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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

2

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

3

DOE O 153.1, Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency ...

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

D. R. Bowman

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

SU?E?I?89: Real?Time Information and Decision Support for Radiological Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Emergency response and medical preparedness for radiological incidents is one of the critical cornerstones for Homeland Security

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken placetechniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportationthe so-called second line of defense.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

12

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSAs role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management System | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency ... Press Release NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management

14

Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

David P. Colton

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600 Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared, safety, and welfare. #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Energy Emergency Response Plan was prepared from

18

Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last line of defense in the event of a nuclear terrorist incident or other types of radiological accident. This readiness level provides the U.S. government with quickly deployable, dedicated resources capable of responding rapidly and comprehensively to nuclear or radiological incidents

19

NNSA Conducts Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

20

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Radiological Response Training in Vienna | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment August 4, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 The public is invited to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment that the U.S. Department of Energy has published for a proposed radiological response training range at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). At the range, INL experts would train personnel, conduct exercises, and perform technology evaluation and demonstrations in support of national technical nuclear forensic and radiological emergency response programs. �The Radiological Response Training Range will allow emergency responders to prepare for a major radiological incident by training in an environment that safely simulates scenarios they might encounter,� said Vic Pearson, DOE�s document manager for the environmental assessment. �Activities at the range would directly support the nation�s readiness to respond to a radiological incident, but more importantly, would enable responders to develop proficiency in characterizing the scene in support of determining the origins of the incident.�

22

Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission > Emergency Response Our Mission > Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier responder to any nuclear or radiological incident within the United States or abroad and provides operational planning and training to counter both domestic and international nuclear terrorism. Planning for Emergencies NNSA develops and implements specific programs, plans, and systems to minimize the impacts of emergencies on worker and public health and safety, the environment, and national security. Learn More > Responding to Emergencies NNSA's mission is to protect the public, environment, and emergency responders from both terrorist and non-terrorist events by providing a

23

Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission > Emergency Response Our Mission > Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier responder to any nuclear or radiological incident within the United States or abroad and provides operational planning and training to counter both domestic and international nuclear terrorism. Planning for Emergencies NNSA develops and implements specific programs, plans, and systems to minimize the impacts of emergencies on worker and public health and safety, the environment, and national security. Learn More > Responding to Emergencies NNSA's mission is to protect the public, environment, and emergency responders from both terrorist and non-terrorist events by providing a

24

Argonne TDC: Emergency Response Technologies  

Emergency Response Technologies. PROTECT (Program for Response Options and Technology Enhancements for Chemical/Biological Terrorism) Grid Security ...

25

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform...

26

Coordination in emergency response management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing a framework to analyze coordination patterns occurring in the emergency response life cycle.

Rui Chen; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu J. Upadhyaya

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hanford Emergency Response Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

Wagoner, J.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Emergency Response Memorandum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... related to recent occurences. If a chemical spill or other emergency occurs, call the emergency number, x2222, immediately. ...

29

Project #8, Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... emergencies EMS and private ambulance personnel did not have protective clothing Secure location of state and local emergency operations ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Emergency Response Guideline Development  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

Gary D. Storrick

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our...

32

NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

field deployable teams of heath physics professionals equipped to conduct radiological search, monitoring, and assessment activities. Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining...

33

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ......

34

NETL: Emergency Response and Communications Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response NewsRoom Welcome to the NETL Emergency Response and Communications Page This is NETL's public website for emergency preparedness. Click here to go directly to...

35

ORISE: REAC/TS Emergency Response Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Services Emergency Response Services The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education...

36

Fire Department Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programs. "Manual of Protective Action Guides and Protective~s. "Emergency Response Protective Action Guides: Airbornefor Setting Protective Action Guides. January 1975. Oak

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Urgent Care/Emergency Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urgent CareEmergency Response Jackie Cohran, RN, MSN, CIC, COHN-5, PresidentCEO Infection Control Consultation Services. Inc 301.749.9540 (p) 301.749.9714(1)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Health Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to Fukushima accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

42

Louisiana Tech University EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/or Residential Life, whichever appropriate, after a disaster. #12;Emergency Response Plan for Students 4 CriticalLouisiana Tech University Part III EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN FOR STUDENTS JANUARY, 2013 #12;Emergency Response Plan for Students 2 SECTION I. INTRODUCTION

Selmic, Sandra

43

Emergency Response: Creativity and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every time emergency responders respond to an incident, they enter an ambiguous situation that is an ill-defined problem space. As the responders engage with the incident, they discover, piece by piece, the unique interlocking problems and act quickly to put form and structure onto the potential solution. In order to quickly, effectively, and safely resolve an incident, emergency responders must have depth and breadth of knowledge across responder disciplines and domains. This knowledge is acquired through both formal training courses and informal training in the station house. The ability to quickly assess a situation, accurately identify the elements as they emerge and their significance, then decide on a course of action combining a variety of domains and skill sets speaks to the creative nature of emergency responders. This study uses naturalistic inquiry to explore what it is like to be an emergency responder, describe how creativity manifests itself in a field environment, and discuss what emergency responders want in their training. This study found that being an emergency responder is emotional, exciting, stressful, challenging, full of the unexpected, and rewarding. During an incident, emergency responders are dealing with the complex interactions of various emotions while resolving difficult and often sad situations. Being an emergency responder is synonymous with being a good problem solver; they are also highly emotionally resilient. The process of creativity within an emergency response environment is seen through preparation that is, training. The consistent review and development of skills makes the skills automatic. Responders also cross-train and, often, an individual responder will have expertise in multiple areas. The improvisational skills of emergency responders to events which are often emergent and creative in their own right, demonstrate a depth of creative force through the handling of complex, high-risk situations with persistence, endurance, and determination. Finally, this study found that emergency responders are passionate about their training. They know that what they learn and practice during training evolutions forms the foundation of their professionalism, provides opportunities to learn new skills or hone already established skills, reinforces safety considerations, and will save their lives and the lives of other people.

Bastian, Marcia

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 1 2.0 RESULTS ................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Positive Program Attributes ............................................................... 4 2.2 Weaknesses and Items Requiring Attention ..................................... 5 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................ 9 4.0 RATING .................................................................................................... 10

45

Priority Assignment in Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the aftermath of mass-casualty events, key resources (such as ambulances and operating rooms) can be overwhelmed by the sudden jump in patient demand. To ration these resources, patients are assigned different priority levels, a process that is called ... Keywords: dynamic programming, emergency response, stochastic orders, stochastic scheduling, triage

Evin Uzun Jacobson; Nilay Tan?k Argon; Serhan Ziya

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Emergency response robot evaluation exercise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 60 robot test methods are being developed by a team led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with the sponsorship of U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). These test methods are being specified and standardized ... Keywords: HRI, capability, emergency response, evaluation, human-robot interaction, measure, metrics, mobility, performance, power, radio communications, repetition, robot, sensor, standard, task, test, test method, test suite, trial

Adam Jacoff; Hui-Min Huang; Ann Virts; Anthony Downs; Raymond Sheh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Evaluation Emergency Planning for Nuclear PowerPotential Definition of Nuclear Emergencies Developingan Emergency Plan . . . . Regulatory Review of Utilities!

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

EMERGENCY RESPONSE ORGANIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes requirements for Emergency Response Organization Training. This program description applies to all Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) contractor and subcontractor employees who are identified to fulfill Hanford Site Emergency Response Organization (ERO) positions.

MITCHELL, L.J.

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HSE MANUAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS LAB FIELD SITE MEDINA THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN 1 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MEMORANDUM PAGE 3 MEDICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS PAGE LIST OF CONTACTS ­ SITE MANAGERS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PAGE 20 CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION PAGE 21 2 #12

Texas at Austin, University of

50

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. CARLSBAD, N.M. - For the first time, a program led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE

51

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. CARLSBAD, N.M. - For the first time, a program led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE

52

THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN Revised January 2013 1 #12;Contents: Main Section: 1) Creates Emergency Response Organization 2) Establishes Principles to Guide Response Efforts Utility Disaster Plan Appendix F: p 25 Pandemic Influenza Action Plan Appendix I: p 32 Useful Contact

Oklahoma, University of

53

Emergency Response, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Response, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery at UCAR Presented by Stephen Sadler the "university" system ·Open Campus ·Public Access-Mesa Lab #12;Emergency Response, Disaster Recovery Issues Response ·Install backup power #12;Curtailed Public Access if Necessary (3 times since 2000

54

ORISE: Helping Strengthen Emergency Response Capabilities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps strengthen government agencies' emergency response capabilities through a variety of exercises, from tabletop training to...

55

Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response (IPLER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology and Information Products for Emergency Response #12;2 IPLER Problem Statement · Disaster response #12;9 NSF Rapid, Google Studies · NSF RAPID: Automated Target Detection Tool for Disaster Response Support Technologies for Environmental Forecasting and Disaster Response" o Supports the national need

Zanibbi, Richard

56

Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data from the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response infrastructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM.

DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Advanced Atmospheric Modeling for Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport and diffusion models are an important part of emergency response systems for industrial facilities that have the potential to release significant quantities of toxic or radioactive material into the atmosphere. An advanced ...

Jerome D. Fast; B. Lance O'steen; Robert P. Addis

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Simulation for emergency response: a framework for modeling and simulation for emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of modeling and simulation tools have been developed and more are being developed for emergency response applications. The available simulation tools are meant mostly for standalone use. Addressing an emergency incident requires addressing multiple ...

Sanjay Jain; Charles McLean

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance  

SciTech Connect

Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robots ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interdependency modeling and emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In large-scale disaster events, infrastructure owners are faced with many challenges in deciding the allocation ofresources for preparation and response actions. This decision process involves building situation awareness, evaluating course of action, ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, discrete event simulation, infrastructure interdependency analysis

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Steven Woolsey; Robert Timpany; Chuck Miller; Anthony McDermott; Milos Manic

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Activities Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Activities Heads of Departmental elements, with the concurrence of their servicing Human Resources staff, are authorized to waive the bi-weekly pay limitation for employees engaged in emergency response activities that include, but are not limited to, disaster relief assistance, radiological assistance, and terrorist attacks. This authority will expire December 31, 2015. Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay Limitation for Emergency Response Activities Responsible Contacts Bruce Murray HR Policy Advisor E-mail bruce.murray@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-3372 More Documents & Publications Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need

62

Design principles of coordinated multi-incident emergency response systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response systems play an important role in homeland security nowadays. Despite this, research in the design of emergency response systems is lacking. An effective design of emergency response system involves multi-disciplinary design considerations. ...

Rui Chen; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu Upadhyaya

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other responsible State agencies. The concept of operationsmay be First, some state agencies have been mandated toThese reviews are very state agencies extensive and contain

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise...

65

Energy Department Announces Emergency Oil Loan In Response to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane Isaac-Related Request Energy Department Announces Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane Isaac-Related Request August 31, 2012 -...

66

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Founded through LANL, Vital...

67

NETL: NETL Emergency Response/Continuity of Operations for Employees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Only > Emergency Response For Employees NETL Emergency ResponseContinuity of Operations for Employees This website is for postings of special instructions for personnel...

68

Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene August 26, 2011 - 12:15pm...

69

Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Security + Safety » Emergency Response & Procedures National Security + Safety » Emergency Response & Procedures Emergency Response & Procedures November 1, 2013 A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz Regarding Fukushima On Friday, I made my first visit to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is stunning that one can see firsthand the destructive force of the tsunami even more than two and a half years after the tragic events October 29, 2013 Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities The Energy Department continues to take actions to protect our energy infrastructure, adapt to climate change and build partnerships to make

70

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

71

American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee Report on Electronic Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

Park, Catherine C., E-mail: cpark@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Harris, Eleanor [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Price, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wallner, Paul E. [21st Century Oncology, Inc., Ft. Myers, FL (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab/ Emergency Response Guide Contact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Guide Contact 2010 Emergency Response Guide Contact Phone Numbers Fire Emergency Numbers: LBNL Phones with 486 and 495 prefix x7911 Non-LBNL buildings JGI in...

73

University of California Santa Cruz EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California Santa Cruz EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN September 2007 #12;University of California, Santa Cruz Page 2 of 11 Emergency Response Plan I. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 4 II. MANAGEMENT OF EMERGENCY OPERATIONS .................................................... 4 A

California at Santa Cruz, University of

74

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergencies 2012.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies IEA: Tracking Clean Energy Progress: Energy Technology Perspectives...

75

Review of the Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos National Laboratory April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of...

76

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Microsoft Word - Appendix H - Emergency Response Plan for Dams...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

H Emergency Response Plan for the Rocky Flats Site Dams This page intentionally left blank LMSRFSS04533-3.0 Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Emergency Response Plan for the Rocky...

79

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

80

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2002 Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ......

82

Application in Emergency Response: Medical Ice Slurry Coolants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Capabilities Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Overview Energy System Applications Safety-Related Applications Homeland Security...

83

Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations  

SciTech Connect

This article presents the experimental work performed in the area of neutron detector development at the Remote Sensing LaboratoryAndrews Operations (RSL-AO) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the last four years. During the 1950s neutron detectors were developed mostly to characterize nuclear reactors where the neutron flux is high. Due to the indirect nature of neutron detection via interaction with other particles, neutron counting and neutron energy measurements have never been as precise as gamma-ray counting measurements and gamma-ray spectroscopy. This indirect nature is intrinsic to all neutron measurement endeavors (except perhaps for neutron spin-related experiments, viz. neutron spin-echo measurements where one obtains ?eV energy resolution). In emergency response situations generally the count rates are low, and neutrons may be scattered around in inhomogeneous intervening materials. It is also true that neutron sensors are most efficient for the lowest energy neutrons, so it is not as easy to detect and count energetic neutrons. Most of the emergency response neutron detectors are offshoots of nuclear device diagnostics tools and special nuclear materials characterization equipment, because that is what is available commercially. These instruments mostly are laboratory equipment, and not field-deployable gear suited for mobile teams. Our goal is to design and prototype field-deployable, ruggedized, lightweight, efficient neutron detectors.

,

2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

Jakubowski, F.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

86

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

87

NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia | National Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses ... Press Release NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia

88

Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2002 March 2002 Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................... 1 2.0 OVERVIEW OF RESULTS ........................................................ 3 3.0 DISCUSSION OF RESULTS ...................................................... 5 3.1 Emergency Response Programs, Plans, and Procedures ....... 5 3.2 Emergency Management Requirements, Roles, and Responsibilities ............................................................... 8 3.3 Emergency Facilities and Equipment ................................... 10 4.0 CONCLUSIONS ......................................................................... 12 5.0 OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENTS .............................

89

Automated data system for emergency meteorological response  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Plant (SRP) releases small amounts of radioactive nuclides to the atmosphere as a consequence of the production of radioisotopes. The potential for larger accidental releases to the atmosphere also exists, although the probability for most accidents is low. To provide for emergency meteorological response to accidental releases and to conduct research on the transport and diffusion of radioactive nuclides in the routine releases, a series of high-quality meteorological sensors have been located on towers in and about SRP. These towers are equipped with instrumentation to detect and record temperature and wind turbulence. Signals from the meterological sensors are brought by land-line to the SRL Weather Center-Analysis Laboratory (WC-AL). At the WC-AL, a Weather Information and Display (WIND) system has been installed. The WIND system consists of a minicomputer with graphical displays in the WC-AL and also in the emergency operating center (EOC) of SRP. In addition, data are available to the system from standard weather teletype services, which provide both routine surface weather observations and routine upper air wind and temperature observations for the southeastern United States. Should there be an accidental release to the atmosphere, available recorded data and computer codes would allow the calculation and display of the location, time, and downwind concentration of the atmospheric release. These data are made available to decision makers in near real-time to permit rapid decisive action to limit the consequences of such accidental releases. (auth)

Kern, C.D.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microsoft Word - 2.11 Emergency Response 0913.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DRAFT Emergency Response In the event of an emergency, personnel should take immediate steps to protect themselves and others and summon aid as described in ES&H Manual Section...

92

The Ability of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center to Collect and Disseminate Environmental Measurements during Radiological Emergencies  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is the United States response organization for radiological emergencies. The FRMAC is structured as an operations center and employs the combined resources of several federal agencies to respond to any disaster resulting in the release of radioactivity. The mission of the FRMAC is to support state and local authorities in the gathering of environmental data using an array of survey equipment ranging from alpha probes, beta/gamma probes, and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectroscopy to the gathering of physical samples. Once collected, the data are projected on maps to assist public officials make protective action decisions. In addition to the accumulation of data, it is the legal obligation of the FRMAC to keep archival records of all data points and their actions. During an event, it is conceivable that hundreds to thousands of sample points will be recorded over a relatively short time. It is in the interest of the federal government and public that the information collected be put to the best use as fast as possible. Toward this end, the Remote Sensing Laboratory, working under the direction of the United States Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, is investigating the use of several technologies that will accelerate data flow from field teams to the FRMAC and, finally, distribution of data to decision makers and the public. Not only can finished data products be viewed through the internet, but the actual collection of data via real-time telemetry can be viewed using this same method. Data from the field will be transferred directly to the FRMAC using the MCPD (multi-path communication device). This base station receives the survey information from the field teams via Bluetooth and instantly investigates the best communication pathway to transfer data to the FRMAC. Possible paths include standalone radio, commercial cellular networks (GPRS and CDMA) and satellite. Once inside the FRMAC, this information is transferred to the pertinent divisions for review, data storage, and eventual display on map products. The internet is also a powerful communications tool being utilized by the FRMAC. Using a secure internet connection, field team location and data collection can be viewed live-time by any computer attached to the internet. Similarly, survey information from our fixed-wing aircraft can be viewed while the mission is being flown. All accumulated data and maps generated in the FRMAC are disseminated on a web page through the secure FRMAC web site. Several new data communication processes are being investigated to aid the FRMAC. Each of these provides an important tool to efficiently collect, record and disseminate environmental measurements to FRMAC scientists and decision makers. The ultimate goal of these processes is to improve the flow of protection decisions and information to the public.

Craig Marianno and James Essex

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Independent Oversight Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Plans and Performance, March 2003 Independent Oversight Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Plans and Performance, March 2003 The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted a review of emergency response plans and performance at DOE Headquarters (HQ) in February 2003. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the readiness and effectiveness of the DOE and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) emergency response teams for a postulated emergency at a field site, and the HQ Incident Command Team for an emergency affecting the Forrestal building. In addition, OA was tasked to evaluate the current status of DOE's Continuity of Operations (COOP) program plans and provide recommendations

94

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

95

Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities Emergency Response Activities States may or may not elect to fund emergency management activities with AIP money. If they do, the AIP should include an Emergency Management section. This section may be implemented at any time - when the AIP is first negotiated, at renewal, or through amendment. This Attachment provides examples of items that might be appropriate in an AIP's Emergency Management section (most have come directly from existing AIPs). These items should be considered neither requirements or restrictions. Since funding is not available to support all of these activities, the AIP should be tailored to reflect the State's most urgent and realistic needs in order

96

Emergency Response Training Draws Professionals From Seven States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seven States CARLSBAD, N.M., August 18, 2000 - Emergency response professionals from Arizona, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas will be in Carlsbad...

97

Review of DOE HQ Emergency Response Plans and Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Plans and Performance March 2003 Prepared by Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of...

98

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

99

Review of DOE HQ Emergency Response Plans and Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Plans and Performance March 2003 Prepared by Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy OFFICE OF INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT AND PERFORMANCE ASSURANCE REVIEW OF DOE HEADQUARTERS EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS AND PERFORMANCE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted a review of emergency response plans and performance at DOE Headquarters (HQ) in February 2003. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the readiness and effectiveness of the DOE and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) emergency response teams for a postulated emergency at a field site, and the HQ Incident Command Team for an emergency affecting the Forrestal building. In addition,

100

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Triage Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Render Safe > Radiological Triage Radiological Triage Triage Logo NNSA's Triage is a non-deployable, secure, on-line capability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hanover County Improves Its Response to Emergency Medical 911 Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting emergency medical service (EMS) performance measure benchmarks for patient response times is an important factor in saving patient lives. Hanover County Fire and EMS in Virginia initiated a quick-response vehicle (QRV) pilot program in which ... Keywords: emergency medical services, nonparametric statistical methods, public services

Laura A. McLay; Henri Moore

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular ... Keywords: design visions, emergency response, palpable computing, participatory design, prototyping, ubiquitous computing

Morten Kyng; Esben Toftdahl Nielsen; Margit Kristensen

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

NNSA, IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for First Responders for  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for First Responders for IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for First Responders for Ports and Customs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA, IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for ... Press Release NNSA, IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for First Responders for

104

Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 1996 22, 1996 Enforcement Letter, EG&G Mound Applied Technologies - August 22, 1996 Issued to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies related to the Inadvertent Transfer of Radiological Contamination at the Mound Plant September 22, 1995 Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Hanford Corporation - September 22, 1995 Issued to Westinghouse Hanford Corporation related to Operational Safety Requirements Implementation at the B Plant/Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility at the Hanford Site August 1, 2011 Rebuilding a Greener New Orleans on Veteran's Day June 9, 2010 BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (3 of 4) June 9, 2010 BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (2 of 4) June 9, 2010 BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4)

105

Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 1998 4, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company - August 4, 1998 Issued to Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company related to a Repetitive Problem with Instrument Operability at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory July 31, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc - July 31, 1998 Issued to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., related to Incomplete Corrective Actions at the Hanford Site, July 31, 1998 July 21, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - July 21, 1998 Issued to the University of California related to Radiological Work Controls at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 21, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. - July 21, 1998 Issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Fire Protection System

106

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

107

Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiotherapy, McGill University Heath Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gois Manso, Paulo [Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo Segreto, Roberto, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.br [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

109

FRMAC Interactions During a Radiological or Nuclear Event  

SciTech Connect

During a radiological or nuclear event of national significance the Federal Radiological Emergency Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) assists federal, state, tribal, and local authorities by providing timely, high-quality predictions, measurements, analyses and assessments to promote efficient and effective emergency response for protection of the public and the environment from the consequences of such an event.

Wong, C T

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Study Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. i 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. i 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. i 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. i 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. i 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. i 2.13.07

111

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Instructor's Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. L 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. L 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. L 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. L 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. L 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. L

112

EVADER: Electric Vehicle Alert for Detection and Emergency Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVADER: Electric Vehicle Alert for Detection and Emergency Response F. Duboisa , G. Baudeta and J effect of vehicle exterior noise for vulnerable users has recently emerged. Quieter cars could reduce pedestrians' ability to travel safely. One of the objectives of the EVADER (Electric Vehicle Alert

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

113

ORISE: Helping Strengthen Emergency Response Capabilities for DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Response Firefighters assisting a disaster victim The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps strengthen government agencies' emergency response capabilities through a variety of exercises, from tabletop training to full-scale drills. ORISE supports emergency response needs across multiple disciplines, including the medical management of radiation incidents through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS). As a DOE reponse asset, REAC/TS is available 24 hours a day/seven days a week to deploy and provide emergency medical treatment for all types of radiation exposure anywhere in the world. Each interdisciplinary team includes a physician, nurse/paramedic and health physicist who are

114

Emergency response training draws professionals from two states  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two States CARLSBAD, N.M., January 31, 2000 - Emergency response professionals from Oregon and Texas will be in Carlsbad Feb. 1-2 to learn how to handle potential accidents...

115

Emergency Response Transport Forecasting Using Historical Wind Field Pattern Matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical pattern matching, or analog forecasting, is used to generate short-term mesoscale transport forecasts for emergency response at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. A simple historical pattern-matching algorithm ...

Roger G. Carter; Robert E. Keislar

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Coordinating, integrating, and synchronizing disaster response : use of an emergency response synchronization matrix in emergency planning, exercises, and operations.  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness (CSEP) Program is a wide-ranging activity in support of a national initiative involving the U.S. Army Chemical Materiel Command (CMA), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), 9 states, and 37 counties. Established in 1988, the CSEP Program enhances emergency planning for the unlikely event of a release of hazardous chemical weapons agent from one of the Army's chemical weapons storage installations currently storing chemical weapons. These obsolete weapons are scheduled to be destroyed; meanwhile, however, they pose a threat to installation workers and residents of the surrounding communities. Argonne's CSEP Program includes a variety of components that serve the needs of multiple program participants. Among the major activities are: (1) Development of the Emergency Planning Synchronization Matrix to facilitate integration of multi-jurisdictional emergency plans: (a) Coordinating, Integrating, and Synchronizing Disaster Response: Use of an Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix in Emergency Planning, Exercises, and Operations. A graphical depiction of the entire emergency response process via a synchronization matrix is an effective management tool for optimizing the design, exercise, and real-life implementation of emergency plans. This system-based approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time. It gives responders the opportunity to make real-time adjustments to maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. An effective response to any natural or technological hazard must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization. An emergency response to an accidental release of chemical warfare agents from one of this nation's eight chemical weapons stockpile sites, like any other disaster response, is complex. It requires the rapid coordination, integration, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and nongovernmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions, each with varying response capabilities, into a unified community response. The community response actions occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Actions are directed and controlled by responding local governments and agencies situated within the response area, as well as by state and federal operations centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protection action decision-making process is greatly compressed. To ensure an effective response with minimal confusion, given the potential catastrophic nature of such releases, the response community must carefully synchronize response operations.

Hewett, P. L., Jr.; Mitrani, J. E.; Metz, W. C.; Vercellone, J. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ANS-8. 23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response  

SciTech Connect

A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort.

Pruvost, N.L.

1991-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Policy and Procedure Manual Diagnostic Services Department of Radiology Diagnostic Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disaster or an ETC alert. DEFINITION: None POLICY: Department of Radiology response to disaster. RESPONSIBILITIES: 1. Refer to hospital Disaster and Emergency Preparedness Manual for more detailed information Disaster Plan Radiology: 10/98, 10/04, 05/06, 01/10 SUBJECT/TITLE: DISASTER PLAN RADIOLOGY PURPOSE

119

Development of the triage, monitoring and treatment Handbook for Members of the Public Affected by Radiological Terrorism - A European Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

European national emergency response plans have long been focused on accidents at nuclear power plants. Recently, the possible threats by disaffected groups have shifted the focus to being prepared also for malevolent use of radiation that are aimed at creating disruption and panic in the society. The casualties will most likely be members of the public. According to the scenario, the number of affected people can vary from a few to mass casualties. The radiation exposure can range from very low to substantial, possibly combined with conventional injuries. There is a need to develop practicable tools for the adequate response to such acts and more specifically to address European guidelines for triage, monitoring and treatment of exposed people. Although European countries have developed emergency response plans for nuclear accidents they have not all made plans for handling malevolent use of radioactive material. Indeed, there is a need to develop practical guidance on emergency response and medical treatment of the public affected by malevolent acts. Generic guidance on this topic has been published by international organisations. They are, however, not operational documents to be used in emergency situations. The Triage, Monitoring and Treatment (TMT) Handbook aims to strengthen the European ability to efficiently respond to malevolent acts in terms of protecting and treating exposed people. Part of the Handbook is also devoted to public information and communication issues which would contribute to public reassurance in emergency situations. The Handbook will be drafted by European and international experts before it is circulated to all emergency response institutions in Europe that would be a part of the handling of malevolent acts using radioactive material. The institutions would be given a 6 months consultation time with encouragement to test the draft Handbook in national exercises. A workshop will allow feedback from these end users on the content, structure and usefulness of the Handbook before a final version is produced. In order to achieve the project's objectives a consortium has been drawn together including, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland, the UK Health Protection Agency, the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection of Poland and the World Health Organisation. Enviros Consulting is acting as the technical secretariat for the project. The Handbook will aim to harmonise the approaches to handling malevolent acts across Europe. This harmonisation will have an added value on the public confidence in authorities since differing approaches in neighbouring countries could lead to public confusion and mistrust. (authors)

Kruse, P. [Enviros Consulting Limited, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX (United Kingdom); Rojas-Palma, C. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Radiation Protection Div., Mol (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency's Use of Geographic Information Systems for Nuclear Emergency Response Support  

SciTech Connect

The U.S, Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) provides Geographic Information System (GIS) support during nuclear emergency response activities. As directed by the NNSA, the RSL GIS staff maintains databases and equipment for rapid field deployment during an emergency response. When on location, GIS operators provide information products to on-site emergency managers as well as to emergency managers at the DOE Headquarters (HQ) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, D.C. Data products are derived from multiple information sources in the field including radiological prediction models, field measurements taken on the ground and from the air, and pertinent information researched on the Internet. The GIS functions as a central data hub where it supplies the information to response elements in the field, as well as to headquarters officials at HQ during emergency response activities.

A. L. Guber

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool: Benchmarking Radiological Assessment and Dose Models using Fukushima Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing the Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool (FRAT), a comprehensive database and software application for accessing, analyzing, and interpreting data related to radiological releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). This report documents the development of the FRAT to support the benchmarking of emergency response and dose modeling codes used by nuclear power plants, using radiological data from the Fukushima ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Emergency Response & Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2011 18, 2011 The Re_house is nearing completion. | Courtesy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon Team. Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters For this year's Solar Decathlon, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is returning to the National Mall with the Re_home, which offers a more sustainable housing solution for communities following a natural disaster. August 9, 2011 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that

123

Ruptured Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm: Staged Emergency Endovascular Treatment in the Interventional Radiology Suite  

SciTech Connect

Ruptured aneurysms of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are rare and challenging to treat surgically. Due to their anatomic location they are difficult to operate on and perioperative morbidity is high. An endovascular approach can be helpful. We recently treated a patient with a ruptured IIA aneurysm in the interventional radiology suite with embolization of the side-branch of the IIA and placement of a covered stent in the ipsilateral common and external iliac arteries. A suitable stent-graft was not available initially and had to be brought in from elsewhere. An angioplasty balloon was temporarily placed across the ostium of the IIA to obtain hemostasis. Two hours later, the procedure was finished by placing the stent-graft.

Kelckhoven, Bas-Jeroen van [HagaZiekenhuis, Location Leyenburg, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)], E-mail: bjvankelckhoven@hotmail.com; Bruijninckx, Boy M. A.; Knippenberg, Bob [HagaZiekenhuis, Location Leyenburg, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Overhagen, Hans van [HagaZiekenhuis, Location Leyenburg, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Founded through LANL, Vital Alert Technologies, Inc. (Vital Alert) has launched a wireless, two-way real-time voice communication system that is effective through 1,000+ feet of solid rock. April 3, 2012 Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data links through rock strata and other solid media. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data links through rock

125

Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene August 26, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall at approximately 7:30 am EDT near Cape Lookout, North Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (Category 1). This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image captures Irene’s landfall moment. | Image courtesy of NOAA Hurricane Irene made landfall at approximately 7:30 am EDT near Cape Lookout, North Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (Category 1). This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image captures Irene's landfall moment. | Image courtesy of NOAA Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability

126

Energy Department Announces Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane Isaac-Related Request Energy Department Announces Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane Isaac-Related Request August 31, 2012 - 11:17am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, DC - Following a request yesterday from Marathon Petroleum Company, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that the Energy Department has agreed to lend 1 million barrels of sweet crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's (SPR) Bayou Choctaw site in Louisiana to address the short term impact on the company's refining capacity caused by Hurricane Isaac, which is resulting in limited crude oil shortages. The loan, which is distinct from a release from the SPR, will be provided to Marathon Petroleum Company under short-term contractual agreements.

127

emergency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dear Neighbors: Dear Neighbors: The events of September 11, 2001, the direct attack on the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, and the subsequent bioterrorist activities in our area, have made us all keenly aware of the need to be prepared in case of emergency. Many in Northern Virginia were directly affected by these events. Others are aware of friends, relatives and neigh- bors who were touched by these tragedies. Local governments routinely work together throughout the year to evaluate and update their emergency response plans. Recent events remind us all that home emergency prepared- ness is a must for everyone and should be carefully planned. This Home Guide to Emergency Preparedness is designed to help you do just that. It does not cover every conceivable emer- gency. However, it does

128

Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment  

SciTech Connect

For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Large Emergency-Response Exercises: Qualitative Characteristics - A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exercises, drills, or simulations are widely used, by governments, agencies and commercial organizations, to simulate serious incidents and train staff how to respond to them. International cooperation has led to increasingly large-scale exercises, often ... Keywords: 'large' exercises, 'play space', agency, bomb threats, crisis, disaster, drill, emergency, emergency response, emotions, exercise, experiential, feelings, fire service, government, group psychotherapy, health agencies, incident, industrial accidents, large group, large-scale exercises, learning, military, multidisciplinarity, personal trust, play, police, psychology, ritual, role-play, simulation, situational trust, situationism, social implications, staff training, trust

Yang-Im Lee; Peter Trim; Julia Upton; David Upton

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

2nd International Joint Topical Meeting on Emergency Preparedness and Response and Robotic and Remote Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is desirable for the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration emergency preparedness and response community to have available every resource to enhance its capabilities for assessing the health effects of environmental agents. Such resources will aid DOE/NNSA in achieving its goal of protecting the health and safety of workers, the public, and environment in event of the release of radiological, chemical, or biological agents into the environment. Studies are reported in this paper where composite data analyses were done for the chemicals included in DOE's Protective Action Criteria (PACs) database. PACs define the concentration of airborne chemicals at which protective actions are required. They are used by DOE/NNSA in developing Emergency Preparedness Procedures and for Operational Emergencies. Data analyses were conducted to discern structure-activity relationship patterns among PAC chemicals by assigned classification schemes based on the 30 accepted categories used by the EPA Gene-Tox Program. PAC chemicals were scored according to their frequency of distribution, severity of toxicity index, and structural classification. These studies yielded results that could be helpful in assessing the toxicity of new chemicals. It is suggested that provisions be made to include chemical structural information in the PAC database.

Lu, Po-Yung [ORNL; Thomas, Richard D. [Intercet, Ltd.; Wassom, John S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on each response disciplines' activities or duties at the scene. During this discussion, the instructor can present response scenarios, each of which would have a different discipline arriving first at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion

132

The Haiti Earthquake: Disaster Lessons and Response from an Emergency Medicine Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director. As in all disaster responses, two important issuesare local: an effective disaster response depends on localEarthquake: Disaster Lessons and Response from an Emergency

Lee, Sharon; Tenny, Montessa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

USE OF THE AERIAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEM HELICOPTER EMERGENCY RESPONSE ACQUISITION SYSTEMS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE SOIL REMEDIATION - [11504  

SciTech Connect

The Aerial Measurement System (AMS) Helicopter Emergency Response Acquisition System provides a thorough and economical means to identify and characterize the contaminants for large area radiological surveys. The helicopter system can provide a 100-percent survey of an area that qualifies as a scoping survey under the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) methodology. If the sensitivity is adequate when compared to the clean up values, it may also be used for the characterization survey. The data from the helicopter survey can be displayed and manipulated to provide invaluable data during remediation activities.

BROCK CT

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members, supplemented by other LLNL scientists, invested over 5000 person-hours of time and generated over 300 analyses and predictions.

Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Current Domain Challenges in the Emergency Response Community  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development of a framework targeted to technology providers in order to better understand the grand domain challenges of the emergency response and management community (EM). In developing this framework, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain and corroborated these findings with current literature. We are currently examining relationships and dependencies within the framework. A thorough understanding of these gaps and dependencies will allow for a more informed approach prioritizing research, developing tools, and applying technology to enhance performance in the EM community.

Barr, Jonathan L.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Burtner, Edwin R.; Mahy, Heidi A.

2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Risk decision analysis in emergency response: A method based on cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response of a disaster is generally a risk decision-making problem with multiple states. In emergency response analysis, it is necessary to consider decision-maker's (DM's) psychological behavior such as reference dependence, loss aversion ... Keywords: Cumulative prospect theory (CPT), Emergency response, Ranking, Risk decision-making

Yang Liu, Zhi-Ping Fan, Yao Zhang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 1 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies More Documents & Publications IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012

138

2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies More Documents & Publications IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012

139

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

140

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

142

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 IEA Response System for OIL SUPPLY 2 IEA MEMBER COUNTRIES Australia Austria Belgium Canada Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Japan Korea (Republic of) Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States These countries are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the IEA is an autonomous agency linked with the OECD. The European Commission also participates in the work of the IEA. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is the energy forum for 28 industrialised countries. IEA member country governments are committed to taking joint measures to meet oil supply emergencies. They also have agreed to share energy information,

143

Community response grids: E-government, social networks, and effective emergency management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the concept of developing community response grids (CRGs) for community emergency response and the policy implications of such a system. CRGs make use of the Internet and mobile communication devices, allowing residents and responders ... Keywords: Community response grid, E-government, Emergency response, Mobile communications, Public policy, Social networks

Paul T. Jaeger; Ben Shneiderman; Kenneth R. Fleischmann; Jennifer Preece; Yan Qu; Philip Fei Wu

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Review of the Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Response Organization at the Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos National Laboratory April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1

145

Ontology-supported case-based reasoning approach for intelligent m-Government emergency response services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a critical need to develop a mobile-based emergency response system (MERS) to help reduce risks in emergency situations. Existing systems only provide short message service (SMS) notifications, and the decision support is weak, especially in ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Emergency response systems, Information extraction, Mobile-based systems, Ontology, m-Government

Khaled Amailef, Jie Lu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluation of Rugged Wireless Mesh Nodes for Use In Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 2007, engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted a two-day evaluation of commercially available battery powered, wireless, self-forming mesh nodes for use in emergency response. In this paper, the author describes the fundamentals of this emerging technology, applciations for emergency response and specific results of the technology evaluation conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Kevin L Young; Alan M Snyder

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A framework for understanding and designing partnerships in emergency preparedness and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using partnerships between the public and private sectors to provide emergency preparedness and response (EPER) functions has become a useful and necessary tool for improving overall emergency management in the United ...

Gustetic, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Leigh)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal

150

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded International Radiological Assistance Program Training for Emergency Response (I-RAPTER) in Slovenia. The training, co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was provided to 36 nuclear/radiological emergency responders, which included 15 participants from Slovenia and 21 students from 20 other countries. The training was conducted with involvement of personnel from Sandia National Laboratories, the Remote Sensing Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory. To read more about the training see: http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/mediaroom/pressreleases/slovenia Posted on March 22, 2012 at 4:13 pm ET

151

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish policy and assign responsibilities for the DoD consequence management response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents and other nuclear or radiological incidents involving materials in DoD custody in accordance with the guidance in National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 28, the National Response Framework, and the National Incident Management System (References (b) through (d)). 2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

Good, D.E.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Port Security: Improving Emergency Response Capabilities at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PORT SECURITY: IMPROVING EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITIES ATMaritime Transportation Security Act of 2002, Pub. L. No.the Federal Maritime Security Coordinator for his respective

Zegart, Amy B; Hipp, Matthew C; Jacobson, Seth K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ORISE: REAC/TS a Key Part of IAEA's Response Assistance Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to strengthen the IAEA's ability to provide assistance and advice, as well as promote emergency preparedness and response capabilities for radiological incidents among IAEA...

155

Nuclear criticality safety aspects of emergency response at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.  

SciTech Connect

Emergency response at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is handled through a graded approach depending on the specific emergency situation . LANL maintains a comprehensive capability to respond to events ranging from minor facility events (alerts) through major community events (general emergencies), including criticality accidents . Criticality safety and emergency response apply to all activities involving significant quantities of fissile material at LANL, primarily at Technical Area 18 (TA-18, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility) and Technical Area 55 (TA-55, the Plutonium Facility). This discussion focuses on response to a criticality accident at TA-55; the approach at TA-18 is comparable .

Baker, J. S. (James S.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Public health: emergency management: capability analysis of critical incident response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 9/11 terrorist incident, homeland security efforts and the readiness of local emergency management agencies have become focal points in the war on terrorism. A significant issue faced by front line responders has been the significant increase ...

Thomas F. Brady

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. OSS19-05.doc

158

Evaluation of an emergency response model for the Rocky Flats Plant: Charter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Charter provides a basis for a cooperative, interagency effort to evaluate the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code for emergency response and emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant. This document establishes the foundation for the project entitled, Evaluation of an Emergency Response Model for the Rocky Flats Plant'' (to be referred to as the Project). This document meets the following objectives: Identify the Project; establish the project management structure, organizational responsibilities, and organizational commitments for reaching the goals of the Project, and identify a process for model revision and revelation for acceptance. 2 figs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

160

The nation's emergency response capabilities have received significant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Generation Incident Command System (NICS), formerly the Lincoln Distributed Disaster Response System (LDDRS-and-control system enables a coordinated, collaborative disaster response by improving situational awareness Figure 1 02420-9108 781-981-4204 #12;as well as interagency interoperability in disaster response. NICS

de Weck, Olivier L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

162

Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response The three-tiered disaster management approach, disaster planning, disaster response and disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IPLER Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response 1 The three-tiered disaster management approach, disaster planning, disaster response and disaster recovery, is ripe for innovation through on understanding user needs in terms of disaster management and response, defining the range of possible solutions

Zanibbi, Richard

163

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

164

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

165

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established

166

Importance of emergency response actions to reactor accidents within a probabilistic consequence assessment model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early health consequences of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as a function of the emergency response parameters has been performed using a probabilistic consequence assessment code. The importance of various emergency response parameters in predicting the consequences for a range of accident source terms was determined through training a neural network algorithm which relates the sensitivity of the output to various choices of the input. Extensions of this approach should be helpful to planners in prioritizing the emergency responses at nuclear power plants.

Mubayi, V.; Neymotin, L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS  

SciTech Connect

Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Program

169

A narrative networks approach to understanding coordination practices in emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines coordination practices in emergency response by adopting a narrative networks approach (Pentland & Feldman, 2007). We apply this approach in the analysis of qualitative data collected in an empirical longitudinal study (2003-2006) ...

Panos Constantinides; Michael Barrett

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Business Responses to Climate Change. Identifying Emergent Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Companies face much uncertainty about the competitive effects of the recently adopted Kyoto Protocol on global climate change and the current and future regulations that may emerge from it. Companies have considerable discretion to explore different market strategies to address global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article examines these strategic options by reviewing the market-oriented actions that are currently being taken by 136 large companies that are part of the Global 500. There are six different market strategies that companies use to address climate change and that consist of different combinations of the market components available to managers. Managers can choose between more emphasis on improvements in their business activities through innovation or employ compensatory approaches such as emissions trading. They can either act by themselves or work with other companies, NGOs, or (local) governments.

Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J. [Business School, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

ICTs and the limits of integration: Converging professional routines and ICT support in colocated emergency response control rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we have tried to establish how the nature of professional routines affects the ICT supported standardization and scripting of work performed by operators in Dutch colocated emergency response control rooms. In this type of multidisciplinary ... Keywords: Emergency response control room, ICTs, colocated control room, emergency response services, inter-organizational collaboration, professional routines

Stefan Soeparman; Hein van Duivenboden; Pieter Wagenaar; Peter Groenewegen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Exercise to Test Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). "This is an excellent opportunity for emergency responders to test the skills they've learned," said Dale Childers, assistant chief of the Odessa Fire Department and emergency management coordinator for Ector County. "It will also help us determine what improvements,

173

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

Slide Rule for Rapid Response Estimation of Radiological Dose from Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a functional slide rule that provides a readily usable ?in-hand? method for estimating nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete shields.

Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

178

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE CAPABILITIES FOR CONDUCTING INGESTION PATHWAY CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENTS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

SciTech Connect

Potential airborne releases of radioactivity from facilities operated for the U. S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site could pose significant consequences to the public through the ingestion pathway. The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a suite of technologies needed to conduct assessments of ingestion dose during emergency response, enabling emergency manager at SRS to develop initial protective action recommendation for state agencies early in the response and to make informed decisions on activation of additional Federal assets that would be needed to support long-term monitoring and assessment activities.

Hunter, C

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

180

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: ... Fact Sheet Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

182

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document  

SciTech Connect

This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the remote location and low population density of some the facilities. As such, the needs assessment contains equivalencies to the applicable requirements. The compliance assessment contains no such equivalencies and simply assesses the existing emergency response resources to the requirements of the BNA and can be updated as compliance changes independent of the BNA update schedule. There are numerous NFPA codes and standards and other requirements and guidance documents that address the subject of emergency response. These requirements documents are not always well coordinated and may contain duplicative or conflicting requirements or even coverage gaps. Left unaddressed, this regulatory situation results in frequent interpretation of requirements documents. Different interpretations can then lead to inconsistent implementation. This BNA addresses this situation by compiling applicable requirements from all identified sources (see Section 5) and analyzing them collectively to address conflict and overlap as applicable to the hazards presented by the LLNL and Sandia/CA sites (see Section 7). The BNA also generates requirements when needed to fill any identified gaps in regulatory coverage. Finally, the BNA produces a customized simple set of requirements, appropriate for the DOE protection goals, such as those defined in DOE O 420.1B, the hazard level, the population density, the topography, and the site layout at LLNL and Sandia/CA that will be used as the baseline requirements set - the 'baseline needs' - for emergency response at LLNL and Sandia/CA. A template approach is utilized to accomplish this evaluation for each of the nine topical areas that comprise the baseline needs for emergency response. The basis for conclusions reached in determining the baseline needs for each of the topical areas is presented in Sections 7.1 through 7.9. This BNA identifies only mandatory requirements and establishes the minimum performance criteria. The minimum performance criteria may not be the level of performance desired Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or Sandia/CA

Sharry, J A

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Work Scope for Developing Standards for Emergency Preparedness and Response: Fiscal Year 2004 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Summarizes the fiscal year 2004 work completed on PNNL's Department of Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response Standards Development Project. Also, the report includes key draft standards, in various stages of development and publication, that were associated with various tasks of the fiscal year 2004 scope of the project.

Stenner, Robert D.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

Self-adaptive and time-constrained data distribution paths for emergency response scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response scenarios where team members coordinate impromptu towards the common human rescue goal are pushing to the extreme the demand for novel services fully aware of any (dynamically collected) relevant information describing the disaster ... Keywords: adaptive context data distribution, context data distribution, context-awareness, disaster areas

Mario Fanelli; Luca Foschini; Antonio Corradi; Azzedine Boukerche

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment.

Sato, P.K.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

Youngen, G.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

If this is an emergency, dial 911 or 459-2345 for Emergency Medical Service Response This form is to be completed whenever an employee desires to seek medical treatment for work related incidents (please type or print clearly)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If this is an emergency, dial 911 or 459-2345 for Emergency Medical Service Response This form map on page 2 Dominican Hospital, Emergency Department (Nights, Holidays and Weekends) 1555 Soquel Dr

California at Santa Cruz, University of

188

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

Sharry, J A

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

DOE Order Self Study Modules - 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29 CFR 1910.120 29 CFR 1910.120 HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SERVICE CENTER Change No: 0 29 CFR 1910.120 Level: Familiar Date: 3/14/05 1 29 CFR 1910.120 HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. Discuss clean-up operations required by the regulation. 2. Discuss corrective actions during clean-up operations covered by the resource conservation and recovery act (RCRA). 3. Discuss operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities.

190

ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response.  

SciTech Connect

American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was published. Suggestions for improvements to increase the usefulness of this standard are being solicited. The Working Group currently has ten members and is drafting a revision of ANSI/ANS-8.23. The focus of this effort is to include additional technical guidance on the following topics: (1) Recommendations for radiation monitoring instruments that may be used during an emergency response to a criticality accident; (2) Recommended resources for a criticality safety specialist during an emergency response to a criticality accident; (3) An example showing how to construct an emergency exercise for a fissile material processing facility. This includes: (a) Estimating the fission source term based on a credible accident scenario; (b) Estimating doses to nearby personnel; (c) Estimating doses to rescuers; (d) A discussion of evacuation and rescue considerations; (e) A review of dosimetry and medical response issues; and (f) Recommendations for the conduct of drills and exercises. This additional guidance will be contained in appendices to the revised standard. In addition, the revised standard will include a reference to an extensive bibliography of resources for emergency planning. The first revision of ANSI/ANS-8.23 should be provided to ANS-8 for ballot by the fall of 2004.

Baker, J. S. (James S.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Biosafety Practices and Emergency Response at the Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Strict federal regulations govern the possession, use, and transfer of pathogens and toxins with potential to cause harm to the public, either through accidental or deliberate means. Laboratories registered through either the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), or both, must prepare biosafety, security, and incident response plans, conduct drills or exercises on an annual basis, and update plans accordingly. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), biosafety, laboratory, and emergency management staff have been working together for 2 years to satisfy federal and DOE/NNSA requirements. This has been done through the establishment of plans, training, tabletop and walk-through exercises and drills, and coordination with local and regional emergency response personnel. Responding to the release of infectious agents or toxins is challenging, but through familiarization with the nature of the hazardous biological substances or organisms, and integration with laboratory-wide emergency response procedures, credible scenarios are being used to evaluate our ability to protect workers, the public, and the environment from agents we must work with to provide for national biodefense.

Frank F. Roberto; Dina M. Matz

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous materials. Safe transportation of hazardous materials is very important. Union Pacific Railroad transports more hazardous material shipments than any other carrier. Early on they realized the benefits to having a dedicated team of personnel to respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. In order to remain the safest carrier of these commodities, an emergency response plan utilizing in house response personnel was needed. This document describes how that plan was created and includes a copy of the plan for the Union Pacific Railroad's Settegast Yard in Houston, Texas. Other carriers may use this as a template to establish their own in house response teams or emergency response plans.

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercise Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program Tom Clawson TEPP Contractor tom@trgroupinc.com Brief TEPP History Brief TEPP History * In 1988, identified need to address emergency preparedness concerns of DOE emergency preparedness concerns of DOE radiological shipments bl h d * EM established in 1989 - Identified need for responder training along all transportation corridors as key to EM mission - TEPP incorporated into DOE Order 151.1, with responsibility assigned to EM * WIPP adopted the the TEPP training in 2000, and began using MERRTT along their routes in 2000 * Created a single DOE radiological transportation training program * Created a single DOE radiological transportation training program for the Department TEPP Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program * TEPP's exercise program is just

194

ORISE: Radiation Emergency Training for Iraq, South Africa and Morocco  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Training International Training REAC/TS Provides International Radiation Emergency Medical Response Training for Emergency Responders In support of the National Nuclear Security Administration's international approach to nuclear and radiological incident response, REAC/TS staff provide training to physicians, nurses and emergency responders in multiple countries each year. REAC/TS has conducted radiation emergency medical response training in Iraq, Kuwait, Morocco, Singapore, South Africa, and Thailand. "As one of the world's primary responders to nuclear and radiological accidents, it's critical that REAC/TS help prepare a variety of health care professionals for the medical management of radiation accidents," said REAC/TS Medical/Technical Director Dr. Albert Wiley. "Our medical

195

A real-time emergency response workstation using a 3-D numerical model initialized with sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many emergency response dispersion modeling systems provide simple Gaussian models driven by single meteorological tower inputs to estimate the downwind consequences from accidental spills or stack releases. Complex meteorological or terrain settings demand more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion. Mountain valleys and sea breeze flows are two common examples of such settings. To address these complexities, the authors have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on a workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. MATHEW/ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project. The models are initialized using an array of surface wind measurements from meteorological towers coupled with vertical profiles from an acoustic sounder (sodar). The workstation automatically acquires the meteorological data every 15 minutes. A source term is generated using either defaults or a real-time stack monitor. Model outputs include contoured isopleths displayed on site geography or plume densities shown over 3-D color shaded terrain. The models are automatically updated every 15 minutes to provide the emergency response manager with a continuous display of potentially hazardous ground-level conditions if an actual release were to occur. Model run time is typically less than 2 minutes on 6 megaflop ({approximately}30 MIPS) workstations. Data acquisition, limited by dial-up modem communications, requires 3 to 5 minutes.

Lawver, B.S.; Sullivan, T.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US); Baskett, R.L. [EG& G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (US)

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cambio : a file format translation and analysis application for the nuclear response emergency community.  

SciTech Connect

Cambio is an application intended to automatically read and display any spectrum file of any format in the world that the nuclear emergency response community might encounter. Cambio also provides an analysis capability suitable for HPGe spectra when detector response and scattering environment are not well known. Why is Cambio needed: (1) Cambio solves the following problem - With over 50 types of formats from instruments used in the field and new format variations appearing frequently, it is impractical for every responder to have current versions of the manufacturer's software from every instrument used in the field; (2) Cambio converts field spectra to any one of several common formats that are used for analysis, saving valuable time in an emergency situation; (3) Cambio provides basic tools for comparing spectra, calibrating spectra, and isotope identification with analysis suited especially for HPGe spectra; and (4) Cambio has a batch processing capability to automatically translate a large number of archival spectral files of any format to one of several common formats, such as the IAEA SPE or the DHS N42. Currently over 540 analysts and members of the nuclear emergency response community worldwide are on the distribution list for updates to Cambio. Cambio users come from all levels of government, university, and commercial partners around the world that support efforts to counter terrorist nuclear activities. Cambio is Unclassified Unlimited Release (UUR) and distributed by internet downloads with email notifications whenever a new build of Cambio provides for new formats, bug fixes, or new or improved capabilities. Cambio is also provided as a DLL to the Karlsruhe Institute for Transuranium Elements so that Cambio's automatic file-reading capability can be included at the Nucleonica web site.

Lasche, George P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security personnel to understand local intelligence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security officials to better protect their communities. Fusion centers provide interdisciplinary expertise on Fusion Center Assessment: A mature, fully functioning national network of fusion centers is critical

199

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

200

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard Section/page/paragraph Change Section 211, page 2-3, paragraph 1 Add new paragraph 1: "Approval by the appropriate Secretarial Officer or designee should be required

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

202

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C....

203

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION...

204

Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

205

Don Haward joins WIPP as manager of radiological control and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Don Harward Joins WIPP as Manager of Radiological Control and Emergency Preparedness CARLSBAD, N.M., May 12, 2000 - The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) has named Don...

206

Software-Defined Ultra-wideband Radio Communications: A New RF Technology for Emergency Response Applications  

SciTech Connect

Reliable wireless communication links for local-area (short-range) and regional (long-range) reach capabilities are crucial for emergency response to disasters. Lack of a dependable communication system can result in disruptions in the situational awareness between the local responders in the field and the emergency command and control centers. To date, all wireless communications systems such as cell phones and walkie-talkies use narrowband radio frequency (RF) signaling for data communication. However, the hostile radio propagation environment caused by collapsed structures and rubble in various disaster sites results in significant degradation and attenuation of narrowband RF signals, which ends up in frequent communication breakdowns. To address the challenges of reliable radio communication in disaster fields, we propose an approach to use ultra-wideband (UWB) or wideband RF waveforms for implementation on Software Defined Radio (SDR) platforms. Ultra-wideband communications has been proven by many research groups to be effective in addressing many of the limitations faced by conventional narrowband radio technologies. In addition, LLNL's radio and wireless team have shown significant success in field deployment of various UWB communications system for harsh environments based on LLNL's patented UWB modulation and equalization techniques. Furthermore, using software defined radio platform for UWB communications offers a great deal of flexibility in operational parameters and helps the radio system to dynamically adapt itself to its environment for optimal performance.

Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

DE-SOL-0003174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations 3174 Critical Capabilities for Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) Support 1. Interested parties shall have experience in: a. Developing training for emergency operations type programs such as response to radiological or nuclear incidents, emergency management and preparation, exercises (full scale through table top), continuity of operations, or other related programs, b. Coordinating consultants and instructional design staff to integrate content provided by the consultants with the course development process employed by instructional designers for technical training development, c. conducting comprehensive analyses such as needs assessments, training effectiveness evaluations, job analyses, functional analyses, task analyses, etc.,

208

Radiological training for tritium facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Emergencies and Emergency Actions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergencies and Emergency Actions Emergencies and Emergency Actions Emergencies and Emergency Actions Selected documents on the topic of Emergencies and Emergency Actions under NEPA. May 12, 2010 Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA With this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality reiterates its previous guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response actions.This memorandum clarifies that the previous guidance remains applicable to current situations and provides guidance on required agency environmental review. September 8, 2005 Memorandum for Federal NEPA Contacts: Emergency Actions and NEPA This Council on Environmental Quality memorandum provides general information on (1) the response to hurricane Katrina;

210

Populus Responses to Edaphic and Climatic Cues: Emerging Evidence from Systems Biology Research  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of Populus as a model system for tree biology continues to be driven by a community of scientists dedicated to developing the resources needed to undertake genetic and functional genomic studies in this genus. As a result, understanding the molecular processes that underpin the growth and development of cottonwood, aspen, and hybrid poplar has steadily increased over the last several decades. Recently, our ability to examine the basic mechanisms whereby trees respond to a changing climate and resource limitations has benefited greatly from the sequencing of the P. trichocarpa genome. This landmark event has laid a solid foundation upon which biologists can now quantify, in breathtaking and unprecedented detail, the diversity of genes, proteins, and metabolites that govern the growth and development of some of the longest living and tallest growing organisms on Earth. Although the challenges likely to be encountered by scientists who work with trees are many, recent literature provides a few examples where a systems approach, one that focuses on integrating transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses, is beginning to provide insights into the molecular-scale response of poplars to their climatic and edaphic environment. In this review, our objectives are to look at evidence from studies that examine the molecular response of poplar to edaphic and climatic cues and highlight instances where two or more omic-scale measurements confirm and hopefully expand our inferences about mechanisms contributing to observed patterns of response. Based on conclusions drawn from these studies, we propose that three requirements will be essential as systems biology in poplar moves to reveal unique insights. These include use of genetically-defined individuals (e.g., pedigrees or transgenics) in studies; incorporation of modeling as a complement to transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data; and inclusion of whole-tree and stand-level phenotypes to place molecular-scale insights into a real-world context.

Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Davis, John M [University of Florida

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

RADIOLOGICAL SURWY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111 111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11". .. .. ; :;: ;I, ' . 1::. J;,;. ~;_:y,;:::::; - T.J..:+~uS~~ .' .:' : : . . .. ...: .:.. : OFTHE EXCERIORPORTIONS O F THE FORIMER BLISS ANT3 LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FAC' KJTy - BUFFALO,NEw YORK - T. J.VITKUS I : . . : : ' . .:. : I : : .. :. Prepaied for.:the:' 6ffice.iibfiEnvir~nmenfal Re$o&idn z . . :

212

GLOBAL RADIOLOGICAL SOURCE SORTING, TRACKING, AND MONITORING (GRADSSTRAM) USING EMERGING RFID AND WEB 2.0 TECHNOLOGIES TO PROVIDE TOTAL ASSET AND INFORMATION VISUALIZATION Paper at 2009 INMM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background Thousands of shipments of radioisotopes developed in the United States (U.S.) are transported domestically and internationally for medical and industrial applications, including to partner laboratories in European Union (EU) countries. Over the past five years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)1 have worked with state first responder personnel, key private sector supply chain stakeholders, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Transportation (DOT), the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring of medical, research and industrial radioisotopes in commerce. ORNL was the pioneer of the international radioisotope shipping and production business. Most radioisotopes made and used today were either made or discovered at ORNL. While most of the radioisotopes used in the commercial sector are now produced and sold by the private market, ORNL still leads the world in the production of exotic, high-value and/or sensitive industrial, medical and research isotopes. The ORNL-EPA-DOE Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) project tested, evaluated, and integrated RFID technologies in laboratory settings and at multiple private-sector shipping and distribution facilities (Perkin Elmer and DHL) to track and monitor common radioisotopes used in everyday commerce. The RFID tracking capability was also tested in association with other deployed technologies including radiation detection, chemical/explosives detection, advanced imaging, lasers, and infrared scanning. At the 2007 EU-U.S. Summit, the leaders of the US Department of Commerce (DOC) and EU European Commission (EC) committed to pursue jointly directed Lighthouse Priority Projects. These projects are intended to foster cooperation and reduce regulatory burdens with respect to transatlantic commerce. The Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) Lighthouse Project on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has been directed to develop a joint framework for cooperation on identification and development of best practices for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technologies The RFID Lighthouse Priority Project commits both sides to endeavor to align U.S. and EU regulatory and policy approaches on RFID technologies, including pilot projects in the public sector.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Kopsick, Deborah A [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Ferren, Mitch [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of ANSI N42-17A by investigating the effects of temperature and humidity on the response of radiological instruments  

SciTech Connect

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.17A-1989 standard`s performance criteria and test methods has been evaluated by investigating the effects of temperature and humidity on the response of 105 portable direct-reading radiological instruments (45 beta-gamma survey meters, 32 neutron rem meters, 1O alpha contamination and 18 tritium-in-air monitors). The US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates the use of ANSI standards for the calibration and performance testing of radiological instruments, and requires that instruments be appropriate for existing environmental conditions. Random tests conducted in an environmental chamber determined the effects of temperatures ranging from {minus}10{degree}C to 50{degree}C and humidity at levels of 40% RH and 95% RH on the response of a cross section of instruments used in routine health physics operations at Los Alamos. The following instruments were tested: Eberline RO-2 and RO-C ionization chambers, Eberline E-530 survey meter with the Model HP-C stainless steel Geiger-Muller (G) wall probe, Eberline PIC-6A and PIC-6B ion chambers, Eberline ESP-1 survey meter with the Model HP-260 pancake G detector, Ludlum 3 survey meter with the Model 44-6 stainless steel G wall probe, Eberline ESP-1, ESP-2 and PAR-4 survey meters with the neutron rem detector, Health Physics Instruments 2080 survey meter with the moderator detector, Ludlum 139 survey meter with the Model 43-32 air-proportional alpha detector, and the Overhoff 394-C, Johnston J-111 and J-110 tritium monitors. Experimental results encompass 1128 temperature tests (1269-hours exposure in the chamber) and 735 humidity tests (1890-hours exposure in the chamber). The study shows the standard`s test requirement for temperature at or near the extreme conditions, and the standard`s test requirement for humidity at 95% RH may be too restrictive for instruments used in the work environment.

Clement, R.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Molecular Responses to Climate and Resource Availability: Emerging Evidence from Systems Biology Research in Populus.  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of Populus as a model system for tree biology continues to be driven by a community of scientists dedicated to developing the resources needed to undertake genetic and functional genomic studies in this genus. As a result, understanding the molecular processes that underpin the growth and development of cottonwood, aspen, and hybrid poplar has steadily increased over the last several decades. Recently, our ability to examine the basic mechanisms whereby trees respond to a changing climate and resource limitations has benefitted greatly from the sequencing of the P. trichocarpa genome. This landmark event has laid a solid foundation upon which tree biologists can now explore the genome-wide effects of temperature, water and nutrient limitations on processes that govern the growth and development of some of the longest living and tallest growing organisms on Earth. Although the challenges likely to be encountered by scientists who work with trees are many, recent literature provides a number of examples whereby a systems approach, one that focuses on transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses is beginning to provide insights into the molecular-scale response of poplars to their climatic and edaphic environment.

Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Davis, John M [University of Florida

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project.

Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Baskett, R.L. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

217

On improving communication in emergency response at network and organizational levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resource allocation in a disaster response varies from oneIn another disaster scenario, the response to the Virginiamedical response for real-life disaster scenarios. MMST is

Dilmaghani, Raheleh B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

radiological accident or incident. Part of NNSA's mission is to protect the public, environment, and emergency responders from both terrorist and non-terrorist events by providing...

219

Emergency Preparedness and Response Emergency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... aquatic photosynthetic tissue as the sensing material for detection of chemical antagonists in the water ? Successfully detected algae in several ...

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Climate Response to Stratospheric Sulfate Injections and Implications for Addressing Climate Emergencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratospheric sulfate aerosol injection has been proposed to counteract anthropogenic greenhouse gas warming and prevent regional climate emergencies. Global warming is projected to be largest in the polar regions, where consequences to climate ...

Kelly E. McCusker; David S. Battisti; Cecilia M. Bitz

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Radiological Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (EM)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT (EM) MANAGEMENT (EM) OBJECTIVE EM.1 A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have,been established and implemented. (Core Requirement 11) Criteria 1. Emergency preparedness drills and exercises are conducted and an adequate response capability,exists. 2. Routine operations drills and exercises are conducted and an adequate response capability exists. 3. Applicable emergency management documentation (e.g., Building Emergency Plan, emergency,response procedures, Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment, alarm response procedures,,and emergency response procedures) has been updated to reflect implementation of the TA-55 . Approach Record Reviews: Review the emergency management documents (e.g., Building

224

Review: A survey of models and algorithms for emergency response logistics in electric distribution systems. Part I: Reliability planning with fault considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response operations in electric distribution systems involve a host of decision-making problems at the reliability and contingency planning levels. Those operations include fault diagnosis, fault location, fault isolation, restoration, and ... Keywords: Depot location, District design, Electric power distribution, Emergency response, Operations research, System configuration

Nathalie Perrier; Bruno Agard; Pierre Baptiste; Jean-Marc Frayret; Andr Langevin; Robert Pellerin; Diane Riopel; Martin TrPanier

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

DOE/NETL's R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Response to Emerging R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues Clean Coal and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy Washington, DC November 17-19, 2003 Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production Pipelines & Storage Fuel Cells Combustion Turbines NETL Plays Key Role in Fossil Energy Supply, Delivery, and Use Technologies Future Fuels Photo of hydrogen fueled car: Warren Gretz, NREL Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Innovations for Existing Plants Program

226

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

227

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses. For Immediate ... Berne. Radioanalytical emergency response exercise. Journal ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Transportation security decision support system for emergency response: A training prototype  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During emergencies, decision making is a challenging task requiring immediate and effective action from responders under the pressures of incomplete and erroneous information. Identification of appropriate resources and personnel, proper lines of communication, ... Keywords: Computer-based training, Mock drills, Organizational learning

S. W. Yoon; J. D. Velasquez; B. K. Partridge; S. Y. Nof

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Radiological Training for NSLS Access has been replaced with BNL General Employee Radiological Training (GERT). Please read the...

230

The U. S. Department of Energy's Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) planning process  

SciTech Connect

On September 2, 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada operations office (DOE/NV) was tasked by the under secretary to develop a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) capability for response to major radiological emergencies. Prior to this time, each DOE region responded to a major radiological accident in their region. The DOE/NV's basic role is to coordinate the use of DOE's assets countrywide and provide the management nucleus of a FRMAC. Six working groups plus a management panel were established to assist in the implementation of the FRMAC response capability, and an interim FRMAC operation plant was published 9 months later. The paper discusses working groups, galileo planning, exercises, FRMAC planning products and future FRMAC activities.

Brown, H.U.; Boardman, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Using architectures for semantic interoperability to create journal clubs for emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In certain types of 'slow burn' emergencies, careful accumulation and evaluation of information can offer a crucial advantage. The SARS outbreak in the first decade of the 21st century was such an event, and ad hoc journal clubs played a critical role in assisting scientific and technical responders in identifying and developing various strategies for halting what could have become a dangerous pandemic. This research-in-progress paper describes a process for leveraging emerging semantic web and digital library architectures and standards to (1) create a focused collection of bibliographic metadata, (2) extract semantic information, (3) convert it to the Resource Description Framework /Extensible Markup Language (RDF/XML), and (4) integrate it so that scientific and technical responders can share and explore critical information in the collections.

Powell, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Linn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Mark L B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Emergency planning | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency planning Subscribe to RSS - Emergency planning Emergency Planning involves determining, in advance, what will be done in response to specific emergencies including...

233

Radiological Control Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support personnel, an accredited Personnel Monitoring service, a fully functional Instrumentation & Calibration facility, expertise in Radiological Engineering and the...

234

Puget Sound Operational Forecast System - A Real-time Predictive Tool for Marine Resource Management and Emergency Responses  

SciTech Connect

To support marine ecological resource management and emergency response and to enhance scientific understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes in Puget Sound, a real-time Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OFS) was developed by the Coastal Ocean Dynamics & Ecosystem Modeling group (CODEM) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PS-OFS employs the state-of-the-art three-dimensional coastal ocean model and closely follows the standards and procedures established by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS). PS-OFS consists of four key components supporting the Puget Sound Circulation and Transport Model (PS-CTM): data acquisition, model execution and product archive, model skill assessment, and model results dissemination. This paper provides an overview of PS-OFS and its ability to provide vital real-time oceanographic information to the Puget Sound community. PS-OFS supports pacific northwest regions growing need for a predictive tool to assist water quality management, fish stock recovery efforts, maritime emergency response, nearshore land-use planning, and the challenge of climate change and sea level rise impacts. The structure of PS-OFS and examples of the system inputs and outputs, forecast results are presented in details.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Chase, Jared M.; Wang, Taiping

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

UCI EMERGENCY UCI EMERGENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCI EMERGENCY PROCEDURES UCI EMERGENCY PROCEDURES UCI Emergency 9-1-1 UCIrvine Police Department 9-1-1 or 949.824.5223 (24 hours / 7 days / week) Counseling Center 949.824.6457 (8 - 5/ M - F) Emergency 949.824.2222 (24 hours / 7 days / week) Emergency Management on-line http://www.police.uci.edu/ Sign

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

236

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

237

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

238

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

239

Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

240

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Team Coordination Game: Zero-fidelity simulation abstracted from fire emergency response practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crisis response engenders a high-stress environment in which teams gather, transform, and mutually share information. Prior educational approaches have not successfully addressed these critical skills. The assumption has been that the highest fidelity ... Keywords: Zero-fidelity simulation, education games, game interface design, information distribution

Zachary O. Toups; Andruid Kerne; William A. Hamilton

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Prevention, Response and Medical Support Branch Emergency Response TeamATSDR Chemical Specific Health Consultation Mercury Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tables of action level guidelines for indoor air concentrations of elemental or metallic mercury in response to a request from both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the state of Michigan. The action levels had been previously developed for individual sites and situations, but the tables summarized these guidelines in a succinct package for use by field personnel. The request was prompted by several small spills in homes caused by replacing or relocating natural gas regulators containing mercury. The homes affected included those serviced by utility companies in both Chicago and Detroit. The guidelines were designed to help risk managers at spill scenes in homes or other locations make decisions regarding cleanup, relocation, etc. Throughout the years, these action level guidelines have been widely disseminated by users. A workgroup has been formed jointly by EPA and ATSDR to develop consistent cleanup guidance for mercury spills, including not only public health actions but also cleanup and sampling methods. As part of that joint effort, EPA has requested that ATSDR update the 2000 guidelines to be included in a more comprehensive guidance. This health consultation is intended to provide that update.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

244

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix B December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . ii Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

245

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

246

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

247

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

248

Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises  

SciTech Connect

Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each governments respective experience in dealing with natural disasters.

Craig Marianno

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Office of Secure Transportat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OMO Offi ce of Mission Operations OST Offi ce of Secure Transportation PAR Protective Action Recommendation RAP Radiological Assistance Program TECC Transportation and Emergency...

250

www.mnltap.umn.edu The trusted resource for Minnesota's local transportation agencies Fall 2008 Vol. 16, No. 4 EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 16, No. 4 EMERGENCY RESPONSE LTAP role in response ..........................2 LRRB UPDATE OPERA.E. Minneapolis, MN 55455-0375 NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID MPLS. MN PERMIT NO. 155 When a natural disaster way to handle an unthink- able event is preparedness. The disaster preparedness plan in Hugo

Minnesota, University of

251

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution...

252

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Considerations for First Aid Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. i 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. INTRODUCTION "Standard first aid is applied prior to contamination control whenever it is considered to have life-saving value, or is important to the patient for relief of pain or prevention of

253

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid 5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. L 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. References: 1. Basic Radiation Protection Technology (2nd edition) - Daniel A. Gollnick 2. Operational Health Physics Training - H. J. Moe

254

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres The DOE Emergency Support Function 12 (ESF-12) Response Team was selected as this year's recipient of...

255

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMP) EMP) OBJECTIVE EMP.1 A routine drill program and emergency operations drill program, including program records, have been established and implemented. (CR-11) Scope: Operations and emergency drill programs, as affected by the SWS, are within the scope of this ORR. Criteria * Emergency preparedness drills and exercises are conducted and an adequate response capability exists. (DOE Order 151.1; DOE Order 5480.20A, Chapter I) * Routine operations drills and exercises are conducted and an adequate response capability exists. (DOE Order 425.1B) * Applicable emergency management documentation (e.g., Building Emergency Plan, emergency response procedures, Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment, alarm response procedures, and emergency response procedures) has been updated to

256

Emergency Management Plan 2010 March 1 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Disaster 3.1 Initiation of Level 2 and 3 Emergency Response 4. Activation of Emergency Management Plan.......................................................................................................... 5 1. Emergency Response Levels 2. Planning and Implementation Principles 3. Incident Command System and Authority of Director of Emergency Operations Response Procedures

Argerami, Martin

257

Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Baseline Surveys for Emergency Planning  

SciTech Connect

Originally established in the 1960s to support the Nuclear Test Program, the AMS mission is to provide a rapid and comprehensive worldwide aerial measurement, analysis, and interpretation capability in response to a nuclear/radiological emergency. AMS provides a responsive team of individuals whose processes allow for a mission to be conducted and completed with results available within hours. This presentation slide-show reviews some of the history of the AMS, summarizes present capabilities and methods, and addresses the value of the surveys.

Lyons, C

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Notice of Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA, in Response to Electricity Reliability Concerns in...

259

Marshall Islands radiological followup  

SciTech Connect

In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the public health and safety in connection with the nuclear programs under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are described in the following paper. They are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals and to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (auth)

Greenhouse, N.A.; McCraw, T.F.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiological design guide  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

Evans, R.A.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology today, promising emerging technologies and references for further reading.

Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Project #8, Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 10. FDNY's Initial Size-up of WTC Conditions: A large aircraft had hit the WTC 1 building. ... Command Post at West and Liberty Streets ...

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Emergency Response Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICS Incident Command System ... Trade Center Disaster: The Con Ed Substation in World ... operations, FDNY, NYPD, and fire ground positioning of ...

265

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved...

266

A number of Western employees will participate in a disaster drill on Wednesday, October 27th. The drill will simulate an emergency response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of Western employees will participate in a disaster drill on Wednesday, October 27th. The drill will simulate an emergency response to an earthquake, including exercises for damage assessment to the web4u. Employees may also call Human Resources at x3774. Disaster drill planned for October 27th

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

267

Environemental Health and Safety www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environemental Health and Safety ­ www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency responders can't be everywhere, helping everyone in your home or work, and the disasters that are most likely to occur in your community. Talk about what

Manning, Sturt

268

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7of 9 7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3 Qualification Area: Radiological Instrumentation.......................................5 Task 2-1.................. ..................................................................... 5 Objective.............................................................................. 5

269

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

270

UCI Emergency Procedures UCI Emergency Call 9-1-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCI Emergency Procedures UCI Emergency Call 9-1-1 UCI Emergency Info Line: 866-IRV-NEWS (Activated only after a disaster) Evacuation Evacuate when: · A fire and/or life safety emergency occurs, · The fire alarm activates (audible and/or visual), · Notified to do so by emergency response personnel

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

271

DOE standard: Radiological control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Student's Guide Notes Module 4-1 I. Introduction II. Radiological Control Program A. Overall program The Radiological Control Program consists of the commitments, policies, and procedures that are administered by a site or facility to meet the EH Health and Safety Policy. The Radiation Protection Program required by 10 CFR Part 835 is an element of the overall Radiological Control Program. The Radiological Control Program should address the following: * Requirements * Responsibilities * Programs/procedures * Assessments B. Size of the program Radiological Control Programs vary in size. There are several factors that may affect the magnitude of a Radiological Control Program. The specific mission, types and quantities of

273

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

274

ORISE: REAC/TS trains emergency responders in preparation for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Training REACTS trains emergency responders in preparation for Pan American Games REACTS conducts radiation emergency medical response training around the...

275

An external dose reconstruction involving a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have underscored the need for the United States government to provide streamlined emergency response procedures and subsequent dose estimations for personnel responding to incidents involving radioactive material. Indeed, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 138 (NCRP 2001) indicates that exposures received by first responders will be important for a number of reasons, including planning for the appropriate use of key personnel in an extended emergency situation. In response, the Department of Homeland Security has published Protective Action Guides (DHS 2006) to help minimize these exposures and associated risks. This research attempts to provide some additional radiological exposure knowledge so that an Incident Commander, with limited or no information, can make more informed decisions about evacuation, sheltering-in-place, relocation of the public, turn-back levels, defining radiation hazard boundaries, and in-field radiological dose assessments of the radiation workers, responders, and members of the public. A method to provide such insight begins with providing a model that describes the physics of radiation interactions, radiation source and geometry, collection of field measurements, and interpretation of the collected data. A Monte Carlo simulation of the model is performed so that calculated results can be compared to measured values. The results of this investigation indicate that measured organ absorbed doses inside a tissue equivalent phantom compared favorably to the derived organ absorbed doses measured by the Panasonic thermoluminescence dosimeters and with Monte Carlo â??Nâ?? Particle modeled results. Additionally, a Victoreen 450P pressurized ion chamber measured the integrated dose and these results compared well with the Panasonic right lateral TLD. This comparison indicates that the Victoreen 450P ionization chamber could potentially serve as an estimator of real-time effective dose and organ absorbed dose, if energy and angular dependence corrections could be taken into account. Finally, the data obtained in this investigation indicate that the MCNP model provided a reasonable method to determine organ absorbed dose and effective dose of a simulated Radiological Dispersal Device in an Inferior-Superior geometry with Na99mTcO4 as the source of radioactive material.

Hearnsberger, David Wayne

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-2008 1-2008 August 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techs\ Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.1-1B, Radiation Protection Programs, March 2007, and as outlined in DOE- STD- 1098-99, CN1, March 2005, DOE Radiological Control (the Radiological Control Standard - RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of

278

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency. This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel. For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ). INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

ORISE: Health Physics in Radiation Emergencies | REAC/TS Continuing Medical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Physics in Radiation Emergencies Health Physics in Radiation Emergencies Dates Scheduled Register Online February 24-28, 2014 June 9-13, 2014 Fee: $200 Maximum enrollment: 24 32 hours American Academy of Health Physics credit This 4½-day course is designed primarily for Health Physicists (HP), Medical Physicists (MP), Radiation Safety Officers (RSO) and others who have radiation dose assessment and/or radiological control responsibilities. The course presents an advanced level of information on radiological/ nuclear event reconstruction, dose assessments/estimations and integration of the physics discipline with medicine. The course provides the basis for HPs, MPs and RSOs to interact with and provide advice and recommendations to medical practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries and illnesses.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools NSTec has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform NSTec will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, NASA, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

Dr. Bradley J Schrader

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 Users Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

Dr. Bradley J Schrader

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

141-2001 141-2001 April 2001 Change Notice No. 1 and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii

286

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14, Radiation Safety Training, of Implementation Guide G44.1B, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard [RCS - DOE-STD-1098-99, Ch. 1]. The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals

287

Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Phase I: RCT Academics Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 1 Phase II: RCT Core Practical (JPMs) Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 1

288

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures ........................................................................................2 Final Verification Signatures ....................................................................................................3 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iv

289

Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror  

SciTech Connect

Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

Hart, M

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydrogen Emergency Response Training for First Responders - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

52 52 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Monte R. Elmore Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 902 Battelle Blvd. Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-6158 Email: monte.elmore@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Jennifer Hamilton, California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), Sacramento, CA * Hanford Fire Department, Richland, WA * Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency

291

NNSA, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

292

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

293

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training for Jordanian, Iraqi Officials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform...

294

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

295

NNSA Conducts Advanced Radiological Assistance Training for Iraqi...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

296

Engineering Emergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore various definitions and characteristics of emergence, how we might recognise and measure emergence, and how we might engineer emergent systems. We discuss the TUNA ("Theory Underpinning Nanotech Assemblers") project, which is investigating ...

Susan Stepney; Fiona A. C. Polack; Heather R. Turner

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

298

Emergency Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Early Dismissal (Early Closing) Due to Inclement Weather - Snow/Ice or Emergency Situation. ... Emergency Situation - "Shelter-in-Place" Plan. ...

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Emergency Checklist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Checklist Emergency supplies for your home: * First aid kit * Toolbox * Candles and matches * Portable radio * Flashlight * Extra batteries * Food and water Evacuation...

300

ORISE Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS):  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities REAC/TS offers medical management of radiation incidents, consultation and training in radiation emergency medicine REAC/TS staff member providing medical assistance Recognized around the world for its expertise in the medical management of radiation incidents, the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides radiation incident response, consultation and preparedness training, and participates in simulation exercises to address the medical aspects of human exposure to ionizing radiation. As REAC/TS continues to establish international partnerships through education, exercises and conferences, the group is strengthening radiological emergency preparedness and response around the globe. REAC/TS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

OK-FIRST: An Example of Successful Collaboration between the Meteorological and Emergency Response Communities on 3 May 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Climatological Survey began an initiative known as Oklahoma's First-Response Information System using Telecommunications (OK-FIRST) in 1996 to support local public-safety agencies (fire departments, law enforcement agencies, and ...

Dale A. Morris; Kenneth C. Crawford; Kevin A. Kloesel; Gayland Kitch

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of such materials over a large area, with responders trying to mitigate the immediate danger to the population in a variety of ways that may change over time (e.g., in-place evacuation, staged evacuations, and declarations of growing evacuation zones over time). In addition, available resources will be marshaled in unusual ways, such as the repurposing of transit vehicles to support mass evacuations. Thus, any simulation strategy will need to be able to address highly dynamic effects and will need to be able to handle any mode of ground transportation. Depending on the urgency and timeline of the event, emergency responders may also direct evacuees to leave largely on foot, keeping roadways as clear as possible for emergency responders, logistics, mass transport, and law enforcement. This RTSTEP project developed a regional emergency evacuation modeling tool for the Chicago Metropolitan Area that emergency responders can use to pre-plan evacuation strategies and compare different response strategies on the basis of a rather realistic model of the underlying complex transportation system. This approach is a significant improvement over existing response strategies that are largely based on experience gained from small-scale events, anecdotal evidence, and extrapolation to the scale of the assumed emergency. The new tool will thus add to the toolbox available to emergency response planners to help them design appropriate generalized procedures and strategies that lead to an improved outcome when used during an actual event.

Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y.; Kang, X. (Energy Systems)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

303

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population

304

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

98 98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata May 2004 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-98 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration,

305

Radiological Toolbox User's Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Eckerman, KF

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Smart Radiological Dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

PNNL: Available Technologies: Nuclear & Radiological  

PNNL has more than 40 years of experience in radiological science and radiochemical separations based on its activities at the U.S. Department of ...

308

Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

Radiological Control Managers Council

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

310

Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

311

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Part 2 Module 2 page 17 Medical radiation sources (total average dose ~ 54 mrem/yr) 1) X rays (total average dose ~ 40mrem/yr) a) X rays are similar to gamma rays; however, they originate outside the nucleus.

312

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

313

For S Radiological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? . ? . -. .- * -* (\/If.r.-5- .* , d- For S Radiological ' mer Bridgepo pecial Metals Adrian, Survey of the Irt Brass Company Extrusion Plant, Michigan / /f?t' . ( F. F. Haywood H. W. Dickson W. D. Cottrell W. H. Shinpaugh _ : I., _-. .I ( ._ rc/ DOE/EV-0005128 ORNL-57 13 / J. E. Burden 0. R. Stone R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith 4 , Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A06 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedStatesGovernment. Neither theUnitedStatesGovernment noranyagency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

314

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". Part 3 1.05-9 4) U.S. national average from diagnostic

315

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

316

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

317

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

318

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established NNSA's Administrator...

320

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at the Nevada Test Site, INS-O-06-02 Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at...

322

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

Emergency Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Note: This page is pending deletion, please refer to the Safety and health main page for emergency procedure information:

324

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home >...

325

NNSA Conducts Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

(I-RAPTER) training in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The training, held at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Almaty, included using radiation detection equipment to locate hidden...

326

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 Earn 11 R&D 100 Awards Jul 2, 2013 US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone View All > Timeline Curious about NNSA...

327

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services Sep 17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts...

328

Emergency Preparedness | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preparedness Emergency Preparedness ISER is responsible for coordinating the protection of critical energy assets and assisting Federal, State, and local governments with...

329

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

SciTech Connect

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ).

INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Impact of Enabling Technologies on Customer Load Curtailment Performance Summer 2001 Results from NYSERDA's PON 585 and 577 Programs and NYISO's Emergency Demand Response Program  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a market and load research study on a small group of participants in the NYISO Emergency Demand Response Program (EDRP) and the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction and Enabling Technology Program Opportunity Notices. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 individual customers that participated in the NYISO EDRP program through New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG), AES NewEnergy, and eBidenergy/ ConsumerPowerLine. These contractors used funding from NYSERDA to apply enabling technologies that were hypothesized to improve customers' ability to curtail load. Both NYSEG and eBidenergy/ConsumerPowerLine offered their customers access to their hourly load data on a day-after basis and, during curtailment events, on a near-real-time basis. Phone interviews were conducted with most customers, however 25% of customers provided initial responses to the survey protocol via email. We then combined the market research information with load data during the curtailment events of August 7-10, 2001 to evaluate the impact of technology on curtailment responses.

Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

This letter is in response to the Department of Energy Emergency Order to Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Genera  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 th , 2007 Anthony J. Como Permitting, Siting, and Analysis Division Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0119 Dear Mr.Como: This letter is in response to the Department of Energy Special Environmental Analysis for Actions Taken under the U.S Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, Virginia. Air Quality impacts This study neglects to report the spatial distribution of modeled pollutant concentrations The only information provided in this regard is that maximum modeled pollutant concentrations occur in Alexandria. Were there modeled NAAQS exceedances elsewhere, such as in the District of Columbia ?

332

Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) Assessment FINAL Specialist Report GEOLOGIC HAZARDS Station Fire, Angeles N.F.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three USFS BAER Team geologists assessed increased risks from geologic hazards within the 161,000 acre Station Fire. Watershed response to moderate and high severity burned areas will depend on storm intensity and duration, but is likely to be threatening to life, property and natural resources, and costly. Even small storms have a high to severe relative hazard rating for dangerous debris flows across most of the burned area. Most treatments to reduce debris flow risk were deemed not feasible, not effective, and cost prohibitive. Rockfall, debris slides and dry ravel will add additional hazard and sediment bulk to flood flows. Debris basins will fill quickly, and could overtop and damage downstream communities and infrastructure. Debris storage sites are lacking. Abandoned mines are exposed and add additional hazards. Treatment options are few, and warning systems and public education are critical.

Jerry Degraff Geologist; Sierra N. F; Jonathan Yonni; Schwartz Geologist; Angeles N. F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

U.S. DOE's Response to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor Accident: Answers and Data Products for Decision Makers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fukushima Daiichi response posed a plethora of scientific questions to the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) radiological emergency response community. As concerns arose for decision makers, the DOE leveraged a community of scientists well-versed in the tenants of emergency situations to provide answers to time-sensitive questions from different parts of the world. A chronology of the scientific Q and A that occurred is presented along with descriptions of the challenges that were faced and how new methods were employed throughout the course of the response.

Reed, A. L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

335

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

336

Radiological Threat Reduction: Dealing with Dirty Bombs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonproliferation and National Security Department May 2, 2007 #12;Topics What is a Radiological Dispersal Device

Homes, Christopher C.

337

Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information at NIST. Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/ Nuclear/Explosives (CBRNE) Information at NIST. ...

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

FDH radiological design review guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

Millsap, W.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

340

Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Planning for Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

342

Emergency Communications | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

343

Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

344

Development of Standard Test Methods for Emergency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of Standard Test Methods for Emergency Response Robots for Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Planning for Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration for Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Planning for Emergencies Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Planning for Emergencies Planning for Emergencies Emergency Management is the application of the necessary resources to

346

Regulatory Supervision of Radiological Protection in the Russian Federation as Applied to Facility Decommissioning and Site Remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Russian Federation is carrying out major work to manage the legacy of exploitation of nuclear power and use of radioactive materials. This paper describes work on-going to provide enhanced regulatory supervision of these activities as regards radiological protection. The scope includes worker and public protection in routine operation; emergency preparedness and response; radioactive waste management, including treatment, interim storage and transport as well as final disposal; and long term site restoration. Examples examined include waste from facilities in NW Russia, including remediation of previous shore technical bases (STBs) for submarines, spent fuel and radioactive waste management from ice-breakers, and decommissioning of Radio-Thermal-Generators (RTGs) used in navigational devices. Consideration is given to the identification of regulatory responsibilities among different regulators; development of necessary regulatory instruments; and development of regulatory procedures for safety case reviews and compliance monitoring and international cooperation between different regulators. (authors)

Sneve, M.K. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Shandala, N.K. [Institute of Biophysics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

Austin, B.A.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 May 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 2. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Part 1, page 14 Change: U.S. Department of Energy, Radiological Control

350

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

351

Radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

Kloepping, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALARA Instructor's Guide ALARA Instructor's Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. References: 1. NCRP Report No. 91 (1987) "Recommendations on Limits for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation" 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998), "Occupational Radiation Protection"

353

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access Control and Work Area Setup Access Control and Work Area Setup Instructor's Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: L 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. L 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. L 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. L 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. L 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. L 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and

354

ORISE: National Security and Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Management Emergency Management Emergency Response Crisis and Risk Communication Forensic Science How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Exercises and Planning Training and Technology Support Resources How to Work With Us Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education National Security and Emergency Management The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps prepare the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) emergency response assets, as well as those of other federal and state agencies, by managing and conducting programs, studies, research, exercises and training. ORISE's national security and emergency management capabilities include: Providing incident response where weapons of mass destruction and/or improvised explosive devices are involved

355

Environmental Measurements in an Emergency: This is not a Drill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-world event such as the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant presented unique challenges in data collection, analysis, and assessment. While emergency responders from the Department of Energy (DOE) are trained regularly to assess the environmental consequences of a radiological or nuclear incident, real-world complexities are difficult or impossible to simulate in such training. The Japan event sharply deviated in several ways and in the very early stages, accurate plume and deposition model predictions were difficult to produce due to the lack of field monitoring data and other information. In addition, there was much less plant monitoring data, essentially no reactor state information, and the meteorological conditions and releases were much more complex. Inevitably, the measurements in Japan presented technical challenges to assessors tasked with ensuring the quality of the finished assessments and data products for government officials, the responder community, and the public. This paper addresses some of the operational real-world complexities; procedures, measurements, or radiological assessments from the Fukushima response are not in the purview of this paper.

Musolino, Stephen V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Clark, Harvey [Remote Sensing Laboratory; McCullough, Thomas [Remote Sensing Laboratory; Pemberton, Wendy [Remote Sensing Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

358

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20555. u. S. Nuclear U. S. NRC. Reactor Safety Study: AnNUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRC Regulatory Guide 1. 101. "Report on Current Activities NRC and the Federal Interagency

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Siting Staff, California Energy Resources Conservation andperformed for the California Energy Resources Conservationby the State of California Energy Resources Conservation and

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Reg- ulation.Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Licen- sing. StandardCommission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Standard

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

WIPP radiological assistance team dispatched to Los Alamos as precautionary measure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched To Los Alamos as Precautionary Measure CARLSBAD, N.M., May 11, 2000 - A team of radiological experts has been dispatched from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in response to a week-long forest fire that is threatening Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), one of the nation's premiere research laboratories. "We are responding completely as a precautionary measure," said Jere Galle, team leader for the WIPP Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. "It is our understanding that nuclear materials at LANL are not in harm's way. Our primary concern, however, is always to protect human health and the environment." The RAP team's mission is to provide radiological assistance to federal agencies, state,

366

DOE M 151.1-1, Power Marketing Administration Emergency Management Program Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual establishes emergency management policy and requirements for emergency planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, and response for the ...

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

Inspection of Savannah River Operations Office Managementof Emergency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Operations Office Managementof Emergency Response and Law Enforcement-Related Grants, IG-0604 Inspection of Savannah River Operations Office Managementof Emergency...

368

ORISE National Security and Emergency Management: Contact Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Management Emergency Response Crisis and Risk Communication Forensic Science How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview Exercises and Planning Training and Technology...

369

Microsoft Word - NA-42 Emergency Ops Training Categorical Exclusion...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

(CX) For Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Emergency Response Training Exercises, Drills and Simulations The DOENNSA Office of Emergency...

370

California native and exotic perennial grasses differ in their response to soil nitrogen, exotic annual grass density, and order of emergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early emergence of plant seedlings can offer strong competitive advantages over later-germinating neighbors through the preemption of limiting resources. This phenomenon may have contributed to the persistent dominance of ...

D'Antonio, Carla M.

371

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Berger, ME; Leonard, RB; Ricks, RC; Wiley, AL; Lowry, PC; Flynn, DF Abstract: This article addresses the problems emergency physicians would face in the event of a nuclear or radiological catastrophe. It presents information about what needs to be done so that useful information will be gathered and reasonable decisions made in the all important triage period. A brief introductory explanation of radiation injury is followed by practical guides for managing the focused history, physical exam, laboratory tests, initial treatment, and disposition of victims of acute radiation syndrome and combined injury. The guides are not intended to serve as a hospital's "emergency

372

Radiological Assistance Program (RAP)- Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Radiological Major Programs > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Radiological Assistance Program Bookmark and Share Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation. Click on image to view larger image. The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team at Argonne can provide assistance in the event of a radiological accident or incident. Support ranges from giving technical information or advice over the telephone, to sending highly trained team members and state-of-the-art equipment to the accident site to help identify and minimize any radiological hazards. The

373

Review of the Hanford Tank Farms Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, December 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tank Farms Tank Farms Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology ........................................................................................................................................

374

Independent Oversight Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity Level Implementation - June 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 2011 May 2011 Independent Oversight Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity Level Implementation June 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1

375

Review of the Hanford Tank Farms Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Farms Tank Farms Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology ........................................................................................................................................

376

Independent Oversight Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity Level Implementation - June 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2011 May 2011 Independent Oversight Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity Level Implementation June 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1

377

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Cover sheets parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 Change: Office of Environment, Safety & Health

378

Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-2001 3-2001 August 2001 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

379

Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-2002 8-2002 May 2002 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

380

Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

Putman, V.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radiological assessment of the town of Edgemont  

SciTech Connect

Congress, in 1980, gave the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility to coordinate and conduct a monitoring, engineering assessment, and remedial cleanup program in Edgemont, South Dakota. The Congressional intent was to locate public properties in Edgemont that had been contaminated by radioactive materials from a local uranium mill, and to clean up those properties. Because the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 gave NRC the authority to monitor for contamination but not to clean up contamination, Congress later assigned the remedial cleanup responsibility to the Department of Energy (DOE). NRC, through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), conducted a radiological survey of 96% of the properties in Edgemont and vicinity during the time period of September 1980 through April 1984. (Out of 976 total properties, 941 were surveyed.) The strategy of the survey was to screen properties for the possible presence of contamination by using short- and long-term radon progeny measurements, indoor and outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements, and soil radium-226 measurements. Properties that failed the screening surveys were measured more extensively to determine whether the elevated readings were due to residual radioactive materials from the uranium mill. This report contains the historical perspective of the Edgemont survey, explains the development and modifications of survey protocols, examines the problems encountered during the survey, and lists a summary of the results. The report also presents conclusions about the effectiveness of the survey techniques and about the rationale of a comprehensive survey of a whole community. The appendices section of this report contains all the protocols, a list of all the properties showing survey results for each, and reports on special studies conducted during the survey. These special studies contain many valuable insights that may prove beneficial to future radiological assessment surveys.

Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.; Young, J.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

U.S. Department of Energy Consequence Management Under the National Response Framework  

SciTech Connect

Under the Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex of the National Response Framework, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has specific responsibilities as a coordinating agency and for leading interagency response elements in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Emergency response planning focuses on rapidly providing response elements in stages after being notified of a nuclear/radiological incident. The use of Home Teams during the field team deployment period and recent advances in collecting and transmitting data from the field directly to assessment assets has greatly improved incident assessment times for public protection decisions. The DOEs Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) based in Las Vegas, Nevada, has successfully deployed technical and logistical support for this mission at national exercises such as Top Officials Exercise IV (TOPOFF IV). In a unique response situation, DOE will provide advance contingency support to NASA during the scheduled launch in the fall of 2009 of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutoniums radioactive decay. DOE assets and contingency planning will provide a pre-incident response posture for rapid early plume phase assessment in the highly unlikely launch anomaly.

Don Van Etten and Paul Guss

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Emergent spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum mechanics and relativity in the continuum imply the well known spin-statistics connection. However for particles hopping on a lattice, there is no such constraint. If a lattice model yields a relativistic field theory in a continuum limit, this constraint must "emerge" for physical excitations. We discuss a few models where a spin-less fermion hopping on a lattice gives excitations which satisfy the continuum Dirac equation. This includes such well known systems such as graphene and staggered fermions.

Michael Creutz

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

384

An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area, Ames, Iowa. Date of survey: July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area in Ames, Iowa, was conducted during the period July 15--25, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the Ames Laboratory and the surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 200 feet (61 meters) along a series of parallel lines 350 feet (107 meters) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 36 square miles (93 square kilometers) and included the city of Ames, Iowa, and the Iowa State University. The results are reported as exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (inferred from the aerial data) in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 7 to 9 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). No anomalous radiation levels were detected at the Ames Laboratory. However, one anomalous radiation source was detected at an industrial storage yard in the city of Ames. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within the expected uncertainty of {+-}15%.

Maurer, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Date of survey: April 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding area in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was conducted during the period March 30 to April 14,1992. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment of the Oak Ridge Reservation for use in environmental management programs and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) along a series of parallel lines 250 feet (76 meters) apart and included X-10 (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), K-25 (former Gaseous Diffusion Plant), Y-12 (Weapons Production Plant), the Freels Bend Area and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, the East Fork Poplar Creek (100-year floodplain extending from K-25 to Y-12), Elza Gate (former uranium ore storage site located in the city of Oak Ridge), Parcel A, the Clinch River (river banks extending from Melton Hill Dam to the city of Kingston), and the CSX Railroad Tracks (extending from Y-12 to the city of Oak Ridge). The survey encompassed approximately 55 square miles (1 41 square kilometers) of the Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area.

Maurer, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Responding to Emergencies Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies Responding to Emergencies emergency response logo NNSA serves as the premier technical leader in

387

Environment/Health/Safety/Security (EHSS): Security and Emergency Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Emergency Services Security and Emergency Services SEO Home page collage Documents Organization Chart Related Sites Fire Department Security Services EMERGENCY SERVICES The purpose of Berkeley Lab's Emergency Services is to ensure emergency resources are in maximum readiness, before, during, and after any emergency. ISSM: Integrated Safeguards and Security Management Security Updates MISSION STATEMENT: Provide integrated and efficient life safety, emergency and security services to all employees, guests, and users at the main Berkeley site and off-site facilities. Also, promote continuous improvement of the Lab's scientific and supportive activities. The core competencies of the group are: Emergency response to include fire suppression, emergency medical and hazmat response services

388

Random Antenna Arrays Boost Emergency Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the many emergency communications difficulties during the response to the ... More importantly, since disaster sites rarely allow for niceties of ...

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This job aid is a quick reference to assist emergency responders in identifying preliminary safety precautions that should be taken during the initial response phase after arrival...

390

ORISE: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Training and Analysis Tool Training Tool Improves Information Sharing Between CSEPP and its Response Partners In 2006,...

391

Fire Rescue Group, Emergency Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mission of the Fire Rescue Group is to provide at Brookhaven with fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, confined space rescue, technical...

392

Counterterrorism and Response Technologies (CART)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and technical support on counterterrorism and response technologies, equipment ... Measurement Laboratory and the Emergency Services Division ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to intensive site security efforts, NNSA is also working to build international standards and criteria for nuclear and radiological security. This includes NNSA's work to...

394

ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The program concludes with an opportunity to apply new knowledge and decision-making skills in a series of six simulated patient case studies depicting hypothetical radiological...

395

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA...

396

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Cotton, Robert Gosslee, Jonathan Sowell, Clayton Weaver FINAL REPORT July 30, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and...

397

Emergency Management: Facility Emergency Plan Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Todd Slater 20 Jun 2007 (updated AUG. 2010) SLAC-I-730-0A14J-001-R001 2 of 12 Emergency Management: Facility Emergency Plan Template This facility emergency plan (FEP)...

398

Emergency Management: Facility Emergency Plan Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approved by 20 Jun 2007 (updated AUG. 2010) SLAC-I-730-0A14J-001-R001 2 of 12 Emergency Management: Facility Emergency Plan Template This facility emergency plan (FEP)...

399

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

Marsha Keister

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Anticipating ethical issues in emerging IT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this essay, a new approach to the ethics of emerging information technology will be presented, called anticipatory technology ethics (ATE). The ethics of emerging technology is the study of ethical issues at the R&D and introduction stage ... Keywords: Anticipatory technology ethics, Design, Emerging technologies, Ethical impact assessment, Forecasting, Futures studies, Governance, Responsible research & innovation, Technology assessment, Uncertainty

Philip A. Brey

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Emergency Operations Training Academy Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Training > Emergency Operations Training Academy Emergency Operations Training Academy Rotating image showing pictures of Classroom, Online and Hands on trainings

402

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Emergency Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management FAQS Emergency Management FAQS August 2010 STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency Plan, observe and evaluate emergency management activities and Federal and contractor technical performance to ensure the adequacy, effectiveness, and compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 151.1B and other DOE Orders and Federal regulations. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities #3 5 3 Review, and/or approve emergency management documentation. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities #4 3 2 Facilitate the notification and reporting of emergencies under Department of Energy (DOE) Order 151.1B Comprehensive Emergency Management System. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities #6 4 1 Resolve, or facilitate the resolution of, emergency management issues.

403

Learn More About NNSA's Emergency Operations Office | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

404

NNSA, Cambodia Sign Statement of Intent for Emergency Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform...

405

Emergency Operations donates more than 357 pounds of food | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

406

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALARA ALARA Study Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. INTRODUCTION All personnel at a facility must be committed to the ALARA philosophy. The RCT can play a major role in establishing and maintaining that commitment by understanding its concepts. This lesson will familiarize the student with the ALARA concepts and the

407

Standard practice for radiologic examination of semiconductors and electronic components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice provides the minimum requirements for nondestructive radiologic examination of semiconductor devices, microelectronic devices, electromagnetic devices, electronic and electrical devices, and the materials used for construction of these items. 1.2 This practice covers the radiologic examination of these items to detect possible defective conditions within the sealed case, especially those resulting from sealing the lid to the case, and internal defects such as extraneous material (foreign objects), improper interconnecting wires, voids in the die attach material or in the glass (when sealing glass is used) or physical damage. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this practice. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the app...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Key Emergency Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Emergency Information What to Do if an Emergency Arises DOE is committed to public safety in the event an emergency arises. You will likely be made aware that an emergency is...

410

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 6000BSE RG 6412 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING no exceptions here) RG 6521 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESIDENCY, GPA REQUIREMENTS Effective

Shyy, Wei

411

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual, Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Safety & Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination Management andor Coordination of APS Site WorkServices Safety & Emergency Management Database Maintenance Personnel Safety & Emergency Management Area...

414

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1098-2008, Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1098-2008 STD-1098-2008 DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL DOE-STD-1098-2008 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1098-2008 RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What is the purpose of DOE-STD-1098-2008? 2. To which DOE position is the authority and responsibility to establish a comprehensive and effective radiological control training program assigned? 3. What is the definition of the term -total effective dose?‖ 4. What is the definition of the term -lifetime control level?‖ 5. What are three trigger levels that require a formal radiological review of work activities?

415

Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

417

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded...

418

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technical Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Access Control and Work Area Setup 10 Access Control and Work Area Setup Study Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: i 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. i 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. i 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. i 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. i 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. i 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and the

419

Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site.

Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Reducing the Risks. In the aftermath of a terrorist attack, wastewater utilities may have to contend with decontamination water containing chemical, biological, or radiological substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the aftermath of a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) attack, decontamination of people and infrastructure will be needed. Decontamination inevitably produces wastewater, and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) need to know how to handle decontamination wastewater. This article describes CBR substances; planning, coordinating, and communicating responses across agencies; planning within a utility; coordination with local emergency managers and first responders; mitigating effects of decontamination wastewater; and mitigating effects on utility personnel. Planning for Decontamination Wastewater: A Guide for Utilities, the document on which this article is based, was developed under a cooperative agreement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) and its contractor, CH2MHILL, Inc.

Warren, Linda P.; Hornback, Chris; Strom, Daniel J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

College of Emergency Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Operations Emergency Operations College of Emergency Operations College of Emergency Operations Vision The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) will be recognized as the model technical training provider for DOE emergency operations personnel, while expanding its customer base to include other designated government and private-sector national and international organizations that require professional training, education, and vocational services. In this expanded role, the Academy will be a vital training asset for DOE and the nation. Roles Provide training analysis, development, and delivery support to the Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40), act in an advisory role in training oriented initiatives, provide access to emergency management/response training throughout the DOE/NNSA complex, support outreach via

422

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C C December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management

423

Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1

424

Independent Oversight Targeted Review of Activity-Level Implementation of Radiological Controls at Sandia National Laboratories, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Targeted Review of Targeted Review of Activity-Level Implementation of Radiological Controls at Sandia National Laboratories May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2

425

Emergency Information | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Information | National Nuclear Security Administration Information | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Emergency Information Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the Sandia Field Office > Emergency Information Emergency Information The Sandia Field Office (SFO) Emergency Management System is designed to

426

A radiological evaluation of phosphogypsum  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum is the by-product resulting from phosphoric acid or phosphate fertilizer production. The phosphate used in these chemical processes contains the naturally occurring radioactive material U and all its subsequent decay products. During processing, the U generally remains in the phosphoric acid product, while the daughter, {sup 226}Ra, tends to be concentrated in the phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has physical properties that make it useful as a sub-base for roadways, parking lots, and similar construction. A radiological evaluation, to determine exposures to workers mixing this material with a stabilizing agent (portland cement), was performed at a South Louisiana phosphoric acid chemical plant. Measurements of the {sup 226}Ra content of the phosphogypsum showed an average of 1.1 +/- 0.3 Bq g-1 (0.7-1.7 Bq g-1). The average measured gross gamma exposure rate on the phosphogypsum pile corresponded to a dose equivalent rate of 0.368 +/- 0.006 mu Sv h-1 (0.32-0.42 mu Sv h-1). Radon daughter concentrations measured on top of the phosphogypsum pile ranged from 0.0006 to 0.001 working levels. An analysis of the airborne {sup 226}Ra concentrations showed only background levels.

Laiche, T.P.; Scott, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Radiological safety training for uranium facilities  

SciTech Connect

This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1. and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585...

431

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585...

432

Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site | National Nuclear Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Consequence Management > Radiation Emergency Assistance

433

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program | Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Planning for Emergencies > Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination

434

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

435

Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

Leena, R. V., E-mail: leenarv_76@yahoo.co.uk; Shyamkumar, N. K. [Christian Medial College, Department of Radiodiagnosis (India)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

JGI - Emergency Operations Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Numbers In an emergency dial 9-911 from JGI, or 1-925-935-6400 to call 911 from a cell phone, or 911 from non-JGI land line. JGI Emergency Status Announcements...

437

In Case of Emergency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Case of Emergency In Case of Emergency Print FirePolice Emergency: ext. 7911 Cell phone or off-site: 510-486-7911 When dialing from off-site, the following numbers need to be...

438

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTecs Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTecs Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul P. Guss

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dosimetry Dosimetry Study Guide 2.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Dosimetry Module Number: 2.04 Objectives: 2.04.01 Identify the DOE external exposure limits for general employees. 2.04.02 Identify the DOE limits established for the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant female general employee. i 2.04.03 Identify the administrative exposure control guidelines at your site, including those for the: a. General employee b. Member of the public/minor c. Incidents and emergencies d. Embryo/fetus i 2.04.04 Identify the requirements for a female general employee who has notified her employer in writing that she is pregnant. 2.04.05 Determine the theory of operation of a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). 2.04.06 Determine how a TLD reader measures the radiation dose from a TLD.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication Systems Communication Systems Study Guide 2.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Communication Systems Module Number: 2.02 Objectives: 2.02.01 Explain the importance of good communication. 2.02.02 Identify two methods of communication and be able to determine different types of each. 2.02.03 Describe different types of communication systems. 2.02.04 Describe the FCC and DOE guidelines regarding proper use of communication systems. 2.02.05 Describe general attributes of good communications. 2.02.06 Explain the importance of knowing how to contact key personnel. i 2.02.07 Identify the communication systems available at your site and methods available to contact key personnel. i 2.02.08 Describe the emergency communication systems available at your site.

442

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication Systems Communication Systems Instructor's Guide 2.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Communication Systems Module Number: 2.02 Objectives: 2.02.01 Explain the importance of good communication. 2.02.02 Identify two methods of communication and be able to determine different types of each. 2.02.03 Describe different types of communication systems. 2.02.04 Describe the FCC and DOE guidelines regarding proper use of communication systems. 2.02.05 Describe general attributes of good communications. 2.02.06 Explain the importance of knowing how to contact key personnel. i 2.02.07 Identify the communication systems available at your site and methods available to contact key personnel. i 2.02.08 Describe the emergency communication systems available at your site.

443

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dosimetry Dosimetry Instructor's Guide 2.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Dosimetry Module Number: 2.04 Objectives: 2.04.01 Identify the DOE external exposure limits for general employees. 2.04.02 Identify the DOE limits established for the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant female general employee. L 2.04.03 Identify the administrative exposure control guidelines at your site, including those for the: a. General Employee b. Member of the Public/Minor c. Incidents and emergencies d. Embryo/Fetus L 2.04.04 Identify the requirements for a female general employee who has notified her employer in writing that she is pregnant. 2.04.05 Determine the theory of operation of a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). 2.04.06 Determine how a TLD reader measures the radiation dose from a TLD.

444

Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations September 19th, 2012 Presenter: David Freshwater, Emergency Management Specialist, Office of Emergency Management, National Nuclear Security Administration Topics covered: Confirm that Critical Safety Function scenarios were addressed in HS/EPHA Determine whether site/facility had robust capabilities that allow flexible and effective emergency response to severe events Engage site/facility personnel regarding preferences for requirements/guidance changes where alternate courses of action existed Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations More Documents & Publications Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes

445

EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An emergency shutdown or scram apparatus for use in a nuclear reactor that includes a neutron absorber suspended from a temperature responsive substance that is selected to fail at a preselected temperature in excess of the normal reactor operating temperature, whereby the neutron absorber is released and allowed to fall under gravity to a preselected position within the reactor core is presented. (AEC)

Paget, J.A.; Koutz, S.L.; Stone, R.S.; Stewart, H.B.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Emergency Management: Facility Emergency Plan Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Building 219, 274 and 278 SSRL Building Facility Emergency Plan In Case of Emergency 9-911 from a SLAC phone 911 from a non-SLAC phone Then notify SLAC Site Security, Ext. 5555 SLAC Emergency Resources SLAC Site Security 5555 On-site Palo Alto Fire Station Number 7 2776 Conventional and Experimental Facilities 8901 Normal working hours only SLAC Medical Department 2281 Waste Management 2399 Building manager Larry Cadapan Assistant building manager Brian Choi Publication date 02/11/2009 Revision date 02/11/2009 Prepared by Behzad Bozorg-Chami Approved by Larry Cadapan 20 Jun 2007 (updated 30 Jun 2007) SLAC-I-730-0A14J-001-R000 2 of 12 Emergency Management: Facility Emergency Plan Template This facility emergency plan (FEP) contains building-specific emergency information for

447

Emergency Management Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Management Evaluations Reports 2010 Independent Oversight Review of Emergency Management at the Pantex Site Office and Pantex Plant, November 2010 Independent Oversight...

448

ORISE: Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Emergency Management Effective emergency management relies on thorough integration of preparedness plans at all levels of government. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science...

449

Emergency Information for Employees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Emergency Information for Employees Coordinating distribution of information to employees about any emergency. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Email LANL...

450

Inspection of Emergency Management at the Office of Secure Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ..................................................................................... 4 4.0 RATINGS ................................................................................................ 6 APPENDIX A - SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ................................. 7 APPENDIX B - SITE-SPECIFIC FINDINGS.............................................. 9 APPENDIX C - EMERGENCY PLANNING ............................................ 11 APPENDIX D - EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS .................................. 19 APPENDIX E - EMERGENCY RESPONSE ............................................. 23 APPENDIX F - READINESS ASSURANCE ............................................ 29 Abbreviations Used in This Report ARG Accident Response Group CCIC Convoy Commander in Charge

451

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

452

Emerging Materials Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Resource Center Home. Materials Education. Materials Education. Established Materials Technologies. Magnesium Superalloys. Emerging Materials...

453

Notice of Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA, in Response to Electricity Reliability Concerns in Washington, DC: Federal Register Notice Volume 71, No. 13 - Jan. 20, 2006 Notice of Emergency Action - Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA, in Response to Electricity Reliability Concerns in Washington, DC: Federal Register Notice Volume 71, No. 13 - Jan. 20, 2006 Docket No. EO-05-01. Pursuant to 10 CFR 1021.343, the U.S. Department of Energy is issuing this Notice to document emergency actions that it has taken, and to set forth the steps it intends to take in the future, to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the matter

454

Memorandum: Emergency Actions and NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2005 8, 2005 MEMORANDUM FOR FEDERAL NEPA CONTACTS FROM: HORST G. GRECZMIEL Associate Director for NEPA Oversight SUBJECT: Emergency Actions and NEPA This memorandum provides: * General information on the response to Katrina * Reporting oil and chemical spills * Projected long term recovery efforts * How agencies can respond to emergencies and comply with NEPA. Please distribute this memorandum to your agency planning and environmental personnel. General information on the response to Katrina: Information is available on the FEMA website at http://www.fema.gov and specifics on the government's response are provided at the "What Government is Doing" link which can be directly accessed at http://www.dhs.gov/dhspublic/interapp/editorial/editorial_0712.xml

455

ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers  

SciTech Connect

This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS PLANS for Phase I the INTERNATIONAL PILOT FOR Global Radiological source SORTING, Tracking, AND MONITORING (GradSStraM) Using eMERGING RFID AND WEB 2.0 TECHNOLOGIES TO PROVIDE TOTAL ASSET AND INFORMATION VISUALIZATIONA United states- European Union Lighthouse Priority Project for fostering trade and reducing regulatory burden  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of shipments of radioisotopes developed in the United States (US) are transported domestically and internationally for medical and industrial applications, including to partner laboratories in European Union (EU) countries. Over the past five years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have worked with state regulatory compliance personnel, key private sector shippers and carriers, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Transportation (DOT), the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring of medical and industrial radioisotopes in commerce. The EPA Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) project tested, evaluated, and integrated RFID technologies in laboratory settings, and at multiple private-sector shipping and distribution facilities (Perkin Elmer and DHL) using common radioisotopes used in everyday commerce. The RFID tracking was also tested in association with other deployed technologies including radiation detection, chemical/explosives detection, advanced imaging, lasers, and infrared scanning. At the 2007 EU-US Summit, the leaders of the US Department of Commerce (DOC) and EU European Commission (EC) committed to pursue jointly directed Lighthouse Priority Projects. These projects are intended to 'foster cooperation' and 'reduce regulatory burdens' with respect to transatlantic commerce. The Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) Lighthouse Project on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has been directed to 'develop a joint framework for cooperation on identification and development of best practices for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technologies.' The RFID Lighthouse Priority Project commits both sides to endeavor to align U.S. and EU regulatory and policy approaches on RFID technologies, including pilot projects in the public sector. The RadSTraM project was specifically cited as a candidate for a RFID Lighthouse Project by the EU/DOC collaboration in meeting their mutual goal of developing a 'joint framework for cooperation on identification and development of best practices for RFID technologies.' Concurrently, the Universal Postal Union (UPU) identified this project as a candidate for radioisotope packages shipped by the postal service between the United State Postal Service (USPS). and European Post Agencies.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTIVE APPAREL PROGRAM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

A program is described for providing adequate radiological protective clothing for all employees. The program consolidates all protective clothing requirements and the development and evaluation of clothing to be utilized, and establishes sound criteria for future procurement of accepted clothing. A council composed of representatives from all interested groups provides an effective means of consultation for the development, evaluation, and establishment of acceptable radiological apparel. Specifications and standards were established for use in the procurement of radiological protective apparel. Items of a non-launderable nature are warehoused and dispersed as requested. Routine reuse items which are laundry-maintained are dispersed through a central laundry facility. A chart illustrates the organization of the program. (C.H.)

Mehas, T.C.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

Ramsey, G.F.

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Finding of No Significant Impact Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL/NUCLEAR COUNTERMEASURES TEST AND EVALUATION COMPLEX, NEVADA TEST SITE The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is the Federal organization charged with defending the borders of the United States under the authority the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-296). The DHS requested the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) a complex for testing and evaluating countermeasures for interdicting potential terrorist attacks using radiological and/or nuclear weapons of mass destruction. In response to that request, NNSA proposes to construct, operate, and maintain the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC). NNSA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1499) (EA) which analyzes the potential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological emergency response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director, Preparedness and Response ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness V O L U M E 2 , I S S U E 4 O C T O B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 Next year the Department of Energy will celebrate an important milestone-the 25th anniversary of the Department's first energy emergency field deployments to provide disaster support to an impacted State or U.S. Territory. As the Department's energy response has evolved over time, so too, has the office charged with leading

462

Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaninated material was discovered in the area during an EG&G aerial radiological survey,l and confirmed by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

463

Health and Safety Research Divlsion RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaminated material was discovered in the area during an. EG&G aerial radiological survey,l and confirmed by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

464

Site-specific waste management instruction - radiological screening facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for managing waste generated from radiological sample screening operations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration Contractor`s activities. This document applies only to waste generated within the radiological screening facilities.

G. G. Hopkins

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

466

Emergency Management Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Management Homepage Emergency Management Mike Venegoni, Manager Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg. 860 - P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 (631) 344-7280 E-mail: mvenegoni@bnl.gov Emergency Management Program Brookhaven National Laboratory :: Fire Danger Index - LOW The Fire Danger Index level takes into account current and antecedent weather, fuel types, and both live and dead fuel moisture. ▪ Index Description (pdf) ▪ NWS Fire Weather Forecast :: Important Information EMERGENCY Numbers Offsite: 631-344-2222 ▪ Emergency Services ▪ Hurricane Awareness :: Be Alert, Be Aware! Watch out for unattended bags/packages and report any unusual or suspicious incidents immediately to Police Headquarters by calling: 631-344-2222 The mission of the Emergency Management Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory is provide the framework for development, coordination, control, and direction of all emergency planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, response, and recovery actions.

467

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Emergency planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emergency-planning Emergency Planning emergency-planning Emergency Planning involves determining, in advance, what will be done in response to specific emergencies including identification and allocation of resources, risk management, mitigation, continuity and recovery. Staff training, using drills, exercises and real events, is an integral part of assuring that the emergency program can be implemented. en COLLOQUIUM: The Promise of Urban Science http://www.pppl.gov/events/colloquium-promise-urban-science

For the first time in history, more than half of the world's population lives in urban areas; by mid-century, 70 percent of the

468

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

469

NNSA, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

470

US, Netherlands Expand Partnership to Secure Radiological Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expand Partnership to Secure Radiological Materials Worldwide | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

471

Health Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

version Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr NNSA Blog October 2013 (1) September 2013 (18) August 2013 (17) July 2013 (20) June 2013 (19) May 2013 (25) April 2013 (17) March 2013...

472

Emergency, Fire Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency, Fire Information Emergency, Fire Information Emergency, Fire Information Protecting our people, emergency personnel, national security information, facilities, lands, and neighboring communities. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Email LANL Update (505) 667-6622 or (877) 723-4101 toll-free Emergency Public Information In the event of an emergency, Los Alamos National Laboratory will provide you with needed information here as it becomes available. The Los Alamos Site Office/Los Alamos National Laboratory Emergency Public Information Plan provides a framework for coordinated, accurate, and timely release of information to Laboratory employees, the news media, potentially affected members of the public, and other stakeholders. Want emergency news emailed to you? Subscribe here.

473

Emergency Management Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM Forum The Oak Ridge Emergency Management Forum is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) and Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA). Each...

474

Online Monitoring And Determination Of Environmental Dose Rate, Using Radiological Network In Albania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From May 2004, in the Institute of Nuclear Physics is installed Albanian Radiological Monitoring Network, in the framework of emergency monitoring in the territory of Albania. In this network, this is unique monitoring on-line system in our country. are included 5(five) monitoring stations, respectively in Tirane, Shkoder, Kukes, Korce and Vlore. The last four stations are near Albanian borders The network performs measures of ambient dose rate in a range from 5 nSv/h up to 10 Sv/h. For measurements are used detector of type VACUTEC 70045 A, which are calibrated in the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, University of Tirana, using standard radiation source Cs-137. This monitoring help to warn in real time the relative authorities, in case of radiological accidents of 5th degree (for example accidents in nuclear power plants, near Albanian territory).

Telhaj, Ervis [Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana (Albania); Deda, Antoneta [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana (Albania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

475

Emergency Medical Coordination Memorandum of Agreement at Brookhaven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and effective response, including specific procedures for receipt of victims of radiation accidents. Emergency Medical Coordination Memorandum of Agreement at Brookhaven...

476

DOE O 151.1C, Comprehensive Emergency Management System  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes policy and assigns roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System. Cancels DOE O 151.1B.

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

477

Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response actions.This memorandum clarifies that the previous guidance remains...

478

PL 107-117 Department of Defense and Emergency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from PL 107-117 Department of Defense and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

479

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible OptaComp will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

Weston, Ken

480

Emergent gravity in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reconsider monolayer graphene in the presence of elastic deformations. It is described by the tight - binding model with varying hopping parameters. We demonstrate, that the fermionic quasiparticles propagate in the emergent 2D Weitzenbock geometry and in the presence of the emergent U(1) gauge field. Both emergent geometry and the gauge field are defined by the elastic deformation of graphene.

M. A. Zubkov; G. E. Volovik

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z