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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Radiological verification survey results at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ008V)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains railroad spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at the Pompton Plains railroad spur were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Results of the independent radiological verification survey at 112 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ082V)  

SciTech Connect

Thorium ores were processed by the Maywood Chemical Works until the property was sold to Stepan Chemical Company in 1959. Wastes were stored at what is now called the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the migration of residuals off site into the surrounding areas, the Stepan property and several vicinity properties were designated for remedial action under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. The DOE conducted radiological surveys of these sites to evaluate current radiological conditions as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In 1988, radiological surveys of some private residential properties on Avenue E in Lodi, New Jersey were conducted by members of an ORNL radiological survey team. Results of this survey indicated radiological contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination at this vicinity property (112 Avenue E), and it was recommended for remediation. In the fall of 1995, a verification survey of this vicinity property was conducted by ORNL, the independent verification contractor for this effort, in conjunction with decontamination operations conducted under the supervision of Bechtel National Incorporated. The verification survey included complete surface gamma scans of the grounds and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. This report describes the radiological verification survey of this residential property. Based on the remedial action and verification survey data reported in this document, all radiological measurements fall below the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines established for this site, and the property at 112 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey successfully meets the DOE radiological guidelines for unrestricted use.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Results of the independent radiological verification survey at 113 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ081V)  

SciTech Connect

Thorium ores were processed by the Maywood Chemical Works until the property was sold to Stepan Chemical Company in 1959. Wastes were stored at what is now called the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), owned by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the migration of residuals off site into the surrounding areas, the Stepan property and several vicinity properties were designated for remedial action under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. The DOE conducted radiological surveys of these sites to evaluate current radiological conditions as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In 1988, radiological surveys of some private residential properties on Avenue E in Lodi, New Jersey were conducted by members of an ORNL radiological survey team. Results of this survey indicated radiological contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination at this vicinity property (113 Avenue E), and it was recommended for remediation. In the fall of 1995, a verification survey of this vicinity property was conducted by ORNL, the independent verification contractor for this effort, in conjunction with decontamination operations conducted under the supervision of Bechtel National Incorporated. The verification survey included complete surface gamma scans of the grounds and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. This report describes the radiological verification survey of this residential property.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Results of the independent radiological verification survey at 108 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ084V)  

SciTech Connect

Thorium ores were processed by the Maywood Chemical Works until the property was sold to Stepan Chemical Company in 1959. Wastes were stored at what is now called the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the migration of residuals off site into the surrounding areas, the Stepan property and several vicinity properties were designated for remedial action under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. The DOE conducted radiological surveys of these sites to evaluate current radiological conditions as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In 1988, radiological surveys of some private residential properties on Avenue E in Lodi, New Jersey were conducted by members of an ORNL radiological survey team. Results of this survey indicated radiological contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination at this vicinity property (108 Avenue E), and it was recommended for remediation. In the fall of 1995, a verification survey of this vicinity property was conducted by ORNL, the independent verification contractor for this effort, in conjunction with decontamination operations conducted under the supervision of Bechtel National Incorporated. The verification survey included complete surface gamma scans of the grounds and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. This report describes the radiological verification survey of this residential property.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Peek Street Site, Schenectady, New York (SY001V)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Peek Street site, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York. The purpose of the survey, conducted during 1993 and continuing through January 1994, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the structure, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected, the industrial property at 425 Peek Street and the adjacent state-owned bike path in Schenectady, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York.

Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.; Carrier, R.F.; Allred, J.F.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (CIO001V)  

SciTech Connect

The Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company in Indian Orchard, Massachusetts was one of many companies performing work during the 1940s associated with the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects for the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). In 1991, a radiological survey was conducted at the site. The survey report indicated {sup 238}U contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination, and some {sup 235}U residues in the west end of the building. Decontamination of the facility to supplemental guidelines, derived by a hazard assessment based on appropriate scenarios for this building, was conducted by subcontractor personnel in 1995 under the direction of Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI), the project management contractor for FUSRAP. The independent radiological verification survey detailed in this report was performed in July and August 1995 under the FUSRAP program by members of ORNL at the request of DOE. The radiological verification survey of the west end of the building included gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma scans for fixed contamination, smear sampling for transferable contamination, and radionuclide analysis of soil samples taken from outside the building and from excavations in the concrete floor inside the building.

Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site is located at 3550 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, Ohio. Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company produced hollow uranium slugs in a machine shop at the site in 1956. The work was performed for National Lead of Ohio in a contract with the Atomic Energy Commission to augment the capacity of the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald in the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects. The current occupant of the building, Force Control, operates a multipurpose machine shop. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed from February to May of 1995. The purpose of the survey was to verify that radioactivity from residues of {sup 238}U was remediated to a level below acceptable DOE guidelines levels.

Rice, D.E.; Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS  

SciTech Connect

Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

10

Independent Verification Survey Report for the Operable Unit-1 Miamisburg Closure Project, Miamisburg, OH  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the independent verification survey were to confirm that remedial actions have been effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately describes the current radiological and chemical conditions of the MCP site.

Weaver, P.

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radiological Habits Survey: Bradwell, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Comparisons with previous surveys 55 Table A Comparison between 1999 and 2007 aquatic internal exposure 56 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 19 3.1 Data recording 19 3.2 Data analysis 21 4. AQUATIC RADIATION RADIATION PATHWAYS 41 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 41 5.2 Unusual pathways 42 5.3 Retailers 43 5.4 Food

12

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Internal exposure 28 4.8 External exposure 31 4.9 Water based activities 33 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 34 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 34 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 36 5.3 Internal exposure 36 6 analysis 21 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 23 4.1 Aquatic survey area 23 4.2 Commercial fisheries 25 4

13

Radiological Habits Survey: Winfrith, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Internal exposure 26 4.8 External exposure 30 4.9 Water based activities 31 5 TERRESTRIAL RADIATION exposure 37 6 DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 40 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 40 6.2 Residential activities analysis 19 4 AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 21 4.1 Aquatic survey area 21 4.2 Commercial fisheries 23 4

14

Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Wholesalers and retailers 29 4.5 Internal exposure 29 4.6 External exposure 30 4.7 Water based activities 32 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 35 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 35 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 39 5.3 Internal exposure 39 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 43 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 43 6.2 Residential activities

15

Radiological Habits Survey, Dounreay, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Internal exposure 25 4.6 External exposure 28 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 32 5.1 Terrestrial survey area and local produce 32 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 33 5.3 Land cover 33 5.4 Internal exposure 34 5 conversion 14 3.2 Determination of critical groups 14 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 18 4.1 Aquatic survey

16

Radiological Habits Survey: Hartlepool, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 27 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other food pathways 28 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 32 4.9 Water based activities 35 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 36 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 36 5.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 38 5.3 Internal exposure 38 6. DIRECT

17

Radiological Habits Survey: Cardiff, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 26 4.5 Wildfowl 26 4.6 Internal exposure 27 4.7 External exposure 29 4.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 37 5.3 Internal exposure 37 6. COMBINED PATHWAYS 41 7. CONCLUSIONS of the survey 15 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 18 3.1 Data recording 18 3.2 Data analysis 20 4. AQUATIC RADIATION

18

Radiological Habits Survey, Faslane, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Land cover 24 5.4 Internal exposure 25 6. DIRECT RADIATION 26 7. COMBINED PATHWAYS 28 8. CONCLUSIONS.5 Wildfowling 18 4.6 Internal exposure 19 4.7 External exposure 21 4.8 Water based activities 22 5. TERRESTRIAL.2 Determination of critical groups 11 3.3 Data analysis 11 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 15 4.1 Aquatic survey

19

Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

36 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 38 5.3 Internal exposure 38 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 42 6.4 Wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other pathways 28 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 31 4.9 Water based activities 34 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 36 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

20

Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

44 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 47 5.3 Internal exposure 47 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 50 6.4 Wholesalers and retailers 34 4.5 Wildfowl 35 4.6 Other pathways 35 4.7 Internal exposure 36 4.8 External exposure 39 4.9 Water based activities 42 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 44 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radiological Habits Survey: Trawsfynydd, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 36 5.3 Internal exposure 36 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 40 6.1 Direct.3 Angling 28 4.4 Wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Internal exposure 29 4.7 External exposure analysis 22 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 4.1 Aquatic survey area 25 4.2 Commercial fisheries 27 4

22

Radiological Habits Survey, Chapelcross, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and local produce 25 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 26 5.3 Land cover 26 5.4 Internal exposure 27 6. DIRECT fisheries 18 4.3 Angling 19 4.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 19 4.5 Internal exposure 20 4.6 External exposure 22 4.7 Water based activities 23 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

23

Radiological Habits Survey, Hunterston 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and local produce 25 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 26 5.3 Land cover 26 5.4 Internal exposure 27 5.5 External fisheries 18 4.3 Angling and hobby fishing 19 4.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 19 4.5 Internal exposure 19 4.6 External exposure 23 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

24

Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Terrestrial survey area 38 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 40 5.3 Internal exposure 40 6. DIRECT RADIATION fishing 29 4.4 Wholesalers and retailers 30 4.5 Wildfowl 30 4.6 Other pathways 30 4.7 Internal exposure 31 4.8 External exposure 34 4.9 Water based activities 36 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 38 5

25

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other pathways 29 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 33 4.9 Water based activities 36 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 38 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 38 5.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 41 5.3 Internal exposure 41 6. DIRECT

26

Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory’s Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007).

W. C. Adams

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

Dudar, Aed M. (Augusta, GA); Wagner, David G. (Augusta, GA); Teese, Gregory D. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

30

Results of the independent verification survey at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted an independent verification of the radiological condition of the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois, at the request of the Department of Energy in June of 1993. The building is owned by the National Steel Corporation. The contamination present resulted from the handling of uranium slabs of metal during the time the betatron facility was used to x-ray the slabs for metallurgical defects. The designation survey did not characterize the entire floor space because of obstructing equipment and debris. Therefore, prior to remediation by Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI), a thorough characterization of the floor was conducted, and the results were immediately conveyed to on-site staff of BNI. An independent verification assessment was also performed after the cleanup activities were performed under the direction of BNI. The process of characterization, remediation, and verification was accomplished within a five-day period. Based on results of the independent verification assessment, the Old Betatron Building was determined to meet the DOE radiological guidelines for unrestricted use.

Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~ *-,-' .r_~, ~ *-,-' .r_~, VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by W. C. Adams Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT JUNE 1994 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Baker arId Wi,,iMI Wsrchouwl-Vcrification June 28, ,994 - ,I I_ ..I .- VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND W ILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by: ' J .,,,~ ' . W . C. Adams, Project Leader Date: Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program

32

Oak Ridge Associated VERIFICATION SURVEY Universities OF THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORAU 89/K-79 ORAU 89/K-79 Prepared by ERIFICATION Oak Ridge Associated VERIFICATION SURVEY Universities OF THE Drepared of SHIPPINGPORT ATOMIC POWER STATION Facility and Site Decommissioning SHIPPINGPORT, PENNSYLVANIA I Projects U.S. Department R LANDIS ot Energy M. R. LANDIS ot Energy Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT .i~ ~~ . ~NOVEMBER 1989 .Ii_- ORAU 89/K-79 VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE SHIPPINGPORT ATOMIC POWER STATION SHIPPINGPORT, PENNSYLVANIA Prepared by M. R. Landis Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3*P~~~ ~~Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 U~~~~~~~~1 ~Project Staff S. F. Barnett F. A. Payne J. D. Berger J. L. Payne G. R. Foltz E. A. Powell

33

Independent Verification Survey Report for the Long Island Solar Farm, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

5119-SR-01-0 INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE LONG ISLAND SOLAR FARM, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION REVIEW AND SURVEY of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 301 Footprint  

SciTech Connect

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION REVIEW AND SURVEY of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 301 Footprint, Argonne Illinois 5061-SR-01-0

E.N. Bailey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of Partial Grid E9, David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Conduct verification surveys of available grids at the DWI 1630 in Knoxville, Tennessee. A representative with the Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) team from ORISE conducted a verification survey of a partial area within Grid E9.

P.C. Weaver

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radiological Habits Survey: Berkeley and Oldbury, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquatic internal exposure 63 pathways at Berkeley and Oldbury Table B Comparison between 2001 and 2007 of the survey 18 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 22 3.1 Data recording 22 3.2 Data analysis 24 4. AQUATIC RADIATION. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 45 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 45 5.2 Unusual pathways 48 5.3 Wholesalers

37

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Survey area 3 3. Conduct of survey 3 4. Data analysis 4 4.1 Internal exposure 4 Figure 2 Critical;3 1. Introduction This report describes a review of public radiation exposure pathways due to liquid 1996-2005 5 4.2 External exposure 6 5. Conclusions 7 6. Recommendations 7 7. References 7 Figure 1

38

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

39

VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE SOUTH WASTE TANK FARM TRAINING/TEST TOWER AND HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE LOCKERS AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WEST VALLEY, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

A team from ORAU’s Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site’s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Phyllis C. Weaver

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Runtime verification of service-oriented systems: a well-rounded survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic nature of Service-Oriented Systems SOSs has made conventional verification techniques such as testing, model checking and theorem proving ineffective. As a result, many studies have been dedicated to verification of SOS. In this survey, we first ...

Reza Babaee; Seyed Morteza Babamir

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiological Habits Survey: Aldermaston/Burghfield, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Internal exposure 30 6 ALDERMASTON DIRECT RADIATION 33 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 33 6.2 Residential pathways 22 4.5 Internal exposure 23 4.6 External exposure 25 4.7 Water based activities 26 5 TERRESTRIAL 3 METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 16 3.1 Data recording 16 3.2 Data analysis 18 4 AQUATIC RADIATION

42

Radiological Habits Survey, Rosyth Business Park, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Land cover 17 5.4 Internal exposure 17 6. DIRECT RADIATION 18 7. COMBINED PATHWAYS 19 8. CONCLUSIONS.5 Wildfowling 14 4.6 Internal exposure 14 4.7 External exposure 15 4.8 Water based activities 16 5. TERRESTRIAL 3.2 Determination of critical groups 8 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 9 4.1 Aquatic survey area 9 4

43

An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-I a.d *4dk *-f--l- -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt of the Air Force In Cooperation W ith: Southwest District Office Ohio Environmental Protection Agency - O h io Cnvironmwhl Protection Agenty Bureau of Radiological Health Ohio Department of Health. I Lb ^U .L*-u i-.-r- --- , .., II ,.--(_ ~_ -_- --- -_ _.. ;

45

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-03-0

W.C. Adams

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

46

REVISED INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF A AND B RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINES TRENCH BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

REVISED INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE A AND B RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINES TRENCH, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY 5062-SR-01-1

P.C. Weaver

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-02-0

W.C. Adams

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

Jaffe, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Review: Formal verification of analog and mixed signal designs: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analog and mixed signal (AMS) designs are an important part of embedded systems that link digital designs to the analog world. Due to challenges associated with its verification process, AMS designs require a considerable portion of the total design ... Keywords: Analog and mixed signal design verification, Formal verification, Survey

Mohamed H. Zaki; Sofiène Tahar; Guy Bois

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site.

Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radiological survey results at 4400 Piehl Road, Ottawa Lake, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan. The survey was performed in September, 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if materials containing uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Baker Brothers facility in Toledo, Ohio had been transported off-site to this neighboring area. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the house and attached garage, beta-gamma scans of the hard surfaces outside, and the collection of soil, water, and dust samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that the majority of the measurements on the property were within DOE guidelines. However, the presence of isolated spots of uranium contamination were found in two areas where materials were allegedly transported to the property from the former Baker Brothers site. Uranium uptake by persons on the property by ingestion is fairly unlikely, but inhalation is a possibility. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the residential property at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan be considered for inclusion under FUSRAP.

Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Mobile High Resolution Gamma Ray Spectrometry System for Radiological Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveying nuclear power plant sites for radioactive contamination is an expensive part of the overall decommissioning process. This report details a mobile radiological survey system designed to produce a rapid and cost effective radiological characterization of outdoor land areas. The system combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry with modern automated surveying techniques to precisely locate areas of contamination.

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area. Date of survey: September 1981  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

Jaffe, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway`s opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date.

Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

King, David A.

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Letter Report - Verification Survey of Final Grids at the David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conduct verification surveys of grids at the DWI 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The independent verification team (IVT) from ORISE, conducted verification activities in whole and partial grids, as completed by BJC. ORISE site activities included gamma surface scans and soil sampling within 33 grids; G11 through G14; H11 through H15; X14, X15, X19, and X21; J13 through J15 and J17 through J21; K7 through K9 and K13 through K15; L13 through L15; and M14 through M16

P.C. Weaver

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

58

Radiological Survey Results for Areas A1 North, A5A, A6, and B2 at the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project, Washington, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania

W.C. Adams

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures.

McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration Demonstration Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education - Independent Verification Lessons Learned IV - performed at nine DOE sites from 2004 to 2008 Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Multiple Sites Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities Challenge The Department of Energy clears property from radiological control after the property has been demonstrated to meet the Department's stringent radiation protection requirements. Radiological surveys are used to demonstrate compliance with the requirements. Independent verification (IV) activities are conducted by an independent third party as a quality check on radiological surveys procedures and practices. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent verification for the Department. In this lessons learned report, ORISE summarizes their

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61

An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

Feimster, E.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Results of the radiological survey at 136 West Central Avenue (MJ030), Maywood, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 136 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 29, 1987.

Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radiological Surveys Performed in Support of the Demolition and Bulk Disposal Decommissioning Method  

SciTech Connect

Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company is decommissioning the Haddam Neck Plant using the 'Demolition and Bulk Disposal' method, or commonly referred to as 'Rip and Ship'. In general, completing the project using this method entails the removal of all irradiated fuel and highly contaminated systems and components, and the subsequent demolition of the above ground portions of most site structures. Since most structures are removed from site, cost and time savings are realized by virtually eliminating the need for remediation. However, this method of decommissioning creates more waste, both radiological and non-radiological, which must be segregated, packaged and disposed of properly. Prior to demolition, various types of radiological surveys must be performed and work controls put into place to minimize the spread of contamination to other areas of the site, and to prevent the inadvertent release of radioactive materials from the site. This paper will discuss the various types of radiological surveys performed, and controls implemented, in support of the demolition and bulk material disposal decommissioning method, with the emphasis on pre-demolition surveys. Details will be provided on the release criteria, survey design, survey implementation and data analysis on each of the various surveys, as well as a discussion on the controls implemented to prevent the various wastes from inadvertently being shipped to an inappropriate disposal facility. This paper will also strive to provide lessons learned for future projects that utilize the demolition and bulk disposal decommissioning method. (authors)

Yetter, R.F. [Babcock Services, Inc., 1840 Terminal Drive, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Newson, C.T. [Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, 362 Injun Hollow Road, East Hampton, CT 06424 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An aerial radiological survey of the southwest drainage basin area of the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 106-square-mile area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), formerly the Savannah River Plant. The survey was conducted from August 24 through September 8, 1988, to collect baseline radiological data over the area. Both natural and man-made gamma emitting radionuclides were detected in the area. The detected man-made sources were confined to creeks, branches, and SRS facilities in the surveyed area and were a result of SRS operations. Naturally-occurring radiation levels were consistent with those levels detected in adjacent areas during previous surveys. The annual dose levels were within the range of levels found throughout the United States.

Feimster, E.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radiological Final Status Survey of the Hammond Depot, Hammond, Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORISE conducted extensive scoping, characterization, and final status surveys of land areas and structures at the DNSC’s Hammond Depot located in Hammond, Indiana in multiple phases during 2005, 2006 and 2007.

T.J. Vitkus

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary second quarter 1996 100, 200, 300 and 600 areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1996 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized below: All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1996 were completed. One Hundred twenty- five environmental radiological surveys were performed during the second quarter of 1996, twenty nine at the active waste sites and ninety six at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels Wag found at three of the active waste sites and fifteen of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as 65,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys seven were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and one was in an unposted area. The contamination found within three of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining four sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. At the site where there was no posting, the contamination was below action levels, however, Site Support Services was notified. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR`s) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. During the second quarter 1996, 0. 7 hectares (1.7 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Surface Contamination (SC) to URM. No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARS) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. No Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIR) were closed during the Second Quarter of 1996. Five open SCIRB had not been resolved.

Dorian, J.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of Partial Grids H19, J21, J22, X20, and X21 at the David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site, Knoxville Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Conduct verification surveys of available grids at the David Witherspoon Incorporated 1630 Site (DWI 1630) in Knoxville, Tennessee. The IVT conducted verification activities of partial grids H19, J21, J22, X20, and X21.

P.C. Weaver

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radiological Habits Survey, Dumfries and Galloway Coast, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-washed pasture 19 4.6 Internal exposure 19 4.7 External exposure 24 5. COMBINED PATHWAYS 26 6. MATERIALS.2 Determination of critical groups 10 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 13 4.1 Aquatic survey area 13 4.2 Commercial of radioactivity in the Irish Sea. Potential exposure pathways include con

69

Radiological Habits Survey, HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wholesalers and retailers 17 4.5 Internal exposure 17 4.6 External exposure 19 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION pathways 22 5.3 Land cover 22 5.4 Internal exposure 23 5.5 External radiation 25 6. COMBINED PATHWAYS 26 7 conversion 10 3.2 Determination of critical groups 11 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 14 4.1 Aquatic survey

70

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 5823/5849 NORTH RAVENSWOOD AVEXJE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 5823/5849 NORTH RAVENSWOOD AVEXJE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Prepared by M.R. LANDIS Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Project Staff J.D. Berger R.C. Gosslee E.A. Powell G.R. Foltz M.J. Laudeman A. Wallo* C.F. Weaver Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites - Remedial Action Program FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760RC0033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. *with the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning -- LIST OF FIGURES Page FIGURE 1: Map of Chicago, Illinois Indicating the Location of the Facility at

71

An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area, Ames, Iowa. Date of survey: July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area in Ames, Iowa, was conducted during the period July 15--25, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the Ames Laboratory and the surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 200 feet (61 meters) along a series of parallel lines 350 feet (107 meters) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 36 square miles (93 square kilometers) and included the city of Ames, Iowa, and the Iowa State University. The results are reported as exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (inferred from the aerial data) in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 7 to 9 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). No anomalous radiation levels were detected at the Ames Laboratory. However, one anomalous radiation source was detected at an industrial storage yard in the city of Ames. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within the expected uncertainty of {+-}15%.

Maurer, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Results of the radiological survey at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HO001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio in 1988 and 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U. The surveys included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; and dust, debris, air, and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Results of the radiological survey at 266 East Spring Valley Avenue (MJ024), Hackensack, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 266 East Spring Valley Avenue, Hackensack, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 23, 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Yucca Mountain Project Proposed Land Withdrawal and Adjacent Areas  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) proposed land withdrawal was conducted from January to April 2006, and encompassed a total area of approximately 284 square miles (73,556 hectares). The aerial radiological survey was conducted to provide a sound technical basis and rigorous statistical approach for determining the potential presence of radiological contaminants in the Yucca Mountain proposed Land withdrawal area. The survey site included land areas currently managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Air Force as part of the Nevada Test and Training Range or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The survey was flown at an approximate ground speed of 70 knots (36 meters per second), at a nominal altitude of 150 ft (46 m) above ground level, along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 250 ft (76 m) apart. The flight lines were oriented in a north-south trajectory. The survey was conducted by the DOE NNSA/NSO Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis, which is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The aerial survey was conducted at the request of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The primary contaminant of concern was identified by YMP personnel as cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs). Due to the proposed land withdrawal area's proximity to the historical Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) facilities located on the NTS, the aerial survey system required sufficient sensitivity to discriminate between dispersed but elevated {sup 137}Cs levels from those normally encountered from worldwide fallout. As part of that process, the survey also measured and mapped the exposure-rate levels that currently existed within the survey area. The inferred aerial exposure rates of the natural terrestrial background radiation varied from less than 3 to 22 microroentgens per hour. This range of exposure rates was primarily due to the surface geological features within the survey area. The survey area has extensive areas of desert valleys, mountain ranges, extinct volcanic cones, and old lava flows. With the exception of five areas identified within the NRDS boundaries (discussed later in this report), there were no areas within the survey that exceeded aerial survey minimum detectable concentration levels of 0.4 through 0.7 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). The {sup 137}Cs levels do not exceed typical worldwide fallout levels for the continental United States.

Craig Lyons, Thane Hendricks

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS FROM A RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON YARDEORO AVENUE,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Health and Safety Research Division Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS FROM A RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON YARDEORO AVENUE, ALBANY, AND CENTRAL AVENUE,, COLONIE, NEW YORK PROPERTIES AL013 - AL028 July 1984 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05840R21400 _- _^." .-. ..-.- _---.--_ -... .- Fk. 3 ,=. Y)*cx gs 1 XEC @ d +I? ,%r $ g .&- _-.. .iTL--- d= m k m t Y iT 5 tn + a UT + t- 7 T? Y 0 + z cd (f c 0 W -7 0 9 0 oc !. __ g b a is d oJ F ig. 1. G a m m a exposure rates measured at the surface at grid points at 50 Yardboro Avenue, Albany, New York (AL013). . EE ?I 0 Es . m: 4 a I .r

76

PRELIMINqRY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT OF THE FORMER STATEN ISLAND WAREHOUSE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

pJ y, 22/4 pJ y, 22/4 PRELIMINqRY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT OF THE FORMER STATEN ISLAND WAREHOUSE SITE (ARCHER-DANIELS MIOLANO COMPANY) AT PORT RICHMOND, NEW YORK ./ Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 . . ' October 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Former1 y Uti 1 i ted Sites-- Remedial Action Program PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT OF THE FORMER STATEN ISLANI I WAREHOUSE SITE (ARCHER-OANIELS MIDLAND COMPANY) AT PORT RICHMOND, NEW YORK B. A. Berven and C. Clark Introduction A number of buildings located at the site of the former Staten Island Warehouse in Port Richmond, New York, were used by Union Minie're

77

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE DCN 0450-SR-01-0  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE’s remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor’s soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

David A. King, CHP

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of 19 Grids in the Lester Flat Area, David Witherspoon Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Perform verification surveys of 19 available grids located in the Lester Flat Area at the Davod Witherspoon Site. The survey grids included E11, E12, E13, F11, F12, F13, F14, F15, G15, G16, G17, H16, H17, H18, X16, X17, X18, K16, and J16.

P.C. Weaver

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

79

An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Date of survey: April 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding area in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was conducted during the period March 30 to April 14,1992. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment of the Oak Ridge Reservation for use in environmental management programs and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) along a series of parallel lines 250 feet (76 meters) apart and included X-10 (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), K-25 (former Gaseous Diffusion Plant), Y-12 (Weapons Production Plant), the Freels Bend Area and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, the East Fork Poplar Creek (100-year floodplain extending from K-25 to Y-12), Elza Gate (former uranium ore storage site located in the city of Oak Ridge), Parcel A, the Clinch River (river banks extending from Melton Hill Dam to the city of Kingston), and the CSX Railroad Tracks (extending from Y-12 to the city of Oak Ridge). The survey encompassed approximately 55 square miles (1 41 square kilometers) of the Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area.

Maurer, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A" 917 A" 917 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. - FORMER LOOW SITE Summary Report Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1981 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION. CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES .. .. . .. . . . . . . . ......... iii LIST OF TABLES ......... .. iv INTRODUCTION .. ......... 1 OBJECTIVE .................... 1 SURVEY TECHNIQUES . . ............. ...... 1 RESULTS ..... 2 Gamma-Ray Exposure Rates . . . . . . 2 Beta-Gamma Dose Rate ............. 2 226Ra in Soil ............ 3 CONCLUSIONS .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. 3 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . .

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81

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and Surrounding Area, Portsmouth, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the 16 square-mile (~41 square-kilometer) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The survey was performed in August 2007 utilizing a large array of helicopter mounted sodium iodide detectors. The purpose of the survey was to update the previous radiological survey levels of the environment and surrounding areas of the plant. A search for a missing radium-226 source was also performed. Implied exposure rates, man-made activity, and excess bismuth-214 activity, as calculated from the aerial data are presented in the form of isopleth maps superimposed on imagery of the surveyed area. Ground level and implied aerial exposure rates for nine specific locations are compared. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters. At specific plant locations described in the report, man-made activity was consistent with the operational histories of the location. There was no spectral activity that would indicate the presence of the lost source.

Namdoo Moon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE GUN FORGING MACHINE BUILDING ITHACA GUN COMPANY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SURVEY SURVEY OF THE GUN FORGING MACHINE BUILDING ITHACA GUN COMPANY ITHACA, NEW YORK T. J. VITKUS AND J. L. PAYNE Prepared for the Office of Erivironmental Restoration U.S.' Department of Energy ORISE 95/K-1 3 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE GUN FORGING MACHINE BUILDING ITHACA GUN COMPANY ITHACA, NEW YORK Prepared by T. J. Vi&us and J. L. Payne Environme& Survey and Site Assessment Program Envirotiental and Health Sciences Group Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Offke of Environmental Restoration FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1995 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. .I I I I I I I I 1 I I I ' I

83

An aerial radiological survey of the Durango, Colorado uranium mill tailings site and surrounding area. Date of survey: August 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of Durango, Colorado, including the inactive uranium mill tailings piles located southwest of the town, was conducted during August 25--29, 1980, for the Department of Energy`s Environmental and Safety Engineering Division. Areas of radiation exposure rates higher than the local background, which was about 15 microrentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), were observed directly over and to the south of the mill tailings piles, over a cemetery, and at two spots near the fairgrounds. The rapidly changing radiation exposure rates at the boundaries of the piles preclude accurate extrapolation of aerial radiological data to ground level exposure rates in their immediate vicinity. Estimated radiation exposure rates close to the piles, however, approached 30 times background, or about 450 {mu}R/h. Radiation exposure rates in a long area extending south from the tailings piles were about 25 {mu}R/h.

Hilton, L.K.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Workshop on Radiological Surveys in Support of the Edgemont Clean-up Action Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, has given Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) the responsibility for the development of procedures for the identification of offsite structures and properties in the vicinity of Edgemont, South Dakota, that require remedial action because of elevated radiation levels caused by residual radioactivity as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. In order to acquaint interested investigators with the procedures PNL has developed and the measurements that have been performed at Edgemont using these procedures, and also to obtain suggestions for the improvement of these procedures, PNL organized a "Workshop on Radiological Surveys in Support of the Edgemont Clean-up Action Program" on behalf of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This workshop was held in Denver on January 21 and 22, 1981. On the first day of the workshop an in-depth discussion of the procedures employed in the entire radiological survey program at Edgemont was held. It included a description of the equipment, techniques and procedures employed in radon daughter measurements within structures, indoor and outdoor gamma radiation surveys, and 226Ra measurements in surface and sub-surface soil samples. On the second day, the results of the measurements that have been conducted at Edgemont were presented. During the afternoon an open discussion of the radiological survey procedures used at Edgemont was held for the purpose of obtaining suggestions for the possible improvement of these procedures. Many useful suggestions were made and a few modifications in the survey procedures at Edgemont have been made in response to these suggestions.

Perkins, R. W.; Young, J. A.; Jackson, P. O.; Thomas, V. W.; Schwendiman, L. C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low-energy radiation. Nine results exceeded the JA soil screening guideline for distributed contamination of 13.5 pCi/g for total TRUs, ranging from 13.7 to 125.9 pCi/g. Because of these results, the goal of showing with 95% confidence that 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to 13.5 pCi/g-TRU activity cannot be met. The value of 13.5 pCi/g represents the 88th percentile rather than the 95th percentile in a nonparametric one-sided upper 90% confidence limit. Therefore, at the 95% confidence level, 88% of the clean pile is projected to be below the 13.5-pCi/g goal. The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual recommends use of a nonparametric statistical ''Sign Test'' to demonstrate compliance with release criteria for TRU. Although this survey was not designed to use the sign test, the data herein would demonstrate that the median (50%) of the clean storage pile is below the l3.5-pCi/g derived concentration guideline level. In other words, with the caveat that additional investigation of elevated concentrations was not performed, the data pass the sign test at the 13.5-pCi/g level. Additionally, the lateral extent of the pile was gridded, and 10% of the grid blocks was scanned with field instruments for the detection of low-energy radiation coupled to ratemeter/scalers to screen for the presence of hot particles. No hot particles were detected in the top 1 cm of the grid blocks surveyed.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site a Naturita, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. The spread of tailings was detected in the area surrounding the site by means of direct above ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples. Radiochemical analyses of water samples in the vicinity of the tailings pile indicate local surface water contamination immediately downstream from the pile, although the /sup 226/Ra concentration in the water at that point as well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The calculated subsoil distribution of /sup 226/Ra in onsite holes is presented graphically. The tailings at this site were removed and reprocessed at another location. This operation was completed and reclamation of the site was conducted in 1978. Consequently the information in this report documents radiological conditions that no longer exist.

Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An aerial radiological survey of the Durango, Colorado uranium mill tailings site and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of Durango, Colorado, including the inactive uranium mill tailings piles located southwest of the town, was conducted during August 25--29, 1980, for the Department of Energy's Environmental and Safety Engineering Division. Areas of radiation exposure rates higher than the local background, which was about 15 microrentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), were observed directly over and to the south of the mill tailings piles, over a cemetery, and at two spots near the fairgrounds. The rapidly changing radiation exposure rates at the boundaries of the piles preclude accurate extrapolation of aerial radiological data to ground level exposure rates in their immediate vicinity. Estimated radiation exposure rates close to the piles, however, approached 30 times background, or about 450 {mu}R/h. Radiation exposure rates in a long area extending south from the tailings piles were about 25 {mu}R/h.

Hilton, L.K.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

New brown dwarfs in Upper Sco using UKIDSS Galactic Cluster Survey science verification data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results from a deep (J = 18.7), wide-field (6.5 square degrees) infrared (ZYJHK) survey in the Upper Sco association conducted within the science verification phase of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey Galactic Cluster Survey (GCS). Cluster members define a sequence well separated from field stars in the (Z-J,Z) colour-magnitude diagram. We have selected a total of 164 candidates with J = 10.5-18.7 mag from the (Z-J,Z) and (Y-J,Y) diagrams. We further investigated the location of those candidates in the other colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams to weed out contaminants. The cross-correlation of the GCS catalogue with the 2MASS database confirms the membership of 116 photometric candidates down to 20 Jupiter masses as they lie within a 2 sigma circle centred on the association mean motion. The final list of cluster members contains 129 sources with masses between 0.3 and 0.007 Msun. We extracted a dozen new low-mass brown dwarfs below 20 Mjup, the limit of previous surveys in the region. Finally, we have derived the mass function in Upper Sco over the 0.3-0.01 Msun mass range, best fit by a single segment with a slope of index alpha = 0.6+/-0.1, in agreement with previous determination in open clusters.

N. Lodieu; N. C. Hambly; R. F. Jameson; S. T. Hodgkin; G. Carraro; T. R. Kendall

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

An aerial radiological survey of the Pilgrim Station Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Plymouth, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial radioactivity surrounding the Pilgrim Station Nuclear Power Plant was measured using aerial radiolog- ical survey techniques. The purpose of this survey was to document exposure rates near the plant and to identify unexpected, man-made radiation sources within the survey area. The surveyed area included land areas within a three-mile radius of the plant site. Data were acquired using an airborne detection system that employs sodium iodide, thallium-activated detectors. Exposure rate and photopeak counts were computed from these data and plotted on aerial photographs of the survey area. Several ground-based exposure measurements were made for comparison with the,aerial survey results. Exposure rates in areas surrounding the plant site varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour, with exposure rates below 6 microroentgens per hour occurring over bogs and marshy areas. Man-made radiation was found to be higher than background levels at the plant site. Radation due to nitrogen-1 6, which is produced in the steam cycle of a boiling-water reactor, was the primaty source of activity found at the plant site. Cesium-137 activity at levels slightly above those expected from natural fallout was found at isolated locations inland from the plant site. No other detectable sources of man-made radioactivity were found.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the City of North Las Vegas (Downtown) and the Motor Speedway  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey on December 11-12, 2007, with the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. The survey covered 19.4 square miles (9.2 square miles over the downtown area of the City of North Las Vegas and 10.2 square miles over the Las Vegas Motor Speedway [LVMS]). The flight lines over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1 and 2. A total of four 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 ft of flight line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system-REDAR V using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data in the form of gamma energy spectra were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes sources. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service with the approval of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, RSL-Nellis is providing this summary to the office of the Mayor of City of North Las Vegas and LVMS security along with the gross counts-based exposure rate and man-made counts maps.

Piotr Wasiolek

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY P NIAGARA FALIS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY P NIAGARA FALIS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. DePartment of EnergY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites - Remedial ActLon Program J . D . B e r g e r P r o j e c t S t a f f J. Burden* w.L. Smlth* R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell J.S . Epler* G.M. S tePhens P.Iil. Frame L.B. Taus* W . 0 . H e l t o n C . F . W e a v e r R . C . G o s s l e e B . S . Z a c h a r e k d I I Prepared bY Radiological Slte Assessoent Progran Manpower Educailon Research, and Training Dlvision Oak Ridge Assoclated Universlties Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3783f-0117 I FINAL REPORT March 1984 Thts report ls based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 wiLh the DePartment of EnergY. *Evaluatlon Research Corporatlon, Oak Ridge, Tennessee TABLE OF CONTENTS L i s t o f F i g u

94

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey performed at the Riverton, Wyoming site in July 1976, are presented. The average external gamma exposure rate at 1 m over the tailings pile was 56 ..mu..R/hr. The corresponding rate for the former mill area was 97 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles in a dry wash is evident; but it appears that, in general, the earth cover over the tailings pile has been effective in limiting both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra as a function of depth in 15 augered holes is presented graphically. A survey of the Teton Division Lumber Company property in Riverton showed a maximum external gamma exposure rate of 270 ..mu..R/hr.

Haywood, F.F.; Lorenzo, D.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Survey of Interventional Radiology Awareness Among Final-Year Medical Students in a European Country  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract the brightest talents to the field.

Leong, Sum; Keeling, Aoife N.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.i [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology (Ireland)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

Colin Okada

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of the City of North Las Vegas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of the city of North Las Vegas for the purpose of mapping natural radiation background and locating any man-made radioactive sources. Survey areas were selected in collaboration with the City Manager's office and included four separate areas: (1) Las Vegas Motor Speedway (10.6 square miles); (2) North Las Vegas Downtown Area (9.2 square miles); (3) I-15 Industrial Corridor (7.4 square miles); and (4) Future site of University of Nevada Las Vegas campus (17.4 square miles). The survey was conducted in three phases: Phase 1 on December 11-12, 2007 (Areas 1 and 2), Phase 2 on February 28, 2008 (Area 3), and Phase 3 on March 19, 2008 (Area 4). The total completed survey covered a total of 44.6 square miles. The flight lines (without the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. A total of eight 2.5-hour-long flights were performed at an altitude of 150 ft above ground level (AGL) with 300 feet of flight-line spacing. Water line and test line flights were conducted over the Lake Mead and Government Wash areas to ensure quality control of the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected continually (every second) over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Collection of spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also be used to identify specific radioactive isotopes. As a courtesy service, with the approval of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office, RSL-Nellis is providing this summary to the office of the Mayor of the City of North Las Vegas along with the gross-count-based exposure rate and man-made count contour maps and GIS shape files in electronic format on a compact disk.

Piotr Wasiolek

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ORNL/luSA-85/6 Health and Safety Research Division PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF TEE FORMER HAVENS PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

luSA-85/6 luSA-85/6 Health and Safety Research Division PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF TEE FORMER HAVENS PLANT OF TEE BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY, BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT May 1985 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACCIVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05-840R21400 \ .-l__--.-- -- PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER HAVENS PLAEJT OF THE BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY, BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT INTRODUCI' ION The Bridgeport Brass Company' s Havens plant located at Kossath and Pulaski Streets, Bridgeport, Connecticut. was used under contract with the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to process uranium during the period

99

Results of the radiological survey at Essex Street and State Route 17 (MJ036), Maywood, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at Essex Street and State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Review of radiological surveys of the General Services Administration's Raritan Depot in Edison, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews two recent radiological surveys of the General Services Administration (GSA) Raritan Depot in Edison, New Jersey, that were conducted after somewhat elevated levels of radiation were detected within a depot building. The first survey indicated gamma radiation levels were higher than natural background levels in some buildings and identified the probable source of the radiation as gypsum-like building tiles that contained natural uranium-chain radionuclides at a level 20 times higher than other materials. Elevated levels of radon and radon decay products also were detected in some buildings. A follow-on survey was conducted to confirm the January measurements and to measure radiation levels at other locations: additional buildings at the depot, buildings on the Middlesex County College campus, and a possible outdoor disposal site. EPA measurements established that ceiling material is the primary source of the radiation. Radioisotope analysis of the ceiling tile material from buildings with elevated radiation levels showed the presence of radium-226 at levels of approximately 25 picocuries per gram (pCi/g); this material would thus have to be treated as hazardous waste, should it be removed. This report critiques the methodology and results of the two surveys and recommends further action.

Herzenberg, C.L.; Winter, R.C.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

Phoenix, K.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

103

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

ORNL/TM-11118 RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT METPATH INCORPORATED,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TM-11118 TM-11118 RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT METPATH INCORPORATED, 1 MALCOLM AVENUE, TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY (TJOO3) FL D. Foley L. M. Floyd, Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Serwce U.S. Department of Commerce I 5265 Port Royal Road. Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy:A03 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an 8ge"cy of the UnitedSlaterGovernmenl.NeithertheUnitedStatesGovernmen~no,anyagency thereof. nor any 01 their employees. makes any warranty. express 0, implied. 0, assumes any legal liabhty or responsibility lo, the accuracy. completeness. 0, UJB~U~WSJ of any information. apparatus. product. or process disClosed. or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

107

An aerial radiological survey of Project Rulison and surrounding area, Battlement Creek Valley, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Project Rulison site, 40 miles (64 kilometers) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado, from July 6 through July 12, 1993. Parallel lines were flown at intervals of 250 feet (76 meters) over a 6.5-square-mile (17-square-kilometer) area at a 200-foot (61-meter) altitude surrounding Battlement Creek Valley. The gamma energy spectra obtained were reduced to an exposure rate contour map overlaid on a high altitude aerial photograph of the area. The terrestrial exposure rate varied from 3.5 to 12.5 {mu}R/h (excluding cosmic) at 1 meter above ground level. No anomalous or man-made isotopes were found.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Falls City, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a radiological survey conducted at the Falls City, Texas, site in July 1976 are presented. There are seven partial to fully stabilized tailings piles, and an overburden pile from an open-pit mine. Above ground gamma-ray exposure rate measurements show moderate levels of contamination throughout the area with a maximum exposure rate of 500 ..mu..R/hr above tailings pile 2. The average exposure rate over the different areas varied from 14 ..mu..R/hr over the southwest end of tailings pile 7 to 207 ..mu..R/hr over the northeast end of the same pile. Analyses of surface soil and dry-wash sediment samples, as well as calculations of subsurface /sup 226/Ra distribution, serve to define the spread of tailings around the area. Water erosion of the tailings is evident, but, because of abundant growth of vegetation on the tailings piles, wind erosion probably is not a major problem.

Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Loy, E.T.; Lorenzo, D.; Ellis, B.S.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at the Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey performed at the Spook site in Converse County, Wyoming, in June 1976, are presented. The mill at this site was located a short distance from the open-pit mine where the ore was obtained and where part of the tailings was dumped into the mine. Several piles of overburden or low-grade ore in the vicinity were included in the measurements of above-ground gamma exposure rate. The average exposure rate over these piles varied from 14 ..mu..R/hr, the average background exposure rate for the area, to 140 ..mu..R/hr. The average exposure rate for the tailings and former mill area was 220 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles down dry washes was evident. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra in ten holes as a function of depth is presented graphically.

Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings near Maybell, Colorado are presented. Measurements of external gamma exposure rate at 1 m above the tailings ranged 16 to 340 ..mu..R/hr with an average value of 65 ..mu..R/hr. Radionuclide analysis of offsite soil and sediment samples, as well as above-ground gamma exposure rate measurements defined the spread of contamination around the tailings pile. This spread is greatest toward the east, in the direction of surface water runoff. Calculated concentrations of /sup 226/Ra in all of the holes drilled in the tailngs, based on gamma monitoring data, showed maximum concentrations in the range 100 to 800 pCi/g.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Ellis, B.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The findings of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Gunnison, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. Results of surface soil sample analyses and direct gamma radiation measurements indicate limited spread of tailings off the site. The only significant above background measurements off the site were obtained in an area previously covered by the tailings pile. There was little evidence of contamination of the surface or of unconfined groundwater in the vicinity of the tailings pile; however, the hydrologic conditions at the site indicate a potential for such contamination. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in all water samples except one from the tailings pile was well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 14 bore holes located on and around the tailings pile was calculated from gamma ray monitoring data obtained jointly with Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc.

Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.G.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Durango, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Durango, Colorado, conducted in April 1976, in cooperation with a team from Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., are presented together with descriptions of the instruments and techniques used to obtain the data. Direct above-ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface soil and sediment samples indicate movement of tailings from the piles toward Lightner Creek on the north and the Animas River on the east side of the piles. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in the former raffinate pond area is only slightly above the background level. Two structures in Durango were found to contain high concentrations of airborne radon daughters, where tailings are known to have been utilized in construction. Near-background concentrations of radon daughters were found in a well-ventilated building close to the tailings.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Ellis, B.S.; Chou, K.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

An aerial radiological survey of Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho and surrounding area, June--July 1986  

SciTech Connect

Three aerial radiological surveys were conducted during the period 16 June through 15 July 1986 over the towns of Pocatello, Soda Springs, and Fort Hall, Idaho and the surrounding areas. The surveys were performed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), utilizing the Aerial Measuring System (AMS). This work was completed in cooperation with a study by the EPA to conduct a dose assessment of human radiation exposure for industrial sources in Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho. The aerial surveys were performed to document the natural terrestrial radiological environment of the three localities and to map the spatial extent and degree of contamination due to phosphate milling operations. The results of these surveys will be used for planning ground-based measurements in addition to being incorporated into the dose assessment document. 4 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Berry, H.A.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY STATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed prototype equipment to demonstrate remote surveying of Inner and Outer DOE Standard 3013 containers for fixed and transferable contamination in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 and 10 CFR 835 Appendix B. When fully developed the equipment will be part of a larger suite of equipment used to package material in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 at the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project slated for installation at the Savannah River Site. The prototype system consists of a small six-axis industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a force sensor, vacuum gripper and a three fingered pneumatic gripper. The work cell also contains two alpha survey instruments, swipes, swipe dispenser, and other ancillary equipment. An external controller interfaces with the robot controller, survey instruments and other ancillary equipment to control the overall process. SRNL is developing automated equipment for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion (PDC) Project that is slated for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment being developed is automated packaging equipment for packaging plutonium bearing materials in accordance with DOE-STD-3013-2004. The subject of this paper is the development of a prototype Radiological Survey Station (RSS). Other automated equipment being developed for the PDC includes the Bagless transfer System, Outer Can Welder, Gantry Robot System (GRS) and Leak Test Station. The purpose of the RSS is to perform a frisk and swipe of the DOE Standard 3013 Container (either inner can or outer can) to check for fixed and transferable contamination. This is required to verify that the contamination levels are within the limits specified in DOE-STD-3013-2004 and 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. The surface contamination limit for the 3013 Outer Can (OC) is 500 dpm/100 cm2 (total) and 20 dpm/100 cm2 (transferable). This paper will concentrate on the RSS developments for the 3013 OC but the system for the 3013 Inner Can (IC) is nearly identical.

Dalmaso, M.; Gibbs, K.; Gregory, D.

2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

Confirmatory radiological survey of portions of the former A. H. Robins Research Center, Richmond, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

The former A.H. Robins Research Center, in Richmond, VA, was devoted primarily to the research and development of pharmaceuticals. The use of radionuclides at the A.H. Robins Research Center was first begun in the early 1960s and the facility is now operating under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License No. 45-09042-01. A. H. Robins' Drug Metabolism Department used radioactive material (H-3, C-14, Na-22, P-32, S-35, CI-36, Ca-45, Cr-51, Ni-63, Rb-86, I-125, I-129, I-131, and Cs-137) in laboratory tracer studies on animals, for calibration of instrumentation, and for research analyses. The radionuclides were used in various,rooms throughout the facility. Following its acquisition by American Home Products in 1990, radionuclide activities were discontinued at this facility. The process for the termination of the material license for A.H. Robins (AHR) was initiated by the Corporate Radiation Health Safety Officer of Wyeth-Ayerst Research (WAR), another wholly owned subsidiary of American Home Products (AHP). In June 1990, WAR developed and submitted a decommissioning plan to the NRC. A radiological survey of the areas in which radionuclides were known to have been handled was performed to determine the extent of the contamination. During the cleanup and survey of the facility, the licensee identified H-3 and C-14 as the major

Adams, W.C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and surrounding area, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and the surrounding area was conducted from mid-August through early September 1984 by EG G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy. The radiological survey was part of the United States Department of Energy Comprehensive Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS) program, which provides state-of-the-art remote sensing to support the needs of the various DOE facilities. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the area surrounding the project site. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. 8 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

Berry, H.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Lakeview, Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Lakeview, Oregon, show that the average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings pile and the evaporation pond area (now dry) is close to the average background level for the area (11 ..mu..R/hr). The /sup 226/Ra concentration in most of the surface soil and sediment samples is also at or below the average background value for surface soil samples in the area (0.8 pCi/g). Calculated /sup 226/Ra concentrations, based on gamma radiation measurements in shallow (1-m-deep) holes, are in agreement with the results of surface soil and sediment analyses and with gamma-ray exposure rate measurements. The tailings at this site have been stabilized by the addition of 46 to 60 cm (18 to 24 in.) of soil that supports vigorous growth of vegetation. This treatment, coupled with a low-level inventory of /sup 226/Ra in the tailings (50 Ci), has resulted in limited spread of tailings by wind and water.

Haywood, F.F.; Burden, J.E.; Ellis, B.S.; Loy, E.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey of two inactive mill sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in April 1976 are presented. One mill, referred to in this report as North Continent (NC), was operated primarily for recovery of radium and vanadium and, only briefly, uranium. The Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) mill produced a uranium concentrate for processing elsewhere and, although low-level contamination with /sup 226/Ra was widespread at this site, the concentration of this nuclide in tailings was much lower than at the NC site. The latter site also has an area with a high above-ground gamma dose rate (2700 ..mu..R/hr) and a high-surface /sup 226/Ra concentration (5800 pCi/g). This area, which is believed to have been a liquid disposal location during plant operations, is contained within a fence. A solid disposal area outside the present fence contains miscellaneous contaminated debris. The estimated concentration of /sup 226/Ra as a function of depth, based on gamma hole-logging data, is presented for 27 holes drilled at the two sites.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Results of the radiological survey at the Niagara-Mohawk property, Railroad Avenue, Colonie, New York (AL218)  

SciTech Connect

A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. The Niagara-Mohawk property on Railroad Avenue in Colonie, New York, was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated June 11, 1987. This commercial property is an irregularly shaped lot partially occupied by an electric power substation and associated transmission lines. Portions of the property that were swampy and heavily vegetated were inaccessible to the survey team. There are no buildings on the property. A diagram showing the approximate boundaries and the 15-m grid network established for measurements on the property is shown. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/45 m wide by 246 m deep. Two views of the property are shown. 13 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Marley, J.L.; Carrier, R.F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and documentation of expert system verification and validation methodologies. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third volume in the final report for the Expert System Verification and Validation (V&V) project which was jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ultimate objective is the formulation of guidelines for the V&V of expert systems for use in nuclear power applications. The purpose of this activity was to survey and document techniques presently in use for expert system V&V. The survey effort included an extensive telephone interviewing program, site visits, and a thorough bibliographic search and compilation. The major finding was that V&V of expert systems is not nearly as established or prevalent as V&V of conventional software systems. When V&V was used for expert systems, it was almost always at the system validation stage after full implementation and integration usually employing the non-systematic dynamic method of {open_quotes}ad hoc testing.{close_quotes} There were few examples of employing V&V in the early phases of development and only weak sporadic mention of the possibilities in the literature. There is, however, a very active research area concerning the development of methods and tools to detect problems with, particularly, rule-based expert systems. Four such static-testing methods were identified which were not discovered in a comprehensive review of conventional V&V methods in an earlier task.

Groundwater, E.H.; Miller, L.A.; Mirsky, S.M. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE SPRU LOWER LEVEL HILLSIDE AREA AT THE KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

During August 10, 2011 through August 19, 2011, and October 23, 2011 through November 4, 2011, ORAU/ORISE conducted verification survey activities at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) site that included in-process inspections, surface scans, and soil sampling of the Lower Level Hillside Area. According to the Type-B Investigation Report, Sr-90 was the primary contributor to the majority of the activity (60 times greater than the Cs-137 activity). The evaluation of the scan data and sample results obtained during verification activities determined that the primary radionuclide of concern, Sr-90, was well below the agreed upon soil cleanup objective (SCO) of 30 pCi/g for the site. However, the concentration of Cs-137 in the four judgmental samples collected in final status survey (FSS) Units A and B was greater than the SCO. Both ORAU and aRc surveys identified higher Cs-137 concentrations in FSS Units A and B; the greatest concentrations were indentified in FSS Unit A.

Harpenau, Evan M.; Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

An aerial radiological survey of the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and surrounding area, Titusville, Florida: Date of survey: October 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) was performed during the period 9 through 23 October 1985. This survey was conducted in three parts. First, a low resolution, low sensitivity background survey was performed that encompassed the entire KSC and CCAFS area. Next, two smaller, high resolution, high sensitivity surveys were conducted: the first focused on Launch Complexes 39A and 39B, and the second on the Shuttle Landing Facility. The areas encompassed by the surveys were 200, 5.5, and 8.5 square miles (500, 14, and 22 sq km), respectively. The purpose of these surveys was to provide information useful for an emergency response to a radiological accident. Results of the background survey are presented as isoradiation contour maps of both total exposure rate and man-made gross count superimposed on a mosaic of recent aerial photographs. Results of the two small, detailed surveys are also presented as an isoradiation contour map of exposure rate on the aerial photograph base. These data were evaluated to establish sensitivity limits for mapping the presence of plutonium-238. Natural background exposure rates at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station are very low, generally ranging from 4 to 6.5 microroentgens per hour (..mu..R/h) and less than 4 ..mu..R/h in wet areas. However, exposure rates in developed areas were observed to be higher due to the importation of construction materials not characteristic of the area. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An aerial radiological survey of the Robert Emmett Ginna Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Ontario, New York  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial radioactivity surrounding the Robert Emmett Ginna Nuclear Power Plant was measured using aerial radiological surveying techniques. The purpose of this survey was to document exposure rates near the plant and to identify unexpected, man-made radiation sources within the survey area. The surveyed area included land areas within a three-mile radius of the plant site. Data were acquired using an airborne detection system that employed sodium iodide, thallium-activated detectors. Exposure-rate and photopeak counts were computed from these data and plotted on aerial photographs of the survey area. Several ground-based exposure measurements were made for comparison with the aerial survey results. Exposure rates in the area surrounding the plant site varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour. Man-made radiation (cobalt-60 within the plant site and cesium-1 37 directly over the reactor) was found at the plant site. In addition, small areas of suspected cesium-137 activity were found within the survey areas. Other than these small sites, the survey area was free of man-made radioac- tivity.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Confirmatory radiological survey for the 190-C Main Pumphouse Facility decommissioning at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An independent assessment of remedial action activities at the 190-C Main Pumphouse Facility at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington has been accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Assessments Group. The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with DOE applicable guidelines and provide independent measurements of the activity levels in the 190-C trenches and 105-C process water tunnels. The assessment included reviews of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan and data provided in the pre- and post-remedial action surveys. An on-site independent verification survey of the facility was conducted during the period of November 19--21, 1996. The independent verification survey included beta and gamma scans, smears for removable contamination, and direct measurements for beta-gamma activity in the trenches and tunnels. The same measurements and scans, with the addition of alpha measurements, were performed on the floor in the filter repair confinement area. The facility was also spot-checked for direct alpha and beta-gamma activity.

Coleman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Forbes, G.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Section

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and assessment of conventional software verification and validation methods. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

By means of a literature survey, a comprehensive set of methods was identified for the verification and validation of conventional software. The 153 methods so identified were classified according to their appropriateness for various phases of a developmental life-cycle -- requirements, design, and implementation; the last category was subdivided into two, static testing and dynamic testing methods. The methods were then characterized in terms of eight rating factors, four concerning ease-of-use of the methods and four concerning the methods` power to detect defects. Based on these factors, two measurements were developed to permit quantitative comparisons among methods, a Cost-Benefit metric and an Effectiveness Metric. The Effectiveness Metric was further refined to provide three different estimates for each method, depending on three classes of needed stringency of V&V (determined by ratings of a system`s complexity and required-integrity). Methods were then rank-ordered for each of the three classes by terms of their overall cost-benefits and effectiveness. The applicability was then assessed of each for the identified components of knowledge-based and expert systems, as well as the system as a whole.

Mirsky, S.M.; Groundwater, E.H.; Hayes, J.E.; Miller, L.A. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

An aerial radiological survey of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Forked River, New Jersey. Date of survey: September 18--25, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant in Forked River, New Jersey, during the period September 18 through September 24, 1992. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) over a 26-square-mile (67-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power plant and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 4 and 10 microroentgens per hour and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system. A previous survey of the power plant was conducted in August 1969 during its initial startup phase. Exposure rates and radioactive isotopes revealed in both surveys were consistent and within normal terrestrial background levels.

Hopkins, H.A.; McCall, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Independent Verification Final Summary Report for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the independent verification was to determine if BJC performed the appropriate actions to meet the specified “hot spot” cleanup criteria of 500 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) uranium-238 (U-238) in surface soil. Specific tasks performed by the independent verification team (IVT) to satisfy this objective included: 1) performing radiological walkover surveys, and 2) collecting soil samples for independent analyses. The independent verification (IV) efforts were designed to evaluate radioactive contaminants (specifically U-238) in the exposed surfaces below one foot of the original site grade, given that the top one foot layer of soil on the site was removed in its entirety.

P.C. Weaver

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

ORISE: Independent verification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent verification Independent verification ORISE techinician performs environmental scanning The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent environmental assessments and verification to determine the effectiveness of radiological cleanup at decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Since 1980, ORISE has performed independent verification at more than 500 sites in 42 states and the District of Columbia. As the primary independent verification contractor for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup projects and the only verification contractor for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), we validate that soil, water and structures are within established state and federal release criteria, and can be safely designated for public use.

131

FINAL REPORT –INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY BUILDING 330 PROJECT FOOTPRINT, ARGONNE, ILLINOIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORISE conducted onsite verification activities of the Building 330 project footprint during the period of June 6 through June 7, 2011. The verification activities included technical reviews of project documents, visual inspections, radiation surface scans, and sampling and analysis. The draft verification report was issued in July 2011 with findings and recommendations. The contractor performed additional evaluations and remediation.

ERIKA N. BAILEY

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

An aerial radiological survey of the Babcock and Wilcox Nuclear Facilities and surrounding area, Lynchburg, Virginia. Date of survey: July 1988  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 18 through July 25, 1988, over a 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) area surrounding the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear facilities located near Lynchburg, Virginia. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) with line spacings of 91 meters (300 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 8 to 12 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). A search of the data for man-made radiation sources revealed the presence of three areas of high count rates in the survey area. Spectra accumulated over the main plant showed the presence of cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co) and cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs). A second area near the main plant indicated the presence of uranium-235 ({sup 235}U). Protactinium-234m ({sup 234m}Pa) and {sup 60}Co were detected over a building to the east of the main plant. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries in support of the aerial data.

Guss, P.P.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH03, Shiprock, NM, July-November 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH03 was conducted on an intermittent basis from July 26 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - a residential trailer, the main structure, and an old gas pump housing. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or paved. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the trailer. However, the results of the radiological assessment did indicate the occurrence of elevated levels of gamma, surface alpha, and radon daughter radioactivity within the main structure. The short-term radon daughter measurements exceeded the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background. The assessment also indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft/sup 2/ of the grounds adjacent to and surrounding the main structure on the east, south, and west sides. The contamination appeared to be due to the presence of unprocessed uranium ore. Analysis of surface soil samples collected from the environs indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

Flynn, K F; Justus, A L; Sholeen, C M; Smith, W H; Wynveen, R A

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR EXPOSURE UNITS Z2-24, Z2-31, Z2-32, AND Z2-36 IN ZONE 2 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management selected Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to perform independent verification (IV) at Zone 2 of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU has concluded IV surveys, per the project-specific plan (PSP) (ORAU 2013a) covering exposure units (EUs) Z2-24, -31, -32, and -36. The objective of this effort was to verify the following. • Target EUs comply with requirements in the Zone 2 Record of Decision (ROD) (DOE 2005), as implemented by using the dynamic verification strategy presented in the dynamic work plan (DWP) (BJC 2007) • Commitments in the DWP were adequately implemented, as verified via IV surveys and soil sampling The Zone 2 ROD establishes maximum remediation level (RLmax) values and average RL (RLavg) values for the primary contaminants of concern (COCs) U-234, U-235, U-238, Cs-137, Np-237, Ra-226, Th-232, arsenic, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Table 1.1 lists Zone 2 COCs with associated RLs. Additional radiological and chemical contaminants were also identified during past characterization and monitoring actions, though the ROD does not present RLs for these potential contaminants. IV activities focused on the identification and quantification of ROD-specific COCs in surface soils, but also generated data for other analytes to support future decisions. ORAU personnel also reviewed EU-specific phased construction completion reports (PCCRs) to focus IV activities and identify potential judgmental sample locations, if any.

none,

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radiological Habits Survey: Hunterston, 2007 This page has been intentionally left blank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................23 4.7 Internal exposure..... .................................................................15 Figure 2 The Hunterston terrestrial (outer ring) and direct radiation (inner ring) survey areas AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS ...........................................................................21 4

136

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radiological survey of shoreline vegetation from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1990--1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A great deal of interest exists concerning the seepage of radiologically contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River where it borders the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site (Hanford Reach). Areas of particular interest include the 100-N Area, the Old Hanford Townsite, and the 300 Area springs. While the radiological character of the seeps and springs along the Hanford Site shoreline has been studied, less attention has been given to characterizing the radionuclides that may be present in shoreline vegetation. The objective of this study was to characterize radionuclide concentrations in shoreline plants along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River that were usable by humans for food or other purposes. Vegetation in two areas was found to have elevated levels of radionuclides. Those areas were the 100-N Area and the Old Hanford Townsite. There was also some indication of uranium accumulation in milfoil and onions collected from the 300 Area. Tritium was elevated above background in all areas; {sup 60}Co and {sup 9O}Sr were found in highest concentrations in vegetation from the 100-N Area. Technetium-99 was found in 2 of 12 plants collected from the Old Hanford Townsite and 1 of 10 samples collected upstream from the Vernita Bridge. The concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and isotopes of uranium were just above background in all three areas (100-N Area, Old Hanford Townsite, and 300 Area).

Antonio, E.J.; Poston, T.M.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

An aerial radiological survey of the project Rio Blanco and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, conducted an aerial radiation survey of the area surrounding ground zero of Project Rio Blanco in the northwestern section of Colorado in June 1993. The object of the survey was to determine if there were man-made radioisotopes on or near the surface resulting from a nuclear explosion in 1972. No indications of surface contamination were found. A search for the cesium-137 radioisotope was negative. The Minimum Detectable Activity for cesium-137 is presented for several detection probabilities. The natural terrestrial exposure rates in units of Roentgens per hour were mapped and are presented in the form of a contour map over-laid on an aerial photograph. A second team made independent ground-based measurements in four places within the survey area. The average agreement of the ground-based with aerial measurements was six percent.

Singman, L.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Confirmatory radiological survey of portions of the former A. H. Robins Research Center, Richmond, Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The former A.H. Robins Research Center, in Richmond, VA, was devoted primarily to the research and development of pharmaceuticals. The use of radionuclides at the A.H. Robins Research Center was first begun in the early 1960s and the facility is now operating under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License No. 45-09042-01. A. H. Robins` Drug Metabolism Department used radioactive material (H-3, C-14, Na-22, P-32, S-35, CI-36, Ca-45, Cr-51, Ni-63, Rb-86, I-125, I-129, I-131, and Cs-137) in laboratory tracer studies on animals, for calibration of instrumentation, and for research analyses. The radionuclides were used in various,rooms throughout the facility. Following its acquisition by American Home Products in 1990, radionuclide activities were discontinued at this facility. The process for the termination of the material license for A.H. Robins (AHR) was initiated by the Corporate Radiation Health Safety Officer of Wyeth-Ayerst Research (WAR), another wholly owned subsidiary of American Home Products (AHP). In June 1990, WAR developed and submitted a decommissioning plan to the NRC. A radiological survey of the areas in which radionuclides were known to have been handled was performed to determine the extent of the contamination. During the cleanup and survey of the facility, the licensee identified H-3 and C-14 as the major

Adams, W.C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An aerial radiological survey of the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and surrounding area, Tucson, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey, which was conducted from March 1 to 13, 1995, covered a 51-square-mile (132-square-kilometer) area centered on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB) in Tucson, Arizona. The results of the survey are reported as contours of bismuth-214 ({sup 214}Bi) soil concentrations, which are characteristic of natural uranium and its progeny, and as contours of the total terrestrial exposure rates extrapolated to one meter above ground level. All data were scaled and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the DMAFB area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 9 to 20 microroentgens per hour at one meter above the ground. Elevated levels of terrestrial radiation due to increased concentrations of {sup 214}Bi (natural uranium) were observed over the Southern Pacific railroad yard and along portions of the railroad track bed areas residing both within and outside the base boundaries. No man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was observed by the aerial survey. High-purity germanium spectrometer and pressurized ionization chamber measurements at eight locations within the base boundaries were used to verify the integrity of the aerial results. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to be in agreement. However, the ground-based measurements were able to detect minute quantities of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) at six of the eight locations examined. The presence of {sup 137}Cs is a remnant of fallout from foreign and domestic atmospheric nuclear weapons testing that occurred in the 1950s and early 1960s. Cesium-137 concentrations varied from 0.1 to 0.3 picocuries per gram, which is below the minimum detectable activity of the aerial system.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Radiological Habits Survey: Torness, 2006 This page has been intentionally left blank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cover 25 5.3 Novel radiation pathways 25 5.4 Internal exposure 25 6. DIRECT RADIATION 27 6.1 Direct.5 Wildfowling 19 4.6 The use of seaweed as a fertiliser 19 4.7 Internal exposure 19 4.8 External exposure 22 4 ratios for use in dose assessments 13 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 14 4.1 Aquatic survey area 14 4

142

Radiological surveys of properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines methods for determining the extent and nature of contamination on properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites. Methods are also examined for verifying the success of remedial actions in removing the residual radioactive materials. Using literature review and practical experiences from the Edgemont, South Dakota survey program a critical review is made of sampling programs, instrumentation, analytical procedures, data reporting format, and statistical analyses of data. Protocols are recommended for measuring indoor and outdoor gamma-ray exposure rates, surface and subsurface Radium-226 concentrations in soil, and radon daughter concentrations.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, th

Cusick L.T.

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inactive uranium-mill tailings pile at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, contains approximately 1520 Ci of /sup 226/Ra in 2.4 million metric tons of tailings covering an area of 43 hectares. All of the former mill buildings were intact and, at the time of this survey, several were in use. The tailings have not been stabilized, but the crusty surface is reported to be resistant to wind erosion. The average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings is 720 ..mu..R/h while the average rate in the former mill area is 150 ..mu..R/h. The adjacent area, between the mill site, ponds, and tailings pile, has an average exposure rate of 230 ..mu..R/h. Gamma radiation measurements outside these areas, as well as the results of analyses of surface or near-surface sediment and soil samples, show fairly wide dispersion of contamination around the site. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 18 holes drilled at the site, calculated from gamma-ray monitoring data, is presented graphically and compared with measured concentrations in two holes.

Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting {sup 238}U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected {sup 241}Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area.

Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Long-Term Overvoltage on Medical Radiology and Treatment Equipment Detected by First Power-Line Monitoring Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study describes an equipment-to-electromagnetic environment incompatibility that occurred in a cancer research and treatment center radiology laboratory that is part of a large teaching and research hospital.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

ORNL-5680 Radiological Surveys  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

These guidelines recommend the following graded action levels for remedial action in terms of external gamma radiation level (EGR) and indoor radon daughter concentration level...

148

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures ........................................................................................2 Final Verification Signatures ....................................................................................................3 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iv

149

Results of the radiological survey at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company (3rd floor), 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HO001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Company (third floor), 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HO001) in August 1993. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, derived from the former Manhattan Engineer District project. The survey included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; and debris sampling for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated {sup 238}U surface contamination in excess of the DOE criteria for surface contamination. The third floor was generally contaminated over 25 percent of its area with isolated spots in the remaining area. Although three isolated spots of contamination were found in areas other than on the third floor (in the same southeastern comer of the facility), they were remediated by sampling. Based on the survey results, this site is recommended for remediation.

Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

An aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited areas of Los Alamos. The data from Technical Area 15, another part of the survey, will be published in another report. Contour maps of the gamma survey data show some Cs-137 activity in Los Alamos Canyon as well as in DP Canyon beside TA-21. Some Be-7, Sb-124, and Co-58 apparently exist in the canyon immediately below the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) ponds. Estimates on the Cs-137 inventory in the canyons range from 210 mCi to 1270 mCi. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates ranged from 6{mu}R/h to about 18{mu}R/h. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR SUB-SLAB SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE FORMER BUILDING K-33, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At DOE’s request, ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the K-33 sub-slab soil during the period of August 2011 through May 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections and measurement and sampling activities. LSRS was forthcoming with information relating to surface scan results. Scans performed by the contractor were of adequate coverage and overall data appear to represent actual site conditions. However, the LSRS technicians failed to identify several areas of elevated direct gamma radiation. Most of the samples taken by ORAU at locations of elevated instrument response were above the remediation concentration for one or more radionuclides of concern (ROC). The contractor was, however, quick to perform additional remediation of areas identified to have contamination above the guidelines. Further investigation by ORAU was not requested once additional remediation was completed. It is presumed the remediation contractor’s future PCCR will present detailed and conclusive evidence that K-33 sub-slab soils either comply or do not comply with record of decision (ROD) criteria. However, ORAU concludes, based on both independent verification (IV) data and data provided by LSRS, that the remediation contractor followed appropriate and applicable procedures and that the associated data adequately represent site conditions.

NICK A. ALTIC

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

A series of low-altitude aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18, and 25 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A series of low-altitude, aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18,and 25 of the Nevada Test Site was conducted from December 1996 through June 1999. The surveys were conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The flights were conducted at a nominal altitude of 15 meters above ground level along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 23 meters apart. The purpose of these low-altitude surveys was to measure, map, and define the areas of americium-241 activity. The americium contamination will be used to determine the areas of plutonium contamination. Americium-241 activity was detected within 8 of the 11 regions. The three regions where americium-241 was not detected were in the inactive Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex in Area 25, which encompassed the Test Cell A and Test Cell C reactor test stands and the Reactor Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly facility.

Colton, D.P.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaninated material was discovered in the area during an EG&G aerial radiological survey,l and confirmed by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

154

Health and Safety Research Divlsion RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaminated material was discovered in the area during an. EG&G aerial radiological survey,l and confirmed by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

155

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director M. G. Yalcintas - Field Survey Supervisor Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM Prepared by the OAK...

156

Radiological Assistance Program (RAP)- Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Radiological Major Programs > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Radiological Assistance Program Bookmark and Share Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation. Click on image to view larger image. The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team at Argonne can provide assistance in the event of a radiological accident or incident. Support ranges from giving technical information or advice over the telephone, to sending highly trained team members and state-of-the-art equipment to the accident site to help identify and minimize any radiological hazards. The

157

Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiological Habits Survey, Torness 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................ 30 4.5 Internal exposure................................................................................................................ 39 5.4 Internal Exposure ................................................................................ 12 4 AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS

159

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal

160

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard Section/page/paragraph Change Section 211, page 2-3, paragraph 1 Add new paragraph 1: "Approval by the appropriate Secretarial Officer or designee should be required

162

Supplemental Radiological Survey Plan for the Lease of the Rooms Associated with C107 of Building K-1006 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, a portion of Bldg. K-1006 was leased to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) as part of the reindustrialization efforts at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The facility was subleased and is being used as an analytical laboratory. The 1998 lease did not include rooms C107, C107-A, C107-B, C107-C, and C107-D. The lease of these rooms is now desired. These rooms comprise the area to be surveyed. The building was constructed as a laboratory facility to support the gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment process. It also contains offices and administrative spaces for laboratory personnel. After the gaseous diffusion process was shut down in the mid-1980s, the building was used to provide research and development support to ETTP environmental, safety, and health programs; the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator; the Central Neutralization Facility; and other multi-site waste treatment activities. It also served as the chemistry laboratory for the Environmental Technology Technical Services Organization. The activities currently conducted in Bldg. K-1006 utilize a variety of analytical techniques. Some of the major techniques being employed are X-ray analysis, electron microanalysis, and spectrochemical analysis. In 1998, a portion of Bldg. K-1006 was leased to CROET as part of the reindustrialization efforts at ETTP. The facility was subleased and is being used as an analytical laboratory. The 1998 lease did not include Rooms C107, C107-A, C107-B, C107-C, and C107-D. Some demolition of furniture and decontamination activities has taken place for Rooms C 107 and C 107-B since the last radiological survey of those rooms. In March 2009, a final remedial action (RA) was performed for the Bldg. K-1006 north basement sump. The Bldg. K-1006 north basement sump is a nominal 30-in.-diameter, 36-in.-deep concrete structure in the north corner of room C107B. The building receives groundwater in-leakage that is periodically pumped to the sewer system via this float-controlled pump. Solids in the bottom of the sump consisted of an estimated 1-ft{sup 3} coarse-grained material that varied in thickness from 0 to 4 in. with no suspended fraction. The RA consisted of removing the water in the sump and then removing and sampling the solids. The solids were mixed with grout after removal and allowed to set. The solids were then disposed off-site at an approved disposal facility. The building sump will remain until the K-1006 building is demolished. The actions for the K- 1006 sump are described in the revised Phased Construction Completion Report for Exposure Unit (EU) Z2-33, which received regulatory approval in December 2009.

Blevins M.F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C....

164

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION...

165

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

166

RADIOLOGICAL SURWY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111 111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11". .. .. ; :;: ;I, ' . 1::. J;,;. ~;_:y,;:::::; - T.J..:+~uS~~ .' .:' : : . . .. ...: .:.. : OFTHE EXCERIORPORTIONS O F THE FORIMER BLISS ANT3 LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FAC' KJTy - BUFFALO,NEw YORK - T. J.VITKUS I : . . : : ' . .:. : I : : .. :. Prepaied for.:the:' 6ffice.iibfiEnvir~nmenfal Re$o&idn z . . :

167

Verification of Adaptive Systems  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance for them. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [New York Institute of Technology (NYIT); Vassev, Emil [Lero – The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre; Hinchey, Mike [Lero – The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre; Rouff, Christopher [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Buskens, Richard [Lockheed Martin Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiological Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

For S Radiological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? . ? . -. .- * -* (\/If.r.-5- .* , d- For S Radiological ' mer Bridgepo pecial Metals Adrian, Survey of the Irt Brass Company Extrusion Plant, Michigan / /f?t' . ( F. F. Haywood H. W. Dickson W. D. Cottrell W. H. Shinpaugh _ : I., _-. .I ( ._ rc/ DOE/EV-0005128 ORNL-57 13 / J. E. Burden 0. R. Stone R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith 4 , Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A06 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedStatesGovernment. Neither theUnitedStatesGovernment noranyagency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

170

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Radiological Training for NSLS Access has been replaced with BNL General Employee Radiological Training (GERT). Please read the...

171

Confirmatory Survey Report for the Quehanna Decommissioning Project, Karthaus, PA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The survey activities consisted of visual inspections and radiological surveys including beta and gamma surface scans and surface beta activity measurements.

W. C. Adams

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Treaty Verification | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification SHARE Treaty Verification ORNL is a strong contributor to future nonproliferation and arms control initiatives through research and development of radiation...

173

Radiological Control Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support personnel, an accredited Personnel Monitoring service, a fully functional Instrumentation & Calibration facility, expertise in Radiological Engineering and the...

174

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-F-2, 183-F Clearwells, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-017  

SciTech Connect

The 126-F-2 site is the clearwell facility formerly used as part of the reactor cooling water treatment at the 183-F facility. During demolition operations in the 1970s, potentially contaminated debris was disposed in the eastern clearwell structure. The site has been remediated by removing all debris in the clearwell structure to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of radiological surveys and visual inspection of the remediated clearwell structure show neither residual contamination nor the potential for contaminant migration beyond the clearwell boundaries. The results of verification sampling at the remediation waste staging area demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

ORISE: Independent verification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to determine the effectiveness of radiological cleanup at decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Since 1980, ORISE has performed...

176

Real Time Quantitative Radiological Monitoring Equipment for Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, analyze, and characterize radiological contamination in soil. These systems have been successfully deployed at several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and Cold War Legacy closure sites. Traditionally, these systems have been used during the characterization and remediation of radiologically contaminated soils and surfaces; however, subsequent to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the applications of these systems have expanded to include homeland security operations for first response, continuing assessment and verification of cleanup activities in the event of the detonation of a radiological dispersal device. The core system components are a detector, a spectral analyzer, and a global positioning system (GPS). The system is computer controlled by menu-driven, user-friendly custom software designed for a technician-level operator. A wide variety of detectors have been used including several configurations of sodium iodide (NaI) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, and a large area proportional counter designed for the detection of x-rays from actinides such as Am-241 and Pu-238. Systems have been deployed from several platforms including a small all-terrain vehicle (ATV), hand-pushed carts, a backpack mounted unit, and an excavator mounted unit used where personnel safety considerations are paramount. The INL has advanced this concept, and expanded the system functionality to create an integrated, field-deployed analytical system through the use of tailored analysis and operations software. Customized, site specific software is assembled from a supporting toolbox of algorithms that streamline the data acquisition, analysis and reporting process. These algorithms include region specific spectral stripping, automated energy calibration, background subtraction, activity calculations based on measured detector efficiencies, and on-line data quality checks and measures. These analyses are combined to provide real-time areal activity and coverage maps that are displayed to the operator as the survey progresses. The flexible functionality of the INL systems are well suited to multiple roles supporting homeland security needs.

John R. Giles; Lyle G. Roybal; Michael V. Carpenter

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modular data structure verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes an approach for automatically verifying data structures, focusing on techniques for automatically proving formulas that arise in such verification. I have implemented this approach with my ...

Kuncak, Viktor (Viktor Jaroslav), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Automated deduction for verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated deduction uses computation to perform symbolic logical reasoning. It has been a core technology for program verification from the very beginning. Satisfiability solvers for propositional and first-order logic significantly automate the task ...

Natarajan Shankar

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Monitoring, verification, and accounting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

verification, and accounting (MVA) activities are underway verification, and accounting (MVA) activities are underway to ensure the injected CO 2 remains in the geologic formation. The first plant has been capturing CO 2 since December 2012, while the second plant completed construction in February and began carbon capture operations in March. Both units are now operating at full capacity. More than 222,000 tons of CO 2 have been captured and provided for storage

180

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix B December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . ii Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

182

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

183

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

184

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

185

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technican Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Study Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. i 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

186

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Instructor's Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. L 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

187

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution...

188

Microsoft Word - Berger Radiological Conditions.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dec. Dec. 2, 2009 1 Summary of Information Regarding Radiological Conditions of NFSS Vicinity Properties J. D. Berger, CHP DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc. Oak Ridge, TN The following is a summary of the information obtained from reviews of radiological survey reports, prepared by ORAU in support of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. These reports were obtained for review from the IVEA Program at ORAU/ORISE. A list of the reports, reviewed for this summary, is included at the end of this report. Hard copies of reports for ORAU survey activities of NFSS and NFSS Vicinity Properties are available at the South Campus Site of ORAU (these reports are not available in electronic form). In addition, there are 12 - 14 boxes of hard-copy supporting data and information, pertinent to the surveys. I inspected the contents of Box 54. That box contained records for NFSS Vicinity

189

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization surveys Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site meets preliminary regulatory standards. ORISE designs characterization surveys using the data quality objectives process. This approach focuses on the particular objective of characterization, and ensures that only the data needed to address the characterization decisions are collected. Data collection efforts are

190

Radiological assessment of the town of Edgemont  

SciTech Connect

Congress, in 1980, gave the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility to coordinate and conduct a monitoring, engineering assessment, and remedial cleanup program in Edgemont, South Dakota. The Congressional intent was to locate public properties in Edgemont that had been contaminated by radioactive materials from a local uranium mill, and to clean up those properties. Because the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 gave NRC the authority to monitor for contamination but not to clean up contamination, Congress later assigned the remedial cleanup responsibility to the Department of Energy (DOE). NRC, through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), conducted a radiological survey of 96% of the properties in Edgemont and vicinity during the time period of September 1980 through April 1984. (Out of 976 total properties, 941 were surveyed.) The strategy of the survey was to screen properties for the possible presence of contamination by using short- and long-term radon progeny measurements, indoor and outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements, and soil radium-226 measurements. Properties that failed the screening surveys were measured more extensively to determine whether the elevated readings were due to residual radioactive materials from the uranium mill. This report contains the historical perspective of the Edgemont survey, explains the development and modifications of survey protocols, examines the problems encountered during the survey, and lists a summary of the results. The report also presents conclusions about the effectiveness of the survey techniques and about the rationale of a comprehensive survey of a whole community. The appendices section of this report contains all the protocols, a list of all the properties showing survey results for each, and reports on special studies conducted during the survey. These special studies contain many valuable insights that may prove beneficial to future radiological assessment surveys.

Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.; Young, J.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for Appliances Title International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for...

192

FACT SHEET ERDA'S RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY PROGRAM INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York; Site A, Cook County Forest Preserve, Palos Park, Illinois; Bridgeport Brass Metal Extfusion Plant (now property of General Motors Corporation), Adrian, Michigan;...

193

Quantum Money with Classical Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification.

Gavinsky, Dmitry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Verification and validation benchmarks.  

SciTech Connect

Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of achievement in V&V activities, how closely related the V&V benchmarks are to the actual application of interest, and the quantification of uncertainties related to the application of interest.

Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Automatic Estimation of the Radiological Inventory for the Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of the radiological inventory of Nuclear Facilities to be dismantled is a process that included information related with the physical inventory of all the plant and radiological survey. Estimation of the radiological inventory for all the components and civil structure of the plant could be obtained with mathematical models with statistical approach. A computer application has been developed in order to obtain the radiological inventory in an automatic way. Results: A computer application that is able to estimate the radiological inventory from the radiological measurements or the characterization program has been developed. In this computer applications has been included the statistical functions needed for the estimation of the central tendency and variability, e.g. mean, median, variance, confidence intervals, variance coefficients, etc. This computer application is a necessary tool in order to be able to estimate the radiological inventory of a nuclear facility and it is a powerful tool for decision taken in future sampling surveys.

Garcia-Bermejo, R.; Felipe, A.; Gutierrez, S.; Salas, E. [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion (Spain); Martin, N. [ENRESA (Spain)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved...

197

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7of 9 7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3 Qualification Area: Radiological Instrumentation.......................................5 Task 2-1.................. ..................................................................... 5 Objective.............................................................................. 5

198

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

199

TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TF Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern. The general logic and strategy of the program to achieve its objectives is shown on Fig. 1-1. Five prior programs form the basis for the TFE Verification Program: (1) AEC/NASA program of the 1960s and early 1970; (2) SP-100 concept development program;(3) SP-100 thermionic technology program; (4) Thermionic irradiations program in TRIGA in FY-86; (5) and Thermionic Technology Program in 1986 and 1987. 18 refs., 64 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Aerial survey finds no increase in radioactivity for Los Alamos...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Alamos County and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The radiological surveys, conducted in August 2011 and June 2012, found that radioisotopes and their associated exposure rates...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quantum Money with Classical Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

Dmitry Gavinsky

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

202

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-2008 1-2008 August 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techs\ Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.1-1B, Radiation Protection Programs, March 2007, and as outlined in DOE- STD- 1098-99, CN1, March 2005, DOE Radiological Control (the Radiological Control Standard - RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of

203

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Automatic Verification of String Manipulating ProgramsOverview Outline Overview Symbolic String Verification Composite Verification References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is it Vulnerable? We investigate string verification problem and present an automata-based approach for automatic verification of string manipulating programs based on symbolic string analysis. String analysis plays an important role in the security area. For instance, one can detect various web vulnerabilities like SQL Command Injection and Cross Site Scripting (XSS) attacks. Fang Yu, UCSB Automatic Verification of String Manipulating ProgramsOutline

Fang Yu; Cs Guest Leture

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Webinar - Software Verification & Validation? - 2012-08-04  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Webinar - Software Verification & Validation [1200]. Purpose: Webinar - Software Verification & Validation [1200]. At the ...

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

Security and Verification Provable cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security and Verification Provable cryptography Benjamin Grégoire1 Tamara Rezk1 1INRIA Sophia Antipolis - Méditerranée, France Cours de Master 2 Univerisité de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Security and Verification 1/ 33 #12;Cryptanalysis-driven Security Propose a cryptographic scheme Wait for someone to come

Gregoire, Benjamin - Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, Centre de recherche Sophia Antipolis

208

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 7% 2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NFOO2) J. K. Williams* and B. A. Berven *Biology Division Date Published November 1986 Investigation Team B. A. Berven - RASA Program Manager W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director W. H. Shinpaugh - Field Survey Supervisor

209

ETV Joint Verification Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations and stakeholder groups consisting of regulators, buyers, and vendor organizations, with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

141-2001 141-2001 April 2001 Change Notice No. 1 and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii

211

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14, Radiation Safety Training, of Implementation Guide G44.1B, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard [RCS - DOE-STD-1098-99, Ch. 1]. The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals

212

Radionuclide Inventory Distribution Project Data Evaluation and Verification White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing of nuclear explosives caused widespread contamination of surface soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Atmospheric tests produced the majority of this contamination. The Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) was developed to determine distribution and total inventory of radionuclides in surface soils at the NTS to evaluate areas that may present long-term health hazards. The RIDP achieved this objective with aerial radiological surveys, soil sample results, and in situ gamma spectroscopy. This white paper presents the justification to support the use of RIDP data as a guide for future evaluation and to support closure of Soils Sub-Project sites under the purview of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Use of the RIDP data as part of the Data Quality Objective process is expected to provide considerable cost savings and accelerate site closures. The following steps were completed: - Summarize the RIDP data set and evaluate the quality of the data. - Determine the current uses of the RIDP data and cautions associated with its use. - Provide recommendations for enhancing data use through field verification or other methods. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror  

SciTech Connect

Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

Hart, M

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Phase I: RCT Academics Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 1 Phase II: RCT Core Practical (JPMs) Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 1

215

Learning meets verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we give an overview on some algorithms for learning automata. Starting with Biermann's and Angluin's algorithms, we describe some of the extensions catering for specialized or richer classes of automata. Furthermore, we survey their recent ...

Martin Leucker

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

217

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TEXAS CITY CHEMICALS, INC.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the Borden Chemical Division plant in Texas City, Texas (see Fig. l), on November 17, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those...

218

Scoring Rules for Forecast Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of probabilistic forecast verification is approached from a theoretical point of view starting from three basic desiderata: additivity, exclusive dependence on physical observations (“locality”), and strictly proper behavior. By ...

Riccardo Benedetti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wavelets and Field Forecast Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current field forecast verification measures are inadequate, primarily because they compress the comparison between two complex spatial field processes into one number. Discrete wavelet transforms (DWTs) applied to analysis and contemporaneous ...

William M. Briggs; Richard A. Levine

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Runtime verification: the application perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past decade, Runtime Verification (RV) has gained much focus, from both the research community and practitioners. Roughly speaking, RV combines a set of theories, techniques and tools aiming towards efficient analysis of systems' executions and ...

Yliès Falcone; Lenore D. Zuck

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AHAM DOE Verification Test Agreement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Verification Test Agreement AHAM DOE Verification Test Agreement This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing...

222

Code verification by static analysis: a mathematical programming ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code verification by static analysis: a mathematical ... One of the most important verification techniques is static code analysis by abstract ...... verif-instances.zip.

223

PNNL: Available Technologies: Nuclear & Radiological  

PNNL has more than 40 years of experience in radiological science and radiochemical separations based on its activities at the U.S. Department of ...

224

Radiological Toolbox User's Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Eckerman, KF

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Smart Radiological Dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population

227

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

98 98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata May 2004 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-98 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration,

228

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established NNSA's Administrator...

229

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix...

230

Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at the Nevada Test Site, INS-O-06-02 Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at...

231

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Part 2 Module 2 page 17 Medical radiation sources (total average dose ~ 54 mrem/yr) 1) X rays (total average dose ~ 40mrem/yr) a) X rays are similar to gamma rays; however, they originate outside the nucleus.

232

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

233

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

234

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

235

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

236

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". Part 3 1.05-9 4) U.S. national average from diagnostic

238

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Study Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." i 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. i 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. INTRODUCTION Environmental monitoring plays a large role in the field of radiological control.

239

A New Verification Score for Public Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CREF, a new verification score for public forecasts, is introduced. This verification score rewards a forecaster who forecasts a rare event accurately. CREF was used to verify local forecasts at the Weather Service Forecast Office (WSFO) in ...

Dean P. Gulezian

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Scientific Verification of Deterministic River Stage Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One element of a complete verification system is the ability to determine why forecasts behave as they do. This paper describes and demonstrates an operationally feasible method for conducting this type of diagnostic verification analysis. ...

Edwin Welles; Soroosh Sorooshian

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Forecast verification: Its Complexity and Dimensionality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two fundamental characteristics of forecast verification problems—complexity and dimensionality—are described. To develop quantitative definitions of these characteristics, a general framework for the problem of absolute verification (AV) is ...

Allan H. Murphy

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD 2006 PROCUREMENT VERIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission DRAFT STAFF REPORT RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD 2007 PROCUREMENT VERIFICATION RPS 2007 Verification Report APRIL 2011 CEC3002011002SD #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Gina Executive Director DISCLAIMER Staff members of the California Energy Commission prepared this report

243

Verification and validation of simulation models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss verification and validation of simulation models. Four different approaches to deciding model validity are described; two different paradigms that relate verification and validation to the model development process are presented; ...

Robert G. Sargent

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Final Status Survey for the Largest Decommissioning Project on Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist the United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) re-industrialization efforts at its gaseous diffusion site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, known as the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the US DOE awarded a 6-year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) contract to BNG America (formerly BNFL Inc.) in 1997. The ETTP 3-Building D and D Project included the removal and disposition of the materials and equipment from the K-33, K-31, and K-29 Gaseous Diffusion Plant buildings. The three buildings comprise more than 4.8 million square feet (446,000 square meters) of floor surface area and more than 350 million pounds (148 million kilograms) of hazardous and radioactively contaminated material, making it the largest nuclear D and D project in progress anywhere in the world. The logistical hurdles involved in a project of this scope and magnitude required an extensive amount of Engineering and Health Physics professionals. In order to accomplish the Final Status Survey (FSS) for a project of this scope, the speed and efficiency of automated survey equipment was essential. Surveys of floors, structural steel and ceilings up to 60 feet (18 meters) were required. The FSS had to be expanded to include additional remediation and surveys due to characterization surveys and assumptions regarding the nature and extent of contamination provided by the US DOE. Survey design and technical bases had to consider highly variable constituents; including uranium from depleted to low enrichment, variable levels of Technetium-99 and transuranic nuclides, which were introduced into the cascade during the 1960's when recycled uranium (RU) from Savannah River was re-enriched at the facility. The RU was transported to unexpected locations from leaks in the cascade by complex building ventilation patterns. The primary survey tool used for the post remediation and FSS was the Surface Contamination Monitor (SCM) and the associated Survey Information Management System (SIMS), developed by Shonka Research Associates, Inc. (SRA). Final Status Radiological surveys have been performed over the last year on a 24-hour per day and seven day per week basis. As many as eight SCMs have been in use at any one time. Each SCM can perform over 250,000 measurements per hour, simultaneously collecting both scan and static measurement requirements to meet FSS regulatory requirements. Thus, efficient management and quality control of giga-bytes of data was needed. In addition, some surveys were accomplished with traditional instrumentation and with some using other automated systems such as smear counters. The FSS Reports required integration of all of the data in a format that permitted undemanding verification by DOE using the ORISE/ESSAP IVT contractor. A project of this scope and magnitude could not have been accomplished without the use of the SCM and SIMS. This paper reports on the survey and logistical issues that required ingenuity of the entire 1,700-person workforce to resolve. In particular, this paper summarizes the issues addressed and resolved by the integrated team of survey technicians, subject matter experts (SMEs), radiological engineers, data processing staff and BNG America management. (authors)

Dubiel, R.W. [Millennium Services, Inc., 222 Creekstone Ridge, Woodstock, GA 30188 (United States); Miller, J. [BNG America, 804 S. Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Quayle, D. [Shonka Research Associates, Inc., 704 S. Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Guidelines for the Monitoring, Evaluation, Reporting, Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation, Reporting, Verification, and Certification of Forestry Projects for Climate Change Mitigation Title Guidelines for the Monitoring, Evaluation, Reporting,...

246

Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

control after the property has been demonstrated to meet the Department's stringent radiation protection requirements. Lessons Learned from Independent Verification...

247

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

248

K Basins Field Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Field Verification Program establishes a uniform and systematic process to ensure that technical information depicted on selected engineering drawings accurately reflects the actual existing physical configuration. This document defines the Field Verification Program necessary to perform the field walkdown and inspection process that identifies the physical configuration of the systems required to support the mission objectives of K Basins. This program is intended to provide an accurate accounting of the actual field configuration by documenting the as-found information on a controlled drawing.

Booth, H.W.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

249

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Radiation Survey Instrumentation 6 Radiation Survey Instrumentation Instructor's Guide 2.16-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Survey Instrumentation Module Number: 2.16 Objectives: 2.16.01 List the factors which affect an RCT's selection of a portable radiation survey instrument, and identify appropriate instruments for external radiation surveys. L 2.16.02 Identify the following features and specifications for ion chamber instruments used at your facility: a. Detector type b. Instrument operating range c. Detector shielding d. Detector window e. Types of radiation detected/measured f. Operator-adjustable controls g. Markings for detector effective center h. Specific limitations/characteristics. L 2.16.03 Identify the following features and specifications for high range

250

Fingerprint verification using statistical descriptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of high precision matching in fingerprint cannot be over-emphasized. This paper presents a novel fingerprint verification algorithm which improves matching accuracy by overcoming the shortcomings of poor image quality. The proposed method ... Keywords: Biometrics, Fingerprint, Reliability, Singular point, Statistical analysis

Mohammed S. Khalil; Dzulkifli Mohamad; Muhammad Khurram Khan; Qais Al-Nuzaili

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

252

Radiological Threat Reduction: Dealing with Dirty Bombs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonproliferation and National Security Department May 2, 2007 #12;Topics What is a Radiological Dispersal Device

Homes, Christopher C.

253

Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information at NIST. Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/ Nuclear/Explosives (CBRNE) Information at NIST. ...

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

255

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

256

Marshall Islands radiological followup  

SciTech Connect

In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the public health and safety in connection with the nuclear programs under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are described in the following paper. They are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals and to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (auth)

Greenhouse, N.A.; McCraw, T.F.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radiological design guide  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

Evans, R.A.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

258

Radiological-dose assessments of atolls in the northern Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Marshall Islands in the Equatorial Pacific, specifically Enewetak and Bikini Atolls, were the site of US nuclear testing from 1946 through 1958. In 1978, the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey was conducted to evaluate the radiological conditions of two islands and ten atolls downwind of the proving grounds. The survey included aerial external gamma measurements and collection of soil, terrestrial, and marine samples for radionuclide analysis to determine the radiological dose from all exposure pathways. The methods and models used to estimate doses to a population in an environment where natural processes have acted on the source-term radionuclides for nearly 30 y, data bases developed for the models, and results of the radiological dose analyses are described.

Robison, W.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiological training for tritium facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

FDH radiological design review guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

Millsap, W.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-1 8-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Radiological Aspects of Plutonium Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify the radiological properties of plutonium. 2. Identify the biological effects of plutonium. 3. Identify special controls and considerations required for plutonium operations. 4. Describe appropriate instruments, measurement techniques, and special radiological survey methods for plutonium. 5. Describe personnel protection requirements and dose control techniques for plutonium. Training Aids: Overhead Transparencies (OTs): OT 8.1 - OT 8.12 (may be supplemented or substituted with updated or site-specific information) Equipment Needs: Overhead projector Screen

262

DOE standard: Radiological control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Final Report - Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Hematite Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee’s procedures and survey results.

E.N. Bailey

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Verification and transparency in future arms control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Verification`s importance has changed dramatically over time, although it always has been in the forefront of arms control. The goals and measures of verification and the criteria for success have changed with the times as well, reflecting such factors as the centrality of the prospective agreement to East-West relations during the Cold War, the state of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the technologies available for monitoring. Verification`s role may be declining in the post-Cold War period. The prospects for such a development will depend, first and foremost, on the high costs of traditional arms control, especially those associated with requirements for verification. Moreover, the growing interest in informal, or non-negotiated arms control does not allow for verification provisions by the very nature of these arrangements. Multilateral agreements are also becoming more prominent and argue against highly effective verification measures, in part because of fears of promoting proliferation by opening sensitive facilities to inspectors from potential proliferant states. As a result, it is likely that transparency and confidence-building measures will achieve greater prominence, both as supplements to and substitutes for traditional verification. Such measures are not panaceas and do not offer all that we came to expect from verification during the Cold war. But they may be the best possible means to deal with current problems of arms reductions and restraints at acceptable levels of expenditure.

Pilat, J.F.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Some thoughts on model verification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most powerful attribute of numerical models for simulating fluid flow in partially saturated fractured media is that they can handle arbitrarily complex problems in terms of geometry, heterogeneity and forcing functions. In contrast, analytical solutions can be only obtained for relatively simple problems. Therefore, the very power of the numerical models that is to be exploited is unnecessarily abridged if the numerical method is viewed merely as a tool for approximately solving the partial differential equation. A broader definition of verification is needed in order to exploit the power and generality of numerical models. In the ultimate, verification should be dictated by axiomatic testability. The development of self-verifying numerical models is a challenge that deserves pursuit.

Narasimhan, T.N.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electric Utility Measurement & Verification Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydro’s demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Measurement and Verification (M&V) of applicable Power Smart Industrial projects is the process of verifying the results of the implementation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) at industrial customer facilities. Power Smart M&V activities are based on the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP); a consensus document produced with the international support of industry and government. This paper discusses BC Hydro’s M&V program and the M&V results from industrial projects. Several case history studies will also be reviewed. The case studies reviewed involve aeration motor speed controls upgrade, steam turbine controls upgrade and natural gas liquid pump speed controls upgrade.

Lau, K.; Henderson, G.; Hebert, D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Experimental verification of quantum computations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum computers are expected to offer substantial speedups over their classical counterparts and to solve problems that are intractable for classical computers. Beyond such practical significance, the concept of quantum computation opens up new fundamental questions, among them the issue whether or not quantum computations can be certified by entities that are inherently unable to compute the results themselves. Here we present the first experimental verification of quantum computations. We show, in theory and in experiment, how a verifier with minimal quantum resources can test a significantly more powerful quantum computer. The new verification protocol introduced in this work utilizes the framework of blind quantum computing and is independent of the experimental quantum-computation platform used. In our scheme, the verifier is only required to generate single qubits and transmit them to the quantum computer. We experimentally demonstrate this protocol using four photonic qubits and show how the verifier can test the computer's ability to perform measurement-based quantum computations.

Stefanie Barz; Joseph F. Fitzsimons; Elham Kashefi; Philip Walther

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 May 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 2. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Part 1, page 14 Change: U.S. Department of Energy, Radiological Control

269

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

270

Radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

Kloepping, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

EerNisse, Errol P. (Albuquerque, NM); Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Snelling, Jay B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL: Carbon Storage - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Focus Area An MVA program is designed to confirm permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations...

274

Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

Jesse, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

National Energy Efficiency Evaluation, Measurement and Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Efficiency Evaluation, Measurement and Verification (EM&V) Standard: Scoping Study of Issues and Implementation Requirements Title National Energy Efficiency...

276

Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes Conformity assessment is a term used to describe the processes followed to demonstrate that a product, service,...

277

National Energy Efficiency Evaluation, Measurement and Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

65E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY National Energy Efficiency Evaluation, Measurement and Verification (EM&V) Standard: Scoping Study of Issues and...

278

Energy Efficiency Measurement & Verification in South Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Energy Efficiency Measurement & Verification in South Africa Speaker(s): Xiaohua Xia Date: December 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar...

279

Formal verification in a commercial setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tutorial addresses the following questions:¿ why do formal verification?¿ who is doing it today?¿ what are they doing?¿ how are they doing it?¿ what about the future?

R. P. Kurshan

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Efficient formal verification of bounds of linear programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenging problems in the formalization of mathematics is a formal verification of numerical computations. Many theorems rely on numerical results, the verification of which is necessary for producing complete formal proofs. The formal verification ...

Alexey Solovyev; Thomas C. Hales

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrologic Verification: A Call for Action and Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, little attention has been focused on the systematic verification of operational hydrologic forecasts. This paper summarizes the results of forecast verification from 15 river basins in the United States. The verification scores for ...

Edwin Welles; Soroosh Sorooshian; Gary Carter; Billy Olsen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

VERIFICATION SURVEY OF PHASE I REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANY RESEARCH...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

site consists of three main areas: ARC proper, the main research facility; the former Biomass Research Facility which consists of approximately 0.8-ha (2-acre), located south of...

284

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

285

NNSA Conducts Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

286

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Radiological Response Training in Vienna | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

287

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO...

289

The Office of Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Verification Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Verification...

290

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

291

DOE handbook: Integrated safety management systems (ISMS) verification team leader`s handbook  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this handbook is to provide guidance to the ISMS verification Team Leader and the verification team in conducting ISMS verifications. The handbook describes methods and approaches for the review of the ISMS documentation (Phase I) and ISMS implementation (Phase II) and provides information useful to the Team Leader in preparing the review plan, selecting and training the team, coordinating the conduct of the verification, and documenting the results. The process and techniques described are based on the results of several pilot ISMS verifications that have been conducted across the DOE complex. A secondary purpose of this handbook is to provide information useful in developing DOE personnel to conduct these reviews. Specifically, this handbook describes methods and approaches to: (1) Develop the scope of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 review processes to be consistent with the history, hazards, and complexity of the site, facility, or activity; (2) Develop procedures for the conduct of the Phase 1 review, validating that the ISMS documentation satisfies the DEAR clause as amplified in DOE Policies 450.4, 450.5, 450.6 and associated guidance and that DOE can effectively execute responsibilities as described in the Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual (FRAM); (3) Develop procedures for the conduct of the Phase 2 review, validating that the description approved by the Approval Authority, following or concurrent with the Phase 1 review, has been implemented; and (4) Describe a methodology by which the DOE ISMS verification teams will be advised, trained, and/or mentored to conduct subsequent ISMS verifications. The handbook provides proven methods and approaches for verifying that commitments related to the DEAR, the FRAM, and associated amplifying guidance are in place and implemented in nuclear and high risk facilities. This handbook also contains useful guidance to line managers when preparing for a review of ISMS for radiological facilities, non-nuclear, or non-Defense Programs facilities. DOE line managers are encouraged to tailor the procedures described in this handbook for ISMS verifications for low risk facilities.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Instructor's Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." L 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. L 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. References: 1. Gollnick, Daniel, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 2nd Edition, Pacific

293

Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Formal verification of practical MPI programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of formal verification of MPI programs operating under a fixed test harness for safety properties without building verification models. In our approach, we directly model-check the MPI/C source code, executing its interleavings ... Keywords: distributed programming, dynamic partial order reduction, message passing interface, model checking, mpi

Anh Vo; Sarvani Vakkalanka; Michael DeLisi; Ganesh Gopalakrishnan; Robert M. Kirby; Rajeev Thakur

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Instrumentation Study Guide Instrumentation Study Guide 2.16-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Survey Instrumentation Module Number: 2.16 Objectives: 2.16.01 List the factors which affect an RCT's selection of a portable radiation survey instrument, and identify appropriate instruments for external radiation surveys. i 2.16.02 Identify the following features and specifications for ion chamber instruments used at your facility: a. Detector type b. Instrument operating range c. Detector shielding d. Detector window e. Types of radiation detected/measured f. Operator-adjustable controls g. Markings for detector effective center h. Specific limitations/characteristics i 2.16.03 Identify the following features and specifications for high range instruments used at your facility:

296

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

297

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF SITE A AND PLOT M  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as the tritiated water source is depleted by both horizontal and vertical migration and radioactive decay. Since substantial amounts of tritium still remain below the surface of...

298

Radiological Habits Survey: Dumfries and Galloway Coast, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................25 4.8 Internal exposure................................................................. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS ...........................................................................17 4

299

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Cover sheets parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 Change: Office of Environment, Safety & Health

300

Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-2001 3-2001 August 2001 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-2002 8-2002 May 2002 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

302

Hierarchical Verification for Increasing Performance in Reliable Processors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic verification using the checker processor introduces severe degradation in performance unless the checker is as fast as the main processor core. Without widening the checker's bandwidth, we propose an active verification management (AVM) approach ... Keywords: Active verification management, Correctness non-critically, Fault tolerance, Filter checker, Hierarchical verification, Performance

Joonhyuk Yoo; Manoj Franklin

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Secure position verification for wireless sensor networks in noisy channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Position verification in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is quite tricky in presence of attackers (malicious sensor nodes), who try to break the verification protocol by reporting their incorrect positions (locations) during the verification stage. In ... Keywords: 3? limit, distance estimation, distributed protocol, location verification, quantiles, wireless networks

Partha Sarathi Mandal; Anil K. Ghosh

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

Piro, Markus [Royal Military College of Canada; Lewis, Brent [Royal Military College of Canada; Thompson, Dr. William T. [Royal Military College of Canada; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NREL: Wind Research - Field Verification Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Verification Project Field Verification Project The mission of the Field Verification Project (FVP) was to enable U.S. industry to complete the research, testing, and field verification needed to fully develop advanced wind energy technologies that lead the world in cost-effectiveness and reliability. The project, completed in 2003, included cost-shared research with industry partners to lead to the development of advanced technology wind turbines and support for projects that verify performance of wind turbine technologies in actual operational applications. FVP provided small wind turbine (<=100 kW) manufacturers with opportunities to operate and monitor their turbines under a range of distributed power applications and environments throughout the United States. This experience helped U.S. companies validate and improve the

306

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

307

Measurement and Verification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification Measurement and Verification Measurement and Verification October 16, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis Photo of a man with a clipboard and measuring tools standing in front of an open energy panel box. A National Park Service energy manager checks an energy management system at the Zion National Park Visitor Center. Measurement and verification (M&V) play a vital role in renewable energy projects. M&V verifies verify that renewable energy technologies successfully meet the energy generation or savings requirements as specified by the agency and the system design. Federal sustainable building guidelines require M&V systems for sustainable building projects and the use of M&V data for benchmarking systems. However, these systems deliver value well beyond regulatory compliance.

308

Runtime verification of object lifetime specifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports on the implementation of a runtime verification system for object lifetime specifications. This system is used to explore and evaluate the expressiveness object lifetime specifications. Object lifetime ...

Benjamin, Zev (Zev A.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Seismic design verification of LMFBR structures  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an assessment of the seismic design verification procedures currently used for nuclear power plant structures, a comparison of dynamic test methods available, and conclusions and recommendations for future LMFB structures.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Automatic verification of competitive stochastic systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present automatic verification techniques for the modelling and analysis of probabilistic systems that incorporate competitive behaviour. These systems are modelled as turn-based stochastic multi-player games, in which the players can either collaborate ...

Taolue Chen; Vojt?ch Forejt; Marta Kwiatkowska; David Parker; Aistis Simaitis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hierarchical layout verification for submicron designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the program HEXDRC for hierarchical circuit extraction and design rule check. The main problem for hierarchical layout verification is to handle interactions between different cells effectively. The kind of interactions however ...

W. Meier

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Intercomparison of Spatial Forecast Verification Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancements in weather forecast models and their enhanced resolution have led to substantially improved and more realistic-appearing forecasts for some variables. However, traditional verification scores often indicate poor performance because ...

Eric Gilleland; David Ahijevych; Barbara G. Brown; Barbara Casati; Elizabeth E. Ebert

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Severe Hazards Analysis and Verification Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the springs and summers of 2006 through 2008, scientists from the National Severe Storms Laboratory and students from the University of Oklahoma have conducted an enhanced severe-storm verification effort. The primary goal for the Severe ...

Kiel L. Ortega; Travis M. Smith; Kevin L. Manross; Angelyn G. Kolodziej; Kevin A. Scharfenberg; Arthur Witt; Jonathan J. Gourley

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A relational framework for bounded program verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All software verification techniques, from theorem proving to testing, share the common goal of establishing a program's correctness with both (1) a high degree of confidence and (2) a low cost to the user, two criteria ...

Dennis, Gregory D. (Gregory David), 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A General Framework for Forecast Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general framework for forecast verification based on the joint distribution of forecasts and observations is described. For further elaboration of the framework, two factorizations of the joint distribution are investigated: 1) the calibration-...

Allan H. Murphy; Robert L. Winkler

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites (Waste Management Conference 2011) Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites (Waste Management Conference 2011) More Documents & Publications

317

Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites (Waste Management Conference 2011) Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites (Waste Management Conference 2011) More Documents & Publications

318

Formal Verification of Safety Automation Logic Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In safety critical processes, especially in nuclear power plants, the new digitalized automation (I&C) systems have brought out new needs for safety evaluation. The programmable digital logic controllers can perform complicated control tasks and, thus, their comprehensive verification against safety requirements is a difficult task. Model checking is a promising approach that enables complete verification of a logic design when a finite state machine model of the control logic is available. The paper describes the use of model checking for the verification of an arc protection system and summarizes experiences of utilizing model checking in automation design and verification. For the verification of the arc protection system, it was necessary to model the overall design of the system and its operation environment. The environment model could be kept relatively simple while covering the essential behaviour of the environment. The results show that it is possible to reliably verify the presence of a desired or the absence of an undesired behaviour of the system. The possibility of complete verification makes model checking different from simulation based testing where only selected schemes can be simulated and one can never be sure that all the possible sequences are examined.

Janne Valkonen; Matti Koskimies; Kim Björkman; Keijo Heljanko; Ilkka Niemelä; Jari J. Hämäläinen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

320

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to intensive site security efforts, NNSA is also working to build international standards and criteria for nuclear and radiological security. This includes NNSA's work to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The program concludes with an opportunity to apply new knowledge and decision-making skills in a series of six simulated patient case studies depicting hypothetical radiological...

322

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

323

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA...

324

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Cotton, Robert Gosslee, Jonathan Sowell, Clayton Weaver FINAL REPORT July 30, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and...

325

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

326

The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 sq.deg. of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science includes studies of: (i) the star formation region G28.983-0.603, cross matching with Spitzer-GLIMPSE data to identify YSOs; (ii) the M17 nebula; (iii) H_2 emission in the rho Ophiuchi dark cloud; (iv) X-ray sources in the Galactic Centre; (v) external galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance; (vi) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. (abridged).

P. W. Lucas; M. G. Hoare; A. Longmore; A. C. Schroder; C. J. Davis; A. Adamson; R. M. Bandyopadhyay; R. de Grijs; M. Smith; A. Gosling; S. Mitchison; A. Gaspar; M. Coe; M. Tamura; Q. Parker; M. Irwin; N. Hambly; J. Bryant; R. S. Collins; N. Cross; D. W. Evans; E. Gonzalez-Solares; S. Hodgkin; J. Lewis; M. Read; M. Riello; E. T. W. Sutorius; A. Lawrence; J. E. Drew; S. Dye; M. A. Thompson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide Study Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages and state the applicable limits. 2.12.05 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on exclusive use vehicles and state the applicable limits. 2.12.06 Identify the proper placement of placards on a transport vehicle. i 2.12.07 Identify inspection criteria that should be checked prior to releasing a

328

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages and state the applicable limits. 2.12.05 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on exclusive use vehicles and state the applicable limits. 2.12.06 Identify the proper placement of placards on a transport vehicle. L 2.12.07 Identify inspection criteria that should be checked prior to releasing a

329

Completing the automated verification of a small hypervisor - assembler code verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In [1] the almost complete formal verification of a small hypervisor with the automated C code verifier VCC [2] was reported: the correctness of the C portions of the hypervisor and of the guest simulation was established; the verification of the assembler ...

Wolfgang Paul; Sabine Schmaltz; Andrey Shadrin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Monitoring and verification R&D  

SciTech Connect

The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report outlined the Administration's approach to promoting the agenda put forward by President Obama in Prague on April 5, 2009. The NPR calls for a national monitoring and verification R&D program to meet future challenges arising from the Administration's nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament agenda. Verification of a follow-on to New START could have to address warheads and possibly components along with delivery capabilities. Deeper cuts and disarmament would need to address all of these elements along with nuclear weapon testing, nuclear material and weapon production facilities, virtual capabilities from old weapon and existing energy programs and undeclared capabilities. We only know how to address some elements of these challenges today, and the requirements may be more rigorous in the context of deeper cuts as well as disarmament. Moreover, there is a critical need for multiple options to sensitive problems and to address other challenges. There will be other verification challenges in a world of deeper cuts and disarmament, some of which we are already facing. At some point, if the reductions process is progressing, uncertainties about past nuclear materials and weapons production will have to be addressed. IAEA safeguards will need to continue to evolve to meet current and future challenges, and to take advantage of new technologies and approaches. Transparency/verification of nuclear and dual-use exports will also have to be addressed, and there will be a need to make nonproliferation measures more watertight and transparent. In this context, and recognizing we will face all of these challenges even if disarmament is not achieved, this paper will explore possible agreements and arrangements; verification challenges; gaps in monitoring and verification technologies and approaches; and the R&D required to address these gaps and other monitoring and verification challenges.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 6000BSE RG 6412 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING no exceptions here) RG 6521 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESIDENCY, GPA REQUIREMENTS Effective

Shyy, Wei

332

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded...

335

NREL: Wind Research - Regional Field Verification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Verification Field Verification The Regional Field Verification (RFV) project, completed in 2007, focused on regional issues and opportunities and tested turbines to gain operational knowledge that could be applied nationwide. The RFV objectives were to: Support industry needs for gaining initial field operation experience with small wind turbines, and verify the performance, reliability, maintainability, and cost of small wind turbines in diverse applications. Expand opportunities for wind energy in new regions of the United States by tailoring projects to meet unique regional requirements, and document and communicate the experience from these projects for the benefit of others in the wind power development community and rural utilities. Through a competitive solicitation in 2001-2002, NREL selected one

336

Electric Power Research Institute Utility Wind Turbine Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the DOE EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) and the Turbine Verification and Technology Transfer Projects funded by the program between 1994 and 2004.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Vehicle Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit BusesModeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses.Modeling and Veri?cation of CNG-Powered Transit Buses J.K.

Hedrick, J. K.; Ni, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Generalized Exponential Markov and Model Output Statistics: A Comparative Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a comparative verification of Model Output Statistics (MOS) against Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM), a single station forecasting technique which uses only the surface observation and climatology as input. The verification was ...

Thomas J. Perrone; Robert G. Miller

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Exploration of small enrollment speaker verification on handheld devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the problem of robust speaker verification for handheld devices under the context of extremely limited training data. Although speaker verification technology is an area of great promise for security ...

Woo, Ram H. (Ram Han)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Tutorial on Text-Independent Speaker Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of a state-of-the-art text-independent speaker verification system. First, an introduction proposes a modular scheme of the training and test phases of a speaker verification system. Then, ...

Bimbot, Frederic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Confirmatory Survey for the Partial Site Release at the ABB Inc. CE Winsor Site, Windsor, CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to confirm that remedial actions had been effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately describes the final radiological conditions of the PSR Impacted Areas.

W.C. Adams

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

2013-09-18: Handbook 130 -- Price Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Handbook 130 - Price Verification. Purpose: This 2-day seminar is designed so that participants will be able to understand ...

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

2013-08-27: Handbook 130 -- Price Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Handbook 130 - Price Verification. Purpose: This 2-day seminar is designed so that participants will be able to understand ...

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

344

EOSO ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP THE REMOT SENSIN EG&G SURVEY REPORT LABORATO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oe. 1-G Oe. 1-G l/ZL=q n EOSO ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP THE REMOT SENSIN EG&G SURVEY REPORT LABORATO EP-F-002 Of THE UNITED STATES DECEMBER 1981 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE AREA SURROUNDING THE BUREAU OF MINES SITE ALBANY, OREGON DATE OF SURVEY: FEBRUARY 1980 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE BUREAU OF MINES SITE ALBANY, OREGON I I I . t I 1 I I I I I I I t PROJECT SCIENTIST: E. FEIMSTER EG&G, INC. LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 1.0 SUMMARY OF RESULTS An aerial radiological measuring system was used to survey areas surrounding the Bureau of Mines Site near Albany, Oregon in February 1980. The survey was conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Operational Safety by the Department's Remote Sensing Laboratory of Las

345

Survey Expectations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan and is known as the Michigan survey, with many other similar surveys conducted across OECD countries so as to provide up to date information on consumer expectations. Questions on expectations are also sometimes included in panel surveys... be formed, do of course make it possible to assess whether, or how far, such expectations are well-founded by comparing the experiences of individual households with their prior expectations. A key aspect of the Michigan survey, and of many other more recent...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Weale, Martin

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Speaker verification under degraded condition: a perceptual study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the effect of degradation on human and automatic speaker verification (SV) tasks. The perceptual test is conducted by the subjects having knowledge about speaker verification. An automatic SV system is developed using the Mel-frequency ... Keywords: Degraded condition, Human vs automatic, Speaker information, Speaker verification

Gayadhar Pradhan; S. R. Prasanna

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A tutorial on text-independent speaker verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of a state-of-the-art text-independent speaker verification system. First, an introduction proposes a modular scheme of the training and test phases of a speaker verification system. Then, the most commonly speech parameterization ... Keywords: Gaussian mixture modeling, cepstral analysis, speaker verification, text-independent

Frédéric Bimbot; Jean-François Bonastre; Corinne Fredouille; Guillaume Gravier; Ivan Magrin-Chagnolleau; Sylvain Meignier; Teva Merlin; Javier Ortega-García; Dijana Petrovska-Delacrétaz; Douglas A. Reynolds

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Triage Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Render Safe > Radiological Triage Radiological Triage Triage Logo NNSA's Triage is a non-deployable, secure, on-line capability

349

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C C December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management

350

Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool: Benchmarking Radiological Assessment and Dose Models using Fukushima Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing the Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool (FRAT), a comprehensive database and software application for accessing, analyzing, and interpreting data related to radiological releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). This report documents the development of the FRAT to support the benchmarking of emergency response and dose modeling codes used by nuclear power plants, using radiological data from the Fukushima ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Survey Statisticians  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

352

Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

J. R. Morton

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

A. Petraglia; C. Sabbarese; M. De Cesare; N. De Cesare; F. Quinto; F. Terrasi; A. D'Onofrio; P. Steier; L. K. Fifield; A. M. Esposito

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY, DEFENSE NATIONAL STOCKPILE CENTER NEW HAVEN DEPOT, NEW HAVEN, INDIANA  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the radiological confirmatory survey were to collect adequate radiological data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of NHD land areas, warehouses, and support buildings. The data generated from the confirmatory survey activities were used to evaluate the results of the Final Status Survey Report (FSSR) submitted by Cabrera Services (Cabrera 2009). Cabrera has stated that all radioactive materials have been removed and that remediation of the open land areas and structure surfaces was complete, and that the NHD meets the criteria for unrestricted use.

E.M. Harpenau

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G Survey Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

kL2' kL2' . ",- - &j EGG0 ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G Survey Report NRC-81 09 April 1981 . AN AERIAL RADIOLOGIC SURVEY OF THE STEPAN CHEMCIAL COMPANY AND SURROUNDING AREA MAYWOOD, N E W JERSEY DATE OF SURVEY: 26 JANUARY 1981 J.R. Mueller Project Director S.A. Gunn Project Scientist APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION W . John Tipton, Head Radiation Sciences Section This Document is UNCLASSIFIED G. P. Stobie Classification Officer This work was performed by EG&G for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission through an EAO transfer of funds to Contract No. DE-AC08-76NV01183 with the United States Department of Energy. 3 ABSTRACT An aerial radiologic survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was performed in Maywood, New Jersey over the Stepan Chemical Company and thesurrounding area. This survey was conducted by EG&G for the

357

Gait verification using knee acceleration signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel gait recognition method for biometric applications is proposed. The approach has the following distinct features. First, gait patterns are determined via knee acceleration signals, circumventing difficulties associated with conventional vision-based ... Keywords: Biometrics, Gait analysis, Identity verification, Physiological signal processing

L. W. Hang; C. Y. Hong; C. W. Yen; D. J. Chang; M. L. Nagurka

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Taximeter verification using imprecise data from GPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, local governments in Spain were using machines with rolling cylinders for testing and verification of taximeters. However, the tyres condition can lead to errors in the process and the mechanical construction of the test equipment is ... Keywords: Fuzzy fitness function, GPS, Genetic fuzzy systems, Metrology, Vague data

José Villar; Adolfo Otero; José Otero; Luciano Sánchez

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Verification Techniques for System-Level Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will explain how to verify SoC logic designs using "formal" and "semi-formal" verification techniques. The critical issue to be addressed is whether the functionality of the design is the one that the designers intended. Simulation has been ... Keywords: Circuits, Electricity, Microelectronics

Masahiro Fujita; Indradeep Ghosh; Mukul Prasad

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pattern Language Verification in Model Driven Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of verifying the application of a Pattern Language in a design that is built based upon the patterns of the language in a model-driven approach. We propose a process named Pattern Language Verifier (PLV) which consists ... Keywords: Model Driven Engineering, Pattern Language Verification

Bahman Zamani, Greg Butler

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Towards Integrated Verification of Timed Transition Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an attempt to combine theorem proving and model-checking to formally verify real-time systems in a discrete time setting. The Timed Automata Modeling Environment (TAME) has been modified to provide a formal model for Time Transition ... Keywords: PVS, Real-time, SAL, equivalence verification, model reduction, model-checking, theorem proving

Mark Lawford; Vera Pantelic; Hong Zhang

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Automatic verification for interactive graphical programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern software applications come with interactive graphical displays. In the past, verification efforts for such programs have usually ignored the I/O aspects of programs and focused instead on their core functionality. This approach leaves open the ... Keywords: ACL2, Dracula, interactive graphical programs

Carl Eastlund; Matthias Felleisen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Handling Global Conditions in Parameterized System Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider symbolic verification for a class of parameterized systems, where a system consists of a linear array of processes, and where an action of a process may in general be guarded by both local conditions restricting the state of the process about ...

Parosh Aziz Abdulla; Ahmed Bouajjani; Bengt Jonsson; Marcus Nilsson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Uncertainty and Inference for Verification Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a forecast is assessed, a single value for a verification measure is often quoted. This is of limited use, as it needs to be complemented by some idea of the uncertainty associated with the value. If this uncertainty can be quantified, it is ...

Ian T. Jolliffe

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radiological safety training for uranium facilities  

SciTech Connect

This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1. and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585...

367

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585...

368

A radiological evaluation of phosphogypsum  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum is the by-product resulting from phosphoric acid or phosphate fertilizer production. The phosphate used in these chemical processes contains the naturally occurring radioactive material U and all its subsequent decay products. During processing, the U generally remains in the phosphoric acid product, while the daughter, {sup 226}Ra, tends to be concentrated in the phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has physical properties that make it useful as a sub-base for roadways, parking lots, and similar construction. A radiological evaluation, to determine exposures to workers mixing this material with a stabilizing agent (portland cement), was performed at a South Louisiana phosphoric acid chemical plant. Measurements of the {sup 226}Ra content of the phosphogypsum showed an average of 1.1 +/- 0.3 Bq g-1 (0.7-1.7 Bq g-1). The average measured gross gamma exposure rate on the phosphogypsum pile corresponded to a dose equivalent rate of 0.368 +/- 0.006 mu Sv h-1 (0.32-0.42 mu Sv h-1). Radon daughter concentrations measured on top of the phosphogypsum pile ranged from 0.0006 to 0.001 working levels. An analysis of the airborne {sup 226}Ra concentrations showed only background levels.

Laiche, T.P.; Scott, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

372

UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, United Nations Development Programme Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Resource Type: Workshop Website: www.un-redd.org/UNREDDProgramme/InternationalSupport/MeasurementReport UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Screenshot References: UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification[1] Background "The specific objectives of the workshop were to develop a roadmap with

373

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.iea.org/papers/pathways/monitoring.pdf Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Screenshot References: Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs[1] This document includes: A brief overview of MVE in the context of S&L programmes.

374

The Office of Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Verification Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Verification The Office of Nuclear Verification

375

The AdaptiV Approach to Verification of Adaptive Systems  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

Rouff, Christopher [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Buskens, Richard [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Hinchey, Mike [Lero – The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

377

Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

Leena, R. V., E-mail: leenarv_76@yahoo.co.uk; Shyamkumar, N. K. [Christian Medial College, Department of Radiodiagnosis (India)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

379

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.17-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Monitoring Instrumentation Module Number: 2.17 Objectives: 2.17.01 List the factors which affects an RCT's selection of a portable contamination monitoring instrument. L 2.17.02 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate meter probes used at your site for beta/gamma and/or alpha surveys: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding and window c. Types of radiation detected/measured d. Energy response for measured radiation e. Specific limitations/characteristics L 2.17.03 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate instruments used at your site: a. Types of detectors available for use b. Operator-adjustable controls

380

SCO Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Survey on Future of NIST's Standards Information Services. June 5, 2013. *. Bookmark and Share. Contact: Clare Allocca 301-975-4359. ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Actton Program VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Vitro Corporation Laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey (see Fig 1), on November 30, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those facilities utilized under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contract during the late 1950s and early 1960s. This

382

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

383

GRIMHX verification and validation action matrix summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WSRC-RP-90-026, Certification Plan for Reactor Analysis Computer Codes, describes a series of action items to be completed for certification of reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations. Validation and verification of the code is an integral part of this process. This document identifies the work performed and documentation generated to satisfy these action items for the Reactor Physics computer code GRIMHX. Each action item is discussed with the justification for its completion. Specific details of the work performed are not included in this document but are found in the references. The publication of this document signals the validation and verification effort for the GRIMHX code is completed.

Trumble, E.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

NGSI: IAEA Verification of UF6 Cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is often ignorant of the location of declared, uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders following verification, because cylinders are not typically tracked onsite or off. This paper will assess various methods the IAEA uses to verify cylinder gross defects, and how the task could be ameliorated through the use of improved identification and monitoring. The assessment will be restricted to current verification methods together with one that has been applied on a trial basis—short-notice random inspections coupled with mailbox declarations. This paper is part of the NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF6 cylinders.

Curtis, Michael M.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Conceptual design. Final report: TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the TFE Conceptual Design, which provided the design guidance for the TFE Verification program. The primary goals of this design effort were: (1) establish the conceptual design of an in-core thermionic reactor for a 2 Mw(e) space nuclear power system with a 7-year operating lifetime; (2) demonstrate scalability of the above concept over the output power range of 500 kW(e) to 5 MW(e); and (3) define the TFE which is the basis for the 2 MW (e) reactor design. This TFE specification provided the basis for the test program. These primary goals were achieved. The technical approach taking in the conceptual design effort is discussed in Section 2, and the results are discussed in Section 3. The remainder of this introduction draws a perspective on the role that this conceptual design task played in the TFE Verification Program.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam, steam condensate and boiler feedwater in large facilities are described. Insights gained and lessons learned through the actual in-field installation of thermal monitoring equipment for energy savings verification purposes at over 100 sites at various locations throughout the United States are presented.

McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub-mm detector size, high dynamic range (below a mGy to several Gy), microsecond time resolution, and absence of electrical wires or other electronics in the dosimeter probe head. Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry systems typically consist of one or more small samples of phosphor, e.g. a mg of plastic scintillator, attached to 10-20 m long optical fiber cables of plastic. During irradiation, each dosimeter probe spontaneously emits radioluminescence (RL) in proportion to the dose rate. The luminescence intensity can be detected with photomultiplier tubes, CCD cameras or other highly sensitive photodetectors. Some crystalline phosphors, such as carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) have the ability to store charge produced in the crystal during irradiation. The stored charge may later be released by fiber-guided laser light under emission of so-called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL signal therefore reflects the passively integrated dose. In contrast to thermoluminescence dosimetry, fiber-coupled OSL dosimetry may be performed in vivo while the dosimeter is still in the patient. Within the last few years, several improvements and new applications of these techniques have been published, and the objective of this review is to provide an introduction to this field and to outline some of these new results. Emphasis will be given to applications in medical dosimetry such as in vivo real-time dose verification in brachytherapy and methods aimed for improved quality assurance of linear accelerators.

Andersen, Claus E. [Radiation Research Division, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

388

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY REPORT FOR THE SECTION 4 AREA AT THE RIO ALGOM AMBROSIA LAKE FACILITY NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory survey were to verify that remedial actions were effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately described the final radiological conditions of the RAM Ambrosia Lake, Section 4 Areas.

W.C. Adams

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

390

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTIVE APPAREL PROGRAM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

A program is described for providing adequate radiological protective clothing for all employees. The program consolidates all protective clothing requirements and the development and evaluation of clothing to be utilized, and establishes sound criteria for future procurement of accepted clothing. A council composed of representatives from all interested groups provides an effective means of consultation for the development, evaluation, and establishment of acceptable radiological apparel. Specifications and standards were established for use in the procurement of radiological protective apparel. Items of a non-launderable nature are warehoused and dispersed as requested. Routine reuse items which are laundry-maintained are dispersed through a central laundry facility. A chart illustrates the organization of the program. (C.H.)

Mehas, T.C.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Secure Position Verification for Wireless Sensor Networks in Noisy Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Position verification in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is quite tricky in presence of attackers (malicious sensor nodes), who try to break the verification protocol by reporting their incorrect positions (locations) during the verification stage. In the literature of WSNs, most of the existing methods of position verification have used trusted verifiers, which are in fact vulnerable to attacks by malicious nodes. They also depend on some distance estimation techniques, which are not accurate in noisy channels (mediums). In this article, we propose a secure position verification scheme for WSNs in noisy channels without relying on any trusted entities. Our verification scheme detects and filters out all malicious nodes from the network with very high probability.

Mandal, Partha Sarathi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

394

A golden anniversary for space-based treaty verification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enabled serendipitous discoveries of remarkable natural phenomena such as cosmic gamma-ray bursts, X-ray novae and solar wind composition. Modern space-based verification systems...

395

Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification (EM&V) of Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification (EM&V) of Residential Behavior-Based Energy Efficiency Programs: Issues and Recommendations Title Evaluation, Measurement, and...

396

Review of the Pantex Plant Implementation Verification Review...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Pantex Plant Implementation Verification Review Processes February 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of...

397

Review of the Implementation Verification Rev iew Processes at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management...

398

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report features a comprehensive measurement and verification (M&V) plan for a fictitious super energy savings performance contract (ESPC) project.

399

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and...

400

Volunteer to conduct free verifications for K-12 schools and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volunteer to conduct free verifications for K-12 schools and worship facilities Secondary menu join us About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Event:Technical Workshop: Measurement, Reporting and Verification...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical Workshop: Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV): Experiences from and for implementation Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technical Workshop: Measurement,...

402

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in Brazil: Methodological Challenges Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.eceee.org/conference_proceedings/eceee/2009/Panel_3/3.049/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/measurement-and-verification-low-inco Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report presents results from Brazilian electric utilities evaluation

403

Lightning Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE)-Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has played a vital role in improving the understanding of lightning protection for wind turbines. In response to concerns from host utilities, the TVP began a lightning protection project to study the impact of lightning activity at the 6.0-megawatt (MW) wind power facility in Ft. Davis, Texas. McNiff Light Industry (MLI) and Global Energy Concepts (GEC) established a broad observation and documentation effort to survey the lightning protection methodologies used and to evaluate the damage resulting from lightning activity at the turbines. The 6.05-MW wind power plant in Searsburg, Vermont, was inspected after a severe lightning storm caused damage to several turbines there. Zond, McNiff, and consultants from Lightning Technologies, Inc. conducted post-damage inspections at both sites to develop recommendations for improving lightning protection. Site operators implemented the recommended mitigation strategies, and the turbines were monitored to determine if the protection measures improved project operations. This paper summarizes the experience gained through TVP's lightning-related research, and provides a set of guidelines for wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators.

McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H.; Lisman, T. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

VLBI surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic surveys of astronomical objects often lead to discoveries, but always provide invaluable information for statistical studies of well-defined samples. They also promote follow-up investigations of individual objects or classes. Surveys using a yet unexplored observing wavelength, a novel technique or a new instrument are of special importance. Significantly improved observing parameters (e.g. sensitivity, angular resolution, monitoring capability) provide new insight into the morphological and physical properties of the objects studied. I give a brief overview of the important Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging surveys conducted in the past. A list of surveys guides us through the developments up until the present days. I also attempt to show directions for the near future.

S. Frey

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

Site-specific waste management instruction - radiological screening facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for managing waste generated from radiological sample screening operations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration Contractor`s activities. This document applies only to waste generated within the radiological screening facilities.

G. G. Hopkins

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

407

Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning: Final Survey for the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final radiological survey for the area where Portland General Electric (PGE) will construct the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at Trojan nuclear power plant. The survey fulfills the requirements for release of this area from Trojan's 10 CFR 50 license before radiation levels increase with spent fuel storage in the ISFSI.

1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

408

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE FUEL OIL TANK AREA HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

During the period of February 14 to 15, 2012, ORISE performed radiological confirmatory survey activities for the former Fuel Oil Tank Area (FOTA) and additional radiological surveys of portions of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant site in Eureka, California. The radiological survey results demonstrate that residual surface soil contamination was not present significantly above background levels within the FOTA. Therefore, it is ORISE’s opinion that the radiological conditions for the FOTA surveyed by ORISE are commensurate with the site release criteria for final status surveys as specified in PG&E’s Characterization Survey Planning Worksheet. In addition, the confirmatory results indicated that the ORISE FOTA survey unit Cs-137 mean concentrations results compared favorably with the PG&E FOTA Cs-137 mean concentration results, as determined by ORISE from the PG&E characterization data. The interlaboratory comparison analyses of the three soil samples analyzed by PG&E’s onsite laboratory and the ORISE laboratory indicated good agreement for the sample results and provided confidence in the PG&E analytical procedures and final status survey soil sample data reporting.

WADE C. ADAMS

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

409

Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Sandusky OH  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory survey activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee’s procedures and final status survey (FSS) results.

E.N. Bailey

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-MECH-23 Verification of High EER Equipment (Page 1 of 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-MECH-23 Verification of High EER 2009 Verification of High EER Equipment Procedures for verification of High EER Equipment are described. 1 System Name or Identification/Tag 2 System Location or Area Served 3 Certified EER Rating

411

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

412

NNSA, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

413

US, Netherlands Expand Partnership to Secure Radiological Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expand Partnership to Secure Radiological Materials Worldwide | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

414

Appendix: Conjectures concerning proof, design, and verification.  

SciTech Connect

This article focuses on an esoteric but practical use of automated reasoning that may indeed be new to many, especially those concerned primarily with verification of both hardware and software. Specifically, featured are a discussion and some methodology for taking an existing design -- of a circuit, a chip, a program, or the like--and refining and improving it in various ways. Although the methodology is general and does not require the use of a specific program, McCune's program OTTER does offer what is needed. OTTER has played and continues to play the key role in my research, and an interested person can gain access to this program in various ways, not the least of which is through the included CD-ROM in [3]. When success occurs, the result is a new design that may require fewer components, avoid the use of certain costly components, offer more reliability and ease of verification, and, perhaps most important, be more efficient in the contexts of speed and heat generation. Although the author has minimal experience in circuit design, circuit validation, program synthesis, program verification, and similar concerns, (at the encouragement of colleagues based on successes to be cited) he presents materials that might indeed be of substantial interest to manufacturers and programmers. He writes this article in part prompted by the recent activities of chip designers that include Intel and AMD, activities heavily emphasizing the proving of theorems. As for his research that appears to the author to be relevant, he has made an intense and most profitable study of finding proofs that are shorter [2,3], some that avoid the use of various types of term, some that are far less complex than previously known, and the like. Those results suggest to me a strong possible connection between more appealing proofs (in mathematics and in logic) and enhanced and improved design of both hardware and software. Here the author explores diverse conjectures that elucidate some of the possibly fruitful connections.

Wos, L.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Characteristic formulae for the verification of imperative programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous work, we introduced an approach to program verification based on characteristic formulae. The approach consists of generating a higher-order logic formula from the source code of a program. This characteristic formula is constructed in such ... Keywords: characteristic formula, interactive verification, total correctness

Arthur Charguéraud

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Probabilistic Fusion of Sorted Score Sequences for Robust Speaker Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic Fusion of Sorted Score Sequences for Robust Speaker Verification Ming-Cheung Cheung1 Engineering, Princeton University, USA Abstract. Fusion techniques have been widely used in multi-dependent fusion al- gorithm for speaker verification. The algorithm is data-dependent in that the fusion weights

Mak, Man-Wai

417

Towards the compositional verification of real-time UML designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current techniques for the verification of software as e.g. model checking are limited when it comes to the verification of complex distributed embedded real-time systems. Our approach addresses this problem and in particular the state explosion problem ... Keywords: embedded systems, object constraint language (OCL), pattern, real-time, unified modelling language (UML)

Holger Giese; Matthias Tichy; Sven Burmester; Wilhelm Schäfer; Stephan Flake

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Formal verification of compiler transformations on polychronous equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, adopting the translation validation approach, we present a formal verification process to prove the correctness of compiler transformations on systems of polychronous equations. We encode the source programs and the transformations with ... Keywords: formal verification, multi-clocked synchronous programs, polychronous model, translation validation, validated compiler

Van Chan Ngo; Jean-Pierre Talpin; Thierry Gautier; Paul Le Guernic; Loïc Besnard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Certification and verification for calmac flat plate solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains information used in the certification and verification of the Calmac Flat Plate Collector. Contained are such items as test procedures and results, information on materials used, Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Manuals, and other information pertaining to the verification and certification.

Not Available

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling and Verification of Reactive Systems using Rebeca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actor-based modeling has been successfully applied to the representation of concurrent and distributed systems. Besides having an appropriate and efficient way for modeling these systems, one needs a formal verification approach for ensuring their correctness. ... Keywords: actor model, compositional verification, model checking, property preserving abstraction, reactive systems

Marjan Sirjani; Ali Movaghar; Amin Shali; Frank S. de Boer

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Integrity verification of cloud-hosted data analytics computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this position paper, we present efficient and practical integrity verification techniques that check whether the untrusted cloud has returned correct result of outsourced data analytics computations. We consider the computation of summation form that ... Keywords: cloud analytics as a service, cloud computing, integrity verification, machine learning

Hui (Wendy) Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Challenge benchmarks for verification of real-time programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-time systems, and in particular safety-critical systems, are a rich source of challenges for the program verification community as software errors can have catastrophic consequences. Unfortunately, it is nearly impossible to find representative ... Keywords: java, real-time, verification

Tomas Kalibera; Pavel Parizek; Ghaith Haddad; Gary T. Leavens; Jan Vitek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

High-performance verification of large concurrent systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-performance verification of large concurrent systems Elbie taKrpska Ph.D. Thesis VU University Systems Ph.D. Thesis Elzbieta Krepska VU University Amsterdam, 2012 #12;This research was funded by the VU. #12;VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT TOWARDS BIG BIOLOGY: HIGH-PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF LARGE CONCURRENT SYSTEMS

Bal, Henri E.

424

Mismatch modeling and compensation for robust speaker verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, primary channel mismatch scenario between enrollment and test conditions in a speaker verification task are analyzed and modeled. A novel Gaussian mixture modeling with a universal background model (GMM-UBM) frame based compensation model ... Keywords: Eigenchannel, Factor analysis, Mismatch compensation, Speaker verification

Yun Lei; John H. L. Hansen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Approaches to verification of two-dimensional water quality models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The verification of a water quality model is the one procedure most needed by decision making evaluating a model predictions, but is often not adequate or done at all. The results of a properly conducted verification provide the decision makers with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with model predictions. Several statistical tests are available for quantifying of the performance of a model. Six methods of verification were evaluated using an application of the BETTER two-dimensional water quality model for Chickamauga reservoir. Model predictions for ten state variables were compared to observed conditions from 1989. Spatial distributions of the verification measures showed the model predictions were generally adequate, except at a few specific locations in the reservoir. The most useful statistics were the mean standard error of the residuals. Quantifiable measures of model performance should be calculated during calibration and verification of future applications of the BETTER model. 25 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.10 Independent Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the conduct of selected independent verification activities. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's independent verifications programs and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1036-93, Guide to Good Practices for Independent Verification 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are drawn from DOE 5480.19.

427

CRAD, Implementation Verification Review - July 20, 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Verification Review - July 20, 2011 Implementation Verification Review - July 20, 2011 CRAD, Implementation Verification Review - July 20, 2011 July 20, 2011 Implementation Verification Review of Safety Basis Hazard Controls (HSS CRAD 45-39, Rev. 1) The Implementation Verification Review (IVR) inspection will evaluate the effectiveness of processes for independently verifying and re-verifying implementation of the safety basis hazard controls at the site's nuclear facilities and associated site office oversight methodology. The inspection will consist of an evaluation of the procedures and processes that establish the IVR or similar process, as well as an evaluation of IVR or similar processes implementation and oversight. Review of implementation at a site may include any or all of the following activities:

428

Verification and validation for induction heating  

SciTech Connect

Truchas is a software package being developed at LANL within the Telluride project for predicting the complex physical processes in metal alloy casting. The software was designed to be massively parallel, multi-material, multi-physics, and to run on 3D, fully unstructured meshes. This work describes a Verification and Validation assessment of Truchas for simulating the induction heating phase of a casting process. We used existing data from a simple experiment involving the induction heating of a graphite cylinder, as graphite is a common material used for mold assemblies. Because we do not have complete knowledge of all the conditions and properties in this experiment (as is the case in many other experiments), we performed a parameter sensitivity study, modeled the uncertainties of the most sensitive parameters, and quantified how these uncertainties propagate to the Truchas output response. A verification analysis produced estimates of the numerical error of the Truchas solution to our computational model. The outputs from Truchas runs with randomly sampled parameter values were used for the validation study.

Lam, Kin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tippetts, Trevor B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, David W [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Monitoring/Verification using DMS: TATP Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operations-management systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a “smart dust” sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the illegal use of explosives or chemical and biological materials. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for field separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. Fast GC is the leading field analytical method for gas phase separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Low-thermal-mass GC columns have led to compact, low-power field systems capable of complete analyses in 15–300 seconds. A collaborative effort optimized a handheld, fast GC/DMS, equipped with a non-rad ionization source, for peroxide-based explosive measurements.

Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle, Manuel Manard

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

DESIGN INFORMATION VERIFICATION FOR NUCLEAR SAFEGUARDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical aspect of international safeguards activities performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the verification that facility design and construction (including upgrades and modifications) do not create opportunities for nuclear proliferation. These Design Information Verification activities require that IAEA inspectors compare current and past information about the facility to verify the operator’s declaration of proper use. The actual practice of DIV presents challenges to the inspectors due to the large amount of data generated, concerns about sensitive or proprietary data, the overall complexity of the facility, and the effort required to extract just the safeguards relevant information. Planned and anticipated facilities will (especially in the case of reprocessing plants) be ever larger and increasingly complex, thus exacerbating the challenges. This paper reports the results of a workshop held at the Idaho National Laboratory in March 2009, which considered technologies and methods to address these challenges. The use of 3D Laser Range Finding, Outdoor Visualization System, Gamma-LIDAR, and virtual facility modeling, as well as methods to handle the facility data issues (quantity, sensitivity, and accessibility and portability for the inspector) were presented. The workshop attendees drew conclusions about the use of these techniques with respect to successfully employing them in an operating environment, using a Fuel Conditioning Facility walk-through as a baseline for discussion.

Robert S. Bean; Richard R. M. Metcalf; Phillip C. Durst

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Gak Ridge fiational Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 September 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites!- Remedial Action Program SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK A radiological survey was conducted at the Bethelem Steel Corporation Plant in Lackawanna, New York, on September 23, 1980, by representatives of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The subject of the radiological survey was a portion of the original 25.4-cm (lo-inch) bar mill used in converting uranium billets into 3.8-cm rods. All radiation survey

432

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Considerations for First Aid Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. i 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. INTRODUCTION "Standard first aid is applied prior to contamination control whenever it is considered to have life-saving value, or is important to the patient for relief of pain or prevention of

433

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid 5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. L 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. References: 1. Basic Radiation Protection Technology (2nd edition) - Daniel A. Gollnick 2. Operational Health Physics Training - H. J. Moe

434

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Protection Standards Radiological Protection Standards Instructor's Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of the 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" Instructional Aids:

435

ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) As greater attention is being directed toward the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities, the need for a standardized approach for implementing the necessary radiological surveys has become increasingly important. A multi-agency committee representing the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has addressed this need by producing a guidance document known as the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). Published in December 1997, MARSSIM provides detailed guidance for planning, implementing and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys to demonstrate compliance with a dose- or risk-based

436

Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HDBK-1113-2008 DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in DOE-STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS). Its purpose is to assist those individuals, Department of Energy (DOE) employees, Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors, and Managing and Integrating

437

NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

439

Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 May 2002 Reaffirmation with Change Notice 2 July 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change Notice No.2 Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities Page/Section Change Throughout the document: Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Revised to: Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement

440

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

145-2008 145-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2008 Program Management Guide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 Program Management Foreword

442

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

443

Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

Rick Demmer

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

Radiological Control Managers’ Council

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

An in situ survey of Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range, Central Nevada. Date of survey: September--November 1993  

SciTech Connect

A ground-based in situ radiological survey was conducted downwind of the Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3 nuclear safety test sites at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada from September through November 1993. The purpose of the study was to corroborate the americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) soil concentrations that were derived from the aerial radiological survey of the Clean Slate areas, which was conducted from August through October 1993. The presence of {sup 241}Am was detected at 140 of the 190 locations, with unrecoverable or lost data accounting for fifteen (15) of the sampling points. Good agreement was obtained between the aerial and in situ results.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Finding and evaluating potential radiological problems in the vicinity of uranium milling sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailings at inactive milling sites usually have a low frequency of human occupancy but continuously generate /sup 222/Rn into the atmosphere. Measurements of airborne /sup 222/Rn and /sup 222/Rn flux are made on the sites to define the tailings source term. Concurrently with these measurements, an ambient /sup 222/Rn monitoring network is established off-site and a meteolrololgical station is established at or near the mill site. Radioactivity can migrate to areas outside of site boundaries by wind and water erosion, groundwater transport, spillage of incoming purposes. In order to identify and assess off-site radioactivity on properties in the vicinity of milling sites, a combination of aerial and ground-level radiological monitoring techniques are used. The ground mobile gamma-ray scan is conducted using a vehicle equipped with sensitive gamma-ray detectors. The detectors are shielded so that gamma radiation input is viewed through only one side of the vehicle. This system is capable of precisely locating properties which have anomalously high gamma radiation levels caused by the presence of tailings. Subsequently, these properties are identified as candidate vicinity properties and are scheduled for radiological surveys subject to the property owner's consent. The comprehensive radiological surveys conducted at these vicinity properties determine the amount, type, and location of tailings materials. Structures on a vicinity property are carefully surveyed to determine the presence or absence of construction-related uses of tailings. If structural uses of tailings are found, air samples are analyzed for /sup 222/Rn progeny, short-term continuous /sup 222/Rn monitoring is instituted, and /sup 222/Rn flux rate from tailings are estimated. If warranted, long-term /sup 222/Rn and progeny measurements are made.

Goldsmith, W.A.; Yates, W.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Supplement No. 2 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol – Verification and Certification Protocol  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Supplement No. 2 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol – Verification and Certification Protocol (November 1985, Rev. 1)

448

BUSpec: A framework for generation of verification aids for standard bus protocol specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A typical verification intellectual property (VIP) of a bus protocol such as ARM advanced micro-controller bus architecture (AMBA) or PCI consists of a set of assertions and associated verification aids such as test-benches, design-ware models and coverage ... Keywords: Assertion-based verification, Bus functional models, Protocol validation, Verification intellectual property

Bhaskar Pal; Ansuman Banerjee; Pallab Dasgupta; P. P. Chakrabarti

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A dynamic assertion-based verification platform for validation of UML designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacity limitations continue to impede widespread adoption of formal property verification in the design validation ow of software and hardware systems. The more popular choice (at least in the hardware domain) has been dynamic property verification ... Keywords: UML, assertion checking, dynamic property verification, software verification

A. Banerjee; S. Ray; P. Dasgupta; P. P. Chakrabarti; S. Ramesh; P. Vignesh; V. Ganesan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Role of science in treaty verification  

SciTech Connect

Technologically advanced nations are currently applying more science to treaty verification than ever before. Satellites gather a multitude of information relating to proliferation concerns using thermal imaging analysis, nuclear radiation measurements, and optical and radio frequency signals detection. Ground stations gather complementary signals such as seismic events and radioactive emissions. Export controls in many countries attempt to intercept materials and technical means that could be used for nuclear proliferation. Never the less, we have witnessed a plethora of nuclear proliferation episodes, that were undetected (or were belatedly detected) by these technologies - the Indian nuclear tests in 1998, the Libyan nuclear buildup, the Iranian enrichment program and the North Korea nuclear weapons program are some prime examples. In this talk we will discuss some of the technologies used for proliferation detection. In particular, we will note some of the issues relating to nuclear materials control agreements that epitomize political difficulties as they impact the implementation of science and technology.

Gavron, A. I. (Avigdor I.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Verification Checklist Home Address: City: State: Zip:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist Home Address: City: State: Zip: Section Requirements (Refer to full Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications for details) Must Correct Builder Verified Rater Verified N/A Note: The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists. ENERGY STAR remains a prerequisite for Indoor airPLUS certification. ENERGY STAR V3 Checklists Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist completed. o o Water Management System Builder Checklist completed. o o HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist completed. o o HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist completed. o o

452

Status Report on REC Verification, Tracking and Associated Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REC REC Verification, Tracking Systems and Associated Issues DOE Workshop on REC Markets and Challenges September 11, 2007 Meredith Wingate Director of Clean Energy Policy Design and Implementation Center for Resource Solutions Main Points * Think National - Verification issues are getting more complicated with the intersection of RECs and emissions markets - Market needs more rigorous verification * More coordination is needed Role of Tracking Systems * Primary tool for implementing state RPS programs * Produce data for environmental disclosure programs * Facilitate REC transactions Certificate-based Tracking Programs * ERCOT RECs Program (2001) * NEPOOL GIS (2002) * WI RRC Program (2003-2007) * PJM GATS (2005) * NJ SRECS (2005) * WREGIS (2007) * M-RETS (2007) * New York State (2008?)

453

Reviewing Measurement and Verification Plans for Federal ESPC Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reviewing Measurement & Verification Plans Reviewing Measurement & Verification Plans for Federal ESPC Projects February 2007 Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy This document was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program by Nexant, Inc., and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This document is posted on FEMP's web site at www.eere.energy.gov/femp/financing/ . [Headers and footers only revised 12/08] Reviewing M&V Plans Contents REVIEWING MEASUREMENT AND VERIFICATION PLANS FOR FEDERAL ESPC PROJECTS ............................................................................................................ 1 STEP 1 - PREPARE CUSTOM REPORT AND CHECKLIST FROM TEMPLATE .......................... 1

454

JOM Salary Survey - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JOM Salary Survey. This survey is currently closed. Please contact the author of this survey for further assistance. Javascript is required for this site to function, ...

455

The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of 6 Y dwarfs (see also Cushing et al.), 89 T dwarfs, 8 L dwarfs, and 1 M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown ...

Bochanski, John J.

456

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Surveillance Guides - RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the workers and comply with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection 2.2 DOE/EH-0256T, rev. 1, Radiological Control Manual 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement RP-0024 from the RL S/RID. This requirement comes from the Radiological Control Manual. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative performs the following activities to evaluate the effectiveness of work practices by contractor personnel in minimizing exposure to radiological hazards.

458

Radiological and Nuclear Security in A Global Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers the state of nuclear and radiological security in the UK and abroad and reports on the methods that could be employed by terrorists with radiological or nuclear material to cause destruction. It is shown that despite current safeguards that problems arise due to materials that are unaccounted for and poor implementation of detection regimes in some geographical regions. The prospect of a future terrorist event that involves nuclear or radiological materials seems likely despite best efforts of prevention.

Jones, Nick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

2012 NERSC User Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results 2012 User Survey Text 2012 NERSC User Survey Text The 2012 NERSC User Survey is closed. The following is the text of the survey. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with...

460

Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data April 13, 2012 - 4:15pm Addthis Shankar Earni Program Manager at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Measurement and verification (M&V) focuses on ensuring that the savings from energy efficiency projects are being realized with a certain degree of confidence. M&V involves understanding how energy savings arebeing realized from a project; designing a cost-effective assessment strategy that addresses how to ensure the savings can be measured; and implementing the designed strategy by gathering the key data followed by analysis and reporting of the actual savings. In some cases, data from the Green Button program can be used to assess the energy savings from new efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological verification survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Skill Scores and Correlation Coefficients in Model Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attributes of the anomaly correlation coefficient, as a model verification measure, are investigated by exploiting a recently developed method of decomposing skill scores into other measures of performance. A mean square error skill score based ...

Allan H. Murphy; Edward S. Epstein

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

V-073: IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager Signature Verification Flaw  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager Signature Verification 3: IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager Signature Verification Flaw Lets Remote Users Modify Attributes V-073: IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager Signature Verification Flaw Lets Remote Users Modify Attributes January 21, 2013 - 12:15am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager Signature Verification Flaw Lets Remote Users Modify Attributes PLATFORM: Tivoli Federated Identity Manager versions 6.2.0, 6.2.1, 6.2.2 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager. REFERENCE LINKS: IBM Security Bulletin: 1615744 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028011 CVE-2012-6359 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The system does not check that all attributes have been signed. A remote user with the ability to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack can modify

463

Summary Verification Measures and Their Interpretation for Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble prediction systems produce forecasts that represent the probability distribution of a continuous forecast variable. Most often, the verification problem is simplified by transforming the ensemble forecast into probability forecasts for ...

A. Allen Bradley; Stuart S. Schwartz

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Neighborhood Verification: A Strategy for Rewarding Close Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution forecasts may be quite useful even when they do not match the observations exactly. Neighborhood verification is a strategy for evaluating the “closeness” of the forecast to the observations within space–time neighborhoods rather ...

Elizabeth E. Ebert

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Scenario based performance optimisation in face verification using smart cards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the effect of an optimisation strategy to be applied to image data in a smart card based face verification system. Accordingly, we propose a system architecture considering the trade-off between performance versus the improvement of memory ...

Thirimachos Bourlai; Kieron Messer; Josef Kittler

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Clock independent timing verification of level-sensitive latches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to automatically handle level-sensitive latches in timing analysis/verification. Timing specifications, including delays and timing constraints, are automatically generated for the cells in the design. The generated timing ...

Robert Tjärnström

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A Simplification of a Real-Time Verification Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the problem of real-time verification with dense dynamics using timeout and calendar based models and simplify this to a finite state verification problem. To overcome the complexity of verification of real-time systems with dense dynamics, Dutertre and Sorea, proposed timeout and calender based transition systems to model the behavior of real-time systems and verified safety properties using k-induction in association with bounded model checking. In this work, we introduce a specification formalism for these models in terms of Timeout Transition Diagrams and capture their behavior in terms of semantics of Timed Transition Systems. Further, we discuss a technique, which reduces the problem of verification of qualitative temporal properties on infinite state space of (a large fragment of) these timeout and calender based transition systems into that on clockless finite state models through a two-step process comprising of digitization and canonical finitary reduction. This technique enables us to ve...

Saha, Indranil; Roy, Suman; 10.1007/978-3-540-75596-8_21

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A lightweight specification language for bounded program verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new light-weight specification language called JForge Specification Language (JFSL) for object-oriented languages such as Java. The language is amenable to bounded verification analysis by a tool ...

Yessenov, Kuat T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Distributions-Oriented Verification of Ensemble Streamflow Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble streamflow prediction systems produce forecasts in the form of a conditional probability distribution for a continuous forecast variable. A distributions-oriented approach is presented for verification of these probability distribution ...

A. Allen Bradley; Stuart S. Schwartz; Tempei Hashino

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

A Generic Forecast Verification Framework for Administrative Purposes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reasons for calculating forecast verification scores, and considerable attention has been given to designing and analyzing the properties of scores that can be used for scientific purposes. Much less attention has been given to ...

Simon J. Mason; Andreas P. Weigel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment: VORTEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment planned for 1994 and 1995 to evaluate a set of hypotheses pertaining to tornadogenesis and tornado dynamics. Observations of state variables will be obtained ...

Erik N. Rasmussen; Jerry M. Straka; Robert Davies-Jones; Charles A. Doswell III; Frederick H. Carr; Michael D. Eilts; Donald R. MacGorman

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Explicitly Accounting for Observation Error in Categorical Verification of Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given an accurate representation of errors in observations it is possible to remove the effect of those errors from categorical verification scores. The errors in the observations are treated as additive white noise that is statistically ...

Neill E. Bowler

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Event Order Abstraction for Parametric Real-Time System Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new abstraction technique, event order abstraction (EOA), for parametric safety verification of real-time systems in which ``correct orderings of events'' needed for system correctness are maintained by timing ...

Umeno, Shinya

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

474

Induction-based gate-level verification of multipliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a method based on unrolling the inductive definition of binary number multiplication to verify gate-level implementations of multipliers. The induction steps successively reduce the size of the multiplier under verification. Through induction, ...

Ying Tsai Chang; Kwang Ting Tim Cheng

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Speaker verification in noisy environment using missing feature approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to handle speech signals corrupted by noise in speaker verification and provide robustness to systems, this paper evaluates the use of missing feature (MF) approach with a novel combination of techniques. A mask estimation based on spectral ...

Dayana Ribas; Jesús A. Villalba; Eduardo Lleida; José R. Calvo

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

477

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

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