rio Grande and Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khedun, Chundun 1977-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    of Dissertation ................................................................................... 5 2 INFLUENCE OF LARGE-SCALE CIRCULATION PATTERNS ON PRECIPITATION... ....................................................................................... 9 2.3.3 Pacific Decadal Oscillation ..................................................................... 11 2.4 Methodology ..................................................................................................... 13 2.5 Study Area...

  20. Posters Radar/Radiometer Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations71971 Posters

  1. The effect of energetic electron precipitation on middle mesospheric night-time ozone during and after a moderate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    mainly by large fluxes of high-energy protons with energies >100 MeV, has been observed and modeled 14 November 2012. [1] Using a ground-based microwave radiometer at Troll Station, Antarctica (72 S, 2 satellite data were used to identify the precipitating particles and to characterize their energy, spatial

  2. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Wittle, J. Kenneth (Chester Springs, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement.

  3. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Charles Lindsey

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REMOTE MONITORING OF SOIL MOISTURE USING AIRBORNE MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS A Thesis by CHARLES LINDSEY J(ROLL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REMOTE MONITORING OF SOIL MOISTURE USING AIRBORNE MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS A Thesis by CHARLES LINDSEY KROLL Approved as to style and content by: man o Co mrtt Hca o D artmc c Ill l c r Mem e Member...

  4. Using a co-located GNSS radio occultation payload for microwave radiometer calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davé, Pratik K. (Pratik Kamlesh)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a new method of calibrating an orbital cross-track scanning microwave radiometer using a co-located radio occultation (RO) instrument with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The radiometer and ...

  5. Research on the Morphology of Precipitation and Runoff in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R.A.

    TR-15 1969 Research on the Morphology of Precipitation and Runoff in Texas R.A. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  6. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  7. The Effects of Great Plains Irrigation on the Surface Energy Balance, Regional Circulation, and Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, David B.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Mechem, David B.

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Irrigation provides a needed source of water in regions of low precipitation. Adding water to a region that would otherwise see little natural precipitation alters the partitioning of surface energy fluxes, the evolution of the planetary boundary...

  8. Impact of GPS Zenith Tropospheric Delay data on precipitation forecasts in Mediterranean France and Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Jennifer

    implies that the GPS data has good potential for influencing numerical models in rapidly developing, high for the forecasting of rainfall. Water vapor plays an important role in energy transfer and in the formation of clouds. 1992]. Rocken et al. (1993)] demonstrated agreement between water vapor radiometers and GPS derived

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  10. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  11. Correlation of globe thermometer response and a YSI radiometer response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franknecht, Robert Howard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the steel 57 in i; try. -' The radian+ heat coiinponon* ivas a major part o' Lhls heat s Lice . = ex'oosrir'e. iclschl mca. sul d the radio. i+ hc t txt Ej xsi Ly with " "ell ov! prir;. ?, s inst ament-:: e*t erin' (v. l' " odcl 653 Radiometer... This investigation developed two regression equations relating measurements of radiant heat, air velocity, and dry bulb temperature to black globe temperatures. The radiant heat energy was controlled over the range of 200 to 2000 Joules/cm sec, as measured by a...

  12. Design evaluation of a ground based radiometer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClellan, Wallace Roy

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiometer Total Power Receiver . . . . . . . . 57 IV-2 X-Band RF Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 IV-3 Insertion Loss Test Setup . . . . . . . . . . . 69 IV-4 Hewlett-Packard 8410S-200 Network Analyzer S ystem. ~ s t ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ 72... of the soil and surface parameters, i. e. , moisture ' C Data Set PD 2 Tape 065 7/28/75 Time-1108 Pond File Freq Polar Angle Average Maximum Minimum A. T. A. T. A. T. St'd Dev'n 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46...

  13. The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Niño related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform­convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

  14. Precipitation over South America during the Last Glacial Maximum: An analysis of the "amount effect" with a water isotope-enabled general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Johnson, Kathleen; Fung, Inez

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF THE ‘‘AMOUNT EFFECT’’ Hoffmann, G. , M. Werner, and M.A. , A. N. LeGrande, and G. Hoffmann (2007), Water isotopeare prescribed as 0.5 [Hoffmann et al. , 1998] and 1.7% [

  15. ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AUSTIN, ME; LOHR, J

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) heterodyne radiometer diagnostic on DIII-D has been upgraded with the addition of eight channels for a total of 40. The new, higher frequency channels allow measurements of electron temperature into the magnetic axis in discharges at maximum field, 2.15 T. The complete set now extends over the full usable range of second harmonic emission frequencies at 2.0 T covering radii from the outer edge inward to the location of third harmonic overlap on the high field side. Full coverage permits the measurement of heat pulses and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations on both sides of the magnetic axis. In addition, the symmetric measurements are used to fix the location of the magnetic axis in tokamak magnetic equilibrium reconstructions. Also, the new higher frequency channels have been used to determine central T{sub e} with good time resolution in low field, high density discharges using third harmonic ECE in the optically gray and optically thick regimes.

  16. IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION;! i! IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION Justin of scales through biophysical exchanges of water and energy, this widespread conversion of land cover has

  17. Spatial predictive distribution for precipitation based on numerical weather predictions (NWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinsland, Ingelin

    for precipitation based on NWP #12;Motivation, hydro power production How much water comes when? With uncertainty Precipitation Data Meteorological model NWP Short term optimalization Run off Hydrological model Past Future

  18. Determination of leaf area index of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and its relationship to site water balance across a large precipitation gradient in East Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Mark Thomas

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zones and the four soil groups. 4 Relationship between PCA LAI (summer 1994 and 1995) and allometric LAI Page . 12 . 18 . 19 5 Relationship between LAI (littertrap) and PCA LAI (summer 1994 and 1995) and allornetric LAI . . 20 6 Relationship... increase of only 2' C for the months of June through September significantly reduced canopy biomass production. This was attributed to increased potential evapotraspiration (PET, from the higher temperature) and decreased soil water storage which together...

  19. The Planck/LFI Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herreros, J M; Rebolo, R; Chulani, H; Rubino-Martin, J A; Hildebrandt, S R; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Miccolis, M; Pena, A; Pereira, M; Torrero, F; Franceschet, C; Lopez, M; Alcala, C; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12008

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly (REBA) is the control and data processing on board computer of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission (ESA). The REBA was designed and built incorporating state of the art processors, communication interfaces and real time operating system software in order to meet the scientific performance of the LFI. We present a technical summary of the REBA, including a physical, functional, electrical, mechanical and thermal description. Aspects of the design and development, the assembly, the integration and the verification of the equipment are provided. A brief description of the LFI on board software is given including the Low-Level Software and the main functionalities and architecture of the Application Software. The compressor module, which has been developed as an independent product, later integrated in the application, is also described in this paper. Two identical engineering models EM and AVM, the engineering qualification model EQM, the flight model ...

  20. Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radio- meter (AVHRR) is decreasing since middle 1980s in response to global are variations in surface albedo and surface energy budgets, sensible heat and water vapor fluxes-chan- nel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) provide a capa

  1. Characterization and calibration of 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system for SST-1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siju, Varsha; Kumar, Dharmendra; Shukla, Praveena; Pathak, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system (74–86 GHz) is designed, characterized, and calibrated to measure the radial electron temperature profile by measuring Electron Cyclotron Emission spectrum at SST-1 Tokamak. The developed radiometer has a noise equivalent temperature of 1 eV and sensitivity of 5 × 10{sup 9} V/W. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperature, a calibration measurement of the radiometer system is performed using hot-cold Dicke switch method, which confirms the system linearity.

  2. Sea surface temperature for climate from the along-track scanning radiometers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embury, Owen

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the construction of a sea surface temperature (SST) dataset from Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) observations suitable for climate applications. The algorithms presented here are now used at ...

  3. Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

  4. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1: precipitation scavenging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers are presented under the headings: cloud studies, precipitation chemistry, plume studies, gas scavenging, microphysics and models.

  5. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Siu Lim

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF' SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Approved as to style and content by: (C rman...

  6. ARM - Measurement - Precipitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiancenumbergovMeasurementsPrecipitation

  7. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  8. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  9. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  10. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  11. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  12. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  13. 1/f noise and other systematic effects in the Planck-LFI radiometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Seiffert; Aniello Mennella; Carlo Burigana; Nazzareno Mandolesi; Marco Bersanelli; Peter Meinhold; Phil Lubin

    2002-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We use an analytic approach to study the susceptibility of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument radiometers to various systematic effects. We examine the effects of fluctuations in amplifier gain, in amplifier noise temperature and in the reference load temperature. We also study the effect of imperfect gain modulation, non-ideal matching of radiometer parameters, imperfect isolation in the two legs of the radiometer and back-end 1/f noise. We find that with proper gain modulation 1/f gain fluctuations are suppressed, leaving fluctuations in amplifier noise temperature as the main source of 1/f noise. We estimate that with a gain modulation factor within +- 1% of its ideal value the overall 1/f knee frequency will be relatively small (< 0.1 Hz).

  14. Land Contamination Correction for Passive Microwave Radiometer Data: Demonstration of Wind Retrieval in the Great Lakes Using SSM/I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Land Contamination Correction for Passive Microwave Radiometer Data: Demonstration of Wind, are typically unavailable within about 100km of any coastline. This paper presents methods of cor- recting land-contaminated radiometer data in order to extract the coastal information. The land contamination signals are estimated

  15. A Cloud Detection Algorithm using the Downwelling Infrared Radiance Measured by an Infrared Pyrometer of the Ground-based Microwave Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, M. H.; Han, D.; Won, H. Y.; Morris, Victor R.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a better utilization of the ground-based microwave radiometer, it is important to detect the cloud presence in the measured data. Here, we introduce a simple and fast cloud detection algorithm by using the optical characteristics of the clouds in the infrared atmospheric window region. The new algorithm utilizes the brightness temperature (Tb) measured by an infrared radiometer installed on top of a microwave radiometer. The two step algorithm consists of a spectral test followed by a temporal test. The measured Tb is first compared with a predicted clear sky Tb obtained by an empirical formula as a function of surface air temperature and water vapor pressure. For the temporal test, the temporal variability of the measured Tb during one minute compares with a dynamic threshold value, representing the variability of the clear sky condition. It is designated as cloud free data only when both the spectral and temporal tests confirm a cloud free data. Overall, most of the thick and uniform clouds are successfully screened out by the spectral test, while the broken and fast-varying clouds are screened out by the temporal test. The algorithm is validated by comparison with the collocated ceilometer data for 6 months, from January 2013 to June 2013. The overall proportion correct is about 88.3% and the probability of detection is 90.8 %, which are comparable with or better than those of previous similar approaches. Two thirds of failures occur when the new algorithm detects clouds while the ceilometer does not detect, resulting in different values of the probability of detection with different cloud base altitude, 93.8, 90.3, and 82.8% for low, mid, and high clouds, respectively. Finally, due to the characteristics of the spectral range, the new algorithm is found to be insensitive to the presence of inversion layers.

  16. A cloud detection algorithm using the downwelling infrared radiance measured by an infrared pyrometer of the ground-based microwave radiometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, M.-H.; Han, D.; Won, H. Y.; Morris, V.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For better utilization of the ground-based microwave radiometer, it is important to detect the cloud presence in the measured data. Here, we introduce a simple and fast cloud detection algorithm by using the optical characteristics of the clouds in the infrared atmospheric window region. The new algorithm utilizes the brightness temperature (Tb) measured by an infrared radiometer installed on top of a microwave radiometer. The two-step algorithm consists of a spectral test followed by a temporal test. The measured Tb is first compared with a predicted clear-sky Tb obtained by an empirical formula as a function of surface air temperaturemore »and water vapor pressure. For the temporal test, the temporal variability of the measured Tb during one minute compares with a dynamic threshold value, representing the variability of clear-sky conditions. It is designated as cloud-free data only when both the spectral and temporal tests confirm cloud-free data. Overall, most of the thick and uniform clouds are successfully detected by the spectral test, while the broken and fast-varying clouds are detected by the temporal test. The algorithm is validated by comparison with the collocated ceilometer data for six months, from January to June 2013. The overall proportion of correctness is about 88.3% and the probability of detection is 90.8%, which are comparable with or better than those of previous similar approaches. Two thirds of discrepancies occur when the new algorithm detects clouds while the ceilometer does not, resulting in different values of the probability of detection with different cloud-base altitude, 93.8, 90.3, and 82.8% for low, mid, and high clouds, respectively. Finally, due to the characteristics of the spectral range, the new algorithm is found to be insensitive to the presence of inversion layers.« less

  17. HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT U.S.A * selnimri@mail.ucf.edu 2 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA 3 Space model has been developed to support the analysis and design of the new airborne Hurricane Imaging

  18. THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIDE SWATH SIMULATION AND WIND SPEED RETRIEVALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIDE SWATH SIMULATION AND WIND SPEED RETRIEVALS Ruba A. Amarin1 Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 4 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA ABSTRACT The knowledge of peak winds in hurricanes is critical to classification of hurricane intensity

  19. Calibration of a Fully Polarimetric Microwave Radiometer Using a Digital Polarimeric Noise Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Calibration of a Fully Polarimetric Microwave Radiometer Using a Digital Polarimeric Noise Source-936-0503 (F), bhlim@umich.edu / cruf@umich.edu (E) Abstract ­ The Correlated Noise Calibration Standard (CNCS polarization mixing calibration equation for AESMIR. Absolute calibration accuracy of AESMIR is estimated

  20. Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers Mentor Report and Baseline Surface Radiation Network Submission Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently twenty-four Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) operating within Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM). Eighteen are located within the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region, there is one at each of the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, and one is part of the instrumentation of the ARM Mobile Facility. At this time there are four sites, all extended facilities within the SGP, that are equipped for a MFRSR but do not have one due to instrument failure and a lack of spare instruments. In addition to the MFRSRs, there are three other MFRSR derived instruments that ARM operates. They are the Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR), the Normal Incidence Multi-Filter Radiometer (NIMFR) and the Narrow Field of View (NFOV) radiometer. All are essentially just the head of a MFRSR used in innovative ways. The MFR is mounted on a tower and pointed at the surface. At the SGP Central Facility there is one at ten meters and one at twenty-five meters. The NSA has a MFR at each station, both at the ten meter level. ARM operates three NIMFRs; one is at the SGP Central Facility and one at each of the NSA stations. There are two NFOVs, both at the SGP Central Facility. One is a single channel (870) and the other utilizes two channels (673 and 870).

  1. Evaluation of Global Monsoon Precipitation Changes based on Five Reanalysis Datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Renping; Zhou, Tianjun; Qian, Yun

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the motivation to identify whether or not a reasonably simulated atmospheric circulation would necessarily lead to a successful reproduction of monsoon precipitation, the performances of five sets of reanalysis data (NCEP2, ERA40, JRA25, ERA-Interim and MERRA) in reproducing the climatology, interannual variation and long-term trend of global monsoon (GM) precipitation are comprehensively evaluated. In order to better understand the variability and long-term trend of GM precipitation, we also examined the major components of water budget, including evaporation, water vapor convergence and the change in local water vapor storage, based on five reanalysis datasets. The results show that all five reanalysis data reasonably reproduce the climatology of GM precipitation. The ERA-Interim (NCEP2) shows the highest (lowest) skill among the five datasets. The observed GM precipitation shows an increasing tendency during 1979-2001 along with a strong interannual variability, which is reasonably reproduced by the five sets of reanalysis data. The observed increasing trend of GM precipitation is dominated by the contribution from the North African, North American and Australian monsoons. All five data fail in reproducing the increasing tendency of North African monsoon precipitation. The wind convergence term in water budget equation dominate the GM precipitation variation, indicating a consistency between the GM precipitation and the seasonal change of prevailing wind.

  2. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yan [I.M. Systems Group at NOAA/NCEP/EMC; Feng, Xia [George Mason University; Houser, Paul [George Mason University; Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Fan, Xingang [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; De Lannoy, Gabrielle [Ghent University, Belgium; Zhan, Xiwu [NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research; Dabbiru, Lalitha [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  3. New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Precipitation Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    of the planet's weather, climate and other environmental systems. Energy, in the form of latent heat............................................................................. 8 DPR: Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar shows how heat is absorbed or released dur- ing the six phase changes of water--freezing, condensa- tion

  5. Asphaltene Precipitation in Crude Oils: Theory and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    of the production of crude oil in deep-water environments and the operations of enhanced oil recovery by miscible asphaltenes and resins. Asphaltenes are defined as the fraction separated from crude oil or petroleum productsAsphaltene Precipitation in Crude Oils: Theory and Experiments Eduardo Buenrostro

  6. U.S.DOE Global Monthly Station Temperature and Precipitation, 1738-1980

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The global monthly station temperature and precipitation data from the U.S. Department of Energy, a dataset hosted at, covers the time period from January, 1738 to December, 1980. The air temperature and precipitation levels are platform observations from ground and water surfaces. The data are maintained in the Research Data Archive at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  7. Global study of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) behaviour and the tuning of a 1-dimensional model to determine the LSWTs of large lakes worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layden, Aisling

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of 246 globally distributed large lakes were derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) for the period 1991 to 2011. These LSWTs, derived in a systematic manner, presents ...

  8. A precise narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with lidar in the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first six months of the grant (December 1991--May 1992) have been taken up with the design and specification for the new narrow-beam radiometer. The radiometer will be built and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research over the next three months. Improved algorithms for obtaining cloud extinction have also been developed. It is proposed during 1993 to use the radiometer in conjunction with a new CSIRO 3-wavelength lidar in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Guinea, which is a test mission under tropical conditions for the ARM CART Tropical West Pacific site, and is part of the TOGA COARE experiment. During the latter part of 1992, the radiometer will be tested thoroughly and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research, Aspendale.

  9. Wheat stress measurement with the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, John Charles

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 35 0Hz, of some natural surfaces. They found ice had an emissivity of 0. 92 while for water it was 0. 4. Yfet soil, at field capacity, had an emissivity of 0. 6 while dry soil had a value of 0. 94. The values for dry and wet soil are for smooth... winter wheat were not used. This was to insure that wheat emission made a significant contribution to the brightness temperature. A further restriction was that the wheat fields comprising the 30 percent must be continuously cropped. This removed from...

  10. Development of a new radiometer for the thermodynamic measurement of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dury, M. R.; Goodman, T. M.; Lowe, D. H.; Machin, G.; Woolliams, E. R. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)] [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a new radiometer to measure the thermodynamic melting point temperatures of high temperature fixed points with ultra-low uncertainties. In comparison with the NPL's Absolute Radiation Thermometer (ART), the 'THermodynamic Optical Radiometer' (THOR) is more portable and compact, with a much lower size-of-source effect and improved performance in other parameters such as temperature sensitivity. It has been designed for calibration as a whole instrument via the radiance method, removing the need to calibrate the individual subcomponents, as required by ART, and thereby reducing uncertainties. In addition, the calibration approach has been improved through a new integrating sphere that has been designed to have greater uniformity.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission radiometer upgrade on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.; Conway, G.; Suttrop, W.; Fessey, J.; Prentice, R.; Gowers, C.; Chareau, J. M. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); IPP-EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Associations, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The capabilities of the Joint European Torus (JET) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics have recently been extended with an upgrading of the heterodyne radiometer. The number of channels has been doubled to 96 channels, with a frequency separation corresponding to <1 cm for JET magnetic field gradient, and with a frequency response of 1 MHz. This enhancement has increased the radial coverage of the ECE electron temperature measurements in JET to approximately the full plasma column (limited at R>2.6 m for the X-mode due to harmonic overlap) at almost all magnetic field values used at JET (1.7 Tradiometer is presented along with some results showing its performance.

  12. Design and implementation of a digitally controlled multi-frequency microwave radiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Gary Lynn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 21. Task-Exchange Diagram for DVMAIN Page 14 16 17 24 . 29 32 34 36 48 56 59 62 64 91 92 93 . 105 LIST OF SCHEWLTICS Schematics 1. Switch Decoder and Driver. 2. Motor Controller Hoard . . 3. Cold Load Controller . . . 4. Hot... of the software for radiometer control and data recording. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT. . . . . . . . . . . . * TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES. LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF SCHEMATICS. CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION. 1. 1 BACKGROUND . 1. 2 RADIOMETRY...

  13. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  14. Calibration of a 32 channel electron cyclotron emission radiometer on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Z. B., E-mail: shizb@swip.ac.cn; Jiang, M.; Huang, X. L.; Zhong, W. L.; Chen, W.; Che, Y. L.; Liu, Z. T.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel 32-channel electron cyclotron emission radiometer has been designed and tested for the measurement of electron temperature profiles on the HL-2A tokamak. This system is based on the intermediate frequency filter detection technique, and has the features of wide working frequency range and high spatial resolution. Two relative calibration methods have been investigated: sweeping the toroidal magnetic field and hopping the output frequency of the local oscillator. Preliminary results show that both methods can ensure reasonable profiles.

  15. Preliminary separation of galactic and cosmic microwave emission for the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, C.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Hinshaw, G.; Wright, E.L.; Kogut, A.; De Amici, G.; Meyer, S.S.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D.T.; Gulkis, S. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States) California, University, Berkeley (United States) Universities Space Research Association, Boulder, CO (United States) California, University, Los Angeles (United States) MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States) Princeton University, NJ (United States) JPL, Pasadena, Ca (United States))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary models of microwave emission from the Milky Way Galaxy based on COBE and other data are constructed for the purpose of distinguishing cosmic and Galactic signals. Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) maps, with the modeled Galactic emission removed, are fitted for a quadrupole distribution. Autocorrelation functions for individual Galactic components are presented. When Galactic emission is removed from the DMR data, the residual fluctuations are virtually unaffected, and therefore they are not dominated by any known Galactic emission component. 42 refs.

  16. Using a cold radiometer to measure heat loads and survey heat leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Hait, T.; Shirron, P. [Cryogenics and Fluids Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an inexpensive cold radiometer for use in thermal/vacuum chambers to measure heat loads, characterize emissivity and specularity of surfaces and to survey areas to evaluate stray heat loads. We report here the results of two such tests for the James Webb Space Telescope to measure heat loads and effective emissivities of 2 major pieces of optical ground support equipment that will be used in upcoming thermal vacuum testing of the Telescope.

  17. Development of multichannel intermediate frequency system for electron cyclotron emission radiometer on KSTAR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Sakoda, Takuya; Mase, Atsushi; Ito, Naoki; Yokota, Yuya [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Nagayama, Yoshio; Kawahata, Kazuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Jeong, Seung H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Myeun [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma experiments on KSTAR are scheduled to start up this year (2008). We have developed an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer to measure the radial electron temperature profiles in KSTAR experiments. The radiometer system consists, briefly, of two downconversion stages, amplifiers, bandpass filter banks, and video detectors. These components are made commercially or developed in house. The system detects ECE power in the frequency range from 110 to 196 GHz, the detected signal being resolved by means of 48 frequency windows. Before installation of this system on KSTAR, we installed a part of this system on large helical device (LHD) to study the system under similar plasma conditions. In this experiment, the signal amplitude, considered to be proportional to the electron temperature, is measured. The time-dependent traces of the electron temperature measured by this radiometer are in good agreement with those provided by the LHD Michelson spectrometer. The system noise level which limits the minimum measurable temperature (converted to the electron temperature) is about 30 eV.

  18. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  19. Validation of Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidatingCloud Properties

  20. MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, In this3, BPA earned net3rdTHE

  1. Improved Retrievals of Temperature and Water Vapor Profiles Using a Twelve-Channel Microwave Radiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpactControl

  2. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1. Precipitation scavenging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These two volumes contain papers prepared for and presented at the Fourth International Conference on Precipitation Scavenging, Dry Deposition, and Resuspension (the Chamberlain Meeting) held during 29 November to 3 December, 1982 in Santa Monica, California. Papers presented are abstracted separately.

  3. Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer.

  4. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  5. Changes in precipitation characteristics and extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    changes in two different climate scenarios. In the Mediterranean region, precipitation amount, frequencyChanges in precipitation characteristics and extremes Comparing Mediterranean to change Swiss with climate change, with potentially severe impacts on human society and ecosystems. This study analyses

  6. Phase field model for precipitates in crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She, Minggang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen precipitate caused by oxygen supersaturation is the most common and important defects in Czochralski (CZ) silicon. The presence of oxygen precipitate in silicon wafer has both harmful and beneficial effects on the ...

  7. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, D. D., E-mail: dtruong@wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ?1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ?2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  8. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  9. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  10. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). In general, higher [H4SiO4] leads to lower dissolution rates. It has often been observed that the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products can cause the dissolution of the glass to increase, even after the rate has decreased significantly. However, it has also been observed that in the concentrations of these silica-bearing solution species do not significantly decrease while other elements continue to be released. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a silica-bearing alteration product, analcime (Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O). In this initial study and to simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The ‘cross affinity’ code option allowed us to account for the fact that glass is a thermodynamically unstable solid with respect to its alteration products in contact with water. The cross-affinity option in the Geochemist’s Workbench geochemical code allowed us to substitute the amorphous silica equilibrium-constant matrix for the glass equilibrium-constant matrix. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. In all cases, our results indicate that the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. Our results, compared in general terms with experiments, show the importance of the gel layer that forms during glass alteration. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

  11. Regional terrestrial water storage change and evapotranspiration from terrestrial and atmospheric water balance computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Famiglietti, J. S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is derived as the residual of precipitation and water vaporThe largest mean water budget residual calculated from theresidual between the two large terms in the combined water

  12. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols likely serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  13. Retrieval of Optical And Size Parameters of Aerosols Utilizing a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and MICROTOPS Sun Photometer Antonio Aguirre Radiometer (MFRSR) and comparing with data from a CIMEL Sun Photometer and a MICROTOPS Sun Photometer. Using the inverse cosine of the angle between the sun and the vertical. A Langley plot provides a linear regression

  14. Precipitation and soil impacts on partitioning of subsurface moisture in Avena barbata: Observations from a greenhouse experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salve, R.; Torn, M.S.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of two grassland soils and precipitation regimes on soil-moisture dynamics. We set up an experiment in a greenhouse, and monitored soil moisture dynamics in mesocosms planted with Avena barbata, an annual species found in California grasslands. By repeating the precipitation input at regular intervals, we were able to observe plant manipulation of soil moisture during well-defined periods during the growing season. We found that the amount of water partitioned to evapotranspiration, seepage, and soil storage varied among different growth stages. Further, both soil type and precipitation regimes had a significant impact on redistributing soil moisture. Whereas in the low-precipitation treatments most water was released to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration, major losses from the high-precipitation treatment occurred as gravity drainage. Observations from this study emphasize the importance of understanding intra-seasonal relationships between vegetation, soil, and water.

  15. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    of radiometers at an ice station frozen into the drifting ice pack of the Arctic Ocean. The NASA/FIRE Arctic- dependent water contents and hydrometeor sizes for all-ice and all-liquid clouds. For the spring and early summer period, all-ice cloud retrievals showed a mean particle diameter of about 60 m and ice water

  16. A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer BOREAS - (the) BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study C - Carbon CABi A modelling approach to carbon, water and energy feedbacks and interactions across the land partitioning of energy, the evapotranspiration of water and if the land-surface is a sink or a source of CO2

  17. Satellite Microwave remote sensing of contrasting surface water inundation changes within the ArcticBoreal Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    -atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2, CH4) fluxes, and potential feedbacks to climate change. Here we report fractional open water (Fw) cover from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E). The AMSR ) of regions above 49°N (Brown et al., 1998). Although permafrost is widespread at high latitudes due to low

  18. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VISSER, ANN E.; BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAEL G.; RUDISILL, TRACY S.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U-containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both process solution samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3:1 U:Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99% of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH > 14 with 1.2 M excess OH{sup -}, greater than 99% of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH > 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen:fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3:1 U:Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

  19. 3742 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 47, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference Detection Algorithms: A Comparative Study Sidharth Misra, Priscilla N is with Halliburton Energy Services, Houston, TX 77032 USA. J. R. Piepmeier is with the Microwave Instrument growth recently in satellite telecommunica- tion, in high-bandwidth point-to-point terrestrial wireless

  20. A Hydrometeorological Study Related to the Distribution of Precipitation and Runoff over Small Drainage Basins -- Urban Versus Rural Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddes, R. G.; Clark, R.A.; Runnels, R. C.

    TR-28 1970 A Hydrometeorological Study Related to the Distribution of Precipitation and Runoff over Small Drainage Basins?Urban Versus Rural Areas R.G. Feddes R.A. Clark R.C. Runnels Texas Water...

  1. Modification of the collective Thomson scattering radiometer in the search for parametric decay on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P.; Stejner, M. [Association EURATOM - DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Risoe Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bongers, W.; Moseev, D.; Westerhof, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM - FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oosterbeek, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics, Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong scattering of high-power millimeter waves at 140 GHz has been shown to take place in heating and current-drive experiments at TEXTOR when a tearing mode is present in the plasma. The scattering signal is at present supposed to be generated by the parametric decay instability. Here we describe the heterodyne detection system used to characterize the newly discovered signal measured at TEXTOR, and we present spectral shapes in which the signal can appear under different conditions. The radiation is collected by the receiver through a quasi-optical transmission line that is independent of the electron cyclotron resonance heating transmission line, and so the scattering geometry is variable. The signal is detected with 42 frequency channels ranging from 136 to 142 GHz. We demonstrate that the large signal does not originate from gyrotron spurious radiation. The measured signal agrees well with independent backscattering radiometer data.

  2. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  3. The precipitation synthesis of broad-spectrum UV absorber nanoceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurhasanah, Iis; Sutanto, Heri; Puspaningrum, Nurul Wahyu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the possibility of nanoceria as broad-spectrum UV absorber was evaluated. Nanoceria were synthesized by precipitation process from cerium nitrate solution and ammonium hydroxide as precipitant agent. Isopropanol was mixed with water as solvent to prevent hard agglomeration. The structure of resulting nanoceria was characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). The transparency in the visible light and efficiency of protection in UV A region were studied using ultraviolet-visible (UV - Vis) spectrophotometer. The results show that nanoceria possess good tranparency in visible light and high UV light absorption. The critical absorption wavelenght of 368 nm was obtained which is desirable for excellent broad-spectrum protection absorbers. Moreover, analysis of photodegradation nanoceria to methylene blue solution shows poor photocatalytic activity. It indicates that nanoceria suitable for used as UV absorber in personal care products.

  4. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  5. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    using Advanced Very High Res- olution Radiometer Lai data, Climate Research Unit climate dataGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance

  6. Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum only recently have attempts been made to develop a thermodynamic description. Published methods

  7. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress of the ratio of hill/coast precipitation during the 20th century in polluted areas in line with the increasing

  8. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  9. Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research on the projection of precipitation extremes has either focused on conceptual physical mechanisms that generate heavy precipitation or rigorous statistical methods that extrapolate tail behavior. However, informing both climate prediction and impact assessment requires concurrent physically and statistically oriented analysis. A combined examination of climate model simulations and observation-based reanalysis data sets suggests more intense and frequent precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios. Utilization of statistical extreme value theory and resampling-based uncertainty quantification combined with consideration of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship reveals consistently intensifying trends for precipitation extremes at a global-average scale. However, regional and decadal analyses reveal specific discrepancies in the physical mechanisms governing precipitation extremes, as well as their statistical trends, especially in the tropics. The intensifying trend of precipitation extremes has quantifiable impacts on intensity-duration-frequency curves, which in turn have direct implications for hydraulic engineering design and water-resources management. The larger uncertainties at regional and decadal scales suggest the need for caution during regional-scale adaptation or preparedness decisions. Future research needs to explore the possibility of uncertainty reduction through higher resolution global climate models, statistical or dynamical downscaling, as well as improved understanding of precipitation extremes processes.

  10. Flow preconditioner for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honacker, H.; Drlik, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow preconditioner for an electrostatic precipitator removes particulate matter from a stream of polluted gas immediately after it passes through a tangential inlet at the lower end of a vertical cylindrical housing and straightens and divides the stream into laminations parallel to the axis of the housing. It comprises an annular ledge or choke ring extending inwardly from said housing above the inlet and an assembly of vanes above said ledge extending radially from the axis of the housing and angularly spaced apart. Each of said vanes has a flow receiving edge directed toward said inlet, a curved portion extending upwardly and away from said inlet, and a flat portion extending upwardly from said curved portion in a plane parallel to the housing axis. The curved portion of each vane defines a trough having a camber which gradually decreases along its span from the outer end of the vane towards the axis of the housng, together with means to vary the centrifugal flow distribution relative to the housing to render the preconditioner adjustable for various flow capacities.

  11. A precise narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with lidar in the ARM Program. Progress report, 1 December 1991--31 May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first six months of the grant (December 1991--May 1992) have been taken up with the design and specification for the new narrow-beam radiometer. The radiometer will be built and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research over the next three months. Improved algorithms for obtaining cloud extinction have also been developed. It is proposed during 1993 to use the radiometer in conjunction with a new CSIRO 3-wavelength lidar in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Guinea, which is a test mission under tropical conditions for the ARM CART Tropical West Pacific site, and is part of the TOGA COARE experiment. During the latter part of 1992, the radiometer will be tested thoroughly and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research, Aspendale.

  12. Response of South American ecosystems to precipitation variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Bras, Rafael L [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Demography Model 2 is a dynamic ecosystem model and land surface energy balance model. ED2 discretizes landscapes of particular terrain and meteorology into fractional areas of unique disturbance history. Each fraction, defined by a shared vertical soil column and canopy air space, contains a stratum of plant groups unique in functional type, size and number density. The result is a vertically distributed representation of energy transfer and plant dynamics (mortality, productivity, recruitment, disturbance, resource competition, etc) that successfully approximates the behaviour of individual-based vegetation models. In previous exercises simulating Amazonian land surface dynamics with ED2, it was observed that when using grid averaged precipitation as an external forcing the resulting water balance typically over-estimated leaf interception and leaf evaporation while under estimating through-fall and transpiration. To investigate this result, two scenario were conducted in which land surface biophysics and ecosystem demography over the Northern portion of South America are simulated over {approx}200 years: (1) ED2 is forced with grid averaged values taken from the ERA40 reanalysis meteorological dataset; (2) ED2 is forced with ERA40 reanalysis, but with its precipitation re-sampled to reflect statistical qualities of point precipitation found at rain gauge stations in the region. The findings in this study suggest that the equilibrium moisture states and vegetation demography are co-dependent and show sensitivity to temporal variability in precipitation. These sensitivities will need to be accounted for in future projections of coupled climate-ecosystem changes in South America.

  13. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  14. An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Christopher James

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are produced. The hourly precipitation-type climatologist present the probabilities for particular precipitation types (frozen, freezing, rain, and mixed) for 2F? temperature intervals from 8F? to 44F?. The synoptic precipitation-type climatologist provide...

  15. Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ controlling precipitate formation is still needed. In this study, we have combined experimental data on nickel

  16. affects regional precipitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accompanying precipitation changes ... Solomon, Susan 10 Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation variability?...

  17. air pollution precipitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution Geosciences Websites Summary: Quantifying precipitation suppression due to...

  18. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  19. Processing NPP Bottoms by Ferrocyanide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savkin, A. E.; Slastennikov Y. T.; Sinyakin O. G.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of work is a laboratory test of a technological scheme for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides by use of ozonization, ferrocyanide precipitation, filtration and selective sorption. At carrying out the ferrocyanide precipitation after ozonization, the specific activity of bottoms by Cs{sup 137} is reduced in 100-500 times. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of ferrocyanide precipitation depends on the quality of consequent filtration. Pore sizes of a filter has been determined to be less than 0.2 {micro}m for complete separation of ferrocyanide residue. The comparison of two technological schemes for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides, characterized by presence of the ferrocyanide precipitation stage has been performed. Application of the proposed schemes allows reducing volumes of radioactive waste in many times.

  20. Estimating tropical cyclone precipitation risk in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    This paper uses a new rainfall algorithm to simulate the long-term tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology in Texas based on synthetic tropical cyclones generated from National Center for Atmospheric Research/National ...

  1. Comparison of Precipitation and Extrography in the Fractionation of Crude Oil Residua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    , the formation of stable emulsions and sludges in petroleum refineries comprised of water, crude oil, and solidComparison of Precipitation and Extrography in the Fractionation of Crude Oil Residua Joseph D. Mc the stability of emulsions or sludges which are produced by these crudes in refinery processing. The resin

  2. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. L.; Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. O.; Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics. Precipitates containing iron and sulfide were present at much higher concentrations in native aquifer materials just upgradient of the PRB than in the PRB itself. Sulfur mass balance on core solids coupled with trends in ground water sulfate concentrations indicates that the average ground water flow after 20 months of PRB operation was approximately twenty fold less than the regional ground water velocity. Transport and reaction modeling of the aquifer PRB interface suggests that, at the calculated velocity, both iron and hydrogen could diffuse upgradient against ground water flow and thereby contribute to precipitation in the native aquifer materials. The initial hydraulic conductivity (K) of the native materials is less than that of the PRB and, given the observed precipitation in the upgradient native materials, it is likely that K reduction occurred upgradient to rather than within the PRB. Although not directly implicated, guar gum used during installation of the PRB is believed to have played a role in the precipitation and flow reduction processes by enhancing microbial activity.

  3. The Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in the Mediterranean basin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Climate change Arctic Oscillation) investigated the effect of climate change on water resources of Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East regionThe Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel Amir Givati b

  4. Precipitable water structure in tropical systems as estimated from TOVS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatfield, Eric

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for approximately 75% of the variance of PW compared to radiosonde data. Large scale features that readily appear in daily and mean PW fields and synoptic scale features found on daily maps coincide with those seen in microwave data. Daily PW values are used...

  5. Effects of Aerosols on Autumn Precipitation over Mid-Eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Qian, Yun; Ge, Jinming; Su, Jing

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term observational data indicated a decreasing trend for the amount of autumn precipitation (i.e. 54.3 mm per decade) over Mid-Eastern China, especially after 1980s (~ 5.6% per decade). To examine the cause of the decreasing trend, the mechanisms associated with the change of autumn precipitation were investigated from the perspective of water vapor transportation, atmospheric stability and cloud microphysics. Results show that the decrease of convective available potential energy (i.e. 12.81 J kg-1/ decade) and change of cloud microphysics, which were closely related to the increase of aerosol loading during the past twenty years, were the two primary factors responsible for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Ours results showed that increased aerosol could enhance the atmospheric stability thus weaken the convection. Meanwhile, more aerosols also led to a significant decline of raindrop concentration and to a delay of raindrop formation because of smaller size of cloud droplets. Thus, increased aerosols produced by air pollution could be one of the major reasons for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Furthermore, we found that the aerosol effects on precipitation in autumn was more significant than in other seasons, partly due to the relatively more stable synoptic system in autumn. The impact of large-scale circulation dominated in autumn and the dynamic influence on precipitation was more important than the thermodynamic activity.

  6. The R/V Discoverer cruise to Manus Island. The BNL Portable Radiometer Package (PRP) evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory installed and operated a Portable Radiation Package (PRP) on the NOAA ship R/V DISCOVERER as part of the Combined Sensor Program cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean. The DISCOVERER transported a collection of radiation and atmospheric instrumentation to positions offshore of manus Island to compare cloud and radiation fields to like instruments measured from a station on the island. The ship sailed NW from Pago Pago, American Samoa, on 14 March 1996 to a latitude of 1{degree}S then due West until it approached manus Island (2{degree}S and 148{degree}E) on approximately 7 April. The ship then turned SW and approached Manus Island in three steps. This route was reversed during the ship`s return to Hawaii. The PRP package is a compact low-power integration of simple sensors that measure long- and short-wave irradiance from moving platforms. A rapid rotating shadowband radiometer that is designed to provide good estimates of diffuse (sky) radiation even from moving buoys or ships was being evaluated. The PRP provided the only means of making diffuse (sky) radiation measurements from the ship. The CSP cruise provided an excellent opportunity to intercompare the PRP with other like instruments in the TWP locale. The unit was located on the starboard flying bridge which was fully exposed to direct sunlight during the ship`s westward transit. When the ship was at its closest approach to manus, the PRP was moved to the island where careful intercomparison with the Manus instrumentation was conducted.

  7. A precise passive narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with LIDAR in the ARM program. Progress report, 1 June 1992--31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work done divides conveniently into two parts. First, the completion of the design and manufacture of the new narrow-beam radiometer, which occupied the period of July to December, 1992. The second part of the report concerns participation of the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research (DAR) Lidar/radiometer team in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea as part of the international TOGA COARE experiment. The DAR team participated for about one month from mid-January. The PROBE experiment allowed the new radiometer to be tested under field conditions, a test which was very successful, with very few teething problems. It is proposed during the rest of 1993 and during 1994 to make further tests with the radiometer and particularly to look at using a stirling cycle liquid nitrogen detector to obviate the need for supplies of liquid nitrogen. It is proposed further during 1994 to carry out a thorough analysis of the PROBE data and collaborate with other US PROBE participants in studying and interpreting the observations as a whole. Some further work with the new ARM radiometer will be done during the CSIRO SOCEX experiment.

  8. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  9. High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

  10. PROGRESS REPORT OF FY 2004 ACTIVITIES: IMPROVED WATER VAPOR AND CLOUD RETRIEVALS AT THE NSA/AAO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. R. Westwater; V. V. Leuskiy; M. Klein; A. J. Gasiewski; and J. A. Shaw

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud coverage, with a focus on the Arctic conditions of cold temperatures and low concentrations of water vapor. The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Although several technologies have been investigated to measure these column amounts, microwave radiometers (MWR) have been used operationally by the ARM program for passive retrievals of these quantities: precipitable water vapor (PWV) and integrated water liquid (IWL). The technology of PWV and IWL retrievals has advanced steadily since the basic 2-channel MWR was first deployed at ARM CART sites Important advances are the development and refinement of the tipcal calibration method [1,2], and improvement of forward model radiative transfer algorithms [3,4]. However, the concern still remains that current instruments deployed by ARM may be inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and IWL. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important because of the possibility of scaling and/or quality control of radiosondes by the water amount. Extremely dry conditions, with PWV less than 3 mm, commonly occur in Polar Regions during the winter months. Accurate measurements of the PWV during such dry conditions are needed to improve our understanding of the regional radiation energy budgets. The results of a 1999 experiment conducted at the ARM North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site during March of 1999 [5] have shown that the strength associated with the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line makes radiometry in this frequency regime suitable for measuring low amounts of PWV. As a portion of our research, we conducted another millimeter wave radiometric experiment at the NSA/AAO in March-April 2004. This experiment relied heavily on our experiences of the 1999 experiment. Particular attention was paid to issues of radiometric calibration and radiosonde intercomparisons. Our theoretical and experimental work also supplements efforts by industry (F. Solheim, Private Communication) to develop sub-millimeter radiometers for ARM deployment. In addition to quantitative improvement of water vapor measurements at cold temperature, the impact of adding millimeter-wave window channels to improve the sensitivity to arctic clouds was studied. We also deployed an Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) during this experiment, both for measuring continuous day-night statistics of the study of cloud coverage and identifying conditions suitable for tipcal analysis. This system provided the first capability of determining spatial cloud statistics continuously in both day and night at the NSA site and has been used to demonstrate that biases exist in inferring cloud statistics from either zenith-pointing active sensors (lidars or radars) or sky imagers that rely on scattered sunlight in daytime and star maps at night [6].

  11. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  12. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  13. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  14. Remote Sensing of Soil and Water Quality in Agroecosystems Vincent de Paul Obade & Rattan Lal & Jiquan Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    and reflection radiometer ASD Analytical spectral device AVIRIS Airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer near real-time information on soil and water quality in the context of major land use practices SPOT Satellites pour l'observation de la terre or earth-observing satellites SWIR Short-wave infrared

  15. Climate Change Assessment for Urban Water Resource Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Ramiro

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    change will influence in the availability of local water resource systems. Water resources are especially vulnerable to dramatic changes in temperature and precipitation, and significant impacts may be experienced by both human and ecosystems...

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  17. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  18. Precipitate Redistribution during Creep of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Schlegel; S. Hopkins; E. Young; M. Frary; J. Cole; T.Lillo

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel-based superalloys are being considered for applications within advanced nuclear power generation systems due to their high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. Alloy 617, a candidate for use in heat exchangers, derives its strength from both solid solution strengthening and the precipitation of carbide particles. However, during creep, carbides that are supposed to retard grain boundary motion are found to dissolve and re-precipitate on boundaries in tension. To quantify the redistribution, we have used electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy to analyze the microstructure of 617 after creep testing at 900 and 1000°C. The data were analyzed with respect to location of the carbides (e.g., intergranular vs. intragranular), grain boundary character, and precipitate type (i.e., Cr-rich or Mo-rich). We find that grain boundary character is the most important factor in carbide distribution; some evidence of preferential distribution to boundaries in tension is also observed at higher applied stresses. Finally, the results suggest that the observed redistribution is due to the migration of carbides to the boundaries and not the migration of boundaries to the precipitates.

  19. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  20. Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

  1. ammonium polyuranate precipitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7-days of accumulated precipitation in inches; current month-to-date accumulated precipitation in...

  2. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  3. Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in a model Ti-Mo-Al alloy studied by direct coupling of transmission Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta...

  4. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    06 R 2 = 0.9713 cumulative CaCO3 precipitation (g) mn m n =R 2 = 0 . 9497 Cumulative CaCO3 precipitation (g) Figure 6

  5. Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

  6. Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively ...

  7. aluminosilicate continuous precipitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    binary elements to enable precipitation hardening 2,4,5. Among the alloying elements, rare earths (RE) stand out Chen, Long-Qing 323 Scaling of Precipitation Extremes over a...

  8. 2011 Baird Holm LLP Storm Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    for control of storm water runoff has been the use of best management practices ("BMPs") ­ Notwithstanding© 2011 Baird Holm LLP Storm Water Management ­ Shifting Paradigms John P. Heil, Esq. Baird Holm LLP@bairdholm.com #12;© 2011 Baird Holm LLP Introductory Summary · Storm water runoff is generated when precipitation

  9. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of 93 and 95, water quantity has become a major topic of concern

  10. Estimating Continental and Terrestrial Precipitation Averages from Raingauge Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willmott, Cort J.; Robeson, Scott M.; Feddema, Johannes J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation, and in areas with s trong precipitation gradients and stat ion-densi ty gradients . 414 C. J. WILLMOTT, S. M. ROBESON AND J. J. FEDDEMA Sampling the LW climatology at the NCAR station locations suggests that many yearly NCAR station densities.... Higher resolution deployments should coincide with high-frequency (in the spatial domain) precipitation variability. Spatial shifts in the precipitation field with time (on seasonal and interannual time-scales, for example) also should be considered...

  11. Precipitation-Regulated Star Formation in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy growth depends critically on the interplay between radiative cooling of cosmic gas and the resulting energetic feedback that cooling triggers. This interplay has proven exceedingly difficult to model, even with large supercomputer simulations, because of its complexity. Nevertheless, real galaxies are observed to obey simple scaling relations among their primary observable characteristics. Here we show that a generic emergent property of the interplay between cooling and feedback can explain the observed scaling relationships between a galaxy's stellar mass, its total mass, and its chemical enrichment level, as well as the relationship between the average orbital velocity of its stars and the mass of its central black hole. These relationships naturally result from any feedback mechanism that strongly heats a galaxy's circumgalactic gas in response to precipitation of colder clouds out of that gas, because feedback then suspends the gas in a marginally precipitating state.

  12. Radar echo signatures versus relative precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Terry Alvin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the relationship between cell-echo signatures and precipitation characteristics, and to support the hypothesis that, during the lifespan of any particular isolated convective cell, the relative rainfall rate, as determined by radar for a given volume scan... Cooperative Program) field experiment of 1979. Four isolated cases, two rainshowers and two thundershowers, were selected for study. Profiles from volume scans taken 10 minutes before, during, and 10 minutes after the maximum radar-determined rainfall rate...

  13. pre-acts -6th annual international conference of Territorial Intelligence -caENTI October 2008 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT METHODS IN HUNGARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    extraction protocols; more sophisticated water treatment methods, drilling deeper wells result in additional a useful sustainable water management model based on the rainwater harvesting practices. Key words: Rainwater, sustainable water management, drinking water, rainwater harvesting, cistern, precipitation

  14. Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, T.H.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

  15. Inhibition of nickel precipitation by organic ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewaters from electroplating are very complex due to the composition of the plating baths. A nickel plating bath typically consists of a nickel source (nickel chloride or nickel sulfate), complexing agents to solubilize nickel ions controlling their concentration in the solution, buffering agents to maintain pH, brighteners to improve brightness of the plated metal, stabilizers (inhibitors) to prevent undesired reactions, accelerators to enhance speed of reactions, wetting agents to reduce surface tension at the metal surface, and reducing agents (only for electroless nickel plating) to supply electrons for reduction of the nickel. Alkaline precipitation is the most common method of recovering nickel from wastewaters. However, organic constituents found in the wastewaters can mask or completely inhibit the precipitation of nickel. The objective of this study was to conduct an equilibrium study to explore the inhibition behavior of various organic ligands on nickel precipitation. This will lay the groundwork for development of technologies efficacious in the treatment of complexed nickel. The organic ligands used in this study are EDTA, triethanolamine (TEA), gluconate, and tartrate.

  16. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hancher, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hackett, Gail D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a flocculating agent, separating precipitate-containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions.

  17. The precipitation response to the desiccation of Lake Chad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauwaet D.; VanWeverberg K.; vanLipzig, N. P. M., Weverberg, K. V., Ridderb, K. D., and Goyens, C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the semi-arid African Sahel, Lake Chad has shrunk from a surface area of 25000 km2 in 1960 to about 1350 km2 due to a series of droughts and anthropogenic influences. The disappearance of such a large open-water body can be expected to have a noticeable effect on the meteorology in the surroundings of the lake. The impact could extend even further to the west as westward propagating convective systems pass Lake Chad in the rainfall season. This study examines the sensitivity of the regional hydrology and convective processes to the desiccation of the lake using a regional atmospheric model. Three Lake Chad scenarios are applied reflecting the situation in 1960, the current situation and a potential future scenario in which the lake and the surrounding wetlands have disappeared. The model simulations span the months July-September in 2006, which includes the rainfall season in the Lake Chad area. Total precipitation amounts and the components of the hydrological cycle are found to be hardly affected by the existence of the lake. A filled Lake Chad does, however, increase the precipitation at the east side of the lake. The model results indicate that the boundary layer moisture and temperature are significantly altered downwind of the lake. By investigating a mesoscale convective system (MCS) case, this is found to affect the development and progress of the system. At first, the MCS is intensified by the more unstable boundary layer air but the persistence of the system is altered as the cold pool propagation becomes less effective. The proposed mechanism is able to explain the differences in the rainfall patterns nearby Lake Chad between the scenarios. This highlights the local sensitivity to the desiccation of Lake Chad whereas the large-scale atmospheric processes are not affected.

  18. Oxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 1. Observations in forests along a precipitation transect in Oregon,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    in the vapor pressure deficit of air that caused isotopic enrichment of soil and leaf water. The enriched soil to evaporative enrichment overshadowed the original isotopic composition of precipitation as a first orderOxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 1. Observations in forests along

  19. Interpreting discrepancies between discharge and precipitation in high-altitude area of Chile's Norte Chico region (2632S)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabatel, Antoine

    's Norte Chico region (26­32°S) Vincent Favier,1,2 Mark Falvey,3 Antoine Rabatel,1 Estelle Praderio,1 February 2009. [1] The water resources of high-altitude areas of Chile's semiarid Norte Chico region (26 discrepancies between discharge and precipitation in high-altitude area of Chile's Norte Chico region (26­32°S

  20. Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the amount and type of precipitation that falls across the western United States. Research shows a trend1 Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you Water is a crucial, industry, energy, recreation, and the natural resources we manage and care about. While most citizens

  1. Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  3. Freezing precipitation in the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William Robert

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the rain and snow sectors with the freezing precipitation generally falling along or near the dividing line In regard to forecasting in Georgia~ Harms (1974) states that~ ". ~ in general, snow will occur north of the 850-mb 0 C i. sotherm...? and freezing rain and sleet in a 30 to 60 n. m band to the south. ? This conflicts somewhat with the rule-of-thumb expo'~ed by Diercks 17 (1970) in which he stated that~ for the eastern United States~ a mixture of snow~ sleet, and rain including freezing...

  4. 2007 Water Resources Advisory Panel By Jessica Harder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    the potential benefits with the negative ramifications of tree harvesting, and ultimately will result in a basin. Maximizing the effectiveness of precipitation can substantially increase the availability of water and water2007 Water Resources Advisory Panel Update By Jessica Harder The Water Resources Advisory Panel

  5. A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified approach to evaluating asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach used an organic deposition cell for measuring asphaltene drop out onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure, temperature and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully-compositional V-L-S mathematical model completed the analysis by matching the experimental results. The model was then used to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios including response to gas-lift operations, and to evaluate the possible location of a tar-mat.

  6. Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

  7. altered precipitation preliminary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    desert plant physiology. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Climate change will significantly impact deserts since precipitation drives biological activity in...

  8. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  9. Afghanistan water constraints overview analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Afghanistan's already severe water supply problems are expected to intensify as Afghan refugees resettle in former conflictive zones. The report examines the technical, economic, cultural, and institutional facets of the country's water supply and suggests steps to mitigate existing and anticipated water supply problems. Chapter 2 presents information on Afghanistan's water resources, covering the country's climate, precipitation, glaciers/snow packs, and watersheds; the principal patterns of water flow and distribution; and comprehensive estimates. Chapter 3 examines water resource development in the country from 1945 to 1979, including projects involving irrigation and hydroelectric power and strategies for improving the drinking water supply.

  10. Electrode supporting base for electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honacker, H.

    1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a base for supporting hollow cylindrical and circular in cross section collector electrodes for an electrostatic precipitator. The base comprises a central portion and is generally circular; a plurality of arcuate venturi and collector trough assemblies which are generally circular and which intersect radially disposed drain troughs; said venturi and collector trough assemblies being concentric with said center portion of said base and drain troughs extending radially outward from said center portion; a circular wall structure secured to outer ends of said drain troughs; fixture means for securing said collector electrodes on said drain troughs; uppermost portions of said drain troughs and said venturi and collector troughs being substantially flush with each other and said venturi and collector trough assemblies disposed on a common plane to provide for uniform laminar flow relative to the collector electrodes.

  11. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  12. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the quality of Missouri drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of '93 and '95, water quantity has become a major

  13. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  14. Oil recovery improvement through profile modification by thermal precipitation. Final report, October 1, 1991--August 27, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, J.C.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project has been to investigate the potential for using temperature-dependent (thermal) precipitation of chemicals to reduce the porosity and permeability of porous rocks. The method consists of injecting hot water that is saturated in a chemical that will precipitate upon cooling. Through this process, the permeability of thief zones in oil reservoirs could be reduced, allowing improved recovery by secondary and tertiary recovery processes. The chemical literature was reviewed for environmentally safe chemicals that have a suitable temperature-dependent solubility for the thermal precipitation process. Four suitable chemicals were identified: boron oxide, potassium carbonate, sodium borate, and potassium chloride. An experimental apparatus was constructed to test the thermal precipitation process at high temperatures and pressures. Data was collected with clastic Berea sandstone cores using two chemicals: potassium carbonate and sodium borate. Data was also collected with limestone cores using potassium carbonate. The porosities and permeabilities were measured before and after being treated by the thermal precipitation process. A theoretical study of the process was also conducted. A model for predicting the fractional reduction in porosity was developed that is based on the temperature-dependent solubility of the chemical used. An empirical model that predicts the fractional reduction in permeability in terms of the fractional reduction in porosity was then developed for Berea sandstone. Existing theoretical models for estimating the permeability of porous media were tested against the measured data. The existing models, including the widely-used Carman-Kozeny equation, underpredicted the reduction in permeability for the thermal precipitation process. This study has shown that the thermal precipitation process has considerable potential for the controlled reduction in porosity and permeability in geologic formations.

  15. Molecular Thermodynamics of Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    Molecular Thermodynamics of Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Fluids Jianzhong Wu and John M the- ory, is used to correlate experimental asphaltene-precipitation data at high-temperature and pressure conditions. In this framework, asphaltenes and resins are represented by pseudopure components

  16. Thermodynamic Micellization Model of Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Thermodynamic Micellization Model of Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Alexey I A thermodynamicmicellization model is proposed for the description of asphaltene precipitationfrom petroleum fluids and the onset of predicted asphaltene precipitation are sensitive to the amount of resins in the crude

  17. Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media approximation by a finite volume. Quelques tests numériques sont ensuite montrés. KEYWORDS: diffusion, dissolution­precipitation, porous­ ficiency of such disposals relies on material barriers. For such a use, cement concrete offers

  18. Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media approximation by a finite volume numériques sont ensuite montrés. KEYWORDS: diffusion, dissolution-precipitation, porous media, finite volumes barriers. For such a use, cement concrete offers the advantage of having a weak porosity. However, disposal

  19. Best Management Practice #4: Water-Efficient Landscaping

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Traditional landscapes require supplemental water to thrive in most locations. Kentucky bluegrass, for example, is native to regions that receive in excess of 40 inches per year of precipitation,...

  20. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  1. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column returned to aerobic conditions, but the concentration later returned to below the clean-up level. Speciation analysis was conducted on soil collected from the treated column after rebound testing. The experimental results show that: (a) The mass of uranium resolubilized in more than four months of column testing was much lower than the amount precipitated. (b) The majority of the uranium was precipitated in the first few inches of the treated column. The majority of the uranium precipitated was associated with iron oxides or in other immobile/sequestered phases. It is important to contrast this result with the results reported by Bryan (2003) who shows that most of the uranium associated with contaminated aquifer solids at Fernald under the existing natural attenuation/pump and treat with reinjection conditions is carbonate bound. Carbonate bound forms are traditionally seen as fairly mobile, but may not be under a calcite/dolomite saturated condition. Fernald is currently conducting further studies to investigate the mobility of the carbonate bound forms. (c) Though reoxidation concentrations from the bench-scale column exceeded 30 {micro}g/L for a time, they later returned to below this value. Effluent concentrations from the treated column are expected to over predict full-scale concentrations for reasons discussed in depth in the text. Finally, these results must be viewed in light of the site's ongoing pump-and-treat with reinjection system. There is reason to believe that although the pump-and-treat technology is currently effectively controlling the uranium plume and reducing the groundwater concentration, it may not be able to reach the treatment standard of 30 {micro}g/L within an economical operating lifetime and then maintain that concentration without rebound. This study suggests that Enhanced Anaerobic Reductive Precipitation can change the speciation and thus reduce the mobility of uranium at the site and expedite closure.

  2. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has become a major topic

  3. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non, hazardous waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has become a major topic

  4. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  5. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  6. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  7. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  8. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongers, W. A.; Beveren, V. van; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; Berg, M. A. van den; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Thoen, D. J. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Nuij, P. J. W. M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baar, M. R. de; Donne, A. J. H.; Hennen, B. A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kantor, M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Forschungszentrum Juelich GMBH, Institute of Energy and Climate research, Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint-Petersburg, 195256 (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the full wave information of the mm-wave signals under investigation. The system is based on directly digitizing the IF band after down conversion. The enabling technology consists of a fast multi-giga sample analog to digital converter that has recently become available. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) are implemented to accomplish versatile real-time data analysis. A prototype system has been developed and tested and its performance has been compared with conventional electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrometer systems. On the TEXTOR Tokamak a proof of principle shows that ECE, together with high power injected and scattered radiation, becomes amenable to measurement by this device. In particular, its capability to measure the phase of coherent signals in the spectrum offers important advantages in diagnostics and control. One case developed in detail employs the FPGA in real-time fast Fourier transform (FFT) and additional signal processing. The major benefit of such a FFT-based system is the real-time trade-off that can be made between frequency and time resolution. For ECE diagnostics this corresponds to a flexible spatial resolution in the plasma, with potential application in smart sensing of plasma instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and sawtooth instabilities. The flexible resolution would allow for the measurement of the full mode content of plasma instabilities contained within the system bandwidth.

  9. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

  10. Imbibition flooding with CO?-enriched water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grape, Steven George

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    light weight, 25 - 35 degree API, diesel oil. Diesel oil was selected because CO, can cause asphaltene precipitation in some heavier crudes. Asphaltene precipitation would ruin the ability of the core to perform mulflple runs. The carbonated water... o e u e Q. 30 20 10 0 20 40 60 60 100 120 Effluent from Core Chamber, om3 Fig. 10. - Imbibition in Sandstone Field Core. 25 The results of the carbonated water flood show a higher initial production of oil. This may be a result of oil...

  11. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. S. ; Smith, R. W. , Calcium Carbonate Precipitation byF. , Microbially Mediated Calcium Carbonate Precipitation:through mixing of calcium and carbonate solutions in a glass

  12. Flood or Drought: How Do Aerosols Affect Precipitation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    by scattering and absorbing the solar radiation that energizes the formation of clouds (3­5). Because all cloud on clouds most- ly act to suppress precipitation, because they de- crease the amount of solar radiation

  13. Aerosol-Cloud interactions : a new perspective in precipitation enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased industrialization and human activity modified the atmospheric aerosol composition and size-distribution during the last several decades. This has affected the structure and evolution of clouds, and precipitation ...

  14. Enhancement of satellite precipitation estimation via unsupervised dimensionality reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology to enhance Satellite Precipitation Estimation (SPE) using unsupervised dimensionality reduction (UDR) techniques is developed. This enhanced technique is an extension to the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN) and Cloud Classification System (CCS) method (PERSIANN-CCS) enriched using wavelet features combined with dimensionality reduction. Cloud-top brightness temperature measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) are used for precipitation estimation at 4 km 4 km spatial resolutions every 30 min. The study area in the continental United States covers parts of Louisiana, Arkansas, Kansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. Based on quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and Heidke skill score (HSS), the results show that the UDR techniques can improve the precipitation estimation accuracy. In addition, ICA is shown to have better performance than other UDR techniques; and in some cases, it achieves 10% improvement in the HSS.

  15. Precipitation of heterogeneous nanostructures: Metal nanoparticles and dielectric nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masai, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi [Department of Applied Physics, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasyo, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterogeneous precipitation of nanocrystallites of metallic Bi and anatase was observed in CaO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} glass-ceramics. Addition of AlN reduced the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Bi metal nanoparticles, which were uniformly dispersed in the glass. After heat-treatment of the Bi-precipitated glass around the glass transition temperature, nanocrystalline anatase precipitated out without aggregation of the Bi metal particles. It was found that the anatase nanocrystal size was affected by the distance between a nanocrystal and a precipitated Bi nanoparticle. The glass-ceramic produced is a functional material containing a random dispersion of different types of nanoparticles with different dielectric constants.

  16. A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscope (TEM), fine carbides with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at...

  17. A micro-alloyed ferritic steel strengthened by nanoscale precipitates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (TEM), fine carbides TiC with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at...

  18. PRECIPITATION-STRENGTHENED AUSTENITIC FE-MN-TI ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, K.-M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy spectrums showing that precipitates are rich in titanium, andtitanium additions can reduce the austenitic stacking fault energyfault energy of the Fe-Mn austenite is lowered by titanium

  19. Introduction Goals Dissolution Precipitation Continuation Questions Mathematical Models for Simultaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    for Simultaneous Particle Dissolution and Nucleation during Heat Treatment of Commercial Aluminium Alloys Jos de Dissolution and Nucleation during Heat Treatment of Commercial Aluminium Alloys #12;Introduction Goals Alloys #12;Introduction Goals Dissolution Precipitation Continuation Questions Aluminium alloy production

  20. Assessment of operating parameter variation on electrostatic precipitator performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunn, Roam Anthony

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lignite coal were collected and resistivity analysis performed for varying conditions of temperature and humidity. As a result of the laboratory analysis, it was determined that moisture and temperature conditioning of Texas lignite coal fly ash... results. I 5. Sample 8 moisturi ed test results. 57 64 66 69 77 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Lignite coal deposit formations in East Texas. Z. The electrostatic precipitator system 3. Electrostatic precipitator in operation. 4. Electrostatic...

  1. An automatic control system for a laboratory precipitation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Mary Alice

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A LABORATORY PRECIPITATION PROCESS A Thesis by MARY ALICE BURNETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1986 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A LABORATORY PRECIPITATION PROCESS A Thesis MARY ALICE BURNETT Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chairman of Committee) Donald L. Reddell (Member) J...

  2. Activation studies with promoted precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manne, Rama Krishna

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACTIVATION STUDIES WITH PROMOTED PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER ? TROPSCH CATALYSTS A Thesis by RAMA KRISHNA MANNE Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ACTIVATION STUDIES WITH PROMOTED PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER ? TROPSCH CATALYSTS A Thesis by RAMA KRISHNA MANNE Approved as to style and content by: Dragomir B. Bukur (Charr...

  3. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l986 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis by EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Commi e) T D. eynol s (Member) Michael T. Lo necker (Member) Donald Mc...

  4. Predicting carbonate mineral precipitation/dissolution events during progressive diagenesis of clastic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surdam, R.C.; MacGowan, D.B.; Dunn, T.L. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (United States)); Moraes, M. (Petrobras (Brazil))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an observable, regular progression of early and late carbonate cements that is separated by carbonate mineral dissolution in many sandstones during progressive burial and diagenesis. The distribution of early cements is a function of incipient hydration of framework grains, sulfate reduction, and bacterial methanogenesis. These early cements typically precipitate from the sediment water interace to burial depths corresponding to about 80C. The distribution of late carbonate cements is a function of the relationship of organic acid anions, aluminosilicate reactions and CO{sub 2} in formation waters. Elevated PCO{sub 2} in a fluid where the pH is buffered by organic acid anions or aluminosilicates results in precipitation of a late carbonate cement (typically ferroan); these late carbonate cements generally form over the temperature interval of 100-130C. The late and early carbonate cement events are separated in time by a period of carbonate mineral dissolution or nonprecipitation. This dissolution is related to the increase in concentration of carboxylic acid anions resulting from the thermocatalytic cracking of oxygen-bearing functional groups from kerogen and/or redox reactions involving kerogen. Examples of the importance of early carbonate cementation/decementation to hydrocarbon reservoirs include the Campos basin of Brazil and the U.S. Gulf Coast. An example of late carbonate cementation/decementation includes the Norphlet Formation. This observed sequence of cementation and decementation can be modeled, and the modeling results can be used to predict enhanced porosity in the subsurface.

  5. WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ESTIMATION IN PUERTO RICO USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ESTIMATION IN PUERTO RICO USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING Eric. W Management of water resources relies on estimates of the hydrologic water balance within defined and/or similar land use. Components of the water balance include precipitation, actual

  6. Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan, E-mail: g.liu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ullah, Asad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Mathematics, Karakoram International University, Gilgit-Baltistan (Pakistan)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

  7. Radiometer Calibration Trends

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations:Radiological Threat Reduction

  8. Radiometer Characterization System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations:Radiological Threat Reduction2

  9. MWRRET (Microwave Radiometer Retrievals)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . DMTBEMU

  10. A Novel Retrieval Algorithm for Cloud Optical Properties from the Atmopsheric Radiation Measurement Program's Two-Channel Narrow-Field-of-View Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.; Marshak, A.; Chiu, J.-Y. C.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud optical depth is the most important of all cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. To estimate cloud optical depth, the atmospheric science community has widely used ground-based flux measurements from either broadband or narrowband radiometers in the past decade. However, this type of technique is limited to overcast conditions and, at best, gives us an "effective" cloud optical depth instead of its "local" value. Unlike flux observations, monochromatic narrow-field-of-view (NFOV) radiance measurements contain information of local cloud properties, but unfortunately, the use of radiance to interpret optical depth suffers from retrieval ambiguity. We have pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) NFOV measurements. The underlying principle of the algorithm is that these two channels have similar cloud properties but strong spectral contrast in surface reflectance. This algorthm offers the first opportunity to illustrate cloud evolution with high temporal resolution retrievals. A combination of two-channel NFOV radiances with multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) fluxes for the retrieval of cloud optical properties is also discussed.

  11. Conditions for precipitation of copper phases in DWPF waste glass. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility precipitate hydrolysis process requires the use of copper formate as a catalyst. The expected absorbed radiation doses to the salt precipitate require higher levels of copper formate which increase the potential for the precipitation of metallic copper containing phases in the DWPF Melter. The conditions required to avoid the precipitation of copper phases are described in this report.

  12. Regional trends and local variability in monsoon precipitation in the northern Chihuahuan Desert, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ductivity is also influenced by precipitation at shorter timescales as well (Alessandri and Navarra, 2008

  13. Large Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) Heel Process Development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.P. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Boley, C.S.; Jacobs, R.A.

    1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A modification to the Precipitate Hydrolysis flowsheet used in DWPF Waste Qualification Runs has been developed.

  14. Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation P; accepted 30 December 2002 Abstract Asphaltenes from four crude oils were fractionated by precipitation) indicated the onset of asphaltene precipitation occurred at lower toluene volume fractions (0.1Á/0.2) than

  15. Water Resour Manage DOI 10.1007/s11269-009-9486-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resour Manage DOI 10.1007/s11269-009-9486-2 Comparison of Process-Based and Temperature calculation approaches within the SWAT model at three sites in two different continents. The results indicate precipitation, which is usually called rainfall, and (2) solid precipitation (snow). The power of any

  16. Continental-scale water resources modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    /Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate) Dennis P. Lettenmaier (University of Washington) #12;Outline, University of Frankfurt, Germany / Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy ­ Temporal: Daily · Input data ­ Precipitation, max/min temperature, wind ­ Land cover data (vegetation, soil

  17. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water Quantity: Missouri has a history of either inadequate amounts of rainfall, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years

  18. Continuous Precipitation of Ceria Nanoparticles from a Continuous Flow Micromixer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tseng, Chih Heng; Paul, Brian; Chang, Chih-hung; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles were continuously precipitated from a solution of cerium(III) nitrate and ammonium hydroxide using a micro-scale T-mixer. Findings show that the method of mixing is important in the ceria precipitation process. In batch mixing and deposition, disintegration and agglomeration dominates the deposited film. In T-mixing and deposition, more uniform nanorod particles are attainable. In addition, it was found that the micromixing approach reduced the exposure of the Ce(OH)3 precipates to oxygen, yielding hydroxide precipates in place of CeO2 precipitates. Advantages of the micro-scale T-mixing approach include shorter mixing times, better control of nanoparticle shape and less agglomeration.

  19. Laboratory-scale evaluations of alternative plutonium precipitation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martella, L.L.; Saba, M.T.; Campbell, G.K.

    1984-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium(III), (IV), and (VI) carbonate; plutonium(III) fluoride; plutonium(III) and (IV) oxalate; and plutonium(IV) and (VI) hydroxide precipitation methods were evaluated for conversion of plutonium nitrate anion-exchange eluate to a solid, and compared with the current plutonium peroxide precipitation method used at Rocky Flats. Plutonium(III) and (IV) oxalate, plutonium(III) fluoride, and plutonium(IV) hydroxide precipitations were the most effective of the alternative conversion methods tested because of the larger particle-size formation, faster filtration rates, and the low plutonium loss to the filtrate. These were found to be as efficient as, and in some cases more efficient than, the peroxide method. 18 references, 14 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Nano {gamma}'/{gamma}'' composite precipitates in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); McAllister, D.; Gao, Y.; Lv, D.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Peterson, B. [Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona 85034 (United States)

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale composite precipitates of Alloy 718 have been investigated with both high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase field modeling. Chemical analysis via energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy allowed for the differentiation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' particles, which is not otherwise possible through traditional Z-contrast methods. Phase field modeling was applied to determine the stress distribution and elastic interaction around and between the particles, respectively, and it was determined that a composite particle (of both {gamma}' and {gamma}'') has an elastic energy that is significantly lower than, for example, single {gamma}' and {gamma}'' precipitates which are non-interacting.

  1. Water Resources and Climate Change in Garden Park, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffa, Thomas W.

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    , is the availability of an adequate water supply. Drought is an ever-present danger, and, with an annual statewide precipitation rate of 12 to 17 inches, the quote above is a grim reminder that water is as precious as gold in Colorado. Combine that fact...

  2. Evaluation of Continental Precipitation in 20th-Century Climate Simulations: The Utility of Multi-Model Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, T J; Gleckler, P J

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), simulations of 20th-century climate have been performed recently with some 20 global coupled ocean-atmosphere models. In view of its central importance for biological and socio-economic systems, model-simulated continental precipitation is evaluated relative to three observational estimates at both global and regional scales. Many models are found to display systematic biases, deviating markedly from the observed spatial variability and amplitude/phase of the seasonal cycle. However, the point-wise ensemble mean of all the models usually shows better statistical agreement with the observations than does any single model. Deficiencies of current models that may be responsible for the simulated precipitation biases as well as possible reasons for the improved estimate afforded by the multi-model ensemble mean are discussed. Implications of these results for water-resource managers also are briefly addressed.

  3. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

    1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

  4. Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, J., E-mail: will@krist.uni-erlangen.de; Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Spiecker, E. [Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Pendellösung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900?°C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70?erg/cm{sup 2}) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ?13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450?°C.

  5. Observational Studies of Atmospheric Aerosols over Bozeman, Montana, Using a Two-Color Lidar, a Water Vapor DIAL, a Solar Radiometer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Observational Studies of Atmospheric Aerosols over Bozeman, Montana, Using a Two-Color Lidar form 24 June 2010) ABSTRACT Coordinated observational data of atmospheric aerosols were collected over-based nephelometer. The optical properties and spatial distribution of the atmospheric aerosols were inferred from

  6. PbO networks composed of single crystalline nanosheets synthesized by a facile chemical precipitation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samberg, Joshua P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Engineering Building I, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Kajbafvala, Amir, E-mail: amir.kajbafvala@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Engineering Building I, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Koolivand, Amir [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, 2620 Yarbrough Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of PbO networks through a simple chemical precipitation route. • The synthesis method is rapid and low-cost. • Each network is composed of single crystalline PbO nanosheets. • A possible growth mechanism is proposed for synthesized PbO networks. - Abstract: For the field of energy storage, nanostructured lead oxide (PbO) shows immense potential for increased specific energy and deep discharge for lead acid battery technologies. In this work, PbO networks composed of single crystalline nanosheets were synthesized utilizing a simple, low cost and rapid chemical precipitation method. The PbO networks were prepared in a single reaction vessel from starting reagents of lead acetate dehydrate, ammonium hydroxide and deionized water. Lead acetate dehydrate was chosen as a reagent, as opposed to lead nitrate, to eliminate the possibility of nitrate contamination of the final product. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis were used to characterize the synthesized PbO networks. The reproducible method described herein synthesized pure ?-PbO (massicot) powders, with no byproducts. A possible formation mechanism for these PbO networks is proposed. The growth is found to proceed predominately in the ?1 1 1? and ?2 0 0? directions while being limited in the ?0 1 1? direction.

  7. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  8. The Environment of Precipitating Shallow Cumulus LOUISE NUIJENS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    of precipitation are presented from two months of radar reflectiv- ity data, collected by the ground-based SPol%. These estimates are based on subsets of TRMM data for which the majority of radar echoes (that span at least 750 m. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, CA, USA A.PIER SIEBESMA Royal

  9. A Quasi-Global Precipitation Time Series for Drought Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    -00002 for "Famine Early Warning Systems Network Support," the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Applied Sciences Program, Decisions award #NN10AN26I for "A Land Data Assimilation System for Famine Early Warning Standardized Precipitation Index supporting the US Drought Portal and the Famine Early Warning System N

  10. Preparation of Lead Zirconate by Homogeneous Precipitation and Calcination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Preparation of Lead Zirconate by Homogeneous Precipitation and Calcination Ersin Emre Oren, Ercan. Introduction LEAD ZIRCONATE (PbZrO3) is an antiferroelectric ceramic with a Curie temperature of 230°C electric field to the ceramic in the antifer- roelectric state) leads to significant energy storage

  11. Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity, and coarsening N. Fujita and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia The growth of niobium carbide in austenite involves the diffusion of both niobium and carbon. These elements diffuse at very different rates. A model is presented

  12. Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and to evaluate the cloud fields in the National Center for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (GFS Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile Facility, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST) field campaign, which and precipitation is demonstrated. Cooling of the lower troposphere is implicated as the probable cause

  13. STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    this situation (e. g., "extRemes" package in open source statistical programming language R) Maximum likelihood1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute in Causes of Trends #12;4 (1) Introduction · Extreme value analysis under stationarity -- Statistical theory

  14. Capacitance studies of cobalt oxide films formed via electrochemical precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    prepared by electrochemically precipitating the hydroxide and heating it in air to form Co3O4 the need to identify more suitable materials. One promising route is the use of transi- tion metal oxides to batteries, are referred to as Faradaic or pseudocapacitors. However, the high cost of these materials has

  15. Late Neoproterozoic cap carbonates: Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada: precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narbonne, Guy

    carbonate is thus interpreted to have formed in two steps: (1) during initial marine ice melting accompaniedLate Neoproterozoic cap carbonates: Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada: precipitation and global glacial meltdown Noel P. James, Guy M. Narbonne, T. Kurtis Kyser Abstract: The 3­27 m-thick cap

  16. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid Daniel M. Dabbs, Usha as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous

  17. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    February 24, 2006 1J. McLean Sloughter is Graduate Research Assistant, Adrian E. Raftery is BlumsteinProbabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging J. McLean Sloughter, Adrian E. Raftery and Tilmann Gneiting 1 Department of Statistics, University of Washington

  18. Bias adjustment of radar-based 3-hour precipitation accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    projection of KNMI radar images 55 4 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Since June 2003 a daily gauge is generated at 1400 UTC when the majority of the manual gauge observations have been reported. The radar-gaugeBias adjustment of radar-based 3-hour precipitation accumulations Iwan Holleman Technical Report

  19. Phosphorus reduction in dairy effluent through flocculation and precipitation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bragg, Amanda Leann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    to the flocculated effluent raised the pH from near 8 to near 9, inducing P precipitation, further reducing the P content. The total P reduction for the best combination of treatments was 97%, a decrease from 76 to 2 mg L-1. If this level of reduction were achieved...

  20. Applying Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) spectral indices for geological mapping and mineral identification on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrie, Robert; Aitchison, Jonathan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tibetan Plateau holds clues to understanding the dynamics and mechanisms associated with continental growth. Part of the region is characterized by zones of ophiolitic melange believed to represent the remnants of ancient oceanic crust and underlying upper mantle emplaced during oceanic closures. However, due to the remoteness of the region and the inhospitable terrain many areas have not received detailed investigation. Increased spatial and spectral resolution of satellite sensors have made it possible to map in greater detail the mineralogy and lithology than in the past. Recent work by Yoshiki Ninomiya of the Geological Survey of Japan has pioneered the use of several spectral indices for the mapping of quartzose, carbonate, and silicate rocks using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) thermal infrared (TIR) data. In this study, ASTER TIR indices have been applied to a region in western-central Tibet for the purposes of assessing their effectiveness for differentiatin...

  1. Precipitation induced stream flow: An event based chemical andisotopic study of a small stream in the Great Plains region of theUSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machavaram, Madhav V.; Whittemore, Donald O.; Conrad, Mark E.; Miller, Norman L.

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A small stream in the Great Plains of USA was sampled tounderstand the streamflow components following intense precipitation andthe influence of water storage structures in the drainage basin.Precipitation, stream, ponds, ground-water and soil moisture were sampledfor determination of isotopic (D, 18O) and chemical (Cl, SO4) compositionbefore and after two intense rain events. Following the first stormevent, flow at the downstream locations was generated primarily throughshallow subsurface flow and runoff whereas in the headwaters region --where a pond is located in the stream channel -- shallow ground-water andpond outflow contributed to the flow. The distinct isotopic signatures ofprecipitation and the evaporated pond water allowed separation of theevent water from the other sources that contributed to the flow.Similarly, variations in the Cl and SO4 concentrations helped identifythe relative contributions of ground-water and soil moisture to thestream flow. The relationship between deuterium excess and Cl or SO4content reveals that the early contributions from a rain event tostreamflow depend upon the antecedent climatic conditions and theposition along the stream channel within the watershed. The design ofthis study, in which data from several locations within a watershed werecollected, shows that in small streams changes in relative contributionsfrom ground water and soil moisture complicate hydrograph separation,with surface-water bodies providing additional complexity. It alsodemonstrates the usefulness of combined chemical and isotopic methods inhydrologic investigations, especially the utility of the deuterium excessparameter in quantifying the relative contributions of various sourcecomponents to the stream flow.

  2. Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic model. It was found that the precipitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Summary Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic to that in gas condensates. As a result of pressure decrease (at a constant tem- perature), the amount is undesirable. The flowlines may be plugged by wax deposition. For both crude oils and gas condensates, one may

  3. THE REGIONAL AND DIURNAL VARIABILITY OF THE VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF PRECIPITATION SYSTEMS IN AFRICA, BASED ON TRMM PRECIPITATION RADAR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    IN AFRICA, BASED ON TRMM PRECIPITATION RADAR DATA Bart Geerts1 and Teferi Dejene University of Wyoming 1 microwave radiances (e.g. Kummerow and Giglio 1994), and 14 GHz radar reflectivities (e.g. Ferreira et al-based techniques are much inferior to radar-based techniques, in principle at least, because the anvil of large

  4. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf...

  5. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this project was to understand asphaltene precipitation in General and carbon dioxide induced precipitation in particular. To this effect, thermodynamic and kinetic experiments with the Rangely crude oil were conducted and thermodynamic and reservoir models were developed.

  6. Characteristics of warm season precipitating storms in the Arkansas–Red River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Li, Xingong

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Analysis of a multisensor precipitation product enables us to extract the precipitation from individual storms in the Arkansas–Red River drainage basin over a period of 11 years. We examine the year-to-year and ...

  7. Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

  8. Future credible precipitation occurrences in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I have studied many factors thought to have influenced past climatic change. Because they might recur, they are possible suspects for future climatic alterations. Most of these factors are totally unpredictable; therefore, they cast a shadow on the validity of derived climatic predictions. Changes in atmospheric conditions and in continental surfaces, variations in solar radiation, and in the earth's orbit around the sun are among the influential mechanisms investigated. Even when models are set up that include the above parameters, their reliability will depend on unpredictable variables totally alien to the model (like volcanic eruptions). Based on climatic records, however, maximum precipitation amounts have been calculated for different probability levels. These seem to correspond well to past precipitation occurrences, derived from tree ring indices. The link between tree ring indices and local climate has been established through regression analysis.

  9. Effect of CNTs on precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/AlCu composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Effect of CNTs on precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/Al­Cu composites Dong H. Nam a , Yun K June 2012 A B S T R A C T The precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/Al­Cu composites was investigated accelerated the precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/Al­Cu composites due to the generation of excess

  10. Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico ANNE W. NOLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico ANNE W. NOLIN Department proportion of the annual precipitation for Arizona and New Mexico arrives during the summer monsoon. Forty-one years of daily monsoon season precipitation data for Arizona and New Mexico were studied using wavelet

  11. Modulation of Caribbean Precipitation by the MaddenJulian Oscillation ELINOR R. MARTIN AND COURTNEY SCHUMACHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elinor R.

    Modulation of Caribbean Precipitation by the Madden­Julian Oscillation ELINOR R. MARTIN satellite precipitation data and reanalysis winds, intraseasonal (30­90 days) variability in Caribbean and 6) of the MJO. The changes in Caribbean precipitation associated with the MJO are shown

  12. A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO Wiel M.F. Wauben precipitation sensor of Ott has been tested at KNMI in order to find out whether it is a suitable candidate for replacing the current operational KNMI precipitation gauge. Tests performed at the calibration facilities

  13. Running Head: Correlation of Microbial Communities with Caclium Carbonate1 (Travertine) Mineral Precipitation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Precipitation2 3 4 Correlation of Microbial Communities with Calcium Carbonate (Travertine)5 Mineral of changing environmental conditions and associated calcium carbonate mineral18 precipitation along the spring and morphology of calcium carbonate mineral precipitation.3 Carbonate minerals are ideal for this type of study

  14. Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual and Abbas different petroleum fluids. Various resins are added to three different petroleum fluids to measure of precipitation. However, addition of resins to a petroleum fluid increases the amount of precipitated asphaltenes

  15. Evaluating the present-day simulation of clouds, precipitation, and radiation in climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    , and net cloud radiative effect, projected cloud fraction, and surface precipitation rate) over the globalEvaluating the present-day simulation of clouds, precipitation, and radiation in climate models] This paper describes a set of metrics for evaluating the simulation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation

  16. Calcite Precipitation and Trace Metal Partitioning in Groundwater and the Vadose Zone: Remediation of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides in Arid Western Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Grant Ferris

    2003-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ remediation is an emerging technology that will play an important role in DOE's environmental restoration program, and is an area where enhancement in fundamental understanding will lead to significantly improved cleanup tools. In situ remediation technologies have inherent advantages because they do not require the costly removal, transport, and disposal of contamination. In addition, these technologies minimize worker exposure because contaminated materials are not brought to the surface. Finally, these technologies will minimize the generation of secondary waste streams with their associated treatment and disposal. A particularly promising in situ remediation technology is bioremediation. For inorganic contaminants such as radionuclides and metals, in situ bioremediation can be used to alter the mobility or reduce the toxicity of radionuclides and metals by changing the valence state of the radionuclides and metals, degrading or producing complexing ligands, or facilitating partitioning on to or off of solid phases. The purpose of the research presented here was to explore microbially facilitated partitioning of metal and radionuclides by their co-precipitation with calcium carbonate. Although this approach is a very attractive cleanup alternative, its practical implementation requires improved scientific understanding of the geochemical and biological mechanisms involved, particularly with respect to rates and mechanisms of microbially facilitated calcite precipitation. Of interest for this investigation is the in situ manipulation of calcite precipitation by the microbially catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The production of ammonia during microbial decomposition of urea tends to drive pH upwards, and results in formation of alkaline conditions. When solution concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- are high enough, calcium carbonate precipitation may occur. A series of water samples collected from four wells tapping the aquifer underlying Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) all tested positively for the presence of urea degrading bacteria. Calcite precipitation experiments were conducted with isolated ESRP urea degrading bacteria and B. pasteurii (ATCC 11859), a known urea hydrolyzer. In all of the experiments, visible white precipitates developed within the first thirty minutes after inoculation. The identity of the precipitates as calcite was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron micrographs of the solids revealed both spherical and amorphous precipitates, with microbes in close association with the minerals. The kinetics of calcite precipitation at 10 to 20 C was subsequently investigated using an artificial groundwater (AGW) medium based on the aqueous chemistry of the ESRP aquifer. Experimental data was fit using unconstrained nonlinear regression and optimization to determine rate constants and points of critical supersaturation (Scritical i.e., calcite nucleation). The highest rates of calcite precipitation (ca. 0.8 mmole L-1 day-1) occurred near Scritical. While unique time course trajectories of dissolved Ca2+ concentrations were observed at the different experimental temperatures, the calcite precipitation rates all followed the same asymptotic profile decreasing progressively with saturation state regardless of temperature. This emphasizes the fundamental kinetic dependence of calcite precipitation on saturation state, which connects the otherwise dissimilar temporal patterns of calcite precipitation that evolved under the different temperature and biogeochemical regimes of the experiments.

  17. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    : The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

  18. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  19. Reducing Phosphorus in Dairy Effluent Wastewater through Flocculation and Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bragg, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Dissolved reactive and total phosphorus loads from agricultural and forested basins to surface waters in Finland. Aqua Fennica 21:127-136. 21. Rout, D., R. Verma, and S. Agarwal. 1999. Polyelectrolyte treatment ? An approach for water quality...

  20. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Eun Joon, E-mail: ejchun@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Baba, Hayato [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimoto, Kazutoshi [Department of the Application of Nuclear Technology, Fukui University of Technology, Gakuen 3-6-1, Fukui-shi, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Saida, Kazuyoshi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  1. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

  2. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

  3. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  4. Synoptic disturbances found in precipitable water fields north of equatorial Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patla, Jason Eddy

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Six case wind field composite analysis is accomplished with both actual winds and reduced shear winds (zonal mean removed at each latitude band). Case study analysis revealed a doppler shifted propagating Rossby Wave (k = 6, c =-5 m/sec) at 500h...

  5. A statistical study of the depth of precipitable water in western Texas and eastern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Samuel Erick

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    also sincerely appreciate the assistance of Mrs . Gerda Merkle who drew the figures and charts and Mrs . Florace Kling who patiently typed the many tables and equations. My deepest gratitude is due my wife Rebekah for her patience, encouragement...

  6. GPS precipitable water measurements used in the analysis of California and Nevada climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Means, James Douglas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    120.01 smyc 36.32 -115.59 2589 dssc 33.73 -116.71 1692 descMeans Duration crrs mvfd cotd dssc bemt msob bmhl sdhl ldesCC dshs BSk SC dsme BSk SC dssc Csb SE dvlw BSk SC dvne BSk

  7. Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    for Sustainable Energy, Biosystems Department, Building BIO-309, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark, k Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 49, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden, §§Woods

  8. Modeled interactive effects of precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    , Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA, }Biosystems Department, Ris National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden, kk

  9. Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    sensitivity to changes in the condition of the Persian Gulf relative to the Mediterranean Sea. This may have the longest ar- cheological record of human civilization. As such, Ho- locene climate changes and what a Regional Climate Model [fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5)­Noah land

  10. ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Solar Energy Center Physics Department 1679 Clearlake Rd. University of Oregon Cocoa, FL 32922 and humidity. If precipitable water is too high or too low, a too low or too high turbidity is inevitably pre, are that it is more sensitive to in- strumental error because two radiometers are involved (instead of one

  11. Evaluation of MERRA Land Surface Estimates in Preparation for the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (EOS) (AMSR-E)] remote sensing and earlier generation.001) in the midlatitudes, where its accuracy is directly proportional to the quality of MERRA precipitation. In the high products) to define biophysical attri- butes and water, mass, and energy exchanges (e.g., Running et al

  12. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; William Smith; Carl Palmer

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGS using CO2 as a working fluid will likely involve hydro-shearing low-permeability hot rock reservoirs with a water solution. After that process, the fractures will be flushed with CO2 that is maintained under supercritical conditions (> 70 bars). Much of the injected water in the main fracture will be flushed out with the initial CO2 injection; however side fractures, micro fractures, and the lower portion of the fracture will contain connate water that will interact with the rock and the injected CO2. Dissolution/precipitation reactions in the resulting scCO2/brine/rock systems have the potential to significantly alter reservoir permeability, so it is important to understand where these precipitates form and how are they related to the evolving ‘free’ connate water in the system. To examine dissolution / precipitation behavior in such systems over time, we have conducted non-stirred batch experiments in the laboratory with pure minerals, sandstone, and basalt coupons with brine solution spiked with MnCl2 and scCO2. The coupons are exposed to liquid water saturated with scCO2 and extend above the water surface allowing the upper portion of the coupons to be exposed to scCO2 saturated with water. The coupons were subsequently analyzed using SEM to determine the location of reactions in both in and out of the liquid water. Results of these will be summarized with regard to significance for EGS with CO2 as a working fluid.

  13. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-SC0006609 - Persistence of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation as an in situ Treatment for Strontium-90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Robert W [University of Idaho] [University of Idaho; Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Laboratory] [Idaho National Laboratory

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE?s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide Sr-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity, that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days and was followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. A post experiment core located within the inter-wellbore zone was collected on day 321 and characterized with respect to cation exchange capacity, mineral carbonate content, urease activity, ureC gene abundance, extractable ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) content, and the C-13 isotopic composition of solid carbonates. It was also subjected to selective extractions for strontium and uranium. Result of the core characterization suggest that urea hydrolysis occurred primarily within the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone and that strontium was mobilized from cation exchange sites and subsequently co-precipitated with new calcium carbonate.

  14. A radar study of the interaction between lightning and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, D.N.; Ulbrich, C.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar study was made of the interaction between lightning and precipitation with the 430 MHz Doppler radar at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. On one occasion, the spectral power at Doppler velocities near that corresponding to the updraft increased substantially within a fraction of a second after a discharge was detected in the beam. Calculations were made to simulate the effect of an electric field change on mean Doppler velocity for a distribution of droplets in a thunderstorm. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

  16. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

  17. Benzene/nitrous oxide flammability in the precipitate hydrolysis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, R A [Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.

    1989-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process for destruction of nitrite in precipitate hydrolysis produces nitrous oxide (N2O) gas as one of the products. N2O can form flammable mixtures with benzene which is also present due to radiolysis and hydrolysis of tetraphenylborate. Extensive flame modeling and explosion testing was undertaken to define the minimum oxidant for combustion of N2O/benzene using both nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The attached memorandum interprets and documents the results of the studies.

  18. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  20. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  1. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. This report covers testing an iron catalyst. During the last quarter, a new precipitated iron catalyst was prepared and tested in the slurry autoclave reactor at various conditions. This catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 1250 hours of testing. This quarter, the test was extended to include performance evaluations at different conversion levels ranging from 35 to 88% at 265 and 275{degree}C. The conversion levels were varied by changing the feed rate. The catalytic performance at different conversion intervals was then integrated to approximately predict performance in a bubble column reactor. The run was shut down at the end of 1996 hours because of a 24-hour-power outage. When the power was back on, the run was restarted from room temperature. Catalytic performance during the first 300 hours after the restart-up was monitored. Overall product distributions are being tabulated as analytical laboratory data are obtained. 34 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Christopher James

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1's accuracy in forecasting frozen precipitation. . . . 60 23 25 Same as FIG. 22 except for model 2 . . . . Same as FIG. 22 except for model 3 . . . . Same as FIG. 22 except for model 4 . . . . 61 62 26 Histogram of responses for snow cases... to the logistic regression analysis of snow cases versus rain cases for model 1. 64 FIGURE Page 27 Histogram of responses for rain cases to the logistic regression analysis of snow cases versus rain cases for model 1 28 Histogram of responses for snow cases...

  3. Water Quality Monitoring Program In the Mill Creek System, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    during 2008. 22 Figure 4.2.A&B Bar graphs showing (A) Patuxent River mean winter-spring flow (January Patterns and River Flow 21 4.1.Precipitation 21 4.2. River Flow 23 5. Long Term Water Quality Trends 24 5

  4. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has

  5. Precipitate hydrolysis experimental facility (PHEF) Run 66 And 67, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, H. B.; Lambert, D. P.

    2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period from late June to early September of this year, approximately 1,600 gallons of precipitate feed stored in the Precipitate Hold Tank (PHT) at PHEF decomposed. This decomposition took place during a two month storage period of the Tetraphenyl borate (TPB) precipitate under a CO{sub 2} blanket. The visual inspection of the tank revealed that a very small amount of TPB solids were left and that there were approximately 100 to 110 gals of benzene/high boilers present in the tank. The resultant decomposition products in the PHT consist of an organic and aqueous phase containing a small quantity of unreacted solids. A path forward was developed to understand TPB decomposition and to determine if the material remaining in the PHT could be processed without adverse effects to the process or equipment. A small scale hydrolysis run with the remaining PHT material was made by Process Technology Development Group of DWPT at TNX. It was determined from small scale runs and an extensive analysis of the PHT material that the decomposed material was safe to run at PHEF without adversely affecting the process or equipment. The PHT volume was 1,592 gallons at the time of decomposition. Two runs (66 and 67) were performed to process the decomposed feed. The main objective of these runs was to process the decomposed precipitate from the PHT. In both the runs copper nitrate was used as the catalyst. Because of the decomposition, the effectiveness of the copper nitrate in catalyzing the destruction of TPB could not be completed. The significant findings of Run 66 are: (1) after 5 hours of aqueous boil, the aqueous product had a Diphenylamine (DPA) concentration of 31 mg/L and the Biphenyl concentration of 8 mg/L. At these concentrations, the high boiling organic mass in the aqueous product included 0.28 lbs of Diphenylamine and 0.07 lbs of Biphenyl. (2) Benzene production was 62.1 gallons, with an aromatic removal ratio of 96.26% as measured by liquid chromatography analysis. (3) The calculated reactor cooling coil heat transfer coefficient during cooldown was 244 (design basis = 80) PCU/ft{sup 2}/hr/C at 55 C. It took 90 minutes to cooldown the reactor contents at cooling water flowrate of 20 gpm and 168 RPM agitator speed. This suggested that minimal high boilers deposition had occurred with the processing of decomposed feed. (4) Phenylboronic Acid concentration dropped below 53 mg/L in less than 180 minutes. As such very little PBA was produced because of the decomposed feed. The Organic Evaporator (OE) cycle was completed in two attempts. In the first attempt, the OE run was interrupted due to a high Evaporator Condenser Decanter (ECD) vapor temperature interlock, approximately 18 minutes into the aqueous boil (AB). The cause of this interlock was determined to be fouling of the ECD tubes by high boiling organics. Several process changes were implemented in an attempt to defoul the condenser tubes. The changes were mainly targeted at running the condenser hot. The increase in CW supply temperature and reduction in CW flow helped to run the condenser hot, to increase the heat transfer efficiency and to melt the high boiling organics from the condenser tubes.

  6. Characterization of irradiation-induced precipitates by small angle x-ray and neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, M.; Eichhorn, F.; Boehmert, J.; Brauer, G. [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Dresden (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the irradiation-induced precipitates in the VVER-440-type steel 15Kh2MFA has been investigated by the combination of small angle neutron scattering and anomalous small angle X-ray scattering. Information about the chemical composition of the irradiation-induced precipitates was obtained by the method of contrast variation. ASAXS experiments with variation of the X-ray energy near the energy of the vanadium K-absorption edge prove the content of vanadium within the irradiation-induced precipitates. The scattering density of the precipitates is lower than the scattering density of the iron matrix. The chemical shift of the vanadium-K{sub {alpha}}-absorption-edge and the results of the variation of the contribution of the magnetic scattering in the SANS experiment show, that vanadium does not precipitate in an elementary state. These results can be explained by assuming the precipitates are vanadium carbide.

  7. pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a , Y. Creff a , N. Petit b,* a IFP of controlling the pH, in a fed batch reactor where precipitation occurs, is con- sidered. Due to the batch Keywords: pH control Fed batch process Precipitation a b s t r a c t In this paper, the problem

  8. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.D.

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to identify conditions at which carbon dioxide induced precipitation occurred in crude oils. Establishing compositions of the relevant liquid and solid phases was planned. Other goals of the project were to determine if precipitation occurred in cores and to implement thermodynamic and compositional models to examine the phenomenon. Exploring kinetics of precipitation was also one of the project goals. Crude oil from the Rangely Field (eastern Colorado) was used as a prototype.

  9. Method of precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium is presented. The method includes precipitating uranium as a uranyl vanadate through mixing an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium and a solution comprising a monovalent or divalent cation to form the corresponding cation uranyl vanadate precipitate. The method also provides a pathway for extraction of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment.

  10. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  11. Modeling the large-scale water balance impact of different irrigation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Modeling the large-scale water balance impact of different irrigation systems J. P. Evans1 and B. F precipitation causes the Turkish government to invest in modernizing its own irrigation systems balance impact of different irrigation systems, Water Resour. Res., 44, W08448, doi:10.1029/2007WR006671

  12. Precipitation in a Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy during aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.Y., E-mail: bigchengjianyi@163.com; Shen, B.; Yu, F.X.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The precipitation processes in a Cu-0.69Cr-0.10Zr-0.02Mg alloy aged at 450 °C and 550 °C have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 450 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? Guinier–Preston zone (fcc Cr-rich phase) ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 550 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. In the evolution of decomposition, the orientation relationship between the precipitates and the Cu matrix changes from cube-on-cube to Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. The ordering of Cr-rich precipitates facilitates the formation of the bcc precipitates and promotes the development of Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. - Highlights: • Two different precipitation sequences in the Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy are proposed. • The changes in orientation relationship of the precipitates are presented. • The roles of ordering and coherent interface of the precipitates are discussed.

  13. DEC03t933 OSTl STREAMFLOW AND SELECTED PRECIPITATION DATA FOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    general adjustment of the first-order leveling networks of both the United States and Canada. iv STREAMFLOW AND SELECTED PRECIPITATION DATA FOM YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND VICINITY, NYE...

  14. On the reconstruction of seasonal oceanic precipitation in the presatellite era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington, Richard

    satellites and the processing of data from dedicated sensors (operating at infrared and microwave wavelengths have evaluated the capabilities and limitations of reconstructing oceanic precipitation using land

  15. Method and means for continuous precipitation of easy-dry, granular uranium peroxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahill, Allen E. (Roland, IA); Burkhart, deceased, Lawrence E. (late of Ames, IA)

    1992-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and means for continuous precipitation of granular uranium peroxide. The reaction vessel and agitation method practiced in it avoid filter plugging and caking problems.

  16. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  18. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many... ] Many cities are promoting landscape management and water conservation practices with their citizens. This garden demonstrates the EARTH- KIND principles of environmentally tolerant, low water use ornamentals. tx H2O | pg. 18 and no adverse runoff...

  19. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300–480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  20. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

  1. Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

  2. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  3. Decadal cyclicity of regional mid-Holocene precipitation: Evidence from Dominican coral proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Lisa

    Decadal cyclicity of regional mid-Holocene precipitation: Evidence from Dominican coral proxies of four Holocene specimens of Montastraea sp. and Siderastrea sp. coral skeletons from the Dominican Republic were analyzed to examine decadal-scale fluctuations in regional precipitation. The specimens range

  4. Modeling precipitation from concentrated solutions with the EQ3/6 chemical speciation codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.F.; Ebinger, M.H.

    1995-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the more important uncertainties of using chemical speciation codes to study dissolution and precipitation of compounds is the results of modeling which depends on the particular thermodynamic database being used. The authors goal is to investigate the effects of different thermodynamic databases on modeling precipitation from concentrated solutions. They used the EQ3/6 codes and the supplied databases to model precipitation in this paper. One aspect of this goal is to compare predictions of precipitation from ideal solutions to similar predictions from nonideal solutions. The largest thermodynamic databases available for use by EQ3/6 assume that solutions behave ideally. However, two databases exist that allow modeling nonideal solutions. The two databases are much less extensive than the ideal solution data, and they investigated the comparability of modeling ideal solutions and nonideal solutions. They defined four fundamental problems to test the EQ3/6 codes in concentrated solutions. Two problems precipitate Ca(OH){sub 2} from solutions concentrated in Ca{sup ++}. One problem tests the precipitation of Ca(OH){sub 2} from high ionic strength (high concentration) solutions that are low in the concentrations of precipitating species (Ca{sup ++} in this case). The fourth problem evaporates the supernatant of the problem with low concentrations of precipitating species. The specific problems are discussed.

  5. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar DEANNA A Measurement Mission satellite's Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone separated by the melting layer. The ice layer is a combination of particles imported from the eyewall

  6. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    1 Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar Deanna A's Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone rainbands. Radar-echo statistics show that rainbands have a two-layered structure, with distinct modes separated by the melting layer

  7. Precipitation process for the removal of technetium values from nuclear waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, D.D.; Ebra, M.A.

    1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency removal of techetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  8. ccsd00004518, Precipitation kinetics of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , kinetics, aluminum alloys, cluster dynamics PACS: 64.60.Cn, 64.60.-i, 64.70.Kb, 64.75.+g 1 Introduction Transition elements are added to aluminum alloys so as to obtain small ordered precipitates and by this wayccsd­00004518, version 2 ­ 21 Mar 2005 Precipitation kinetics of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum

  9. Modeling of Plate-Like Precipitates in Aluminum Alloys--Comparison between Phase Field and Cellular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Modeling of Plate-Like Precipitates in Aluminum Alloys--Comparison between Phase Field and Cellular artificial ageing of aluminum alloys: the phase field and the cellular automaton methods. Although both and computationally effective for the application of precipitation modeling. Keywords Aluminum alloys, Cellular

  10. Assessing the individual contributions of variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation to crop yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Andrew W.

    Short Title:15 Contributions, Temperature, Solar radiation, Precipitation, Crop yield16 Page 1 of 41 The results showed that year-to-year variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation28 in solar radiation showed the strongest isolated impact on simulated yields.34 Its decrease caused

  11. How robust are observed and simulated precipitation responses to tropical ocean warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    moisture and net radiative cooling provide powerful constraints upon future changes in precipitation. While cooling, derived from satellite data, is less coherent. Precipitation trends and relationships by the availability of moisture but by atmospheric energy balance. Enhanced net radiative cooling of the atmosphere

  12. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro Yael), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate to nematocysts, mucous glands, and sensory or nerve cells (2, 3). Many corals also precipitate calcium carbonate

  13. Are environmental conditions recorded by the organic matrices associated with precipitated calcium carbonate in cyanobacterial microbialites?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    calcium carbonate in cyanobacterial microbialites? P. GAUTRET 1 , R. DE WIT 2 , G. CAMOIN 3 AND S. GOLUBIC acid composition of organic matrices associated with calcium carbonate precipitates in microbialites Caledonia (Nouméa lagoon) and French Polynesia (Tikehau atoll). Calcium carbonate precipitation

  14. The relative importance of deforestation, precipitation change, and temperature sensitivity in determining the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    The relative importance of deforestation, precipitation change, and temperature sensitivity human disturbances ­ two of the most important of which are deforestation and climate change of deforestation as well as the response of species to changes in temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric

  15. Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation variability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Detection-attribution of global warming at the regional scale: How to deal with precipitation record over recent decades. Citation: Douville, H. (2006), Detection-attribution of global warming at recent climate scenarios, Douville et al. [2005] showed that the precipitation response to global warming

  16. Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum K. G precipitation; sorption; isotherms; X-ray diffraction; hydrous iron oxide; hydrous aluminum oxide; copper. INTRODUCTION Hydrous oxides of iron (HFO) and aluminum (HAO) are important mineral components of natural

  17. ELEVATION-DEPENDENT TRENDS IN PRECIPITATION OBSERVED BY THE NAME RADAR NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    i THESIS ELEVATION-DEPENDENT TRENDS IN PRECIPITATION OBSERVED BY THE NAME RADAR NETWORK Submitted BY ANGELA K. ROWE ENTITLED ELEVATION- DEPENDENT TRENDS IN PRECIPITATION OBSERVED BY THE NAME RADAR NETWORK BY THE NAME RADAR NETWORK Radar data from the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) Enhanced Observing

  18. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  19. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

  20. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  1. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Averill, Frank [ORNL] [ORNL; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  2. Late Quaternary glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation distribution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann V. Rowan; Simon H. Brocklehurst; David M. Schultz; Mitchell A. Plummer; Leif S. Anderson; Neil F. Glasser

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glaciers respond to climate variations and leave geomorphic evidence that represents an important terrestrial paleoclimate record. However, the accuracy of paleoclimate reconstructions from glacial geology is limited by the challenge of representing mountain meteorology in numerical models. Precipitation is usually treated in a simple manner and yet represents difficult-to-characterize variables such as amount, distribution, and phase. Furthermore, precipitation distributions during a glacial probably differed from present-day interglacial patterns. We applied two models to investigate glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation in the eastern Southern Alps of New Zealand. A 2-D model was used to quantify variations in the length of the reconstructed glaciers resulting from plausible precipitation distributions compared to variations in length resulting from change in mean annual air temperature and precipitation amount. A 1-D model was used to quantify variations in length resulting from interannual climate variability. Assuming that present-day interglacial values represent precipitation distributions during the last glacial, a range of plausible present-day precipitation distributions resulted in uncertainty in the Last Glacial Maximum length of the Pukaki Glacier of 17.1?km (24%) and the Rakaia Glacier of 9.3?km (25%), corresponding to a 0.5°C difference in temperature. Smaller changes in glacier length resulted from a 50% decrease in precipitation amount from present-day values (-14% and -18%) and from a 50% increase in precipitation amount (5% and 9%). Our results demonstrate that precipitation distribution can produce considerable variation in simulated glacier extents and that reconstructions of paleoglaciers should include this uncertainty.

  3. Uses of chloride/bromide ratios in studies of potable water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Whittemore, D.O. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey; Fabryka-Martin, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In natural ground water systems, both chlorine and bromine occur primarily as monovalent anions, chloride and bromide. Although dissolution or precipitation of halite, biological activity in the root zone, anion sorption, and exchange can affect chloride/bromide ratios in some settings, movement of the ions in potable ground water is most often conservative. Atmospheric precipitation will generally have mass ratios between 50 and 150; shallow ground water, between 100 and 200; domestic sewage, between 300 and 600; water affected by dissolution of halite, between 1,000 and 10,000; and summer runoff from urban streets, between 10 and 100. These, and other distinctive elemental ratios, are useful in the reconstruction of the origin and movement of ground water, as illustrated by case studies investigating sources of salinity in ground water from Alberta, Kansas, and Arizona, and infiltration rates and pathways at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  4. Computerized Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

  5. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  6. On an Enhanced PERSIANN-CCS Algorithm for Precipitation Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU); Hsu, Kuo-Lin [University of California, Irvine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing wavelet and selected features (WSF), median merging (MM), and selected curve-fitting (SCF) techniques, the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Networks Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) has been improved. The PERSIANN-CCS methodology includes the following four main steps: 1) segmentation of satellite cloud images into cloud patches, 2) feature extraction, 3) classification of cloud patches, and 4) derivation of the temperature rain-rate (T R) relationship for every cluster. The enhancements help improve step 2 by employing WSF, and step 4 by employing MM and SCF. For the study area herein, the results show that the enhanced methodology improves the equitable threat score (ETS) of the daily and hourly rainfall estimates mostly in the winter and fall. The ETS percentage improvement is about 20% for the daily (10% for hourly) estimates in the winter, 10% for the daily (8% for hourly) estimates in the fall, and at most 5% for the daily estimates in the summer at some rainfall thresholds. In the winter and fall, the area bias is improved almost at all rainfall thresholds for daily and hourly estimates. However, no significant improvement is obtained in the spring, and the area bias in the summer is also greater than that of the implemented PERSIANN-CCS algorithm.

  7. An Analogue Approach to Identify Heavy Precipitation Events: Evaluation and Application to CMIP5 Climate Models in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    An analogue method is presented to detect the occurrence of heavy precipitation events without relying on modeled precipitation. The approach is based on using composites to identify distinct large-scale atmospheric ...

  8. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the simulation of tropical precipitation by the Community Climate Model, Version 3, developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. For an evaluation of the annual cycle of precipitation, ...

  9. An automatic control system for a laboratory precipitation process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Mary Alice

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Loop Tuning Procedure Flow Control pH Control RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 19 22 22 23 23 25 25 26 28 Calibrations Lime Dose ? pH Calibration Results Main Control Program Description Control Loop Tuning Results and Testing. Flow Cont... in type and concentration to compounds typically found in cooling water. Several tests were performed on 500 ml batches of feed- water using the pH meter, the lime pump, and a 10% lime slurry. Gaseous nitrogen was bubbled through the feedwater to strip...

  10. Evaluations of Radionuclides of Uranium, Thorium, and Radium Associated with Produced Fluids, Precipitates, and Sludges from Oil, Gas, and Oilfield Brine Injection Wells in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an unsurpassed lack of scientific data with respect to the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium, thorium, and radium in the produced formation fluids (brine), precipitates, and sludges generated with the operation of oil and gas wells in Mississippi. These radioactive elements when contained in the formation fluids have been given the term NORM, which is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive materials. When they are technologically enhanced during oil and gas production activities resulting in the formation of scale (precipitates) and sludges they are termed TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials). As used in this document, NORM and TENORM will be considered equivalent terms and the occurrence of NORM in the oilfield will be considered the result of production operations. As a result of the lack of data no scientifically sound theses may be developed concerning the presence of these radionuclides in the fluid brine, precipitate (scale), or sludge phases. Over the period of just one year, 1997 for example, Mississippi produced over 39,372,963,584 liters (10,402,368,186 gallons or 247,675,433 barrels) of formation water associated with hydrocarbon production from 41 counties across the state.

  11. Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive transport in a homogeneous silicon-etched pore network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Victoria; Yoon, Hongkyu; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Hess, Nancy J.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in shallow-to-deep subsurface siliciclastic and limestone rock reservoirs. As a result, these carbonate water-rock interactions play a critically important role in research on groundwater remediation, geological carbon sequestration, and hydrocarbon exploration. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of Mg2+ concentration on CaCO3 crystal morphology, precipitation rate, and porosity occlusion under flow and mixing conditions similar to those in subsurface aquifers.

  12. DRAFT Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OFSupplemental Technology TestingDiscussion after

  13. Global cloud liquid water path simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, L. [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)] [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Rikus, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Martin, C.; Platt, R. [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model`s simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model`s diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Coupling Quantitative Precipitation Estimate and Great Lakes Hydrologic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rationale The ability to provide accurate runoff estimates not only impacts forecasting of the water levels of the Seaway, but can help business such as commercial shippers, marinas, and hydropower and nuclear plants environment, the Great Lakes basin, and GLERL will improve its LBRM to hourly computations and its AHPS

  15. Examining the Relationship between Antecedent Soil Moisture and Summer Precipitation in the U.S. Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................. 67 5.2 Spatial variations in the soil moisture-precipitation relationship............ 67 5.3 Temporal variations in the soil moisture-precipitation relationship ....... 71 5.4 Persistence of spatial patterns in SM anomalies... ..................................... 74 5.5 Temporal variations in the relationship between GP summer precipitation and Ni?o SSTs ................................................................... 75 5.6 SST persistence versus SM persistence...

  16. The impact of agricultural intensification and irrigation on landatmosphere interactions and Indian monsoon precipitation --A mesoscale modeling perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    and Indian monsoon precipitation -- A mesoscale modeling perspective E.M. Douglas a, , A. Beltrán-Przekurat b convergence, mesoscale convection, and precipitation patterns over the Indian monsoon region. Four experiments pattern and changes in mesoscale precipitation. These agricultural changes, including irrigation modify

  17. Effect of solution annealing temperature on precipitation in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwar, A., E-mail: akashiwar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur-440010, Maharashtra (India); Vennela, N. Phani, E-mail: phanivennela@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur-440010, Maharashtra (India); Kamath, S.L., E-mail: kamath@iitb.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai-400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, R.K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur-440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, effect of solution annealing temperature (1050 Degree-Sign C and 1100 Degree-Sign C) and isothermal ageing (700 Degree-Sign C: 15 min to 6 h) on the microstructural changes in 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated systematically. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to follow the microstructural evolution, while an energy dispersive spectrometer attached to scanning electron microscope was used to obtain localised chemical information of various phases. The ferritic matrix of the two phase 2205 duplex stainless steel ({approx} 45% ferrite and {approx} 55% austenite) undergoes a series of metallurgical transformations during ageing-formation of secondary austenite ({gamma}{sub 2}) and precipitation of Cr and Mo rich intermetallic (chi-{chi} and sigma-{sigma}) phases. For solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, significant amount of carbides were observed in the ferrite grains after 1 h of ageing at 700 Degree-Sign C. {chi} Phase precipitated after the precipitation of carbides-preferentially at the ferrite-ferrite and also at the ferrite-austenite boundaries. {sigma} Phase was not observed in significant quantity even after 6 h of ageing. The sequence of precipitation in samples solution annealed at 1050 Degree-Sign C was found to be carbides {yields} {chi} {yields} {sigma}. On the contrary, for samples solution annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C, the precipitation of {chi} phase was negligible. {chi} Phase precipitated before {sigma} phase, preferentially along the ferrite-ferrite grain boundaries and was later consumed in the {sigma} phase precipitation. The {sigma} phase precipitated via the eutectoid transformation of ferrite to yield secondary austenite {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase in the ferrite and along the ferrite-austenite grain boundaries. An increase in the volume fraction of {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase with simultaneous decrease in the ferrite was evidenced with ageing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of solution annealing temperature on microstructural evolution is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {chi} Phase precipitated preferentially in the samples solution annealed at 1050 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sigma} Phase precipitated preferentially in the samples solution annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For SA at 1050 Degree-Sign C, the sequence of precipitation was carbides {yields} {chi} phase {yields} {sigma} phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For SA at 1100 Degree-Sign C, {sigma} phase precipitated via the eutectoid reaction: ferrite (F) {yields} {sigma} + {gamma}{sub 2}.

  18. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media – Subsurface Biogeochemical Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colwell, Frederick [Oregon State University; Wildenschild, Dorthe [Oregon State University; Wood, Brian [Oregon State University; Gerlach, Robin [Montana State University; Redden, George

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal for this research was to understand how best to add compounds to receptive microbial communities in porous media in order to achieve optimal calcite precipitation in a volumetrically significant space and to understand the physiological health of the cells that are responsible for the calcite precipitation. The specific objectives were to: (1) develop better tools for visually examining biofilms in porous media and calcium carbonate precipitation being mediated by microbes in porous media, and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of using that tool within a flow cell model system.

  19. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

  20. J.F. Meirink et al., Precipitation retrievals from SEVIRI ---IPC, 1 July 2013 Retrieval of precipitation from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    of median and 95th percentile of CPP/radar rain rate as a function of solar zenith angle. Based on data over Cloud Top Temperature [K] Height liquid column [m] Cloud Phase LWP > 160 g m-2 re (water) > 15 m Output --- IPC, 1 July 2013 Solar zenith angle dependence Positive bias in CPP rain rates at high solar zenith

  1. Caribbean Precipitation in Observations and IPCC AR4 Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elinor Ruth

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    those models using heat (H), water (W) or no (N) flux cor- rection. AMIP indicates whether monthly AMIP data was avail- able. Further model details, including references, can be found at the PCMDI website http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov... site at http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/. Wavelet software is available at URL: http://atoc.colorado.edu/research/wavelets/ and was developed by C. Torrence and G. Compo. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION...

  2. Interannual variability of summer precipitation in Texas and its implication to summer drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and drought are unclear, they can be understood in terms of convective instability. This research is designed to investigate how convective instability influences monthly mean precipitation in Texas in the summertime and to examine the modulation of convective...

  3. A census of precipitation features in the tropics using TRMM: radar, ice scattering, and lightning observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Stephen William

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and two ocean regions during August, September and October 1998, this study used radar retrievals and 85 GHz Polarization Corrected Temperatures (PCTs, which passively measure relative concentrations of precipitation-sized ice particles within a cloud...

  4. ,Altitudinal distribution of monthly norms of precipitation on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz range (Kyrgyzstan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    range (Kyrgyzstan) Korobitsina . 1. Introduction Our main task was to identify territorial distribution of precipitation on the northern slope of the Kyrgyz range (NSKR) (within Kyrgyzstan), where over 30 rivers, widely

  5. Determination and Mitigation of Precipitation Effects on Portal Monitor Gamma Background Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revis, Stephen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to establish a correlation between precipitation and background gamma radiation levels at radiation portal monitors (RPM) deployed at various ports worldwide, and to devise a mechanism by which the effects...

  6. Mixing-induced precipitation and porosity evolution in porous media Simon Emmanuel, Brian Berkowitz *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    remain. Such deposi- tional patterns are commonly observed in fractured and high porosity carbonate precipitation in geological formations, the physical parameters that characterize the porous matrix. All rights reserved. Keywords: Reactive transport; Fractures; Specific surface area 1. Introduction

  7. Effects of Sea-Salt Aerosols on Precipitation in Simulations of Shallow Cumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kogan, Yefim L.; Mechem, David B.; Choi, Kityan

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of large-eddy simulations with size-resolving microphysical processes was performed in order to assess effects of sea-salt aerosols on precipitation process in trade cumulus. Simulations based on observations from ...

  8. Method for inhibiting silica precipitation and scaling in geothermal flow systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrar, J.E.; Lorensen, L.E.; Locke, F.E.

    1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for inhibiting silica scaling and precipitation in geothermal flow systems by on-line injection of low concentrations of cationic nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly polymeric imines, polymeric amines, and quaternary ammonium compounds is described.

  9. Method for inhibiting silica precipitation and scaling in geothermal flow systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrar, Jackson E. (Castro Valley, CA); Lorensen, Lyman E. (Orinda, CA); Locke, Frank E. (Lafayette, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for inhibiting silica scaling and precipitation in geothermal flow systems by on-line injection of low concentrations of cationic nitrogen-containing compounds, particularly polymeric imines, polymeric amines, and quaternary ammonium compounds.

  10. Comparison of soy protein concentrates produced by membrane filtration and acid precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Jung

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of proteins using ultrafiltration (UF) process is an attractive alternative compared to conventional acid precipitation method. The mild processing condition, which leads to less protein denaturation, may be one of major virtues...

  11. Surface-Induced Nickel Hydroxide Precipitation in the Presence of Citrate and Salicylate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Surface-Induced Nickel Hydroxide Precipitation in the Presence of Citrate and Salicylate Noriko U-lim- iting step for the formation of Ni­Al LDH is Al dissolu- Nickel contamination of soils is a serious

  12. On the Feasibility of Precisely Measuring the Properties of a Precipitating Cloud with a Weather Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runnels, R.C.

    In this paper the results of an investigation are presented that are concerned with the feasibility of employing a weather radar to make precise measurements of the properties of a precipitating cloud. A schematic cloud is proposed as a model...

  13. Toward a better integration of biological data from precipitation manipulation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Earth system models Nicholas G. Smith1 , Vikki L. Rodgers2 , Edward R. Brzostek3 , Andrew Kulmatiski4 The biological responses to precipitation within the terrestrial components of Earth system models, or land

  14. Improving Groundwater Predictions Utilizing Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts from General Circulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    Improving Groundwater Predictions Utilizing Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts from General. The research reported in this paper evaluates the potential in developing 6-month-ahead groundwater Surface Temperature forecasts. Ten groundwater wells and nine streamgauges from the USGS Groundwater

  15. Radioactive Testing Results in Support of the In-Tank Precipitation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Barnes, M.J.; Peterson, R.A.; Crawford, C.L.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of twelve tests examined benzene generation rates with radioactive materials simulating the planned Batches 2 through 4 that complete Cycle 1 for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility.

  16. Demonstration of Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation Process Using Savannah River Site High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.B.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the experimental effort to demonstrate the continuous precipitation of cesium from Savannah River Site High Level Waste using sodium tetraphenylborate. In addition, the experiments examined the removal of strontium and various actinides through addition of monosodium titanate.

  17. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  18. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  19. Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Mixed Ni-Al Precipitate Formation on a Soil Clay Fraction D A R R Y L R . R O B E R-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precipitate formation on a soil clay fraction was monitored using X in 0.1 M NaNO3. Initial Ni sorption kinetics on the soil clay were rapid at all pH values but differed

  20. XAFS of Synthetic Iron(III)-Arsenate Co-Precipitates and Uranium Mill Neutralized Raffinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); COGEMA Resources Inc., Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Cutler, J. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Demopoulos, G. P. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rowson, J. W. [Department of Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    XAFS studies were carried out for chemical speciation of arsenic species in uranium mill neutralized raffinate solids. To aid the structural characterization, synthetic iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates were prepared to mimic the actual uranium mill tailings neutralization products. The principle components analysis method was used to validate the synthetic amorphous scorodite as a primary model compound for arsenate species in the raffinate samples under the specific precipitation conditions.

  1. A study of convective precipitation as revealed by radar observation, Texas 1958-59

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Robert Alfred

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be difficult to overesthnate the economy of time and the increase in accuracy af data reduction resulting from its use, All of the computed data were printed out on a continuous form which facili- meed further analysis by hand methods. C. Anal ~ Mad... after first formation. 1. First Echo Anal sis. The classic theory of precipitation furma- tion, first advanced by V. 'egsner (34) and later promoted by Bergeron (5), hyp?besixed the necessity of ice crystals for the initiation of precipitation...

  2. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient gas water heating appliance to market; a plan toefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and to planefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and 3) to

  4. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step in developing a realistic degradation term for tankless water heatersstep (water draw event) in the simulation. Instantaneous Gas Water Heater

  6. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  7. SMALL-SCALE TESTING OF PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.; Scogin, J.; Daniel, G.; King, W.

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, SRNL conducted a series of experiments to produce calcined plutonium (Pu) oxide and measure the physical properties and water adsorption of that material. This data will help define the process operating conditions and material handling steps for HB-Line. An anion exchange column experiment produced 1.4 L of a purified 52.6 g/L Pu solution. Over the next nine weeks, seven Pu(IV) oxalate precipitations were performed using the same stock Pu solution, with precipitator feed acidities ranging from 0.77 M to 3.0 M nitric acid and digestion times ranging from 5 to 30 minutes. Analysis of precipitator filtrate solutions showed Pu losses below 1% for all precipitations. The four larger precipitation batches matched the target oxalic acid addition time of 44 minutes within 4 minutes. The three smaller precipitation batches focused on evaluation of digestion time and the oxalic acid addition step ranged from 25-34 minutes because of pump limitations in the low flow range. Following the precipitations, 22 calcinations were performed in the range of 610-690 C, with the largest number of samples calcined at either 650 or 635 C. Characterization of the resulting PuO{sub 2} batches showed specific surface areas in the range of 5-14 m{sup 2}/g, with 16 of the 22 samples in the range of 5-10 m2/g. For samples analyzed with typical handling (exposed to ambient air for 15-45 minutes with relative humidities of 20-55%), the moisture content as measured by Mass Spectrometry ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 wt % and the total mass loss at 1000 C, as measured by TGA, ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 wt %. For the samples calcined between 635 and 650 C, the moisture content without extended exposure ranged from 0.20 to 0.38 wt %, and the TGA mass loss ranged from 0.26 to 0.46 wt %. Of these latter samples, the samples calcined at 650 C generally had lower specific surface areas and lower moisture contents than the samples calcined at 635 C, which matches expectations from the literature. Taken together, the TGA-MS results for samples handled at nominally 20-50% RH, without extended exposure, indicate that the Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation process followed by calcination at 635-650 C appears capable of producing PuO{sub 2} with moisture content < 0.5 wt% as required by the 3013 Standard. Exposures of PuO{sub 2} samples to ambient air for 3 or more hours generally showed modest mass gains that were primarily gains in moisture content. These results point to the need for a better understanding of the moisture absorption of PuO{sub 2} and serve as a warning that extended exposure times, particularly above the 50% RH level observed in this study will make the production of PuO{sub 2} with less than 0.5 wt % moisture more challenging. Samples analyzed in this study generally contained approximately 2 monolayer equivalents of moisture. In this study, the bulk of the moisture released from samples below 300 C, as did a significant portion of the CO{sub 2}. Samples in this study consistently released a minor amount of NO in the 40-300 C range, but no samples released CO or SO{sub 2}. TGA-MS results also showed that MS moisture content accounted for 80 {+-} 8% of the total mass loss at 1000 C measured by the TGA. The PuO{sub 2} samples produced had particles sizes that typically ranged from 0.2-88 {micro}m, with the mean particle size ranging from 6.4-9.3 {micro}m. The carbon content of ten different calcination batches ranged from 190-480 {micro}g C/g Pu, with an average value of 290 {micro}g C/g Pu. A statistical review of the calcination conditions and resulting SSA values showed that in both cases tested, calcination temperature had a significant effect on SSA, as expected from literature data. The statistical review also showed that batch size had a significant effect on SSA, but the narrow range of batch sizes tested is a compelling reason to set aside that result until tests

  8. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  9. Microwave emissivity of fresh water ice--Lake ice and Antarctic ice pack--Radiative transfer simulations versus satellite radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave emissivity models of sea ice are poorly validated empirically. Typical validation studies involve using averaged or stereotyped profiles of ice parameters against averaged radiance measurements. Measurement sites are rarely matched and even less often point-by-point. Because of saline content, complex permittivity of sea ice is highly variable and difficult to predict. Therefore, to check the validity of a typical, plane-parallel, radiative-transfer-based ice emissivity model, we apply it to fresh water ice instead of salt-water ice. Radiance simulations for lake ice are compared with measurements over Lake Superior from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E). AMSR-E measurements are also collected over Antarctic icepack. For each pixel, a thermodynamic model is driven by four years of European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data and the resulting temperature profiles used to drive the emissivity model. The results suggest that the relatively simple ...

  10. The Diurnal Cycle of Clouds and Precipitation along the Sierra Madre Occidental Observed during NAME-2004: Implications for Warm Season Precipitation Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    . Ground-based precipitation retrievals from the NAME Event Rain Gauge Network (NERN) and Colorado State University­National Center for Atmospheric Research (CSU­NCAR) version 2 radar composites over the southern due to changes in the depth and vigor of shallow clouds and mixed-phase cloud depths

  11. Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by...

  12. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was provided by two more tubing pumps. Fluid surfaces were protected from COE contamination by a constant pressure nftrogen blanket. The reactor was operated for a period of time greater than or equal to lD hydraulic retentfon times or 7 times the ratio..., the ultra-high lime process has been proposed as a method to eliminate the constituents of chemical scale which reduce the recycle capacity of water in cooling systems. Reported herein are the results of a bench scale reactor study designed to evaluate...

  13. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

  14. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  15. Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    - sources · High rates of calcite (CaCO3) precipitation as waters take in atmospheric CO2 Ca2+ + CO3 2- CaCO setting · Two leachate sources: input increases alkalinity (>1500mg/L as CaCO3), pH (>12) and Ca2+ (>600mg/L) · CM2: Pilot CW sized by CaCO3 removal rates from volunteer system · CM3: Monitored through natural

  16. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrateEnergyNews WaterWater

  17. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    n n g g : : M i i d d d d l l e e R R i i o o G G r r a a n n d d e e Middle Rio Grande Water Assembly Mid Region Council of Governments Sandia National Laboratories Utton...

  18. Investigating Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    substances. It covers most of the earth?s surface, sometimes to a depth of more than a mile. It exists as a colorless gas in the atmosphere. It caps the poles with ice and occurs in the snows of winter. Liquid water fills brooks, streams, rivers, lakes, ponds...

  19. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  20. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  1. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

  2. One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces Jiming Jin,2 Xiaogang heat ¯ux (W mÀ2 ) Iprec heat ¯ux of precipitation (W mÀ2) I5 s downwelling solar radiation (W mÀ2, USA. Email: jjm@hwr.arizona.edu or gao@hwr.arizona.edu Contract grant sponsor: NASA

  3. Dynamics of water use and responses to herbivory in the invasive reed, Arundo donax (L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of variability in precipitation, suggesting that recent rainfall constituted a significant proportion of the water taken up by this species. Herbivory by a stem-galling wasp and a sap-feeding scale, both separately and together, reduced the rates of leaf scale...

  4. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies and feedback of land surface and atmospheric processes over large space and time scales. Remote sensing-based variables including soil moisture (from AMSR-E), surface heat fluxes (from MODIS) and precipitation rates

  5. MONITORING PRESENT DAY CHANGES IN WATER VAPOUR AND THE RADIATIVE ENERGY BALANCE USING SATELLITE DATA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    precipitation events are expected to exert an adverse effect on agriculture, water resources, human health in the total area affected by drought and the flood risk associated with increased frequency of heavy of droughts. While there is evidence for this response (e.g. Neelin et al., 2006; Seager et al. 2007

  6. Kinetics of Zinc/ Arsenate Co-Sorption at the Goethite-Water Interface. (5827)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Zinc/ Arsenate Co-Sorption at the Goethite-Water Interface. (5827) Authors: D.L. Sparks, and 1000 mg goethite L-1 solutions at pH 7, collected complimentary As and Zn K-edge EXAFS data after of aging time. Arsenate and zinc formed adamite-like and koettigite-like surface precipitates on goethite

  7. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  8. An experimental investigaion of seawater/basalt interactions: the role of water/rock ratios and temperature gradients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Paul Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the precipitation of Fe-sulfides (pyri te and pyrrhoti te) in both 5/1 and 50/1 water/rock ratio systems. As a result of this precipitation, Fe was effectively fractionated from Mn and the Fe/Mn ratio of the fluid decreased. Because the 50/1 systems had lower pH.... EPR). This investi- gation also provides data potentially useful in predicting the occur- rence and kind of mineralization at ocean spreading centers as a function of the temperature and water/rock ratio regime of that system. 11 METHODS Ex...

  9. Dealing with parameter uncertainty in the calculation of water surface profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas-Cruz, Ruben F.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Dealing with Parameter Uncertainty in the Calculation of Water Surface Profiles. (August 1998) Ruben R Vargas-Cruz, B. S. , Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ralph A. Wurbs Hydrologic and hydraulic... component of the hydrologic cycle in the analysis is important. In that case the water budget must be calculated using the following expression. P ? R ? I ? G ? E ? T=tkS where, P = Precipitation, R = Surface runoff, I = Infiltration, G = Groundwater...

  10. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ........SPECIAL BUREAU OF RECLAMATION CENTENNIAL COVERAGE 14..............Water News Briefs 15 Keyes, Commissioner of Reclamation, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Several con- vention topics will focus afternoon NWRA board of director's meeting. Plains farmers survey their land in western Nebraska, probably

  11. Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

  12. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  13. VO.sub.2 precipitates for self-protected optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gea, Laurence A. (Knoxville, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming crystallographically coherent precipitates of vanadium dioxide in the near-surface region of sapphire and the resulting product is disclosed. Ions of vanadium and oxygen are stoichiometrically implanted into a sapphire substrate (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), and subsequently annealed to form vanadium dioxide precipitates in the substrate. The embedded VO.sub.2 precipitates, which are three-dimensionally oriented with respect to the crystal axes of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 host lattice, undergo a first-order monoclinic-to-tetragonal (and also semiconducting-to-metallic) phase transition at .about.77.degree. C. This transformation is accompanied by a significant variation in the optical transmission of the implanted region and results in the formation of an optically active, thermally "switchable" surface region on Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  14. MAP3S precipitation chemistry network. Third periodic summary report, July 1978-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network consists of eight collection sites in the northeastern United States. Precipitation event samples are collected by cooperating site operators, using specially developed sampling equipment. In this, the third periodic summary report, are listed field and concentration data for the period July 1, 1978 to December 31, 1979. Over three years' samples have been collected at most of the sites, which went into operation between September 1976 and October 1978. Samples are chemically analyzed at a central laboratory for 13 pollutant species. Weekly samples in addition to event samples were collected over a 1 1/2 year period at three sites. Analysis of one year's results indicates that there is little difference between the concentrations collected by the two methods in terms of seasonal precipitation-weighted means for all species except dissolved SO/sub 2/. Event samples tend to average about 25% higher in SO/sub 2/ than weekly samples.

  15. DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

  16. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  17. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths

  18. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  19. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  20. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

    1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innocenzi, Valentina, E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Kopacek, Bernd [SAT, Austrian Society for Systems Engineering and Automation, Gurkasse 43/2, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Vegliò, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

  2. The frequency and rate of precipitation as a function of in-the-cloud temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Henry Allen

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE FREQUENCY AND RATE OF PRECIPITATION AS A FUNCTION OF IN-THE-CLOUD TEMPERATURES A Thesis by HENRY ALLEN KING III Submitted to the Graduate . College of Texas ABrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1970 Major Subject, Meteorology THE FREQUENCY AND RATE OF PRECIPITATION AB A FUNCTION OF IN-THE-CLOUD TEMPERATURES A Thesis HENRY ALLEN KING III Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee ~a 8 ~s. aa o...

  3. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

  4. Modeling of Late Blooming Phases and Precipitation Kinetics in Aging Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle work at the atomic scale is to develop a predictive quantitative model for the microstructure evolution of RPV steels under thermal aging and neutron radiation. We have developed an AKMC method for the precipitation kinetics in bcc-Fe, with Cu, Ni, Mn and Si being the alloying elements. In addition, we used MD simulations to provide input parameters (if not available in literature). MMC simulations were also carried out to explore the possible segregation/precipitation morphologies at the lattice defects. First we briefly describe each of the simulation algorithms, then will present our results.

  5. Honeywell Modular Automation System Computer Software Documentation for the Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STUBBS, A.M.

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Computer Software Document (CSWD) is to provide configuration control of the Honeywell Modular Automation System (MAS) in use at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for the Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process in Rm 230C/234-5Z. The magnesium hydroxide process control software Rev 0 is being updated to include control programming for a second hot plate. The process control programming was performed by the system administrator. Software testing for the additional hot plate was performed per PFP Job Control Work Package 2Z-00-1703. The software testing was verified by Quality Control to comply with OSD-Z-184-00044, Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process.

  6. Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States); Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

  7. Water Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Sandia Team Attends World Water Week in Stockholm On December 12, 2014, in Climate, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Water...

  9. Water Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

  10. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  11. Simulation of the Stable Water Isotopes in Precipitation over South America: Comparing Regional to Global Circulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Christophe "Kristof"

    an isotopic signature similar to Rayleigh distillation, in accordance with experimental studies. Finally, in order to relate the simulation analysis to the fractionation mechanisms. This confirms that the amount effect, via Rayleigh distillation processes, is dominant during the wet season. During the dry season

  12. New formulae to evaluate the atmospheric layers of precipitable water and gases, applicable in solar radiation computing models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in solar radiation computing models V. B0103descu Energetica, Centrale Electrice, Polytechn. Inst irradiance. In this context, the relatively low density of solar radiation recording stations favoured measurements. Reviews and classifications of the main calculations procedures of solar radiation have been

  13. THE DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF NETWORK OF GROUND-BASED GPS WATER VAPOR MONITORING STATIONS TO IMPROVE PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it is the means by which moisture and latent heat are transported to produce mesoscale weather events. And remote a a Institute of Urban Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, No.55 Bei Wa Xi Li, Haidian District. Dr. Chao-Lin Zhang, IUM, CMA, Beijing, clzhang@ium.cn, c_lzhang@yahoo.com. 1. INTRODUCTION Remote

  14. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  15. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  16. Factors Affecting Ni and Zn Hydroxide Precipitate Formation in Soils. (S02-peltier222185-oral)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Factors Affecting Ni and Zn Hydroxide Precipitate Formation in Soils. (S02-peltier222185-oral) Authors: E.F. Peltier* - Univ. of Delaware D.L. Sparks - Univ. of Delaware Abstract: The formation matter in the soil. Speaker Information: Edward Peltier, Univ. of Delaware, Dept. of Plant and Soil

  17. THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES Andreas C, Schlieren, Switzerland Spectroscopic and microscopic studies have shown that Ni and Co sorption by clay:1 or 2:1 phyllosilicates requires the release ofA1 and Si from clay minerals. Due to similar metal

  18. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    1 Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar Deanna A (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone rainbands. Radar-echo2 statistics show that rainbands have a two-layered structure, with distinct modes separated by the3 melting layer. The ice layer

  19. Predicting b0 precipitate morphology and evolution in MgRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    , magnesium (Mg) alloys have been extensively studied for armor, aerospace and automobile applications [1Predicting b0 precipitate morphology and evolution in Mg­RE alloys using a combination of first alloys is predicted using a multi-scale modeling approach combining a three-dimensional (3-D) phase

  20. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Lien-Mow (North Augusta, SC); Kilpatrick, Lester L. (Aiken, SC)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  1. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  2. Electron transport and precipitation at Mercury during the MESSENGER flybys: Implications for electron-stimulated desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303, USA h Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center-stimulated desorption MESSENGER a b s t r a c t To examine electron transport, energization, and precipitation analysis for two solar-wind parameter conditions corresponding to the first two MESSENGER Mercury flybys

  3. High-latitude dayside energetic precipitation and IMF BZ rotations N. stgaard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Owing to the high latitudes it is unlikely that these electrons were energized on the nightside by the solar wind. The precipitation appears at $77­79° magnetic latitude and coincides with a northward Ionosphere: Auroral ionosphere (2704); 2784 Magnetospheric Physics: Solar wind/magnetosphere interactions

  4. Effects of Cu Content and Preaging on Precipitation Characteristics in Aluminum Alloy 6022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Effects of Cu Content and Preaging on Precipitation Characteristics in Aluminum Alloy 6022 W and artificial aging response in aluminum alloy 6022 were investigated using transmission electron microscopy,are an important group of aluminum alloys that can be although its structure has been proposed

  5. PRECIPITATION HARDENING IN ALUMINUM ALLOY 6022 W.F. Miao and D.E. Laughlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    PRECIPITATION HARDENING IN ALUMINUM ALLOY 6022 W.F. Miao and D.E. Laughlin Department of Materials) (Accepted in revised form January 21, 1999) Introduction The use of aluminum alloys for automotive body behavior in aluminum alloy 6022. Experimental Procedure The composition of the 6022 alloy used

  6. Phase relations and precipitation in AlMgSi alloys with Cu additions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Conference in Aluminum Alloys 8, University of Cambridge, UK, July, 2002. * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1Phase relations and precipitation in Al­Mg­Si alloys with Cu additions§ D.J. Chakrabartia , David E led to extensive studies on 6xxx alloys in recent years. These alloys often contain Cu in varying

  7. Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California; revised 29 March 2011; accepted 1 April 2011; published 7 May 2011. [1] Beryllium7 is a potentially potential as a sediment tracer in desert environments. Beryllium7 in vegetation and the upper few cm of soil

  8. Mountain Precipitation and Hydrology in the Middle East Ronald. B. Smith*, Jason Evans*, Robert Oglesby**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Mountain Precipitation and Hydrology in the Middle East Ronald. B. Smith*, Jason Evans*, Robert shadow effect. Recent studies have tried to quantify this effect on Alpine terrain [Smith et al. 2003a model of this is the response to heating in a steady stratified stream [Smith and Lin, 1982

  9. Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean-Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low-level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

  10. Supporting Information (SI) TITLE: SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR URANIUM BEARING PRECIPITATES IN VADOSE ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Supporting Information (SI) TITLE: SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR URANIUM BEARING PRECIPITATES, and -XRF, -XAS, and -XRD Analyses. SI-2: Total metal(loid) HF digestion and chemical analyses of uranium, T. R. A Practical Handbook of Seawater Analysis; Second ed.; Fisheries Research Board of Canada

  11. Energetic outer radiation-belt electron precipitation during recurrent solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    on the atmosphere [Seppälä et al., 2004]. During some intense solar storms solar protons in the energy range 1Energetic outer radiation-belt electron precipitation during recurrent solar activity Mark A and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia. Russell S. Grew School of Mathematical

  12. Regional sensitivity of Greenland precipitation to NAO variability E. Mosley-Thompson,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Regional sensitivity of Greenland precipitation to NAO variability E. Mosley-Thompson,1,2 C. R. Readinger,1,2 P. Craigmile,3 L. G. Thompson,1,4 and C. A. Calder3 Received 27 September 2005; revised 2. Citation: Mosley-Thompson, E., C. R. Readinger, P. Craigmile, L. G. Thompson, and C. A. Calder (2005

  13. Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David

    1 Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA NOAA/NESDIS Satellite of satellite-derived cloud-top brightness temperatures from GOES longwave infrared (channel 4) satellite data, rain, freezing rain, and sleet. The distributions of cloud-top brightness temperatures were constructed

  14. Patterns of Precipitation and Mesolow Evolution in Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    Patterns of Precipitation and Mesolow Evolution in Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices ERIC P manifestations of mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs) that traversed Oklahoma during the periods May­August 2002 Profiler Network data. Forty-five MCVs that developed from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been

  15. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to understand fundamental aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced asphaltene precipitation. Oil and asphaltene samples from the Rangely field in Colorado were used for most of the project. The project consisted of pure component and high-pressure, thermodynamic experiments, thermodynamic modeling, kinetic experiments and modeling, targeted corefloods and compositional modeling.

  16. The frequency of tropical precipitating clouds as observed by the TRMM PR and ICESat/GLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Sean Patrick

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY??????????????????? 11 A. Data??????????????????? 11 B. Analysis Method?????????????? 12 III COINCIDENT SCAN ANALYSIS????????????... 18 IV TROPICAL PRECIPITATING CLOUD FRACTION????? 23 V CONCLUSION????????????????????.. 31..., with land-ocean separation included.??????????????. 15 4 a) Horizontal scan and b) cross-section of a sample coincident case from 20 October 2003 over the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo?????????????????????............. 19 5 Histograms...

  17. FY10 Transition Plan For CCDD Applied Research Center (ARC) on Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FY10 Transition Plan For CCDD Applied Research Center (ARC) on Precipitation Pingping Xie Climate- Statement of transition goal Due to the manual operation nature, this processing cannot be converted transition to date N/A C- Location of data set production, identification of production team (including

  18. Microalloy Precipitation in Hot Charged Slabs , J.G. Speer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    Microalloy Precipitation in Hot Charged Slabs M.S. Dyer1 , J.G. Speer1 , D. K. Matlock1 , A. J. Shutts2 , S. Jansto3 , K. Xu4 , B.G. Thomas4 1 Myra S. Dyer, John G. Speer, David K. Matlock The George S

  19. Soil Moisture Feedbacks to Precipitation in Southern Africa BENJAMIN I. COOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with below-normal rainfall during the summer wet season (Reason and Rouault 2002). Be- cause changes in these SSTs may be a signature of an- thropogenic climate change, there is some speculation that the near­March) precipitation in southern Africa are investigated using the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3

  20. The Caribbean Low-Level Jet and Its Relationship with Precipitation in IPCC AR4 Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elinor R.

    The Caribbean Low-Level Jet and Its Relationship with Precipitation in IPCC AR4 Models ELINOR R Report (AR4) shows that all models have the ability to simulate the location and height of the Caribbean Caribbean and, hence, an overly strong CLLJ. The ability of the models to simulate the correlation between

  1. Altitudinal Gradients of Stable Isotopes in Lee-Slope Precipitation in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , this isotopic fractionation and distillation can be driven by vapor transport to higher altitudes, higher of the Canadian Rockies at the Continental Divide and receives precipitation from both westerly (Pacific) air altitudes. Surface and upper-air meteorological data were analyzed to classify the type of weather systems

  2. arXiv draft On the mechanisms of precipitation of graphene on nickel thin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    arXiv draft On the mechanisms of precipitation of graphene on nickel thin films L. Baraton1 (a) , Z. In the case of nickel, where carbon has a significant solubility, such a growth process includes at least two, we dissolve calibrated amounts of carbon in nickel films, using carbon ion implantation

  3. Development of precipitation retrievals at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths for geostationary satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    for precipitation retrieval from geostationary sensors based on mesoscale cloud modeling and radiative transfer resolution problem from a geostationary orbit. Adding the thermal infrared observations has a limited impact rain and the other hydrometeor profiles. These theoretical results are evaluated at close

  4. Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partridge, Jerry A. (Richland, WA); Bosuego, Gail P. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  5. Proton and electron precipitation over Svalbard -first results from a new Imaging Spectrograph (HiTIES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendillo, Michael

    Proton and electron precipitation over Svalbard - first results from a new Imaging Spectrograph (Hi Manuscript-No. 1 #12;Proc. of Atmospheric Studies by Optical Methods (2001) :1­4 Proton and electron, U.K. Received: 28.11.2001 ­ Accepted: 11.07.2002 Abstract. An unusually intense energetic proton

  6. Proton-electron precipitation eects on the electron production and density above EISCAT (Troms) and ESR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Proton-electron precipitation eects on the electron production and density above EISCAT (Tromsù June 1998 Abstract. The suprathermal particles, electrons and protons, coming from the Sun. This equation has been solved for the three dierent suprathermal species (electrons, protons and hydrogen atoms

  7. The MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: Eighth periodic summary report (1984)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana, M.T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary report, the eighth in the series, contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1984. Sections cover Quality Assurance/Quality Control, network site information, and a brief statistical summary of the 1984 data.

  8. The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns Ahmed Mohamed Degu,1 February 2011. [1] Understanding the forcings exerted by large dams on local climate is key to establishing formation are identified around the reservoir shoreline for 92 large dams of North America. Our study

  9. Retrofit precipitators mounted on $28-million deck structure constructed over highway. [Ohio Edison Co. , Sammis station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudich, R.L.; Kirchner, P.N.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space problems resulted in a 900-foot concrete deck to hold retrofitted precipitators that collect particulates from the Ohio Edison's largest power station. Because the deck spans a state highway, a tight construction schedule was met using a bonus/penalty agreement. Design considerations included an open construction and riverbank work. 5 figures. (DCK)

  10. A Study of Austenite Precipitate Growth in Duplex Stainless Steel A Research Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    A Study of Austenite Precipitate Growth in Duplex Stainless Steel A Research Performance Evaluation-based metals handbooks. Due the multi-component nature of the duplex stainless steels which are the basis stainless steel. Current State of Knowledge The velocity of an interface during a phase transformation can

  11. MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: sixth periodic summary report (1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothert, J.E.; Dana, M.T.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1982. Included is an update on network status and a summary of the USGS blind sample analysis program and laboratory sample exchanges during 1982. The statistical summary is deferred to a forthcoming publication.

  12. Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous solution by Clostridium sp. C. Zhang a,b, , C.J. Dodge c , S.V. Malhotra a,1 , A.J. Francis c,d a Department of Chemistry t s Uranium forms various complexes with ionic liquids. Uranium bioreduction was affected by the type

  13. Investigation of Variations and Impacts of Tropical Cyclone Precipitation in Texas (1950-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in watersheds surrounding the city of Houston. An automated extraction method is developed to identify TCP from 60 years of precipitation data from Cooperative Observing Network gauges. Texas receives an average of 123.5 mm of TCP/year, which is ~13...

  14. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laidler, James J. (Richland, WA); Borisch, Ronald R. (Kennewick, WA); Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  15. Polymer Crystallization and Precipitation-Induced Wrapping of Carbon Nanofibers with PBT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    were used to create hybrid nanostructures consisting of CNFs and poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 114: 1312­1319, 2009 Key words: hybrid nanostructures; carbon nanofiber; nanocomposites; crystallization; precipitation INTRODUCTION Poly (butylene terephthalate) (PBT

  16. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  17. Recent changes in the summer precipitation pattern in East China and the background circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for seasonal forecasting. A prominent interdecadal shift in the East China rainfall pattern happened of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China e-mail: zhuyl@mail.iap.ac.cn W. Zhou School of Energy and Environment, CityRecent changes in the summer precipitation pattern in East China and the background circulation

  18. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean´veloppement, La Paz, Bolivia Received 24 April 2002; revised 6 June 2002; accepted 6 June 2002; published 10 the equilibrium line of the Zongo glacier (2.4 km2 ), Bolivia (16°S). Study of the influence of wind, air

  19. Drinking Water Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  20. Atmospheric Moisture Budget and Spatial Resolution Dependence of Precipitation Extremes in Aquaplanet Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the resolution dependency of precipitation extremes in an aqua-planet framework. Strong resolution dependency of precipitation extremes is seen over both tropics and extra-tropics, and the magnitude of this dependency also varies with dynamical cores. Moisture budget analyses based on aqua-planet simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores but the same physics parameterizations suggest that during precipitation extremes moisture supply for surface precipitation is mainly derived from advective moisture convergence. The resolution dependency of precipitation extremes mainly originates from advective moisture transport in the vertical direction. At most vertical levels over the tropics and in the lower atmosphere over the subtropics, the vertical eddy transport of mean moisture field dominates the contribution to precipitation extremes and its resolution dependency. Over the subtropics, the source of moisture, its associated energy, and the resolution dependency during extremes are dominated by eddy transport of eddies moisture at the mid- and upper-troposphere. With both MPAS and HOMME dynamical cores, the resolution dependency of the vertical advective moisture convergence is mainly explained by dynamical changes (related to vertical velocity or omega), although the vertical gradients of moisture act like averaging kernels to determine the sensitivity of the overall resolution dependency to the changes in omega at different vertical levels. The natural reduction of variability with coarser resolution, represented by areal data averaging (aggregation) effect, largely explains the resolution dependency in omega. The thermodynamic changes, which likely result from non-linear feedback in response to the large dynamical changes, are small compared to the overall changes in dynamics (omega). However, after excluding the data aggregation effect in omega, thermodynamic changes become relatively significant in offsetting the effect of dynamics leading to reduce differences between the simulated and aggregated results. Compared to MPAS, the simulated stronger vertical motion with HOMME also results in larger resolution dependency. Compared to the simulation at fine resolution, the vertical motion during extremes is insufficiently resolved/parameterized at the coarser resolution even after accounting for the natural reduction in variability with coarser resolution, and this is more distinct in the simulation with HOMME. To reduce uncertainties in simulated precipitation extremes, future development in cloud parameterizations must address their sensitivity to spatial resolution as well as dynamical cores.