National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for radiological emergency response

  1. Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-06-27

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Supersedes DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

  2. TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training (MERRTT) | Department of Energy Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge

  3. Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response. Provides information and resources concerning the development of Operational Guidelines as part of planning guidance for protection and recovery following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and/or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents. Operational Guidelines Technical (OGT) Manual, 2009 RESRAD-RDD Complementing Software to OGT Manual EPA Protective Action Guidelines (2013), Interim Final Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC)

  4. Emergency Response Planning for Radiological Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Allison, T.; Kamboj, S.; Chen, S.Y.

    2006-07-01

    The emergency management planning tool RISK-RDD was developed to aid emergency response planners and decision makers at all levels of government to better understand and prepare for potential problems related to a radiological release, especially those in urban areas. Radioactive release scenarios were studied by using the RISK-RDD radiological emergency management program. The scenarios were selected to investigate the key aspects of radiological risk management not always considered in emergency planning as a whole. These aspects include the evaluation of both aerosolized and non-aerosolized components of an atmospheric release, methods of release, acute and chronic human health risks, and the concomitant economic impacts as a function of the risk-based cleanup level. (authors)

  5. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  6. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANL

    2008-05-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  7. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  8. Nation's Radiological Assistance Program teams practice emergency response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Nation's Radiological Assistance Program teams practice emergency response Thursday, March 31, 2016 - 11:05am NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) teams from around the country gathered in Albuquerque in late March as part of RAP Training for Emergency Response (RAPTER). This training consists of an intensive series of drills conducted four times a year to provide recertification for members of Department of Energy (DOE)/National

  9. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  10. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  11. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken placeĖtechniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportationĖthe so-called second line of defense.

  12. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  13. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  14. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  15. NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in Vienna August 01, 2013 ... Radiological Assistance Program Training for Emergency Response Advanced ...

  16. Nation's Radiological Assistance Program teams practice emergency...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Blog Nation's Radiological Assistance Program teams practice emergency response ... of Department of Energy (DOE)National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) nuclear ...

  17. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

  18. Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.; Bowman, David R.; Remick, Alan

    2012-05-01

    The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSAís role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

  19. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  20. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  1. NNSA, NATO Conduct Emergency Response Training in the Czech Republic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA, NATO Conduct Emergency Response Training in the Czech Republic June 04, 2014 ... Radiological Assistance Program Training for Emergency Response (I-RAPTER) course ...

  2. radiological response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home radiological response radiological response Fukushima: Five Years Later After the March 11, 2011, Japan earthquake, tsunami, ...

  3. Emergency Response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    It is providing direct emergency management assistance to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Argentina, Armenia, Brazil, China,...

  4. emergency response assets | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    emergency response assets Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal asset available on request by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. The FRMAC is an interagency organization with representation... Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site NNSA's Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site (REAC/TS)

  5. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  6. About Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Emergency Response About Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a

  7. Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Programs Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last line of defense in the

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  9. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents This part should...

  10. Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Emergency Response Department of Energy's chief risk officer visits Nevada National Security Site Earlier this month, Associate Deputy Secretary John MacWilliams visited the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in his role as Chief Risk Officer for the Department of Energy. He reviewed the various ways the NNSS contributes to the department's and NNSA's missions, including radiological... NNSA sites prepared for disasters using real-time response management system Pantex Emergency Services now

  11. Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    An emergency response to a disaster is complex, requiring the rapid integration, coordination, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and non-governmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions into a unified community response. For example, a community¬ís response actions to a fixed site hazardous materials incident could occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Response actions are directed and controlled by local governments and agencies situated withinmore¬†¬Ľ the response area, as well as by state and federal operaticns centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protective action decision-making process is greatly compressed. The response community must carefully plan and coordinate response operations in order to have confidence that they will be effectively implemented when faced with the potentially catastrophic nature of such releases. A graphical depiction of the entire response process via an emergency response synchronization matrix is an effective tool in optimizing the planning, exercising, and implementation of emergency plans. This system¬óbased approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time in relation to hazard actions. It provides the opportunity to make real¬ótime adjustments as necessary for maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. A response must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization.¬ę¬†less

  12. emergency response assets

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Radiological Assistance Program http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorismrespondingtoemergenciesfirstresponders-0

  13. radiological emergency | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    emergency NNSA administrator visits NNSS to meet team, see national security work Last month, Department of Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) visited NNSA's Nevada Field Office where he hosted an all-hands for NNSA-Nevada staff and presented several service awards. During the trip he visited the NNSA... NNSA to Participate in Aerial Radiation Training Exercise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - On March 21 through

  14. LPG emergency response training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dix, R.B.; Newton, B.

    1995-12-31

    ROVER (Roll Over Vehicle for Emergency Response) is a specially designed and constructed unit built to allow emergency response personnel and LPG industry employees to get ``up close and personal`` with the type of equipment used for the highway transportation of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This trailer was constructed to simulate an MC 331 LPG trailer. It has all the valves, piping and emergency fittings found on highway tankers. What makes this unit different is that it rolls over and opens up to allow program attendees to climb inside the trailer and see it in a way they have never seen one before. The half-day training session is composed of a classroom portion during which attendees will participate in a discussion of hazardous material safety, cargo tank identification and construction. The specific properties of LPG, and the correct procedures for dealing with an LPG emergency. Attendees will then move outside to ROVER, where they will participate in a walkaround inspection of the rolled over unit. All fittings and piping will be representative of both modern and older equipment. Participants will also be able to climb inside the unit through a specially constructed hatch to view cutaway valves and interior construction. While the possibility of an LPG emergency remains remote, ROVER represents Amoco`s continuing commitment to community, education, and safety.

  15. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) December 01, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. NNSA provides technical support to the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Defense for nuclear terrorism events and domestic nuclear weapon accidents and incidents. The NNSA emergency response assets also provide support to nuclear site and facility accidents and

  16. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) January 01, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has more than 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents. NNSA provides technical support to the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, State, and Defense for nuclear terrorism events and domestic nuclear weapon accidents and incidents. The NNSA emergency response assets also provide support to nuclear site and facility accidents and

  17. DOE/NV/11718-036 UC-700 FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE UNITED STATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11718-036 UC-700 FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE UNITED STATES by Daryl J. Thomé Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 89193-8521 Bruce W. Hurley, Ph.D. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 89193 ABSTRACT The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) to coordinate all off-site radiological response

  18. Emergency response training draws professionals from two states

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two States CARLSBAD, N.M., January 31, 2000 - Emergency response professionals from Oregon and Texas will be in Carlsbad Feb. 1-2 to learn how to handle potential accidents involving radioactive and hazardous materials. The course, titled "Train-The-Trainer: First Responder Radiological Transportation Emergency Course," is taught by members of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Emergency Responder Training Team. It provides emergency response professionals with the tools to teach

  19. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law Enforcement and ... Administration's (NNSA) Alarm Response Training (ART) program for local law enforcement ...

  20. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law Enforcement and ... This week marks the fifth anniversary of NNSA's Alarm Response Training (ART) program for ...

  1. Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of defense in the event of a nuclear terrorist incident or other types of radiological accident Learn More Planning for Emergencies Exercise Program Field Assistance and Oversight ...

  2. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA NuclearRadiological Incident Response December 01, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to ...

  3. Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incidents | Department of Energy Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by the government to develop new methods to reduce the consequence of potential radiological incidents. This is evident in the enhancement of technologies and methods to

  4. Emergency Response Training Draws Professionals From Seven States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seven States CARLSBAD, N.M., August 18, 2000 - Emergency response professionals from Arizona, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas will be in Carlsbad Aug. 23-25 to learn how to handle potential accidents involving radioactive and hazardous materials. The course, titled "Train-The-Trainer: First Responder Radiological Transportation Emergency Course," is taught by members of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Emergency Responder Training Team. The

  5. Emergency Response Exercise | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparedness Emergency Preparedness ISER is responsible for coordinating the protection of critical energy assets and assisting Federal, State, and local governments with disruption preparation, response, and mitigation in support of Presidential Policy Directive 8. DOE (through ISER) is the lead office for executing the Emergency Support Function 12 Energy (ESF-12) mission. This mission is outlined in the National Response Framework (NRF), and it facilitates the assessment, reporting, and

  6. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, R., Pemberton, W., Beal, W.

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

  7. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2013-05-28

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-07-12

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

  10. WIPP Receives New Emergency Response Vehicle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 19, 2015 WIPP Receives New Emergency Response Vehicle WIPP recently placed a new emergency response vehicle into service. The new fire engine "Engine 24" will enhance...

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment August 4, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 The public is invited to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment that the U.S. Department of Energy has published for a proposed radiological response training range at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). At the range, INL

  12. 3510T1 Emergency Response Protocol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    510 Appendix T1 Emergency Response Protocol 1.0 Purpose This emergency response procedure is used by everyone at Jefferson Lab as the basis for response during an emergency situation in the absence of management direction. By their very nature, emergencies pose unique challenges, Jefferson Lab recognizes that listing the requirements for every possible emergency is prohibitive, but has used identified plausible situations to produce this guidance. For general lab-wide emergency procedures: 2.0

  13. Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Activities |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Activities Waiver of the Bi-Weekly Pay L:imitation for Emergency Response Activities Heads of Departmental elements, with the concurrence of their servicing Human Resources staff, are authorized to waive the bi-weekly pay limitation for employees engaged in emergency response activities that include, but are not limited to, disaster relief assistance, radiological assistance, and terrorist attacks. This

  14. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Enforcement and First Responders across the Country | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law Enforcement and First Responders across the Country February 10, 2014 This week marks the fifth anniversary of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Alarm Response Training (ART) program for local law enforcement and other critical first responders around the country. In the five

  15. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Enforcement and First Responders Across the Country | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law Enforcement and First Responders Across the Country Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 3:00pm This week marks the fifth anniversary of NNSA's Alarm Response Training (ART) program for local law enforcement and other critical first responders around the country. In the five years of providing this course, NNSA has trained

  16. Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    States may or may not elect to fund emergency management activities with AIP money. If they do, the AIP should include an Emergency Management section. This section may be implemented at any time ‚ÄĒ...

  17. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012.pdf (3.86 MB) More Documents & Publications IEA Response ...

  18. ORISE: Helping Strengthen Emergency Response Capabilities for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps strengthen government agencies' emergency response capabilities through a variety of exercises, from tabletop training to...

  19. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decision making...

  20. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas.

  1. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or ...

  2. Impact of Nuclear Medicine on Emergency Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February ¬Ľ Impact of Nuclear Medicine on Emergency Response Impact of Nuclear Medicine on Emergency Response WHEN: Feb 26, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Courtyard Marriott, Santa Fe CONTACT: Evelyn Mullen (505) 665-7576 CATEGORY: Community TYPE: Meeting INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description A number of novel isotopes and associated drug compounds are being developed, both in the US and elsewhere, for diagnosis and therapy in the field of nuclear medicine. The accelerator at Los Alamos is

  3. Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. C. Nielsen

    2006-01-01

    During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

  4. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS

  5. About Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in the event of a nuclear terrorist incident or other types of radiological accident. ... material if some type of terrorist event or natural occurring event or accident. ...

  6. Drill Program Ensures Emergency Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Preparedness As part of its Corrective Action Plans in response to the Accident Investigation Board reports for the February fire and radiological events, the WIPP ...

  7. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  8. Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's premier first-response resource in assessing an emergency situation and advising decision-makers on further steps to take to evaluate and minimize the hazards of a radiological incident. RAP provides resources (trained personnel and equipment) to evaluate, assess, advise, isotopically identify, search for, and assist in the mitigation of actual or perceived nuclear or radiological

  9. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  10. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-06-24

    This article presents the experimental work performed in the area of neutron detector development at the Remote Sensing Laboratory‚ÄďAndrews Operations (RSL-AO) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the last four years. During the 1950s neutron detectors were developed mostly to characterize nuclear reactors where the neutron flux is high. Due to the indirect nature of neutron detection via interaction with other particles, neutron counting and neutron energy measurements have never been as precise as gamma-ray counting measurements and gamma-ray spectroscopy. This indirect nature is intrinsic to all neutron measurement endeavors (except perhaps for neutron spin-related experiments, viz. neutron spin-echo measurements where one obtains őľeV energy resolution). In emergency response situations generally the count rates are low, and neutrons may be scattered around in inhomogeneous intervening materials. It is also true that neutron sensors are most efficient for the lowest energy neutrons, so it is not as easy to detect and count energetic neutrons. Most of the emergency response neutron detectors are offshoots of nuclear device diagnostics tools and special nuclear materials characterization equipment, because that is what is available commercially. These instruments mostly are laboratory equipment, and not field-deployable gear suited for mobile teams. Our goal is to design and prototype field-deployable, ruggedized, lightweight, efficient neutron detectors.

  11. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

  12. Code System for Emergency Response Dose Assessment.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-16

    Version: 00 A dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Dose pathways represented in the model are those that are most likely to be important during and immediately following a release (hours) rather than over an extended time frame (days or weeks). The doses computed include: external dose resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides in the air and deposited on the ground, internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation, and total whole-body dose. Threemore¬†¬Ľ preprocessors are included. RSFPREP generates the MESORAD run specification (input) file, METWR creates the meteorological data file, and RELPREP prepares the release definition file. PRNT is a postprocessor for generating printer or screen-compatible output. All four programs run interactively. MESORAD was developed from version 2.0 of the MESOI atmospheric dispersion model (NESC 9862) retaining its modular nature.¬ę¬†less

  13. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  14. Jefferson Lab to Conduct Emergency Response Exercise | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Conduct Emergency Response Exercise Jefferson Lab to Conduct Emergency Response Exercise on Aug. 9 NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Aug. 9, 2016 - Today, City of Newport News first responders and staff at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will participate in an emergency response exercise. The objective of the exercise is to provide a training opportunity for members of the lab community and for Newport News emergency responders. Local fire department personnel plan to participate in the

  15. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this responsemore¬†¬Ľ time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.¬ę¬†less

  16. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

  17. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Accident Response Group (ARG) - The ARG response element is comprised of scientists, ... equipment ready for short-notice dispatch to the scene of a U.S. nuclear weapon accident. ...

  18. Variable Voltage Substation Electric Fire and Emergency Response |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Variable Voltage Substation Electric Fire and Emergency Response Variable Voltage Substation Electric Fire and Emergency Response Question from Participant: My question is from an emergency response perspective. It was stated that it took ~ ¬Ĺ for electricians to de-energize the electrical components before firefighters were allowed in to fight the fire. This delay causes more damage to equipment and potential propagation of the fire. Is there not a "master"

  19. Radiological Control

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-06-16

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs.

  20. Independent Oversight Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 26, 2003 The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted a review of emergency response plans and performance at DOE ...

  1. WIPP Hosts Fire Protection and Emergency Response Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 6, 2015 WIPP Hosts Fire Protection and Emergency Response Workshop Fire protection experts from the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), the...

  2. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-05

    Neutron detectors are utilized in a myriad of applications‚ÄĒfrom safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutronmore¬†¬Ľ detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Finally, modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.¬ę¬†less

  3. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-05

    Neutron detectors are utilized in a myriad of applications‚ÄĒfrom safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutron detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Finally, modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-12-02

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and requirements for the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), as set forth in the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  5. Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy March 2002 Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................... 1 2.0 OVERVIEW OF RESULTS ........................................................ 3 3.0 DISCUSSION OF RESULTS ...................................................... 5 3.1 Emergency Response Programs, Plans, and Procedures

  6. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) / Radiological Advisory Team NRAT Logo NNSA's Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team (NRAT) provides an emergency response capability for on-scene scientific and technical advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA follow-on assets as needed. The NRAT is composed of scientists and technicians who can provide advice or conduct limited

  7. Radiological Security Partnership | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | (NNSA) Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's premier first-response resource in assessing an emergency situation and advising decision-makers on further steps to take to evaluate and minimize the hazards of a radiological incident. RAP provides resources (trained personnel and equipment) to evaluate, assess, advise, isotopically identify, search for, and assist in the mitigation of actual or perceived nuclear or radiological

  8. FRMAC Interactions During a Radiological or Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C T

    2011-01-27

    During a radiological or nuclear event of national significance the Federal Radiological Emergency Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) assists federal, state, tribal, and local authorities by providing timely, high-quality predictions, measurements, analyses and assessments to promote efficient and effective emergency response for protection of the public and the environment from the consequences of such an event.

  9. DOE Launches Emergency Response Hydrogen Training Resource

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office announces the launch of a new, free, online national hydrogen safety training resource for emergency responders that provides a single repository of credible and reliable information related to hydrogen and fuel cells that is current and accurate and eliminates duplicative efforts among various training programs.

  10. A Simulation Learning Approach to Training First Responders for Radiological Emergencies ? A Continuation of Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, Joe E; Cross, Butch; Sanders, Robert Lon

    2008-01-01

    Real-time gaming engines, such as Epic Game's Unreal Engine[1], provide an excellent resource as a training environment. These engines provide an alternate reality that can accurately depict not only real world geometry, but they can also achieve realistic physical effects such as radiation fields and blast physics. The real time photorealistic graphics available through the Unreal Engine add to its applicability to this project's needs. Moreover, this engine provides a very efficient means to modify the game's physics modeling, visual effects, and game play structure to fit the ever-evolving needs of a training curriculum. To this end, we have worked to extend the Unreal Engine to incorporate radiation effects dependent on distance from a radiological source, similar to what one would experience in the real world. In order to help better prepare first responders for using the radiological detection equipment vital for mission success, we have continued work, previously described by Sanders and Rhodes [2], on a Geiger counter readout display being implemented and added to the interface's Heads Up Display (HUD) as well as incorporating a physically accurate model within the engine that will allow the first responder to acclimate themselves to the sounds and possible size of the device. Moreover, the Karma Physics Engine, which works in conjunction with the Unreal Engine 2, accurately simulates fluid physics, blast effects, and basic player movements. It is this physics engine that has been the focus of our continued efforts and has been extended to include realistic modeling of radiological effects.

  11. Analysis of offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. Evaluation of radiological materials, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.; Daugherty, N.M.; Smith, M.L.; Bunch, D.; Toresdahl, J.; Verholek, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this report is to fully document technical data and information that have been developed to support offsite emergency planning by the State of Colorado for potential accidents at the Rocky Flats Plant. Specifically, this report documents information and data that will assist the State of Colorado in upgrading its radiological emergency planning zones for Rocky Flats Plant. The Colorado Division of Disaster Emergency Services (DODES) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) represent the primary audience for this report. The secondary audience for this document includes the Rocky Flats Plant; federal, State, and local governmental agencies; the scientific community; and the interested public. Because the primary audience has a pre-existing background on the subject, this report assumes some exposure to emergency planning, health physics, and dispersion modeling on the part of the reader. The authors have limited their assumptions of background knowledge as much as possible, recognizing that the topics addressed in the report may be new to some secondary audiences.

  12. NNSA emergency response assets highlighted | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    disasters using real-time response management system DC Survey 2013 NNSA displays helicopter in Baltimore NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Boston April 17-20

  13. ORISE: REAC/TS Emergency Response Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management of radiation incidents. Our response teams are equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment that can be transported to a site or used in our unique facility in...

  14. NNSA Officials Observe Russian Nuclear Emergency Response Exercise...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The exercise, which took place at a shipyard near Murmansk in late July, was intended to test the preparedness of Russian emergency response forces to mitigate the effects of a ...

  15. ORISE: REAC/TS Provides Emergency Medical Response Expertise...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How ORISE is Making a Difference REACTS Provides Emergency Medical Response Expertise to Empire 09 Albany, N.Y. The Empire 09 exercise was held in Albany, N.Y. Medical and health...

  16. NNSA hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    partnership | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response partnership Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 3:17pm NNSA hosted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - a core partner of the agency's global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts - to discuss cooperative efforts in emergency preparedness and response. Early in their visit, IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Division of

  17. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  18. Establishing remediation levels in response to a radiological dispersal event (or dirty bomb).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Klemic, G. A.; Taboas, A. L.; Environmental Assessment; Environmental Measurements Lab.; DOE-CH

    2004-05-01

    The detonation of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) could produce significant social and economic damage, the extent of which would depend largely on how quickly and effectively cleanup levels were established and on public acceptance of those levels. This paper shows that current radiological cleanup laws and regulations, models for converting dose or risk goals to cleanup concentrations, and existing site-specific criteria were not designed specifically for RDD cleanups but, absent changes, would apply by default. The goals and approaches of these legal and methodological structures often conflict; using them in response to terrorism could undermine public confidence, cause delays, and produce unnecessary costs or unacceptable cleanups. RDD cleanups would involve immediate priorities not envisioned in the existing radiological cleanup framework, such as balancing radiation risks with the health, economic, and other societal impacts associated with access to the infrastructure necessary to sustain society (e.g., hospitals, bridges, utilities). To minimize the achievement of terrorism goals, the elements of an RDD cleanup response -- including updating existing legal/regulatory structures to clarify federal authority, goals, and methods for developing RDD cleanup criteria -- must be in place soon; given the complexity of the issues and the potential societal impact, this effort should be expedited.

  19. Emerging Threats and Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last line of defense in the event of

  20. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency's Use of Geographic Information Systems for Nuclear Emergency Response Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. L. Guber

    2001-06-01

    The U.S, Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) provides Geographic Information System (GIS) support during nuclear emergency response activities. As directed by the NNSA, the RSL GIS staff maintains databases and equipment for rapid field deployment during an emergency response. When on location, GIS operators provide information products to on-site emergency managers as well as to emergency managers at the DOE Headquarters (HQ) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, D.C. Data products are derived from multiple information sources in the field including radiological prediction models, field measurements taken on the ground and from the air, and pertinent information researched on the Internet. The GIS functions as a central data hub where it supplies the information to response elements in the field, as well as to headquarters officials at HQ during emergency response activities.

  1. Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Response Responding to Emergencies emergency response logo NNSA serves as the premier technical leader in responding to and successfully resolving nuclear and radiological threats worldwide. When the need arises, NNSA is prepared to respond immediately to any type of nuclear or radiological accident or incident. Part of NNSA's mission is to protect the public, environment, and emergency responders from both terrorist and non-terrorist events by providing a responsive, flexible,

  2. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) overview of FRMAC operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response plan (FRERP). This cooperative effort will assure the designated Lead Federal Agency (LFA) and the state(s) that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. The mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Operations describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas. These off-site areas may include one or more affected states.

  3. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, John A.

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  4. Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Irene | Department of Energy Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene August 26, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall at approximately 7:30 am EDT near Cape Lookout, North Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (Category 1). This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image captures Irene√ʬĬôs landfall moment. | Image courtesy of NOAA Hurricane Irene made landfall at approximately 7:30

  5. Los Alamos Field Office Emergency Public Information | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Los Alamos Field Office Emergency Public Information Los Alamos Field Office Emergency Public Information DOE NNSA Accident Response Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) Accident Response Group (ARG) Emergency Response DOE NNSA Fissile Material Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Nuclear Emergency Support Team (NEST) Nuclear Weapons Guide Office of Secure Transportation Plutonium Fact Sheet

  6. USE OF THE AERIAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEM HELICOPTER EMERGENCY RESPONSE ACQUISITION SYSTEMS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE SOIL REMEDIATION - [11504

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROCK CT

    2011-02-15

    The Aerial Measurement System (AMS) Helicopter Emergency Response Acquisition System provides a thorough and economical means to identify and characterize the contaminants for large area radiological surveys. The helicopter system can provide a 100-percent survey of an area that qualifies as a scoping survey under the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) methodology. If the sensitivity is adequate when compared to the clean up values, it may also be used for the characterization survey. The data from the helicopter survey can be displayed and manipulated to provide invaluable data during remediation activities.

  7. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members

  8. Current Domain Challenges in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Burtner, Edwin R.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2011-05-08

    This paper describes the development of a framework targeted to technology providers in order to better understand the grand domain challenges of the emergency response and management community (EM). In developing this framework, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain and corroborated these findings with current literature. We are currently examining relationships and dependencies within the framework. A thorough understanding of these gaps and dependencies will allow for a more informed approach prioritizing research, developing tools, and applying technology to enhance performance in the EM community.

  9. Microsoft Word - Appendix H - Emergency Response Plan for Dams...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Flow Charts Appendix G Potential Problems and Emergency Actions Appendix H Emergency ... boundary should be considered as a minimum for evacuation planning purposes. ...

  10. Radiological Assistance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  11. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  12. Evaluation of Rugged Wireless Mesh Nodes for Use In Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L Young; Alan M Snyder

    2007-11-01

    During the summer of 2007, engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted a two-day evaluation of commercially available battery powered, wireless, self-forming mesh nodes for use in emergency response. In this paper, the author describes the fundamentals of this emerging technology, applciations for emergency response and specific results of the technology evaluation conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  13. Emergency planning | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programs Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last line of defense in the

  14. Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Response / Training Emergency Operations Training Academy Rotating image showing pictures of Classroom, Online and Hands on trainings The Office of Emergency Operations, NA-40-The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) EOTA provides training and education to enhance the readiness of personnel in the radiological-nuclear emergency operations community. For more information or to contact us, visit the EOTA website at: http://eota.energy.gov/ Vision The Emergency

  15. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also

  16. Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. ‚Äď For the first time, a program led by EM‚Äôs Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE for response to potential radiological incidents joined an exercise to test national readiness for such an event.

  17. United States Showcases Nuclear Emergency Response Capabilities | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind Speed at 90 m 10-JAN-2011 1.1.1 Wind Speed at 90 m m/s 11.5 - 12.0 11.0 - 11.5 10.5 - 11.0 10.0 - 10.5 9.5 - 10.0 9.0 - 9.5 8.5 - 9.0 8.0 - 8.5 7.5 - 8.0 7.0 - 7.5 6.5 - 7.0 6.0 - 6.5 0.0 - 6.0 mph 25.7 - 26.8 24.6 - 25.7 23.5 - 24.6 22.4 - 23.5 21.3 - 22.4 20.1 - 21.3 19.0 - 20.1 17.9 - 19.0 16.8 - 17.9 15.7 - 16.8 14.5 - 15.7 13.4 - 14.5 0.0 - 13.4 Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    Showcases Nuclear Emergency Response Capabilities October 17, 2008 AVILA, Spain -

  18. Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Good, D.E.

    1996-04-16

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

  19. ORISE: REAC/TS a Key Part of IAEA's Response Assistance Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is to strengthen the IAEA's ability to provide assistance and advice, as well as promote emergency preparedness and response capabilities for radiological incidents among IAEA...

  20. ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to mass casualties that may involve radiological injuries. The interactive, two-hour training, titled Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical Response to Mass Casualties...

  1. Review of the Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Materials Program Emergency Plan describes and identifies the mechanisms for integrating local agencies and other external organizations. These include policy letters and ...

  2. Review of the Headquarters Facilities Emergency Response Plans

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... For example, the OEPs require supervisors to report to security any problems with ... resolved and is using the occupant emergency planning team to help prioritize this list and ...

  3. Determination of Radiation Energy Response for Thermoluminescent Dosimeter TLD-100: Determination of Organ Dose in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deda, Antoneta; Telhaj, Ervis

    2009-04-19

    TLD-100 (thermoluminescent dosimeter) cards (chips) were calibrated using X-rays with energies of 25-250 kV produced by a Cs-137 source. The energy responses of lithium fluoride crystals for different energies of X-rays were studied. QA/QC was then performed in the Albanian Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory. Based on the QA/QC results, the chips were used to study the doses to different organs in diagnostic radiology. Organ dose was evaluated after calculation of e dose in air (Kair), using an ionizing chamber.

  4. U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  5. WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste

  6. Evaluation of an emergency response model for the Rocky Flats Plant: Charter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This Charter provides a basis for a cooperative, interagency effort to evaluate the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code for emergency response and emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant. This document establishes the foundation for the project entitled, Evaluation of an Emergency Response Model for the Rocky Flats Plant'' (to be referred to as the Project). This document meets the following objectives: Identify the Project; establish the project management structure, organizational responsibilities, and organizational commitments for reaching the goals of the Project, and identify a process for model revision and revelation for acceptance. 2 figs.

  7. DOE and State Organizations Update Important Agreement on Coordinating a Unified Response to Energy Emergencies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz last week signed an updated Energy Emergency Assurance Coordinators (EEAC) Agreement with the National Association of State Energy Officials, National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, National Governors Association, and the National Emergency Management Association. Updating the EEAC Agreement is a critical step in helping the Federal Government and States work together to provide a unified response to energy emergencies. The updated EEAC Agreement lays out concrete items to improve our collective ability to share information, which is essential for making sound response and restoration decisions during emergencies.

  8. Program development to identify and characterize potential emergency situations at a petroleum refinery and determination of industrial hygiene emergency responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oransky, J.J.; Delp, S.N.; Deppen, E.A.; Barrett, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the modern world the field of industrial hygiene continues to grow beyond the traditional definition of the profession. This case study documents the problem solving approach used to identify potential exposures and evaluate industrial hygiene preparedness to handle emergencies due to fire or major spill at a complex multi-process petroleum refinery. In the recent past an environmental engineer and industrial hygiene consulting firm was retained by a mature, multi-process petroleum refinery to assist in the program development to identify and characterize potential emergency situations due to a fire, major release, or spill. This study would assist the refinery in compliance with the process safety and emergency response standards and to protect refinery operations and fire fighting personnel by minimizing potential exposures and risk when responding to such a major incident.

  9. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K.E.

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  10. Emergency Public Information | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) Response / Training Emergency Operations Training Academy Rotating image showing pictures of Classroom, Online and Hands on trainings The Office of Emergency Operations, NA-40-The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) EOTA provides training and education to enhance the readiness of personnel in the radiological-nuclear emergency operations community. For more information or to contact us, visit the EOTA website at: http://eota.energy.gov/ Vision The Emergency

  11. NNSA to Showcase Emergency Response Assets in Baltimore | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Established by Congress in 2000, NNSA is a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy responsible for enhancing national security through the military application ...

  12. Review of the Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, April 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independent Oversight Review of the Emergency Response Organization at the Los Alamos National Laboratory April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0

  13. Detection and monitoring of air emissions and emergency response planning within three geographic areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report gives the results of air emissions and emergency response planning in the following areas: Baton Rouge/New Orleans; Philadelphia/Wilmington/South Jersey; and Niagara Falls/Buffalo.

  14. Independent Oversight Review of DOE Headquarters Emergency Response Plans and Performance, March 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of Energy’s Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted a review of emergency response plans and performance at DOE Headquarters (HQ) in February 2003.

  15. Business Responses to Climate Change. Identifying Emergent Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2005-07-01

    Companies face much uncertainty about the competitive effects of the recently adopted Kyoto Protocol on global climate change and the current and future regulations that may emerge from it. Companies have considerable discretion to explore different market strategies to address global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article examines these strategic options by reviewing the market-oriented actions that are currently being taken by 136 large companies that are part of the Global 500. There are six different market strategies that companies use to address climate change and that consist of different combinations of the market components available to managers. Managers can choose between more emphasis on improvements in their business activities through innovation or employ compensatory approaches such as emissions trading. They can either act by themselves or work with other companies, NGOs, or (local) governments.

  16. WIPP Instructors to Provide Specialized Training For Indiana Emergency Response Professionals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indiana Emergency Response Professionals CARLSBAD, N.M., January 25, 2001 - Trainers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be in Indianapolis, Indiana, January 29-30 and February 1-2 to teach emergency response professionals what to do should they arrive at an accident involving a WIPP shipment. Transuranic radioactive waste shipments from DOE's Battelle Columbus Laboratories in Columbus, Ohio, are tentatively scheduled to begin in 2002. Trucks coming

  17. Milepost locations in rural emergency response : the missing piece.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Hillary Minich

    2004-06-01

    An incident location must be translated into an address that responders can find on the ground. In populated areas it's street name and address number. For sparsely populated areas or highways it's typically road name and nearest milepost number. This is paired with road intersection information to help responders approach the incident as quickly and safely as possible. If responders are new to the area, or for cross-country response, more assistance is needed. If dispatchers had mileposts as points on their maps they could provide this assistance as well as vital information to public safety authorities as the incident unfolds. Mileposts are already universally understood and used. The missing rural response piece is to get milepost locations onto dispatch and control center screens.

  18. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

    2012-03-20

    This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

  19. SU-E-P-57: Radiation Doses Assessment to Paediatric Patients for Some Digital Diagnostic Radiology Examination in Emergency Department in Qatar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdallah, I; Aly, A; Al Naemi, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation doses to pediatric patients undergoing standard radiographic examinations using Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) in Paediatric emergency center of Hamad General Hospital (HGH) in state of Qatar and compared with regional and international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs). Methods: Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was measured for 2739 patients for two common X-ray examinations namely: Chest AP/PA, Abdomen. Exposure factors such as kV, mAs and Focal to Skin Distance (FSD) were recorded for each patient. Tube Output was measured for a range of selected kV values. ESD for each individual patient was calculated using the tube output and the technical exposure factors for each examination. The ESD values were compared with the some international Dose Reference Levels (DRL) for all types of examinations. Results: The most performed procedure during the time of this study was chest PA/PA (85%). The mean ESD values obtained from AP chest, PA chest and AP abdomen ranged 91‚Äď120, 80‚Äď84 and 209 ‚Äď 659 ¬ĶGy per radiograph for different age‚Äôs groups respectively. Two protocols have been used for chest AP and PA using different radiological parameters, and the different of ESD values for chest PA and were 41% for 1 years old child, 57% for 5 years old for chest AP. Conclusion: The mean ESD were compared with those found in literature and were found to be comparable. The radiation dose can be reduced more for Chest AP and PA examination by optimization of each investigation and hence more studies are required for this task. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving local reference doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in this local department and hence it can be applied in the whole Qatar.

  20. radiological. survey

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  1. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-11-09

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

  2. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE CAPABILITIES FOR CONDUCTING INGESTION PATHWAY CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENTS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-11

    Potential airborne releases of radioactivity from facilities operated for the U. S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site could pose significant consequences to the public through the ingestion pathway. The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a suite of technologies needed to conduct assessments of ingestion dose during emergency response, enabling emergency manager at SRS to develop initial protective action recommendation for state agencies early in the response and to make informed decisions on activation of additional Federal assets that would be needed to support long-term monitoring and assessment activities.

  3. Emergency Response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en International Programs http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorisminternationalprograms

  4. Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Radiological Triage Triage Logo NNSA's Triage is a non-deployable, secure, on-line capability that provides remote support to emergency responders in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency. Triage has on-call scientists available 24 hours a day to analyze site-specific data and confirm radioisotope identification in the event of a radiological incident. The data is transmitted through the Triage website or provided over the telephone. Triage is an integrated system that is comprised of

  5. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  6. Work Scope for Developing Standards for Emergency Preparedness and Response: Fiscal Year 2004 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2005-09-28

    Summarizes the fiscal year 2004 work completed on PNNL's Department of Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response Standards Development Project. Also, the report includes key draft standards, in various stages of development and publication, that were associated with various tasks of the fiscal year 2004 scope of the project.

  7. ORISE: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REAC/TS Capabilities Overview Emergency Response Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Continuing Medical Education How ORISE is Making a Difference Overview CBL International Exercise Emergency Response Training International Training RANET Asset Resources Overview Frequently Asked Questions about Radiation Understanding Radiation Video Series The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents Dose Estimates and Compendia Procedure Demonstrations for Contaminated Patients

  8. Radiological Control

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION ... DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical ...

  9. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  10. Web-based emergency response exercise management systems and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goforth, John W.; Mercer, Michael B.; Heath, Zach; Yang, Lynn I.

    2014-09-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for simulating portions of an emergency response exercise includes generating situational awareness outputs associated with a simulated emergency and sending the situational awareness outputs to a plurality of output devices. Also, the method includes outputting to a user device a plurality of decisions associated with the situational awareness outputs at a decision point, receiving a selection of one of the decisions from the user device, generating new situational awareness outputs based on the selected decision, and repeating the sending, outputting and receiving steps based on the new situational awareness outputs. Other methods, systems, and computer program products are included according to other embodiments of the invention.

  11. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program Tom Clawson TEPP Contractor tom@trgroupinc.com Brief TEPP History Brief TEPP History * In 1988, identified need to address emergency preparedness concerns of DOE emergency preparedness concerns of DOE radiological shipments bl h d * EM established in 1989 - Identified need for responder training along all transportation corridors as key to EM mission - TEPP incorporated into DOE Order 151.1, with responsibility assigned to EM * WIPP adopted the the TEPP

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  13. Emergency Plan | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Emergency Operations Training Academy Emergency Operations Training Academy The Office of Emergency Operations, NA-40-The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) EOTA provides training and education to enhance the readiness of personnel in the radiological-nuclear emergency operations community. For more information or to contact us, visit the EOTA website at

    Emergency Plan Emergency

  14. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  15. Learn More About NNSA's Emergency Operations Office | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Emergency Response Learn More About NNSA's Emergency Operations Office NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier responder to any nuclear or radiological incident within the United States or abroad and provides operational planning and training to counter both domestic and international nuclear terrorism. NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond

  16. Biosafety Practices and Emergency Response at the Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank F. Roberto; Dina M. Matz

    2008-03-01

    Strict federal regulations govern the possession, use, and transfer of pathogens and toxins with potential to cause harm to the public, either through accidental or deliberate means. Laboratories registered through either the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), or both, must prepare biosafety, security, and incident response plans, conduct drills or exercises on an annual basis, and update plans accordingly. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), biosafety, laboratory, and emergency management staff have been working together for 2 years to satisfy federal and DOE/NNSA requirements. This has been done through the establishment of plans, training, tabletop and walk-through exercises and drills, and coordination with local and regional emergency response personnel. Responding to the release of infectious agents or toxins is challenging, but through familiarization with the nature of the hazardous biological substances or organisms, and integration with laboratory-wide emergency response procedures, credible scenarios are being used to evaluate our ability to protect workers, the public, and the environment from agents we must work with to provide for national biodefense.

  17. Radiological Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard

  18. Radiological Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist

  19. eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.; Clark, Harvey W.; Essex, James J.; Wagner, Eric C.

    2013-07-01

    The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the

  1. HAZWOPER and Radiological Worker II Training offered to local-area (GTN) employees in June

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy (AU-11), is coordinating Local-area (GTN) safety and health training: Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) and Radiological Worker II training with the Laborers' International Union of North America (LIUNA) Training and Education Fund.

  2. Nearly 3,000 Emergency Responders Receive EM Training | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The initiative works to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials ... Addthis Related Articles Emergency responders search for a mock radiological source in a ...

  3. Emergency Vocabulary | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Department of Energy's chief risk officer visits Nevada National Security Site Earlier this month, Associate Deputy Secretary John MacWilliams visited the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in his role as Chief Risk Officer for the Department of Energy. He reviewed the various ways the NNSS contributes to the department's and NNSA's missions, including radiological... NNSA sites prepared for disasters using real-time response management system Pantex Emergency Services now

  4. Radiological Control - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98-2008, Change Notice 1, Radiological Control by Diane Johnson The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities...

  5. Project T100 -- Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, C.E.

    1994-11-09

    The scope of this Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) is to provide a system of Quality Assurance reviews and verifications on the design and construction of the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center, project 95L-EWT-100 at Hanford. The reviews and verifications will be on activities associated with design, procurement, and construction of the HAMMER project which includes, but is not limited to earthwork, placement of concrete, laying of rail, drilling of wells, water and sewer line fabrication and installation, communications systems, fire protection/detection systems, line tie-ins, building and mock-up (prop) construction, electrical, instrumentation, pump and valves and special coatings.

  6. RADIOLOGICAL SURWY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11".

  7. Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

  8. A process for evaluation and state approval of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    This document contains copies of the vugraphs used by C. R. Hodgin for the November 6, 1991 presentation summarizing the process to be used for evaluation of the Emergency Response Dispersion Model. (MHB)

  9. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  10. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  11. Nuclear Emergency Search Team

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-09-20

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST) operations to malevolent radiological incidents. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  12. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of candidates for Radiological Control Technician (RCT) and for RCT Supervisor. ... OEBs as indicated in DOE's Radiological Control Standard (RCS) and the RCT Training ...

  13. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasper, Peter Donald; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization‚Äôs nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a ‚ÄúCyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)‚ÄĚ focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  14. NNSA Agrees to Emergency Operations Cooperation with Morocco...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear and radiological terrorism and promote international nuclear and environmental safety and security. ... jointly conducted exercises and emergency management assistance.

  15. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  16. Environmental emergency response plans (EERPs): A single plan approach to satisfy multiple regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzyka, L.

    1995-11-01

    Conrail is a freight railroad operating in twelve northeast and midwestern states transporting goods and materials over 11,700 miles of railroad. To repair, maintain, rebuild, and manufacture locomotives and rail cars, and to maintain the track, right of way, bridges, tunnels and other structures, Conrail uses petroleum products, solvents and cleaners. These products are stored in hundreds of storage tanks in and around the yards and right of way. To power the trains, locomotives are fueled with diesel fuel. With large volumes of fuel, lubricants, solvents and cleaners, safe and efficient handling of petroleum and chemicals is crucial to avoid negative impacts on the environment. Conrail recently revisited the issue of environmental emergency response planning. In an attempt to assure full compliance with a myriad of federal, state, and local regulation, a ``single plan approach`` was chosen. Single plans for each facility, coined EERPs, were decided on after careful review of the regulations, and evaluation of the company`s operational and organizational needs.

  17. Report on the emergency response to the event on May 14, 1997, at the plutonuim reclamation facility, Hanford Site, Richland,Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoop, D.S.

    1997-08-20

    On the evening of May 14,1997, a chemical explosion Occurred at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) in the 200 West Area(200-W) of the Hanford Site. The event warranted the declaration of an Alert emergency, activation of the Hanford Emergency Response Organization (BRO), and notification of offsite agencies. As a result of the emergency declaration, a subsequent evaluation was conducted to assess: 9 the performance of the emergency response organization o the occupational health response related to emergency activities o event notifications to offsite and environmental agencies. Additionally, the evaluation was designed to: 9 document the chronology of emergency and occupational health responses and environmental notifications connected with the explosion at the facility 0 assess the adequacy of the Hanford Site emergency preparedness activities; response readiness; and emergency management actions, occupational health, and environmental actions 0 provide an analysis of the causes of the deficiencies and weaknesses in the preparedness and response system that have been identified in the evaluation of the response a assign organizational responsibility to correct deficiencies and weaknesses a improve future performance 0 adjust elements of emergency implementing procedures and emergency preparedness activities.

  18. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological

  19. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after

  20. responding to emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    responding to emergencies Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal asset available on request by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. The FRMAC is an interagency organization with representation... Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site NNSA's Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site (REAC/TS)

  1. Mechanical-reliability evaluation of a proposed emergency-response radioiodine air sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupa, J.F.; Bird, S.K.; Motes, B.G.

    1982-12-01

    In the event of environmental releases of radionuclides following an accident at a commercial nuclear power plant, the concentrations of the radionuclides must be determined to assess the potential radiological impacts. A prototype air sampler was developed to measure airborne radioiodine. An independent evaluation of the mechanical reliability of the air sampler was conducted to determine the effects of temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, dusty air, and mechanical treatment on the samplers performance. The air sampler motor exhibited an insufficient lifetime and would not operate reliably at low temperatures on direct current voltage. Brief scoping studies were conducted to identify candidate motors to replace the original air sampler motor.

  2. The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

    2005-10-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

  3. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part 6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Table of Contents Page Module 2.01 Radiological Documentation

  4. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards

  5. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This

  6. Radiological Technician Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard ... . . . . . . . . 1 Phase I: RCT Academics Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  7. Federal, State, Local Agencies Conclude Radiological Emergency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An interagency organization, the FRMAC involves the Department of Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services and the FBI in ...

  8. Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) The Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory or ERAD, developed by AU-22, serves as an assistance tool to the DOE complex for protection of the public and environment from radiation. The ERAD is a combination webinar/conference call, designed to provide DOE and its contractors a forum to share information, lessons-learned, best practices, emerging trends, compliance

  9. 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations November 2012; Environmental Measurements in an Emergency: This is not a Drill!; Stephen V. Musolino; Brookhaven National Laboratory (2.44 MB) November 2012; Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) D&D Presentation for the DOE ERAD Working Group;

  10. Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Steps in the RAP Emergency Response An emergency request for the RAP may come from any government or private organization. Requests may come directly to NNSA's Headquarters ...

  11. 2013 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) meetings PDF icon Nov 2013 Derived Intervention and Response Levels for Tritium Oxide at the Savannah River Site; Tim Janik,...

  12. A Low-Cost, Real-Time Network for Radiological Monitoring Around Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldo, N A

    2004-08-13

    A low-cost, real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response has been developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the site perimeter to continuously monitor radiological conditions as part of LLNL's comprehensive environment/safety/health protection program. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These low-power sensors transmit measurement data back to a central command center (CCC) computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio- and computer- based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. This system provides a low-cost real-time radiation monitoring solution that is easily converted to incorporate both a hard-wired interior perimeter with strategically positioned wireless secondary and tertiary concentric remote locations. These wireless stations would be configured with solar voltaic panels that provide current to recharge batteries and power the sensors and radio transceivers. These platforms would supply data transmission at a range of up to 95 km from a single transceiver location. As necessary, using radio transceivers in repeater mode can extend the transmission range. The RTRAM network as it is presently configured at LLNL has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions. With the proposed

  13. Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-11-20

    The Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) is a real-time emergency response modeling capability designed to advise Emergency Managers of the path, timing, and projected impacts from an atmospheric release. TRAC evaluates the effects of both radiological and non-radiological hazardous substances, gases and particulates. Using available surface and upper air meteorological information, TRAC realistically treats complex sources and atmospheric conditions, such as those found in mountainous terrain. TRAC calculates atmospheric concentration, deposition, and dose for more thanmore¬†¬Ľ 25,000 receptor locations within 80 km of the release point. Human-engineered output products support critical decisions on the type, location, and timing of protective actions for workers and the public during an emergency.¬ę¬†less

  14. Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Emergency Operations Training Academy Emergency Operations Training Academy The Office of Emergency Operations, NA-40-The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA) EOTA provides training and education to enhance the readiness of personnel in the radiological-nuclear emergency operations community. For more information or to contact us, visit the EOTA website at

  15. NNSA Continues to Assist Vietnam in Enhancing its Nuclear/Radiological...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Continues to Assist Vietnam in Enhancing its NuclearRadiological Emergency Program August 27, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is ...

  16. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A. Self Introduction 1. Name 2. Phone number 3. Background 4. Emergency procedure review B. ... basic radiological control factors. 1. Physical condition of worker DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ...

  17. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy ...

  18. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG ... an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14 to ...

  19. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of ...

  20. Office of Radiological Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of physical security of radiological materials;

  21. Provision of mobile and man-portable radiation detection equipment;
  22. Regional cooperation on safeguards...

  1. response-112.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    responding to emergencies Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal asset available on request by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. The FRMAC is an interagency organization with representation... Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site NNSA's Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site (REAC/TS)

  2. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE focuses its radiological audit and assessment services in these key areas: Nondestructive assay (NDA) Radiological control programs Environmental monitoring programs ...

  3. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  4. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E.; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction‚ÄĒboth in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: ‚ÄĘ Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. ‚ÄĘ Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. ‚ÄĘ The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. ‚ÄĘ Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  5. Development of the table of initial isolation distances and protective action distances for the 2004 emergency response guidebook.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D. F.; Freeman, W. A.; Carhart, R. A.; Krumpolc, M.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2005-09-23

    This report provides technical documentation for values in the Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances (PADs) in the 2004 Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG2004). The objective for choosing the PADs specified in the ERG2004 is to balance the need to adequately protect the public from exposure to potentially harmful substances against the risks and expenses that could result from overreacting to a spill. To quantify this balance, a statistical approach is adopted, whereby the best available information is used to conduct an accident scenario analysis and develop a set of up to 1,000,000 hypothetical incidents. The set accounts for differences in containers types, incident types, accident severity (i.e., amounts released), locations, times of day, times of year, and meteorological conditions. Each scenario is analyzed using detailed emission rate and atmospheric dispersion models to calculate the downwind chemical concentrations from which a 'safe distance' is determined. The safe distance is defined as the distance downwind from the source at which the chemical concentration falls below health protection criteria. The American Industrial Hygiene Association's Emergency Response Planning Guideline Level 2 (ERPG-2) or equivalent is the health criteria used. The statistical sample of safe distance values for all incidents considered in the analysis are separated into four categories: small spill/daytime release, small spill/nighttime release, large spill/daytime release, and large spill/nighttime release. The 90th-percentile safe distance values for each of these groups became the PADs that appear in the ERG2004.

  6. Letter to the Editor: Appropriate selection of dose coefficients in radiological assessments: C-14 and Cl-36: response to the letter of G Smith and M Thorne (2015 J. Radiol. Prot. 35 737-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, John D.; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This letter to the editor of Journal of Radiological Protection is in response to a letter to the editor from G. M. Smith and M. C. Thorne of Great Britain concerning the appropriate selection of dose coefficients for ingested carbon-14 and chlorine-36, two of the most important long-lived components of radioactive wastes. Smith and Thorne argue that current biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for carbon and chlorine are overly cautious models from the standpoint of radiation dose estimates for C-14 and Cl-36, and that more realistic models are needed for evaluation of the hazards of these radionuclides in nuclear wastes. We (Harrison and Leggett) point out that new biokinetic models for these and other elements (developed at ORNL) will soon appear in ICRP Publications. These new models generally are considerably more realistic than current ICRP models. Here, examples are given for C-14 inhaled as carbon dioxide or ingested in water as bicarbonate, carbonate, or carbon dioxide.

  7. Letter to the Editor: Appropriate selection of dose coefficients in radiological assessments: C-14 and Cl-36: response to the letter of G Smith and M Thorne (2015 J. Radiol. Prot. 35 737-40)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harrison, John D.; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This letter to the editor of Journal of Radiological Protection is in response to a letter to the editor from G. M. Smith and M. C. Thorne of Great Britain concerning the appropriate selection of dose coefficients for ingested carbon-14 and chlorine-36, two of the most important long-lived components of radioactive wastes. Smith and Thorne argue that current biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for carbon and chlorine are overly cautious models from the standpoint of radiation dose estimates for C-14 and Cl-36, and that more realistic models are needed for evaluation of the hazards ofmore¬†¬Ľ these radionuclides in nuclear wastes. We (Harrison and Leggett) point out that new biokinetic models for these and other elements (developed at ORNL) will soon appear in ICRP Publications. These new models generally are considerably more realistic than current ICRP models. Here, examples are given for C-14 inhaled as carbon dioxide or ingested in water as bicarbonate, carbonate, or carbon dioxide.¬ę¬†less

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  9. Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Baseline Surveys for Emergency Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, C

    2012-06-04

    Originally established in the 1960s to support the Nuclear Test Program, the AMS mission is to provide a rapid and comprehensive worldwide aerial measurement, analysis, and interpretation capability in response to a nuclear/radiological emergency. AMS provides a responsive team of individuals whose processes allow for a mission to be conducted and completed with results available within hours. This presentation slide-show reviews some of the history of the AMS, summarizes present capabilities and methods, and addresses the value of the surveys.

  10. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  11. emergency response assets

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    portable field radiation monitoring instrumentation for alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron detection, in addition to generators, mobile laboratories, air samplers,...

  12. WIPP Radiological Relase Report Phase 2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, February 14, 2014 April 2015 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Radiological Release ...

  13. WIPP Radiological Release Report Phase 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Phase 1 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14, 2014 April 2014 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Radiological ...

  14. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology

  15. Comprehensive Emergency Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-01

    To establish policy and to assign and describe roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System. The Emergency Management System provides the framework for development, coordination, control, and direction of all emergency planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, response, and recovery actions. Canceled by DOE O 151.1B. Cancels DOE O 151.1.

  16. In Case of Emergency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Case of Emergency In Case of Emergency Print Fire/Police Emergency: ext. 7911 Cell phone or off-site: 510-486-7911 When dialing from off-site, the following numbers need to be proceeded by 486-. the area code for the LBNL is (510). Fire Department (non-emergency): ext. 6015 Police Department (non-emergency): ext. 5472 Non-Emergency Reporting: ext. 6999 Additional information about emergency procedures at Berkeley Lab can be found on the red Emergency Response Guides posted around the lab and

  17. Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at

  18. Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure ...

  19. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  20. ORISE: Health Physics in Radiation Emergencies | REAC/TS Continuing Medical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Course Health Physics in Radiation Emergencies Dates Scheduled Register Online March 13-17, 2017 June 19-23, 2017 Fee: $225 Maximum enrollment: 20 32 hours American Academy of Health Physics credit This 4¬Ĺ-day course is designed primarily for Health Physicists (HP), Medical Physicists (MP), Radiation Safety Officers (RSO) and others who have radiation dose assessment and/or radiological control responsibilities. The course presents an advanced level of information on

  1. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part 7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3

  2. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part 8 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Oral Examination Boards Phase III Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This page intentionally left blank ii DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Purpose of Oral Examinations

  3. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This page intentionally left blank ii DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures

  4. Radiological Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This page intentionally left blank. ii DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  5. West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EOC Emergency Operations Center EPZ Emergency Planning Zone ERO Emergency Response ... that contributed to MPOSS performance problems identified later in this report: * ...

  6. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation ...

  7. ORISE: Radiation Emergency Training for Iraq, South Africa and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Training REACTS Provides International Radiation Emergency Medical Response ... REACTS has conducted radiation emergency medical response training in Iraq, Kuwait, ...

  8. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

  9. General Employee Radiological Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14,

  10. General Employee Radiological Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The

  11. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata May 2004 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-98 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information

  12. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 Users’ Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Bradley J Schrader

    2010-10-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users’ manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  13. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 Users’ Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Bradley J Schrader

    2009-03-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users’ manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  14. Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.A.; Stearns, L.J.; Davie, A.D.; Day, E.

    2007-07-01

    Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

  15. Comprehensive Emergency Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-11-02

    The Order establishes policy and assigns roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System. Supersedes DOE O 151.1B.

  16. This letter is in response to the Department of Energy Emergency Order to Resume Limited Operation at the Potomac River Genera

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 7 th , 2007 Anthony J. Como Permitting, Siting, and Analysis Division Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0119 Dear Mr.Como: This letter is in response to the Department of Energy Special Environmental Analysis for Actions Taken under the U.S Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in Alexandria, Virginia. Air Quality impacts This study

  17. Accident Investigation Report- Radiological Release

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 14, 2014, an airborne radiological release occurred at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Because access to the underground was restricted following the event, the investigation was broken into two phases. The Phase 1 report focused on how the radiological material was released into the atmosphere and Phase 2, performed once limited access to the underground was re‚Äźestablished, focused on the source of the released radiological material.

  18. Smart Radiological Dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

    2004-07-20

    A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

  19. Radiological Assessor Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    141-2001 April 2001 Change Notice No. 1 and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823.

  20. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    22-2009 February 2009_______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1

  1. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 (Revised 2013) Module 2.03 Counting Errors and Statistics Student's Material Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: (This document, Study Material, is referred to as Study Guide in the Program Management Guide) 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample measurements. 2.03.02. State

  2. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 February 2009 Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009

  3. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Part 2 Module 2 page 17 Medical

  4. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout

  5. Radiological Security Partnership | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Programs / Nonproliferation / Global Material Security / Radiological Security Radiological Security Partnership Radiological Security Partnership Secure Your Business, Your Community, and Your Country. Sign Up Today for Services Provided by the Radiological Security Partnership. RSP Logo Initiative of the Global Material Security Program Formerly the Global Threat Reduction Initiative RSP Registration RSP More Info Learn More Radiological Security Partnership

  6. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-29

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholderís intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualtiesí absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  7. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  8. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  9. NIOSH comments to DOL on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration proposed rule on hazardous waste operations and emergency response by R. A. Lemen, December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The testimony concerns the views of NIOSH regarding the safety or workers engaged in hazardous waste operations and emergency response. NIOSH suggests the following requirements: adequate worker training before the worker begins handling hazardous wastes; the use of site control zones and a thorough site evaluation prior to the beginning work at the site; the use of handling techniques that limit the potential for human exposure to hazardous substances; and medical surveillance of all workers potentially exposed to hazardous substances. Suggested modifications to the proposed OSHA regulation are attached and deal with the following areas: scope, application and definitions for the work; contractors and subcontractors; site characterization and analysis; site control; training; medical examinations and consultations; recordkeeping; engineering controls; personal protective equipment; informational programs; shipping and transport; decontamination; procedures for handling emergency incidents; specialist employees; and sanitation at temporary workplaces.

  10. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.