Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Radiological Dispersion Devices and Basic Radiation Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introductory physics courses present the basic concepts of radioactivity and an overview of nuclear physics that emphasizes the basic decay relationship and the various types of emitted radiation. Although this presentation provides insight into radiological science it often fails to interest students to explore these concepts in a more rigorous manner. One reason for limited student interest is the failure to link the discussion to topics of current interest. The author has found that presenting this material with a link to radiological dispersion devices (RDDs) or dirty bombs and their associated health effects provides added motivation for students. The events of Sept. 11 2001 and periodic media focus on RDDs heighten student interest from both a scientific curiosity as well as a personal protection perspective. This article presents a framework for a more interesting discussion of the basics of radiation science and their associated health effects. The presentation can be integrated with existing radioactivitylectures or added as a supplementary or enrichment activity.

Joseph John Bevelacqua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Bayesian Network Analysis of Radiological Dispersal Device Acquisitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It remains unlikely that a terrorist organization could produce or procure an actual nuclear weapon. However, the construction of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) from commercially produced radioactive sources and conventional explosives could...

Hundley, Grant Richard

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimating the exposure to first receivers from a contaminated victim of a radiological dispersal device detonation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The threat of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) detonation arouses the concern of contaminated victims of all ages. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose to a uniformly contaminated five-year old male. It also explores...

Phillips, Holly Anne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

An external dose reconstruction involving a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emergency situation. In response, the Department of Homeland Security has published Protective Action Guides (DHS 2006) to help minimize these exposures and associated risks. This research attempts to provide some additional radiological exposure knowledge...

Hearnsberger, David Wayne

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv?MBq?1?s?1) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15?year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1?year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

Eun Young Han; Wi-Ho Ha; Young-Woo Jin; Wesley E Bolch; Choonsik Lee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C C December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management

7

ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

GRIGSBY KM

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response. Provides information and resources concerning the development of Operational Guidelines as part of planning guidance for protection and recovery following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and/or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents. Operational Guidelines Technical (OGT) Manual, 2009 RESRAD-RDD Complementing Software to OGT Manual EPA Protective Action Guidelines (2013), Interim Final Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC)

9

THE RABIT: A RAPID AUTOMATED BIODOSIMETRY TOOL FOR RADIOLOGICAL TRIAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-priority need in an environment of heightened concern over possible radiological or nuclear terrorist attacks (Pellmar and Rockwell 2005). The detonation of even a small dirty bomb (radiological dispersal device of radiological injuries. A small improvised nuclear device (IND) would produce a major health emergency

10

Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-RAY) Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR RADIATION-PRODUCING (X-RAY) DEVICES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1109-97 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1109-97 iii Note: The page numbers refer to Change Notice 1 of the standard which was issued in February 2002. The changes have been incorporated in the Adobe PDF file posted on the DOE Technical Standards Web Site. Change Notice No. 1. RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR RADIATION-

11

Nuclear tools for characterising radiological dispersion in complex terrain: evaluation of regulatory and emergency response models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Routine operations of a nuclear research reactor and its facilities offer opportunities for collection of rare environmental tracer datasets which can be used for atmospheric dispersion model evaluation studies. The HIFAR reactor near Sydney, Australia, routinely emits the radioactive noble gas 41Ar, and other radionuclides such as 133Xe and 135Xe are also emitted from nearby radiopharmaceutical production facilities. Despite extremely low emission levels of these gases, they are nevertheless detectable using state-of-the-art technology, and sensitive detectors have been placed at four locations in the surrounding region which features complex terrain. The high research potential of this unique dataset is illustrated in the current study, in which predictions from two atmospheric dispersion models used for emergency response are compared with 41Ar peak observations from the detector network under a range of stability conditions, and long-term integrated data is also compared with a routine impact assessment model.

Alastair G. Williams; Geoffrey H. Clark; Leisa Dyer; Richard Barton

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

5 - Medical Considerations for Radiological Terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the medical considerations for radiological terrorism. Radiological warfare (RW) attack is the deliberate use of radiological materials to cause injury and death. The explosion of a radiological weapon causes damage by the heat and blast liberated at the time of detonation. The proliferation of nuclear material and technology has made the acquisition and terrorist use of ionizing radiation more probable than ever. Currently, there are three threat scenarios for radiological terrorism. The most probable scenario for the near future would be a radiological dispersion device. Such a weapon can be developed and used by any terrorist with conventional weapons and access to radionuclides. This is an expedient weapon in that the radioactive waste material is easy to obtain from any location that uses radioactive sources. These sites can include a nuclear-waste processor, a nuclear power plant, a university research facility, a medical radiotherapy clinic, or an industrial complex.

James Winkley; Paul D. Mongan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Monte Carlo Simulations to Determine Doses to Healthcare Providers After a Radiological Dispersal Device Event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MC Calculations / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Protection

Kimberly Burns; Nolan Hertel; Armin Ansari

14

Forward model calculations for determining isotopic compositions of materials used in a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the multiple radial-region pin cell was 7 times that of the 2D pin cell. For this reason, the 2D pin cell was used to benchmark the isotopics with data from other reactors. The reactors from which the methodology was benchmarked were Calvert Cliffs Unit #1...

Burk, David Edward

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

Guidance for use of Radiology Devices and Radioactive Materials in Research Protocols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, or the stem set forth by the International Commission on Radiological dosimetry calculations. Alternatively, dosimetry published by United States Pharmacopeial Forum Society of Nuclear Medicine, in a package insert, or in another peer reviewed format may be submitted. · Describe

Puglisi, Joseph

16

Dispersal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispersal Dispersal Nature Bulletin No. 675-A April 15, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SEED DISPERSAL Plants that scatter their seeds widely have a better chance to survive than those which do not. Different kinds spread their seeds in various special ways. Many seeds ride the wind. Maple seeds spin away like little helicopters with a single wing. In a strong breeze they can travel a city block. Those of the elm are small papery disks with a seed in the center. The ash seed and its wing resembles a canoe paddle. In the basswood a few seeds are suspended beneath a large flat blade that glides through the air. Ripe, dry pine cones open and release winged seeds hidden between the cone scales.

17

Comparative dosimetry of dental CBCT devices and 64-slice CT for oral and maxillofacial radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives This study compares 2 measures of effective dose, E1990 and E2007, for 8 dentoalveolar and maxillofacial cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units and a 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) unit. Study design Average tissue-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a radiation analog dosimetry phantom. Effective doses were derived using 1990 and the superseding 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. Results Large-field of view (FOV) CBCT E2007 ranged from 68 to 1,073 ?Sv. Medium-FOV CBCT E2007 ranged from 69 to 560 ?Sv, whereas a similar-FOV MDCT produced 860 ?Sv. The E2007 calculations were 23% to 224% greater than E1990. Conclusions The 2007 recommendations of the ICRP, which include salivary glands, extrathoracic region, and oral mucosa in the calculation of effective dose, result in an upward reassessment of fatal cancer risk from oral and maxillofacial radiographic examinations. Dental CBCT can be recommended as a dose-sparing technique in comparison with alternative medical CT scans for common oral and maxillofacial radiographic imaging tasks.

John B. Ludlow; Marija Ivanovic

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Children as vulnerable populations in radiological/nuclear events: discussion scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......approximately half the number of adults. The device is not discovered by anyone and detonates...Scenario 3-241AmBe radiological dispersion device In this scenario, it was recognised that...children who happen to be watching or listening to media reports as they will likely take......

Matthew Rodrigues; Joseph Chaput; Christopher Bellman; Tom Cousins

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

20

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

EMSL - radiological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiological en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes...

24

Optimal sizing and location of SVC devices for improvement of voltage profile in distribution network with dispersed photovoltaic and wind power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intermittent power generation of wind turbines and photovoltaic plants creates voltage disturbances in power distribution networks which may not be acceptable to the consumers. To control the deviations of the nodal voltages, it is necessary to use fast dynamic control of the reactive power in the distribution network. Implementation of the power electronic devices, such as Static Var Compensator (SVC), enables effective dynamic state as well as a static state of the nodal voltage control in the distribution network. This paper analyzed optimal sizing and location of SVC devices by using genetic algorithm, to improve nodal voltages profile in a distribution network with dispersed photovoltaic and wind power plants. Practical application of the developed methodology was tested on an example of a real distribution network.

Aleksandar Savi?; Željko ?uriši?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy ; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by the government to develop new methods to reduce the consequence of potential radiological incidents. This is evident in the enhancement of technologies and methods to detect, prepare, or manage radiological incidents or accidents . With any radiological accident, radiological dispersal device (RDD), or improvised nuclear device (IND) , the major focus is always on the immediate phase of an incident or accident and less centered on the intermediate phase and the late recovery phase of that incident. In support of the 2008 protective action guides(PAGs) for RDDs , established by the Department of Homeland Security and by agreement with the EPA, the White House requested establishment of a series of operational guidelines that would focus on efforts during all phases of the incident and not just the immediate phase. “Operational Guidelines” were developed for this purpose. The operational guidelines are dose based pre-derived levels of radioactivity or radionuclide concentrations in various media that can be measured in the field and compared to the PAGs to quickly determine if protective actions are warranted. I.e can certain roads, bridges or metro systems be used, can the public return to their homes or businesses, can the public consume certain foods, etc. An operational guidelines manual, developed by a federal interagency working group led by the Department of Energy (DOE), was published in 2009 as the Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident, with its companion software RESidual RADiation (RESRAD)-RDD. With the development of the new PAG Manual (Interim Final 2013) by the EPA, an interagency working group was created under the auspices of the ISCORS to develop a revised operational guidelines manual that would reflect the changes by EPA’s new PAG Manual, new best available technology based on new dosimetric models (ICRP 60+), include operational guidelines for IND’s and increase the amount of radionuclides in the OGT Manual from 11 radioisotopes to 55. The new manual is scheduled for publication in 2015.

26

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal

27

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard Section/page/paragraph Change Section 211, page 2-3, paragraph 1 Add new paragraph 1: "Approval by the appropriate Secretarial Officer or designee should be required

28

Dealing with at-risk populations in radiological/nuclear emergencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE...Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents...Security Council Interagency Policy Coordination Subcommittee for...Response to Radiological and Nuclear Threats. Planning guidance......

Diana Wilkinson

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Industrial Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... chief application of industrial radiology in Norway is in the examination of pipe welds in hydroelectric plant. H. Vinter (Denmark), director of the Akademiet for de Technische Videns ... and to compare various methods of non-destructive testing. He gave results of tests on turbine disk forgings of austenitic steel which showed satisfactory agreement between radiography, ultrasonic examination and ...

1950-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

31

Dental Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning “cheat sheet” to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

Tony M. Woodward

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

radiological | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Na8(AlSiO4)6I2, were observed in the 24000 ppm specimen and were verified with micro-XRD and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Citation: Riley BJ, MJ Schweiger, DS Kim,...

33

RADIOLOGICAL SURWY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111 111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11". .. .. ; :;: ;I, ' . 1::. J;,;. ~;_:y,;:::::; - T.J..:+~uS~~ .' .:' : : . . .. ...: .:.. : OFTHE EXCERIORPORTIONS O F THE FORIMER BLISS ANT3 LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FAC' KJTy - BUFFALO,NEw YORK - T. J.VITKUS I : . . : : ' . .:. : I : : .. :. Prepaied for.:the:' 6ffice.iibfiEnvir~nmenfal Re$o&idn z . . :

34

Women in pediatric radiology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM et al. (2001) Pediatric radiology at the millennium.a case study of pediatric radiology. J Am Coll Radiol 6:635–WORKPLACE Women in pediatric radiology M. Ines Boechat # The

Boechat, M. Ines

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, R.L.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

37

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Radiological and Depleted Uranium Weapons: Environmental and Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear weapons are due to the release of blast and thermal energy and the immediate and residual ionizing radiation energy. Most of the short-term damages to the environment and the human health are caused by the blast and thermal energies. Ionizing radiation energy received in large doses at high dose rates (victims of nuclear explosions) can produce acute radiation sickness and can even be lethal. Individuals having received lower radiation doses, or even high doses at low dose rates, may suffer from stochastic effects, primarily, the induction of cancer. Studies of exposed populations suggest the probability of developing a lethal cancer following low dose rate exposure is increased by approximately 5% for each Sv the whole-body receives. This risk is added, of course, to the risk of dying from cancer without exposure to radiation, which is more than 20% worldwide. For radiological weapons (radiological dispersion devices or dirty bombs), the health effects due to radiation are expected to be minor in most cases. Casualties will mainly occur due to the conventional explosive. Fear, panic, and decontamination costs will be the major effects. Significant radiation damage to individuals would likely be limited to very few persons. Depleted uranium (DU) weapons leave in the battlefield fragmented or intact DU penetrators as well as DU dust. The latter, if inhaled, could represent a radiological risk, especially to individuals spending some time in vehicles hit by DU munitions. All studies conducted so far have shown the outdoors doses to be so low not to represent a significant risk. For those spending 10 h per year in vehicles hit by DU munitions, the risk of developing a lethal cancer is slightly higher (?0.2%).

P.R. Danesi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor Safety 3 C #12;Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1

Sheridan, Scott

40

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix B December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . ii Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

42

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

43

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

44

Panoramic Radiology: Endodontic Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endodontics is concerned with the morphology, physiology, and pathology of the human dental pulp and periradicular tissues. Radiology is especially important for diagnosis in the...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiological Assistance Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses  

SciTech Connect

We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Device convolution effects on the collective scattering signal of the E Multiplication-Sign B mode from Hall thruster experiments: 2D dispersion relation  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the collective light scattering diagnostic transfer function is considered in the context of the dispersion relation of the unstable E Multiplication-Sign B mode previously reported. This transfer function is found to have a contribution to the measured frequencies and mode amplitudes which is more or less significant depending on the measurement wavenumbers and angles. After deconvolution, the experimental data are found to be possibly compatible with the idea that the mode frequency in the jet frame (after subtraction of the Doppler effect due to the plasma motion along the thruster axis) is independent of the orientation of the wave vector in the plane orthogonal to the local magnetic field.

Cavalier, J.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G. [IJL, Universite de Lorraine, CNRS (UMR 7198), BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Tsikata, S. [ICARE, CNRS (UPR 3021), 1C av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans (France); Honore, C.; Gresillon, D. [LPP, CNRS (UMR 7648), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7of 9 7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3 Qualification Area: Radiological Instrumentation.......................................5 Task 2-1.................. ..................................................................... 5 Objective.............................................................................. 5

49

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

50

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-2008 1-2008 August 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techs\ Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.1-1B, Radiation Protection Programs, March 2007, and as outlined in DOE- STD- 1098-99, CN1, March 2005, DOE Radiological Control (the Radiological Control Standard - RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of

51

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

53

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 25-Oct-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

54

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

55

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

56

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study

Sheridan, Scott

57

Radiology of thoracic diseases  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Seed Dispersal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Dispersal Seed Dispersal Nature Bulletin No. 35 October 6, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F, Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation SEED DISPERSAL Plants have various ways of spreading their seeds. Some have "fly-away" seeds. Included are the dandelion, thistle, tumbleweed, cattail, clematis, and many trees. The cottonwood, sycamore, aspen, linden, ailanthus, maple, box elder, birch and the pines are all trees having seeds with wings or with "down", that are carried by winds. Certain aquatic plants have seeds that sink to bury themselves in.the mud beneath the water. Others have seeds that float and are distributed by the winds and currents that carry them away. Many plants "shoot" their seeds, the seed pods popping open with sufficient force to throw the seeds many feet away, Notable in this group are knotgrass, lady slippers, violets, vetches, jewel weed, witch- hazel, and Heavea, the Para rubber tree, The witch-hazel may shoot its seeds 30 or 40 feet.

59

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14, Radiation Safety Training, of Implementation Guide G44.1B, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard [RCS - DOE-STD-1098-99, Ch. 1]. The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals

60

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

141-2001 141-2001 April 2001 Change Notice No. 1 and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures ........................................................................................2 Final Verification Signatures ....................................................................................................3 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iv

62

Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Phase I: RCT Academics Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 1 Phase II: RCT Core Practical (JPMs) Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 1

63

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

64

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC) Where nuclear research and deployment capabilities come together to solve nuclear nonproliferation challenges. Skip Navigation Links...

67

Panoramic Radiology: Oncologic Dentistry Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Panoramic radiology can serve as an important input supporting ... they are also important (1) for planning dental treatment in preparation of the oral cavity...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population

69

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

98 98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata May 2004 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-98 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration,

70

Dispersed Indeterminacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A state of a single particle can be represented by a quantum blob in the corresponding phase space, or by a cell in its 2-D subspace. Its area is frequently stated to be no less than one half of the Plank constant, implying that such a cell is an indivisible quantum of the 2-D phase space. But this is generally not true, as is evident, for instance, from representation of some states in the basis of innately discrete observables like angular momentum. Here we consider some dispersed states involving the evanescent waves (EW) different from that in the total internal reflection. Such states are represented by a set of separated point-like cells, but with a large total indeterminacy. An idealized model has a discrete Wigner function forming an infinite periodic array of dots on the phase plane. The question about the total momentum indeterminacy in such state is discussed. We argue that the transverse momentum eigenstates corresponding to the considered EW-s cannot be singled out by any known measurement procedure, and the whole infinite set of the corresponding eigenvalues can contribute only a certain fraction to the observed momentum indeterminacy which remains finite.

Moses Fayngold

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Illicit trafficking of radiological & nuclear materials : modeling and analysis of trafficking trends and risks.  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over the illicit trafficking of radiological and nuclear materials were focused originally on the lack of security and accountability of such material throughout the former Soviet states. This is primarily attributed to the frequency of events that have occurred involving the theft and trafficking of critical material components that could be used to construct a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or even a rudimentary nuclear device. However, with the continued expansion of nuclear technology and the deployment of a global nuclear fuel cycle these materials have become increasingly prevalent, affording a more diverse inventory of dangerous materials and dual-use items. To further complicate the matter, the list of nuclear consumers has grown to include: (1) Nation-states that have gone beyond the IAEA agreed framework and additional protocols concerning multiple nuclear fuel cycles and processes that reuse the fuel through reprocessing to exploit technologies previously confined to the more industrialized world; (2) Terrorist organizations seeking to acquire nuclear and radiological material due to the potential devastation and psychological effect of their use; (3) Organized crime, which has discovered a lucrative market in trafficking of illicit material to international actors and/or countries; and (4) Amateur smugglers trying to feed their families in a post-Soviet era. An initial look at trafficking trends of this type seems scattered and erratic, localized primarily to a select group of countries. This is not necessarily the case. The success with which other contraband has been smuggled throughout the world suggests that nuclear trafficking may be carried out with relative ease along the same routes by the same criminals or criminal organizations. Because of the inordinately high threat posed by terrorist or extremist groups acquiring the ingredients for unconventional weapons, it is necessary that illicit trafficking of these materials be better understood as to prepare for the sustained global development of the nuclear fuel cycle. Conversely, modeling and analyses of this activity must not be limited in their scope to loosely organized criminal smuggling, but address the problem as a commercial, industrial project for the covert development of nuclear technologies and unconventional weapon development.

York, David L.; Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical ExaminerCoroner...

73

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

74

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

75

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

76

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Part 2 Module 2 page 17 Medical radiation sources (total average dose ~ 54 mrem/yr) 1) X rays (total average dose ~ 40mrem/yr) a) X rays are similar to gamma rays; however, they originate outside the nucleus.

77

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

78

For S Radiological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? . ? . -. .- * -* (\/If.r.-5- .* , d- For S Radiological ' mer Bridgepo pecial Metals Adrian, Survey of the Irt Brass Company Extrusion Plant, Michigan / /f?t' . ( F. F. Haywood H. W. Dickson W. D. Cottrell W. H. Shinpaugh _ : I., _-. .I ( ._ rc/ DOE/EV-0005128 ORNL-57 13 / J. E. Burden 0. R. Stone R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith 4 , Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A06 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedStatesGovernment. Neither theUnitedStatesGovernment noranyagency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

79

Case Based Dental Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

Brook A. Niemiec

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". Part 3 1.05-9 4) U.S. national average from diagnostic

82

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD Stanford University Lucile Radiology LPCH Thank you Par Lab Briefer, lighter, safer anesthesia for pediatric MRI #12; practice #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH Current Solution INVASIVE LIMITS ACCESS

California at Berkeley, University of

83

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

84

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

85

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

86

Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll  

SciTech Connect

For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND Abstract: The RESRAD-RDD code was developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT) to assist decision makers, emergency responders, and emergency preparedness planners for response to radiological dispersal device incidents (RDD). The RESRAD-RDD code was released as a companion software tool in 2009 to support the OGT Manual—Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Preparedness and Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident (DOE/HS-0001). The original RESRAD-RDD code was Microsoft Excel based software with the user interface written in Visual Basic. This version of RESRAD-RDD is being converted to a database driven software that runs on Windows 7 operating system in the .NET environment. The new RESRAD-RDD code is being tested to make sure it reproduces old code results. The new code runs faster than the old spreadsheets code by a factor of 10 or so, fewer clicks are required for the same calculations, operational guidelines can be easily located, and the reports can be written to PDFs instead of HTML. Additional radionuclides are also being added to the new RESRAD-RDD code. An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) scenario is also being added to the code and about 44 - 60 radionuclides will be added to handle IND incident. A new OGT Task Group is in the process of updating the OGT Manual and providing guidance on the development of the IND scenario and methodology. The new code, RESRAD-RDD&IND is expected to be released in early 2015. Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; Jing-Jy Cheng, Argonne National Laboratory; Sunita Kamboj, Argonne National Laboratory; David LePoire, Argonne National Laboratory; Paul Flood, Argonne National Laboratory

88

Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; Jing-Jy Cheng, Argonne National Laboratory; Sunita Kamboj, Argonne National Laboratory; David LePoire, Argonne National Laboratory; Paul Flood, Argonne National Laboratory Abstract: The RESRAD-RDD code was developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT) to assist decision makers, emergency responders, and emergency preparedness planners for response to radiological dispersal device incidents (RDD). The RESRAD-RDD code was released as a companion software tool in 2009 to support the OGT Manual—Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Preparedness and Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident (DOE/HS-0001). The original RESRAD-RDD code was Microsoft Excel based software with the user interface written in Visual Basic. This version of RESRAD-RDD is being converted to a database driven software that runs on Windows 7 operating system in the .NET environment. The new RESRAD-RDD code is being tested to make sure it reproduces old code results. The new code runs faster than the old spreadsheets code by a factor of 10 or so, fewer clicks are required for the same calculations, operational guidelines can be easily located, and the reports can be written to PDFs instead of HTML. Additional radionuclides are also being added to the new RESRAD-RDD code. An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) scenario is also being added to the code and about 44 - 60 radionuclides will be added to handle IND incident. A new OGT Task Group is in the process of updating the OGT Manual and providing guidance on the development of the IND scenario and methodology. The new code, RESRAD-RDD&IND is expected to be released in early 2015.

89

Radiological training for tritium facilities  

SciTech Connect

This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Radiological Protection for DOE Activities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes radiological protection program requirements that, combined with 10 CFR 835 and its associated implementation guidance, form the basis for a comprehensive program for protection of individuals from the hazards of ionizing radiation in controlled areas. Extended by DOE N 441.3. Cancels DOE 5480.11, DOE 5480.15, DOE N 5400.13, DOE N 5480.11; please note: the DOE radiological control manual (DOE/EH-0256T)

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

91

Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Chapter 12 - Dispersants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three dispersants were prepared to address dispersancy concerns associated with conductive nanotubes, cement, and pigment colorants used in ink jets. In the first case conductive nanotubes were dispersed in water by ultrasounding a mixture of nanotubes with polymeric pyridinium ionic salts. A cement dispersant consisting of a polyether containing polyacrylic acid successfully passed the 15 Hit Flow Rate. Finally ink jet colorants Lithol Rubin and Phthalo were dispersed in water using ethylene-propylene oxide polymers with minimum viscosity increase.

Thomas F. DeRosa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

DOE standard: Radiological control  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

95

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 May 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 2. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Part 1, page 14 Change: U.S. Department of Energy, Radiological Control

96

An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology  

SciTech Connect

To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology.

Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Ra1hlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

1980-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

98

Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Cancels DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

99

Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring Science Report ­ SC030308/SR SCHO0407BMNL-E-P #12;ii Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological #12;iv Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological Monitoring Executive

100

Daydreaming Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daydreaming Devices is a project on aspects of daydream and the design of convertible furniture within the context of art. This thesis addresses the concepts and the design of two daydreaming devices developed during my ...

Da Ponte, Ana Sofia Lopes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

102

Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450  

SciTech Connect

In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved

Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radiological Assistance Program (RAP)- Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Radiological Major Programs > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Radiological Assistance Program Bookmark and Share Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation. Click on image to view larger image. The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team at Argonne can provide assistance in the event of a radiological accident or incident. Support ranges from giving technical information or advice over the telephone, to sending highly trained team members and state-of-the-art equipment to the accident site to help identify and minimize any radiological hazards. The

104

Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-2002 8-2002 May 2002 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

105

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Cover sheets parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 Change: Office of Environment, Safety & Health

106

Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-2001 3-2001 August 2001 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

107

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

109

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

110

US, UK, Kazakhstan Secure Radiological Transportation Vehicles...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

place them in secure storage, and improve radiological transportation security and site security. The United Kingdom-funded projects provide an immediate security and safety...

111

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Data results provided back to the field within 30-60 minutes. All NNSA teams that conduct search, detection and identification operations, to include the Radiological...

112

Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program  

SciTech Connect

The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

(trained personnel and equipment) to evaluate, assess, advise, isotopically identify, search for, and assist in the mitigation of actual or perceived nuclear or radiological...

114

Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public...

115

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

116

Electrochromic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

Allemand, Pierre M. (Tucson, AZ); Grimes, Randall F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Ingle, Andrew R. (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Kennedy, Steve R. (Tuscon, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Boulton, Jonathan M. (Tucson, AZ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

118

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

119

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

120

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMHO] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May 13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

122

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

123

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMHO] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

124

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

125

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

126

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-2013/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

127

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Radiation Therapy (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Radiation Therapy ­ (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTHB] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

128

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

129

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 25-Oct-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

130

Dispersed flow film boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

Yoder, Graydon L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

2012-2013 Diagnostic Radiology Fellows Cardiovascular Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dbweinreb@ Pediatric Radiology Body Imaging 1st yr. Neuroradiology NCI Body Mammography Sonya Edwards 149042012-2013 Diagnostic Radiology Fellows Cardiovascular Imaging Nuclear Medicine David Weinreb 14895 14909 laxpati@ Michael Kim 14961 mjjkim@ Vascular and Interventional Radiology Charles Kosydar 14908

Sonnenburg, Justin L.

134

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and requirements for the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), as set forth in the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Turnage, Jennifer

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The requirements for reporting transactions involving radiological sealed sources are identified in Department of Energy (DOE) Notice (N) 234.1, Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources. The data reported in accordance with DOE N 234.1 are maintained in the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) database by the Office of Information Management, within the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

139

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Microchannel devices  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of stainless steel microchannel heat exchangers was examined through microlamination, the process of diffusion bonding precision machined metallic foils. The influence of diffusion bonding parameters, as well as the device geometry on the strength of the bond between the foils and embedded channel integrity, was investigated. During diffusion bonding, high temperatures and/or pressures result in well bonded foils, but these conditions cause the embedded channels to deform, which will degrade the efficiency of fluid flow through the channels. Alternatively, low temperatures and/or pressures result in undeformed channels but weakly bonded foils. This causes failure of the device due to fluid leakage. Thus, a processing envelope exists for producing a sound device with no fluid leakage and no degradation of fluid flow properties. The theoretical limit on aspect ratio within two-fluid counter-flow microchannel heat exchangers was also investigated. A counter-flow device is comprised of alternating layers of microchannels, which allow the two fluids to flow in opposite directions separated by fins. A theoretical model for interpreting the span of the fin as a function of the fin thickness was established. The model was verified experimentally by fabricating specimens to simulate the counter-flow device. The results of these investigations were used to aid in the design and processing of prototype microchannel devices.

Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A...

142

Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to Incident Commanders Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to Incident Commanders...

143

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation...

144

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents This part should...

145

Radiological Conditions on Rongelap Atoll: Perspective on Resettlement of Rongelap Atoll  

SciTech Connect

The most widely accepted international guidelines for protection of the public from ionizing radiation and in circumstances related to intervention strategies to reduce exposures to preexisting conditions, such as those on Rongelap Island, come from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Council on Radiation Protection and the International Atomic Energy Agency. By all internationally agreed scientific criteria, present radiological conditions on Rongelap Island are considered safe for permanent resettlement. Safe implies that no additional cancer deaths are expected among those living on Rongelap Island beyond the number that would occur in a community of the same population size, similar ages and mix of males and females, who do not experience exposure to residual fallout by living on the island. It is expected that the average dose received by Rongelap Island residents will fall well below the dose adopted by the Republic of the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claims Tribunal considered a ''safe'' or acceptable health risk. These conclusions are supported by environmental measurements and assessments performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) including the results of radiological surveillance of resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island for various lengths of time from 1999 through 2002, and independent studies conducted by Japanese scientists. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons was responsible for the widespread dispersion of radioactive fallout around the globe. Rongelap Island received higher levels of fallout from local or close-in fallout deposition from nuclear testing on Bikini Atoll. The main pathway for exposure to radiation from the bomb testing is ''internally'' through ingestion of radioactive cesium (cesium-137) taken up from the soil into locally grown foodstuffs. Resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island who ate local foods have volunteered to have the cesium-137 content of their bodies measured. The measuring device is called a whole body counter. A person relaxes in a chair for a few minutes while counts are taken using a detector a few inches away from the body. The whole body counting program on Rongelap Island was established under a cooperative agreement between the Rongelap Atoll Local Government (RALG), the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Local technicians from Rongelap continue to operate the facility under supervision of scientists from LLNL. Whole body counting data collected on resettlement workers during the initial phases of resettlement can tell us what exposure level a permanently resettled population could reasonably expect. The average internal dose to resettlement workers from cesium-137 is less than 1 mrem (0.01 mSv) per year. The highest individual dose observed over the last 3-years was less than 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) per year. The RALG-DOE resettlement support plan also calls for spreading potassium fertilizer across the agricultural areas to prevent the uptake of cesium-137 into plants. Fertilization will reduce the dietary intake of cesium-137 and reduce the dose to island residents. By 2004, over 70 percent of the cesium-137 deposition in soil from fallout in 1954 will have decayed to a non-radioactive substance. Over the next 10-20 years, more than one-half of the remaining cesium-137 in the soil and vegetation of the atoll islands will have disappeared by decay or washed out of the soil by rain. Removing some soil, applying crushed coral around living areas, and spreading potassium fertilizer across agricultural areas will reduce the level of radiation exposure in the resettled population to levels below those considered safe by the Nuclear Claims Tribunal and to levels well below those considered safe by the international scientific community.

Hamilton, T F

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Triage Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Render Safe > Radiological Triage Radiological Triage Triage Logo NNSA's Triage is a non-deployable, secure, on-line capability

149

Detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

Smith, Jay E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Integrating pathology and radiology disciplines: an emerging opportunity?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pediatric vascular malformations: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and the role of interventional radiology.

Sorace, James; Aberle, Denise R; Elimam, Dena; Lawvere, Silvana; Tawfik, Ossama; Wallace, W Dean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

Bzorgi, Fariborz M

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

2.04 - Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter addresses the technologies and the applications of radiology used in the field of oral (or dental) and maxillofacial imaging. While the basic science and x-ray technology are the same as in general radiology, there are here important specialized differentiations that lead to very distinct equipment and procedures compared to general medical imaging. Four major subcategories are discussed: Dedicated x-ray sources for dental intraoral radiology, that is, radiography where the detector is located inside the oral cavity, and the radiographic object consisting of a few teeth Intraoral detectors: (classic) radiographic film, photostimulated-phosphor imaging plates, and solid-state digital detectors (that produce an image immediately) Equipment for panoramic and for cephalometric extraoral radiology Cone beam volumetric imaging (3D x-ray) of the head (aka CBCT)

R. Molteni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Educational strategies in oral and maxillofacial radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we interpret a trend in higher education in terms of its relation to oral and maxillofacial radiology education. Specifically, we describe an “evidence-based dental education” – borrowing from the ...

Madeleine Rohlin; Koji Shinoda; Yumi Takano

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiological safety training for uranium facilities  

SciTech Connect

This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Investigation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Today, the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) released the initial accident investigation report related to the Feb. 14 radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

156

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

157

Impact of dispersed solar and wind systems on electric distribution planning and operation  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale dispersed solar photovoltaic and wind generation (DSW) will affect the generation, transmission, and distribution systems of an electric utility. This study examines the technical and economic impacts of dispersing DSW devices within the distribution system. Dispersed intermittent generation is included. Effects of DSW devices on capital investments, reliability, operating and maintenance costs, protection requirements, and communication and control requirements are examined. A DSW operation model is developed to help determine the dependable capacity of fluctuating solar photovoltaic and wind generation as part of the distribution planning process. Specific case studies using distribution system data and renewable resource data for Southern California Edison Company and Consumers Power Company are analyzed to gain insights into the effects of interconnecting DSW devices. The DSW devices were found to offer some distribution investment savings, depending on their availability during peak loads. For a summer-peaking utility, for example, dispersing photovoltaic systems is more likely to defer distribution capital investments than dispersing wind systems. Dispersing storage devices to increase DSW's dependable capacity for distribution systems needs is not economically attractive. Substation placement of DSW and storage devices is found to be more cost effective than feeder or customer placement. Examination of the effects of DSW on distribution system operation showed that small customer-owned DSW devices are not likely to disrupt present time-current distribution protection coordination. Present maintenance work procedures, are adequate to ensure workmen's safety. Regulating voltages within appropriate limits will become more complex with intermittent generation along the distribution feeders.

Boardman, R.W.; Patton, R.; Curtice, D.H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

159

Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory or ERAD, developed by HS-22, serves as an assistance tool to the DOE complex for protection of the public and environment from radiation. The ERAD is a combination webinar/conference call, designed to provide DOE and its contractors a forum to share information, lessons-learned, best practices, emerging trends, compliance issues, etc. in support of radiological protection programs developed in accordance with DOE O 458.1. ERAD Presentations, Questions and Answers ERAD

160

A radiological evaluation of phosphogypsum  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum is the by-product resulting from phosphoric acid or phosphate fertilizer production. The phosphate used in these chemical processes contains the naturally occurring radioactive material U and all its subsequent decay products. During processing, the U generally remains in the phosphoric acid product, while the daughter, {sup 226}Ra, tends to be concentrated in the phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has physical properties that make it useful as a sub-base for roadways, parking lots, and similar construction. A radiological evaluation, to determine exposures to workers mixing this material with a stabilizing agent (portland cement), was performed at a South Louisiana phosphoric acid chemical plant. Measurements of the {sup 226}Ra content of the phosphogypsum showed an average of 1.1 +/- 0.3 Bq g-1 (0.7-1.7 Bq g-1). The average measured gross gamma exposure rate on the phosphogypsum pile corresponded to a dose equivalent rate of 0.368 +/- 0.006 mu Sv h-1 (0.32-0.42 mu Sv h-1). Radon daughter concentrations measured on top of the phosphogypsum pile ranged from 0.0006 to 0.001 working levels. An analysis of the airborne {sup 226}Ra concentrations showed only background levels.

Laiche, T.P.; Scott, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Doses to patients from dental radiology in France  

SciTech Connect

In France, a national study was undertaken to estimate both dental radiology practices (equipment and activity) and the associated population collective dose. This study was done in two steps: A nationwide survey was conducted on the practitioner categories involved in dental radiology, and dosimetric measurements were performed on patients and on an anthropomorphic phantom by using conventional dental x-ray machines and pantomographic units. A total of 27.5 x 10(6) films were estimated to have been performed in 1984; 6% of them were pantomographic and 94% were conventional. Most of the organ doses measured for one intra-oral film were lower than 1 mGy (100 mrad); pantomogram dose values were generally higher than intra-oral ones. The collective effective dose equivalent figure was 2,000 person-Sv (2 x 10(5) person rem) leading to a per head dose equivalent of 0.037 mSv (3.7 mrem). The study allowed authors to identify ways to reduce the patient dose in France (e.g., implementing the use of long cone devices and controlling darkroom practices).

Benedittini, M.; Maccia, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F. (Centre d'etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Determination of dispersivities from a natural-gradient dispersion test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and radioactive wastes. Contaminant hydrogeology is presently a focal point in the realm of hydrologic modeling. Generally, models are designed to represent simplified versions of reality and The style and format of this document was taken from the Journal... dispersivities, v ia a graphical approach, from a natural-gradient dispersion test in which artificial pollution was injected into an aquifer. The dispersion test was conducted by Sud icky et al. (1983) in order to characterize the dispersive properties...

Hoover, Caroline Marie

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs.

Elder, J.C.; Graf, J.M.; Dewart, J.M.; Buhl, T.E.; Wenzel, W.J.; Walker, L.J.; Stoker, A.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mobile Device Guide Google Android based devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile Device Guide ­ Google Android based devices CSUF Date Last Revised: 1/20/11 Page 1 of 3;Mobile Device Guide ­ Google Android based devices CSUF Date Last Revised: 1/20/11 Page 2 of 3 2. Under' with your campus username and enter your password (case sensitive). 4. Tap `next'. #12;Mobile Device Guide

de Lijser, Peter

166

Uncertainty propagation in puff-based dispersion models using polynomial chaos Umamaheswara Konda a,*, Tarunraj Singh a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based dispersion model is used as a test case to study the effect of uncertainties in the model parameters and radiological incidents like the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 (National Research Council (U.S.), 2003 of the releases, some of which are addressed in the (Environmental Protection Agency) EPA's Guide- line on Air

Singh, Tarunraj

167

3, 895923, 2006 Dispersivity behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ground-water remediation or protection work. Dispersivity is established as one of the key uncertain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

168

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology Radiology Department Management Technology Associate of Technical Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology ­ Radiology Department Management Technology ­ Associate-Nov-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However technology, housed at the Salem Campus. Course Subject and Title Credit Hours Min. Grade Major GPA Important

Sheridan, Scott

169

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electrochromic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochromic device includes a first substrate spaced from a second substrate. A first conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the first substrate. A first electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the first conductive member. The first electrochromic material includes an organic material. A second conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the second substrate. A second electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the second conductive member. The second electrochromic material includes an inorganic material. An ionic liquid is positioned between the first electrochromic material and the second electrochromic material.

Schwendemanm, Irina G. (Wexford, PA); Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Finley, James J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Boykin, Cheri M. (Kingsport, TN); Knowles, Julianna M. (Apollo, PA)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

OLED devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An OLED device having an emission layer formed of an ambipolar phosphine oxide host material and a dopant, a hole transport layer in electrical communication with an anode, an electron transport layer in communication with a cathode, wherein the HOMO energy of the hole transport layer is substantially the same as the HOMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer, and the LUMO energy of the electron transport layer is substantially the same as the LUMO energy of the ambipolar host in the emission layer.

Sapochak, Linda Susan [Arlington, VA; Burrows, Paul Edward [Kennewick, WA; Bimalchandra, Asanga [Richland, WA

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Diversionary device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diversionary device has a housing having at least one opening and containing a non-explosive propellant and a quantity of fine powder packed within the housing, with the powder being located between the propellant and the opening. When the propellant is activated, it has sufficient energy to propel the powder through the opening to produce a cloud of powder outside the housing. An igniter is also provided for igniting the cloud of powder to create a diversionary flash and bang, but at a low enough pressure to avoid injuring nearby people.

Grubelich, Mark C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited)  

SciTech Connect

Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO{sub 2} laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup ?3} is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10{sup 20} m{sup ?3} can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

Akiyama, T., E-mail: takiyama@lhd.nifs.ac.jp; Yasuhara, R.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K. [Chubu University, Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai-shi, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Interconnector device  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an interconnector device that allows a lithium-type battery to be substituted for a Leclanche battery. The Leclanche battery is of predetermined dimensions and has a pair of coil spring connection terminals at predetermined locations on the top surface thereof. The lithium battery of different predetermined dimensions than the Lechanche battery and has a pair of female connection sockets positioned at a predetermined off-center location on the top surface. The locations of the coil spring terminals and the connection sockets of the respective batteries are at substantially different non-matching positions, comprising a thin flat water of non-conducive material of predetermined size and configuration, the wafer having the same cross-section dimensions as the Leclanche battery. A pair of prongs on the underside surface of the wafer and at locations correspond to the locations of the female connection sockets of the lithium battery. The prongs received into the female connection sockets when the interconnector device is mounted on the lithium batter. A pair of coil spring connection terminals mounted on the opposite of top surface of the wafer and having a configuration which matches that of the connection terminals of the Leclanche battery and positioned at locations which corresponds to the locations of the coil spring connection terminals of the Leclanche battery. A pair of electrical conductors plated on the underside surface of the wafer for respectively interconnecting the pairs of prongs and the pair of coil spring connection terminals in parallel.

Christopulos, J.A.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

177

Phonon dispersion in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taking into account the constraints imposed by the lattice symmetry, the phonon dispersion is calculated for graphene with interactions between the first and second nearest neighbors in the framework of the Born-von Karman model. Analytical expressions are obtained for the out-of-plane (bending) modes determined only by two force constants as well as for the in-plane modes with four force constants. Values of the force constants are found in fitting to elastic constants and Raman frequencies observed in graphite.

L. A. Falkovsky

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

Optoelectronic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an optoelectronic device comprising an active portion which converts light to electricity or converts electricity to light, the active portion having a front side for the transmittal of the light and a back side opposite from the front side, at least two electrical leads to the active portion to convey electricity to or from the active portion, an enclosure surrounding the active portion and through which the at least two electrical leads pass wherein the hermetically sealed enclosure comprises at the front side of the active portion a barrier material which allows for transmittal of light, one or more getter materials disposed so as to not impede the transmission of light to or from the active portion, and a contiguous gap pathway to the getter material which pathway is disposed between the active portion and the barrier material.

Bonekamp, Jeffrey E.; Boven, Michelle L.; Gaston, Ryan S.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Phonon dispersion in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Taking into account constraints imposed by the lattice symmetry we calculate analytically [1] the phonon dispersion for graphene with interactions between first and second neighbors. We find that the out?of?plane (bending) modes are not coupled with in?plane modes and described only with two force constants one of which is determined by the corresponding Raman frequency and another by the smallest elastic constant C44. In contrast to calculations by Saito et al we find the linear dispersion of the bending (out?of?plane) mode around the ? point with a small but finite sound velocity =1.57 km/s. The sound velocity of this mode is very sensitive to small variations of the force constants. The sound velocities of in?plane modes are = 20.3 km/s and =13.1 km/s. Because of the lack of information for graphene we compare the present theory with experiments on graphite. The low phonon frequencies in the critical points turn out less than their values in graphite since the atoms in graphene are more free to move in the out?of?plane direction in comparison with graphite. Accuracy of the comparison can be estimated using the value of the observed splitting of the ZA and ZO' modes in graphite which is around 130 1/cm. [1] L.A. Falkovsky cond?mat/0702409.

Leonid A. Falkovsky

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors May 29, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Jessie Welch performs...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

182

Method And Apparatus For Reducing Sample Dispersion In Turns And Junctions Of Micro-Channel Systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed pertains to improvement in the performance of microchannel devices by providing turns, wyes, tees, and other junctions that produce little dispersion of a sample as it traverses the turn or junction. The reduced dispersion results from contraction and expansion regions that reduce the cross-sectional area over some portion of the turn or junction. By carefully designing the geometries of these regions, sample dispersion in turns and junctions is reduced to levels comparable to the effects of ordinary diffusion. The low dispersion features are particularly suited for microfluidic devices and systems using either electromotive force, pressure, or combinations thereof as the principle of fluid transport. Such microfluidic devices and systems are useful for separation of components, sample transport, reaction, mixing, dilution or synthesis, or combinations thereof.

Griffiths, Stewart K. (Danville, CA), Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA)

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - arms aerial radiological Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Diagnostic Radiology * Clinical Rotation Breast Imaging... * Clinical Rotation Pediatric Radiology * Clinical Rotation Nuclear Medicine Semester ... Source: VandeVord,...

184

Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety Page 1 of 2 FORM LU-1 Revision 01 1 safety training and submit this registration to the LSO prior to use of Class 3B or 4 lasers. A copy will be returned to the Laser Supervisor to be filed in the Laboratory Laser Safety Notebook. Both the Laser

Houston, Paul L.

185

Feminist theoretical perspectives on ethics in radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......about the substantive public health issues? In the Western world...female cancer, and yet public health systems come under serious...accorded the best education, health care, nutrition or technology...unwanted food or inferior or even dangerous radiological or other technical......

Mary Condren

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient. Phys...C. A. and Persliden, J. Energy imparted to the patient in diagnostic...factors for determining the energy imparted from measurements of...dental radiology. | Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality......

Ebba Helmrot; Gudrun Alm Carlsson

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2014 Radiological Concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2014 Radiological Concentration Fall Math 141 or 147 (4) FA, SP, SU-approved by the department. Courses in Nuclear Engineering other than 500, 502 or 598 may also be used as technical electives. No more than four (4) credit hours of nuclear engineering courses in which a C- or lower is the highest

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

188

Development of radiological concentrations and unit liter doses for TWRS FSAR radiological consequence calculations  

SciTech Connect

The analysis described in this report develops the Unit Liter Doses for use in the TWRS FSAR. The Unit Liter Doses provide a practical way to calculate conservative radiological consequences for a variety of potential accidents for the tank farms.

Cowley, W.L.

1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nano dispersion amplified waveguide structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly dispersive waveguide structure is proposed tocefficiently compress and expand ultra short pulses in a package forming a sufficiently small footprint. A sub-wavelength...

Brown, J; Johnson, Eric; Moharam, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The effects of using Cesium-137 teletherapy sources as a radiological weapon (dirty bomb)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While radioactive sources used in medical diagnosis do not pose a great security risk due to their low level of radioactivity, therapeutic sources are extremely radioactive and can presumably be used as a radiological weapon. Cobalt-60 and Cesium-137 sources are the most common ones used in radiotherapy with over 10,000 of such sources currently in use worldwide, especially in the developing world, which cannot afford modern accelerators. The present study uses computer simulations to investigate the effects of using Cesium-137 sources from teletherapy devices as a radiological weapon. Assuming a worst-case terrorist attack scenario, we estimate the ensuing cancer mortality, land contamination, evacuation area, as well as the relevant evacuation, decontamination, and health costs in the framework of the linear risk model. The results indicate that an attack with a Cesium-137 dirty bomb in a large metropolitan city (especially one that would involve several teletherapy sources) although would not cause any sta...

Liolios, Theodore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion Practical Air Pollution Dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Pollution Air Pollution Dispersion 1 of 5 Practical ­ Air Pollution Dispersion in the lectures how such models can be used to explain observed concentrations of air pollutants in an area and to test `what-if' scenarios for pollution control and reduction. You will use the Gaussian Plume Model

Moncrieff, John B.

192

Integration of Laser-Welded Ag Nanowire Transparent Conducting Layers on Photovoltaic Devices (DMR-0819860)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of Laser-Welded Ag Nanowire Transparent Conducting Layers on Photovoltaic Devices (DMR conducting layers in applications ranging from organic flexible electronics to rigid photovoltaics. However of a hybrid organic photovoltaic device [1]. The NWs are dispersed on the device and the network is welded

Petta, Jason

193

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Protection Standards Radiological Protection Standards Instructor's Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of the 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" Instructional Aids:

194

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Considerations for First Aid Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. i 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. INTRODUCTION "Standard first aid is applied prior to contamination control whenever it is considered to have life-saving value, or is important to the patient for relief of pain or prevention of

195

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid 5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. L 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. References: 1. Basic Radiation Protection Technology (2nd edition) - Daniel A. Gollnick 2. Operational Health Physics Training - H. J. Moe

196

French Sizing of Medical Devices is not Fit for Purpose  

SciTech Connect

PurposeThe purpose of the study is to quantify the variation in the metric equivalent of French size in a range of medical devices, from various manufacturers, used in interventional radiology.MethodsThe labelling of a range of catheters, introducers, drains, balloons, stents, and endografts was examined. Products were chosen to achieve a broad range of French sizes from several manufacturers. To assess manufacturing accuracy, eight devices were selected for measurement using a laser micrometer. The external diameters of three specimens of each device were measured at centimeter intervals along the length of the device to ensure uniformity.ResultsA total of 200 labels of interventional radiology equipment were scrutinized. The results demonstrate a wide variation in the metric equivalent of French sizing. Labelled products can vary in diameter across the product range by up to 0.79 mm.The devices selected for measurement with the non-contact laser micrometer demonstrate acceptable manufacturing consistency. The external diameter differed by 0.05 mm on average.ConclusionsOur results demonstrate wide variation in the interpretation of the French scale by different manufacturers of medical devices. This has the potential to lead to problems using coaxial systems especially when the products are from different manufacturers. It is recommended that standard labelling should be employed by all manufacturers conveying specific details of the equipment. Given the wide variation in the interpretation of the French scale, our opinion is that this scale either needs to be abandoned or be strictly defined and followed.

Kibriya, Nabil, E-mail: nabskib@yahoo.co.uk; Hall, Rebecca; Powell, Steven [The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); How, Thien [University of Liverpool, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences (United Kingdom); McWilliams, Richard G. [The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modeling volcanic ash dispersal  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Connector device for building integrated photovoltaic device  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is premised upon a connector device and method that can more easily electrically connect a plurality of PV devices or photovoltaic system components and/or locate these devices/components upon a building structure. It also may optionally provide some additional sub-components (e.g. at least one bypass diode and/or an indicator means) and may enhance the serviceability of the device.

Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Eurich, Gerald K.; Lesniak, Michael J.; Mazor, Michael H.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Gaston, Ryan S.

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microsoft Word - Berger Radiological Conditions.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dec. Dec. 2, 2009 1 Summary of Information Regarding Radiological Conditions of NFSS Vicinity Properties J. D. Berger, CHP DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc. Oak Ridge, TN The following is a summary of the information obtained from reviews of radiological survey reports, prepared by ORAU in support of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. These reports were obtained for review from the IVEA Program at ORAU/ORISE. A list of the reports, reviewed for this summary, is included at the end of this report. Hard copies of reports for ORAU survey activities of NFSS and NFSS Vicinity Properties are available at the South Campus Site of ORAU (these reports are not available in electronic form). In addition, there are 12 - 14 boxes of hard-copy supporting data and information, pertinent to the surveys. I inspected the contents of Box 54. That box contained records for NFSS Vicinity

200

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 May 2002 Reaffirmation with Change Notice 2 July 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change Notice No.2 Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities Page/Section Change Throughout the document: Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Revised to: Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement

202

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 7% 2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NFOO2) J. K. Williams* and B. A. Berven *Biology Division Date Published November 1986 Investigation Team B. A. Berven - RASA Program Manager W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director W. H. Shinpaugh - Field Survey Supervisor

203

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

145-2008 145-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2008 Program Management Guide

204

Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HDBK-1113-2008 DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in DOE-STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS). Its purpose is to assist those individuals, Department of Energy (DOE) employees, Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors, and Managing and Integrating

205

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 Program Management Foreword

206

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

207

Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

Radiological Control Managers’ Council

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site`s 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, and thermoluminescent and radiochromic dosimetry. The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, and a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentations, photon transfer standards and alpha, beta and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory. Photographs that accompany the text appear in the Appendix and are designated Figure A.1 through A.29.

Goles, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Uncertainty analyses for radiological assessments of St. Louis FUSRAP Sites  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty analyses were performed in conjunction with radiological assessments of the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the Airport Site (SLAPS), and the Ball Field Site (SLBFS). Contaminants of concern at each location are natural uranium, radium, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 230}Th. The SLDS was used for uranium and thorium ore processing and includes an area of 45 acres. The SLAPS covers 22 acres and was used as a staging area for materials from the SLDS. Contaminants on the SLEFS were dispersed from the SLAPS, which involves an area of 80 acres. Significant levels of uranium contamination range from near zero to several thousand pCi/g and extend to about 20 feet in depth in a few locations at SLAPS and SLDS. Significant areas of peak radium and thorium concentrations are several hundred pCi/g with similar ranges in depth. Peak concentrations correspond to high grade ore. Radium and thorium constitute a greater radiological hazard than does uranium at all three locations. In order to satisfy the Environmental Protection Agency guideline for a lifetime risk of less than 10{sup -4}, the maximally exposed individual must receive less than about 4 mrem y{sup -1} if one assumes a risk of 5% per Sv. Based on the plant ingestion pathway, residual {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 230}Th, concentrations of 400, 2, 4, and 40 pCi g{sup -1} at SLDS result in a 10{sup -4} lifetime risk with a 95% confidence level. Slightly different results were obtained for SLAPS and SLBFS. If more pathways are considered, such as radon, these values are even lower. Residual contamination levels could be increased by a factor of 25 if the historical Department of Energy limit of 100 mrem y{sup -1} is acceptable. The volume of contaminated soil that presents a 10{sup -4} lifetime risk is about 500,000 yd{sup 3}. The volume of soil contaminated to greater than 15 pCi g{sup -1} of each radionuclide is about a factor of ten less.

Miller, L.F.; Spencer, K.M.; White, D.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ballistic dispersion in temperature gradient focusing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regime is the most familiar regime in microfluidic systems, an oft-overlooked regime is that of purely kinematic (or ballistic) dispersion. In most microfluidic systems, this dispersion regime is transient systems. Keywords: microfluidics; temperature gradient focusing; kinematic dispersion; Taylor

Santiago, Juan G.

211

Thermal Ordering in Mixed Nanoclay Dispersions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter investigates the temperature induced orientational ordering in 1:1 Laponite-MMT dispersion. This dispersion showed thermally activated irreversible conformational phase transition from mostly isot...

Ravi Kumar Pujala

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Controlling particle dispersion in latex paints containing associative thickeners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dispersants—high carboxylate dispersant (polyacrylic acid), a range of dispersants with varying amounts of carboxylate (i.e ... monomer), a hydrophobic dispersant (olefin/maleic acid copo...

Edward Kostansek

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Instructor's Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. L 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

214

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technican Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Study Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. i 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

215

Surveillance Guides - RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the workers and comply with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection 2.2 DOE/EH-0256T, rev. 1, Radiological Control Manual 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement RP-0024 from the RL S/RID. This requirement comes from the Radiological Control Manual. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative performs the following activities to evaluate the effectiveness of work practices by contractor personnel in minimizing exposure to radiological hazards.

216

Feminist theoretical perspectives on ethics in radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from her work in feminist theory and from listening to contributors to the debate. Feminist...channelled through pharmaceutical and medical device companies, but little or no research...enhancing such low-technological diagnostic devices and procedures as an initiative that would......

Mary Condren

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Lab Breakthrough: Fusion Research Leads to Antiterrorism Device |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fusion Research Leads to Antiterrorism Device Fusion Research Leads to Antiterrorism Device Lab Breakthrough: Fusion Research Leads to Antiterrorism Device June 26, 2012 - 12:17pm Addthis Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory developed an antiterrorism device that can detect and identify sources of dangerous radiation that could be used in a dirty bomb. See the other Lab Breakthrough videos on the YouTube playlist. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What is MINDS? MINDS stands for Miniature Integrated Nuclear Detection System The system detects and identifies radiological conditions under a variety of real-world environments - for instance in a shipping yard, at an airport, or public building. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Charles Gentile, Lead Developer of

218

Efficient light emitting devices utilizing CdSe(ZnS) quantum dots in organic host matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate efficient electroluminescence from thin film structures containing core-shell CdSe(ZnS) quantum dots dispersed in molecular organic host materials. In the most efficient devices, excitons are created on the ...

Coe-Sullivan, Seth (Seth Alexander)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thin film lithium-based batteries and electrochromic devices fabricated with nanocomposite electrode materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin-film lithium-based batteries and electrochromic devices (10) are fabricated with positive electrodes (12) comprising a nanocomposite material composed of lithiated metal oxide nanoparticles (40) dispersed in a matrix composed of lithium tungsten oxide.

Gillaspie, Dane T; Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, John Roland

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

Actuation of shape memory polymer using magnetic fields for applications in medical devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel approach to the heating and actuation of shape memory polymer using dispersed Curie temperature thermo-regulated particles is proposed. Such a material has potential applications in medical devices which are delivered ...

Buckley, Patrick Regan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

222

NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management System | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency ... Press Release NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management

223

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

224

Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by...

225

Analysis of nuclear test TRINITY radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the TRINITY nuclear test. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. Comparisons of the WSNSO fallout analyses with analyses performed in the 1940s are presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1987 fallout patterns are tabulated in appendices.

Quinn, V.E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ornl< ORNLRASA-8664 (MJ18V) orni OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL EZ-BBBB - *VERIFICATION SURVEY AT THE BALLOD ASSOCIATES PROPERTY,...

227

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

228

DOE, Westinghouse to Partner with NMJC To Train Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Partner with NMJC To Train Radiological and Waste Handling Technicians Hobbs, NM, December 5, 2001 -- Representatives of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) yesterday...

229

Trending and root cause analysis of TWRS radiological problem reports  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a uniform method for trending and performing root cause analysis for radiological problem reports at Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS).

Brown, R.L.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

231

DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H,...

232

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Heating device for semiconductor wafers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

Vosen, Steven R. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Heating device for semiconductor wafers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

Vosen, S.R.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

The leaded apron revisited: does it reduce gonadal radiation dose in dental radiology  

SciTech Connect

A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic human phantom was used with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry system to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose to the ovarian and testicular region during dental radiologic procedures. Measurements were made with and without personal lead shielding devices consisting of thyroid collar and apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalence. The radiation absorbed dose with or without lead shielding did not differ significantly from control dosimeters in vertex occlusal and periapical views (p greater than 0.05). Personal lead shielding devices did reduce gonadal dose in the case of accidental exposure (p less than 0.05). A leaded apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalent was permeable to radiation in direct exposure testing.

Wood, R.E.; Harris, A.M.; van der Merwe, E.J.; Nortje, C.J. (Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Dispersion engineering of high-Q silicon microresonators via thermal oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and demonstrate a convenient and sensitive technique for precise engineering of group-velocity dispersion in high-Q silicon microresonators. By accurately controlling the surface-oxidation thickness of silicon microdisk resonators, we are able to precisely manage the zero-dispersion wavelength while simultaneously further improving the high optical quality of our devices, with the optical Q close to a million. The demonstrated dispersion management allows us to achieve parametric generation with precisely engineerable emission wavelengths, which shows great potential for application in integrated silicon nonlinear and quantum photonics.

Jiang, Wei C; Usechak, Nicholas G; Lin, Qiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Present Role of Radiological Methods in Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Present Role of Radiological Methods in Engineering R. Halmshaw A brief outline of the history of industrial radiology is given. Major...of metals and metal thicknesses used in engineering, X-ray energies from 20 keV to 30 MeV...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Printed circuit dispersive transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Printed circuit dispersive transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

Ikezi, Hiroyuki (Rancho Santa Fe, CA); Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren (San Diego, CA); DeGrassie, John S. (Encinitas, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Bipolar thermoelectric devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work presented here is a theoretical and experimental study of heat production and transport in bipolar electrical devices, with detailed treatment of thermoelectric effects. Both homojunction and heterojunction devices ...

Pipe, Kevin P. (Kevin Patrick), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

242

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established

243

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Radiological Assessment and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develops Paperless Tool to Assist with Data Input Into Radiological Develops Paperless Tool to Assist with Data Input Into Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System During the Empire 09 exercise, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) tested (for the first time) a paperless system of data management to support the operations of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The paperless FRMAC (pFRMAC) provides tools that enables the FRMAC to collect and process field measurements and samples following a radiological or nuclear event. The process allows field data to be entered into specialized electronic tablets that are then sent to the Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System (RAMS). RAMS is the hub of pFRMAC that provides data analysis to the consequence management home team and

244

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded International Radiological Assistance Program Training for Emergency Response (I-RAPTER) in Slovenia. The training, co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was provided to 36 nuclear/radiological emergency responders, which included 15 participants from Slovenia and 21 students from 20 other countries. The training was conducted with involvement of personnel from Sandia National Laboratories, the Remote Sensing Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory. To read more about the training see: http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/mediaroom/pressreleases/slovenia Posted on March 22, 2012 at 4:13 pm ET

245

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Protection Standards Radiation Protection Standards Study Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Module 1.09 Radiation Protection Standards

246

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas Summary This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.) PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 28, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension Recycling of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas December 12, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental

247

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

248

Radiological consequences of a propagated fire accident in a radiochemical separations facility  

SciTech Connect

A radiological consequence analysis of a propagated fire accident in a Savannah River Site (SRS) radiochemical separations facility has been performed. This analysis supports the safety documentation for the SRS plutonium reprocessing facility. Included are the evaluation of the doses resulting from the exposure to the radioactive airborne release for co-located facility worker and the off-site individual receptors. Atmospheric dispersion calculations using qualified five-year (1987-1991) meteorological data were performed with the computer code AXAIR89Q, a validated computer code for radiological dose calculations. Radioactive source term estimates and assumptions of material composition and isotope distribution were based on existing permissible storage levels as defined in approved safety documentation. The fire accident scenario assumes that the fire propagates in the entire facility on four structural levels. Approximately 97% of the radioactive materials released occurs from levels three and four of the facility, which are not included in the ventilation pathway to the sand trap filter. Radiological analysis results indicate that the doses to co-located worker and off-site individual receptors are equal to 4.4 rem and 3.3 rem, respectively. Accident mitigators that were identified include provision for filtration capacity from levels three and four of the facility, and relocation of stored radioactive materials. Provision for filtration capacity would reduce the source term from an unfiltered activity of 53.6 Ci to a filtered activity of 2.0 Ci. Relocation of stored radioactive materials would result in a source term reduction from 53.6 Ci to 20 Ci. Limitations exist, however, that may make implementation of the identified mitigators difficult or prohibitive.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pulse detecting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, W.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Enhancing Diagnostic Accuracy in Oral Radiology: A Case for the Basic Sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Background: Cognitive processing in diagnostic oral radiology requires a solid foundation in the basic sciences as well as knowledge of the radiologic changes associated with… (more)

Baghdady, Mariam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids radiological findings Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pulmonary edema... administrative codes that will aid in billing and quality assurance. The radiology report should record... of Radiology. ACR prac- tice guideline for...

254

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Preparing for the Threat of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amber Waves ORISE coordinates tabletop exercise to help agencies prepare for the threat of dirty bombs Radiological dispersion devices (RDDs), also known as dirty bombs, are...

255

Articulating feedstock delivery device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

Jordan, Kevin

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Organic photosensitive devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nonlinear dispersion and compact structures  

SciTech Connect

Relaxing the distinguished ordering underlying the derivation of soliton supporting equations leads to new equations endowed with nonlinear dispersion crucial for the formation and coexistence of compactons, solitons with a compact support, and conventional solitons. Vibrations of the anharmonic mass-spring chain lead to a new Boussinesq equation admitting compactons and compact breathers. The model equation [ital u][sub [ital t

Rosenau, P. (Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel) Center For Nonlinear Studies, MS-B258 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

Multiple overseas dispersal in amphibians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other islands in the western Indian Ocean have been subject to intense...amphibians, which in the western Indian Ocean region are mostly rep...further used as a new calibration point of a molecular clock. We thereby...amphibian overseas dispersal in the Indian Ocean region and the origin...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

5, 1196512030, 2005 Dispersion on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 11965­12030, 2005 Dispersion on complex terrain under winter conditions J. L. Palau et al-resolution mesoscale and Lagrangian particle models J. L. Palau1 , G. P´erez-Landa1 , J. Meli´a2 , D. Segarra2 , and M November 2005 ­ Published: 22 November 2005 Correspondence to: J. L. Palau (jlp@confluencia.biz) © 2005

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

260

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

262

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

263

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

264

Radiological assessment of BWR recirculatory pipe replacement  

SciTech Connect

Replacement of primary recirculating coolant pipe in BWRs is a major effort that has been carried out at a number of nuclear generating stations. This report reviews the planned or actual pipe replacement projects at six sites: Nine Mile Point-1, Monticello, Cooper, Peach Bottom-2, Vermont Yankee, and Browns Ferry-1. It covers the radiological issues of the pipe replacement, measures taken to reduce doses to ALARA, estimated and actual occupational doses, and lessons learned during the various replacements. The basis for the decisions to replace the pipes, the methods used for preparation and decontamination, the removal of old pipe, and the installation of the new pipe are briefly described. Methods for reducing occupational radiation dose during pipe repairs/replacements are recommended. 32 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Parkhurst, M.A.; Hadlock, D.E.; Harty, R.; Pappin, J.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Radiological Control Change Notice 1 Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: May DATE: May 20, 2004 REPLY TO EH-52:Judith D. Foulke:301 :903-5865 ATTN OF: CHANGE NOTICE TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANDBOOK, DOE-STD- SUBJECT. 1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TO: George Detsis, EH-3 1 This memorandum forwards Change Notice Number 1 to subject DOE Technical Standard, DOE-STD-1098-99. The changes are being made as part of the 5-year review of the standard. The table inserted into the document details the changes. After the changes are made, a notice of intent to reaffirm memorandum will be issued. A compact disk (CD) of the revised document in MS Word and in PDF format is attached. If there are any questions, please contact Dr. Judith Foulke of my staff on 3-5865 or electronic mail (Judy.Foulke@eh.doe.gov). ill R. McArthur, PhD, C1}T Office Director Office of Worker Protection Policy

266

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.  

SciTech Connect

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Testing, Training, and Signature Devices | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing, Testing, Training, and ... Testing, Training, and Signature Devices Y-12 manufactures specialized uranium testing, training, and signature devices to support the nuclear detection community. As part of our national security mission, and in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we are producing unique test objects for passive gamma ray signature analysis. Y-12 is fabricating new Highly Enriched Uranium Equivalent Radiological Signature Training Devices, tools that use an innovative method to replicate a much larger mass of uranium. These objects contain small amounts of U-235 embedded in an aluminum alloy. When seen by a detector, however, the gamma ray signature is nearly equivalent to a much larger amount of U-235, due to the alloying effect that minimizes the uranium

268

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment August 4, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 The public is invited to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment that the U.S. Department of Energy has published for a proposed radiological response training range at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). At the range, INL experts would train personnel, conduct exercises, and perform technology evaluation and demonstrations in support of national technical nuclear forensic and radiological emergency response programs. �The Radiological Response Training Range will allow emergency responders to prepare for a major radiological incident by training in an environment that safely simulates scenarios they might encounter,� said Vic Pearson, DOE�s document manager for the environmental assessment. �Activities at the range would directly support the nation�s readiness to respond to a radiological incident, but more importantly, would enable responders to develop proficiency in characterizing the scene in support of determining the origins of the incident.�

269

Center for Devices and Radiological Health DESIGN CONTROL GUIDANCEDESIGN CONTROL GUIDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.30 and Sub-clause 4.4 of ISO 9001 March 11, 1997 #12;#12;i FOREWORD To ensure that good quality assurance a framework that manufacturers must use when developing and implementing design controls. The framework #12;iii PREFACE Effective implementation of design controls requires that the regulation and its

Vetter, Frederick J.

270

APPENDIX B: HANDBOOKS PRODUCED BY THE CENTER FOR DEVICES AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH (CDRH)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Medical Imaging APPENDIX B: HANDBOOKS PRODUCED BY THE CENTER FOR...correction is given in the Handbook ( Stern et al., 1995b...because the absorbed dose does not depend on the size of the...B.5. Sample tabulation: Handbook of Tissue Doses for Fluoroscopic......

APPENDIX B: HANDBOOKS PRODUCED BY THE CENTER FOR DEVICES AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH (CDRH)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

272

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers

273

Mobile Device Guide Apple iPhone Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile Device Guide ­ Apple iPhone Devices CSUF Date Last Revised: 1/20/11 Page 1 of 3 ConnectingPhone desktop. 1a. Expand `Mail, Contacts, Calendars' as shown. #12;Mobile Device Guide ­ Apple iPhone Devices (case sensitive). 4. Tap `next'. #12;Mobile Device Guide ­ Apple iPhone Devices CSUF Date Last Revised

de Lijser, Peter

274

Shear dispersion in dense granular flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the P\\'eclet number squared, as in classical Taylor--Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extensions to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

Christov, Ivan C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gravitational dispersion in a torsional wave machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that mechanical waves traveling in a torsional, mechanical wave machine exhibit dispersion due to gravity and the discreteness of the medium. We also show that although the dispersion due to discreteness is negligible, the dispersion due to gravity can be easily measured, and can be shown to disappear in a zero-gravity environment.

Rafael de la Madrid; Alejandro Gonzalez; George Irwin

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, C.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Each element within an array of metamaterial (MM) elements comprises multiple loops and at least one gap. The MM elements may comprise resonators with conductive loops and insulated gaps, or the inverse in which insulated loops are present with conductive gaps; each providing useful transmissive control properties. The metamaterial elements are fabricated on a semiconducting substrate configured with a

279

Composite Thermoelectric Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Composite thermoelectric devices incorporating common conductors laminated between P- and N-type thermoelectric plates demonstrate internal ohmic loss reduction and enhanced performance

280

Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

Owen, L.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Instructor's Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. L 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. L 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. L 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. L 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. L 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. L

282

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Overheads  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13.1 13.1 Overhead 13.1 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators Objectives: * Identify the general characteristics of accelerators. * Identify the types of particles accelerated. * Identify the two basic types of accelerators. * Identify uses for accelerators. * Define prompt radiation. * Identify prompt radiation sources. OT 13.2 Overhead 13.2 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Define radioactivation. * Explain how contaminated material differs from activated material with regard to radiological concerns. * Identify activation sources. OT 13.3 Overhead 13.3 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Identify engineered and administrative controls at accelerator facilities. * Identify the special

283

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

284

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2008 30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work

285

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

286

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

287

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Study Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. i 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. i 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. i 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. i 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. i 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. i 2.13.07

288

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste

289

A comparative study of quality control in diagnostic radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......effective National Regulatory Authority in Syria...radiological and Nuclear Regulatory Office, for his...2 Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. Atlas of Reference Plans for Medical Diagnostic...Burkhart R. L. A review of the experience......

M. H. Kharita; M. S. Khedr; K. M. Wannus

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2008 30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work

291

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: ... Fact Sheet Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet

292

DOE-HDBK-1143-2001; Radiological Control Training for Supervisors - Course Introduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

143-2001 143-2001 Instructor's Guide DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Administrative Policies and Procedures Objectives: Upon completion of this training, the student will be able to: 1. Identify the radiological controlled areas a person should be allowed to enter after successfully completing General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I training, and Radiological Worker II training. 2. List five actions used to increase the awareness level of workers relating to proper radiological work practices. 3. Identify three conditions when a "Stop Radiological Work" should be initiated. 4. Identify the actions that should be performed, prior to recommencement of work, after a "Stop Radiological Work" order has been initiated.

293

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

Dudar, Aed M. (Augusta, GA); Wagner, David G. (Augusta, GA); Teese, Gregory D. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile robotic system that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console.

Dudar, Aed M. (Dearborn, MI); Ward, Clyde R. (Aiken, SC); Jones, Joel D. (Aiken, SC); Mallet, William R. (Cowichan Bay, CA); Harpring, Larry J. (North Augusta, SC); Collins, Montenius X. (Blackville, SC); Anderson, Erin K. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Mobile Device Management Android Device Enrollment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to manage your device. c. Enter your password. #12;d. Accept the Terms and Conditions e. You have completed. 2. Get Touchdown from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search for Touchdown. c. Use the application. #12;3. Get Citrix Mobile Connect from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search

300

A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology  

SciTech Connect

To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

Koetser, Inge C. J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Vries, Eefje N. de [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Smorenburg, Susanne M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Self-actuated device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

Hecht, Samuel L. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Pulse charging device  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a device for pulse charging of capacitor storage devices of high-power nanosecond generators. The charging voltage reaches 30 kV, the charged capacitance is 2-100 nF, the charging time is 5-10 usec, the pulse frequency reaches 10 kHz, and the average power of the device is 15 kW. The device uses two-section oscillatory charging of the capacitors from a dc supply through high-speed thyristors and a pulse transformer. The described device is intended for use as part of a test bench for high-power nanosecond pulse generators for pumping gas lasers and their components.

Butakov, L.D.; Dubich, V.K.; Lashuk, N.A.; Shubkin, N.G.; Vizir', V.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fluidic nanotubes and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); He, Rongrui (El Cerrito, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yiying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Planar electrochemical device assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

Jacobson; Craig P. (Lafayette, CA), Visco; Steven J. (Berkeley, CA), De Jonghe; Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1?° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

Tun-Jen Hsiao; Tsehaye Eyassu; Kimberly Henderson; Taesam Kim; Chhiu-Tsu Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Device for calibrating a radiation detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Device for calibrating a radiation detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

Mc Fee, Matthew C. (New Ellenton, SC); Kirkham, Tim J. (Beech Island, SC); Johnson, Tippi H. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

RSAC -6 Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program  

SciTech Connect

RSAC-6 is the latest version of the RSAC program. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory; decay and in-grow the inventory during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment; model the downwind dispersion of the activity; and calculate doses to downwind individuals. Internal dose from the inhalation and ingestion pathways is calculated. External dose from ground surface and plume gamma pathways is calculated. New and exciting updates to the program include the ability to evaluate a release to an enclosed room, resuspension of deposited activity and evaluation of a release up to 1 meter from the release point. Enhanced tools are included for dry deposition, building wake, occupancy factors, respirable fraction, AMAD adjustment, updated and enhanced radionuclide inventory and inclusion of the dose-conversion factors from FGR 11 and 12.

Schrader, Bradley J; Wenzel, Douglas Rudolph

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiological considerations of phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture  

SciTech Connect

The radiological concerns associated with phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture have been placed in perspective by considering the consequences of a hypothetical case involving heavy long term applications of phosphogypsum. In California, such a schedule might consist of an initial gypsum application of 10 tons/acre followed by alternate year applications of 5 tons/acre. If the radium content of the gypsum were 15 pCi/g and the till depth 6 inches, this schedule could be maintained for more than 100 years before the radium buildup in the soil would reach a proposed federal concentration limit of 5 pCi/g. An agricultural worker spending 40 h a week in a field containing 5 pCi/g of radium would be exposed to terrestrial radiation of about 7 ..mu..R/h above background. This exposure would result in an annual radiation dose of about 15 mrem, which is 3% of the recommended limit for an individual working in an uncontrolled area. Five pCi/g of radium in the soil could generate airborne radon daughter concentrations exceeding the concentration limit proposed for residential exposure. However, as residential exposure limits are predicated on 75% of continuous occupancy, these limits should not be applied to agricultural workers because of the seasonal nature of their work. Radium uptake by food crops grown in the hypothetical soil would result in a 50 year integrated dose to the bone surface of 1.4 rem. This dose is conservatively based on the assumption that an adult's total vegetable diet comes from this source and that consumption was continuous during the 50 year period.

Lindeken, C.L.

1980-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Unipolar arc simulation device  

SciTech Connect

We describe a simple laboratory device for establishing a vacuum arc plasma discharge that can serve to simulate a unipolar arc. The technique makes use of a triggered vacuum arc plasma gun to generate a plasma plume that in turn causes breakdown of a secondary discharge. The device is in fact a secondary vacuum arc discharge that is triggered by a primary vacuum arc discharge, with some of the features of the secondary plasma discharge having similarities with a unipolar arc configuration. Here we describe the experimental setup and outline how the device can be used for some areas of unipolar arc materials research. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.

Wang, S.G.; Brown, I.G. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis  

SciTech Connect

Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Investigation of 2D laterally dispersive photonic crystal structures : LDRD 33602 final report.  

SciTech Connect

Artificially structured photonic lattice materials are commonly investigated for their unique ability to block and guide light. However, an exciting aspect of photonic lattices which has received relatively little attention is the extremely high refractive index dispersion within the range of frequencies capable of propagating within the photonic lattice material. In fact, it has been proposed that a negative refractive index may be realized with the correct photonic lattice configuration. This report summarizes our investigation, both numerically and experimentally, into the design and performance of such photonic lattice materials intended to optimize the dispersion of refractive index in order to realize new classes of photonic devices.

Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Guo, Junpeng; Peters, David William; Hadley, G. Ronald

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Bring Your Own Device  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bring your own Device, or BYOD, has been a popular topic for some time now. While government organizations and private companies continue to struggle with how to enjoy the business and economic...

315

Optical Signal Processing Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the previous chapters we have presented advanced optoelectronic devices which performed a specific task: generation of coherent radiation, modulation, light detection or multi/demultiplexing. In this chapte...

Professor Daniela Dragoman; Professor Mircea Dragoman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multimaterial rectifying device fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic and optoelectronic device processing is commonly thought to be incompatible with much simpler thermal drawing techniques used in optical fiber production. The incorporation of metals, polymer insulators, and ...

Orf, Nicholas D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ion Channels as Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ion channels are proteins with a hole down ... biological function. Channels are devices in the engineering sense of the word and engineering analysis helps understand their function. In particular ... The curren...

Bob Eisenberg

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Multimaterial multifunctional fiber devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical fibers and semiconductor devices differ significantly in their properties and their processing approaches. The latter require an assembly of metal, insulator and semiconductor materials into complex geometries with ...

Sorin, Fabien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping  

SciTech Connect

A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane Ike, was sent to the EPA Region 6 Rapid Needs Assessment and the State of Texas Joint Field Office in Austin, Texas. It appears that though there is considerable damage in Galveston and Texas City, there are fewer chemical leaks than during either hurricanes Katrina or Rita. Specific information gathered from the data was reported out to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Headquarters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the State of Texas Emergency Management Agency.

LANL

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Ion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Ion Dispersion Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion: Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

PRICE LEVELS AND DISPERSION WITH ASYMMETRIC INFORMATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the extensive literature on price dispersions that exists to date, there is a gap in the analysis of how market structure affects prices as… (more)

Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Enhanced dispersion in cylindrical packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...method dispersivity geometry ground water heterogeneity hydrodynamics numerical models pollution pore water porosity remediation simulation tracers 2001 07...processes including groundwater remediation, secondary oil recovery...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Student's Guide Notes Module 4-1 I. Introduction II. Radiological Control Program A. Overall program The Radiological Control Program consists of the commitments, policies, and procedures that are administered by a site or facility to meet the EH Health and Safety Policy. The Radiation Protection Program required by 10 CFR Part 835 is an element of the overall Radiological Control Program. The Radiological Control Program should address the following: * Requirements * Responsibilities * Programs/procedures * Assessments B. Size of the program Radiological Control Programs vary in size. There are several factors that may affect the magnitude of a Radiological Control Program. The specific mission, types and quantities of

325

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.1 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work practices are implemented. * Ensure accurate and appropriately made measurements. * Incorporate measures to minimize

326

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALARA Instructor's Guide ALARA Instructor's Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. References: 1. NCRP Report No. 91 (1987) "Recommendations on Limits for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation" 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998), "Occupational Radiation Protection"

328

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

329

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 of 9 6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

330

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access Control and Work Area Setup Access Control and Work Area Setup Instructor's Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: L 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. L 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. L 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. L 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. L 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. L 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and

331

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Study Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." i 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. i 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. INTRODUCTION Environmental monitoring plays a large role in the field of radiological control.

332

A Simple Audio Conductivity Device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Simple Audio Conductivity Device ... To solve these problems, the authors have built a simple audio conductivity device that is very sensitive to current flow. ...

Gregory Berenato; David F. Maynard

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A review of dispersion modelling and its application to the dispersion of particles: An overview of different dispersion models available  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides the first review of the application of atmospheric models for particle dispersion. The different types of dispersion models available, from simple box type models to complex fluid dynamics models are outlined and the suitability of the different approaches to dispersion modelling within different environments, in regards to scale, complexity of the environment and concentration parameters is assessed. Finally, several major commercial and non-commercial particle dispersion packages are reviewed, detailing which processes are included and advantages and limitations of their use to modelling particle dispersion. The models reviewed included: Box models (AURORA, CPB and PBM), Gaussian models (CALINE4, HIWAY2, CAR-FMI, OSPM, CALPUFF, AEROPOL, AERMOD, UK-ADMS and SCREEN3), Lagrangian/Eulerian Models (GRAL, TAPM, ARIA Regional), CFD models (ARIA Local, MISKAM, MICRO-CALGRID) and models which include aerosol dynamics (GATOR, MONO32, UHMA, CIT, AERO, RPM, AEROFOR2, URM-1ATM, MADRID, CALGRID and UNI-AERO).

N.S. Holmes; L. Morawska

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures.

Valentine, A.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electrical apparatus lockout device  

SciTech Connect

A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

Gonzales, R.

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electrical apparatus lockout device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple lockout device for electrical equipment equipped with recessed power blades is described. The device comprises a face-plate (12) having a threaded member (14) attached thereto and apertures suitable for accommodating the power blades of a piece of electrical equipment, an elastomeric nose (16) abutting the face-plate having a hole for passage of the threaded member therethrough and power blade apertures in registration with those of the face-plate, a block (20) having a recess (34) in its forward face for receiving at least a portion of the hose, a hole therein for receiving the threaded member and an integral extension (26) extending from its rear face. A thumb screw (22) suitable for turning with the hands and having internal threads suitable for engaging the threaded member attached to the face-plate is inserted into a passage in the integral extension to engage the threaded member in such a fashion that when the device is inserted over the recessed power blades of a piece of electrical equipment and the thumb screw (22) tightened, the elastomeric nose (16) is compressed between the face-plate (12) and the block (20) forcing it to expand laterally thereby securing the device in the recess and precluding the accidental or intentional energization of the piece of equipment by attachment of a power cord to the recessed power blades. Means are provided in the interval extension and the thumb screw for the attachment of a locking device (46) which will satisfy OSHA standards.

Gonzales, Rick (Chesapeake, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hospital response for children as a vulnerable population in radiological/nuclear incidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hospital's response to a nuclear or radiological emergency...Stronger links between nuclear medicine programs and...operations and preparedness policies need to include paediatric...Infectious Disease. Policy statement: chemical-biological...population in radiological/nuclear incidents. | Emergency......

Brenda Conway; Jordan Pike

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspects radiological aspects Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 14 Radiological Control Manual ESH Division Summary: Radiological Control Manual ESH Division SLAC-I-720-0A05Z-001-R005 1...

339

Paint for detection of corrosion and warning of chemical and radiological attack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East...The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions (2001) The...in soil and lifetime cancer risk due to gamma radioactivity...radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Yearly Chnages of Radiation Exposure Doses Received by Workers in Radiological Occupations at Kyushu University Hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......by Workers in Radiological Occupations at Kyushu University Hospital Hideo Irie * Chikara Takei * Shigeki Momii * Takehiko Higuchi...by workers in radiological occupations at Kyushu University Hospital from September 1962 to March 1966 were reported. The exposure......

Hideo Irie; Chikara Takei; Shigeki Momii; Takehiko Higuchi; Sigeaki Okamura; Kouji Masuda

1967-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Quality Control in the Radiological Departments of the Florence General Hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Quality Control in the Radiological Departments of the Florence General Hospital C. Gori G. Belli S. Calvagno L. Capaccioli A. Guasti G. Spano G. Zatelli At the Hospital of Careggi in Florence six radiological departments are currently active......

C. Gori; G. Belli; S. Calvagno; L. Capaccioli; A. Guasti; G. Spanò; G. Zatelli

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface  

SciTech Connect

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - action program radiological Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program RWT Radiological Worker Training SLAC Stanford Linear Accelerator Center 12;DOE G 441.1-12 1 03... radiological hazards (10 CFR 835.901(c)). Radiation safety training...

345

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district...radiological scenario around uranium-mining sites in the Singhbhum...3 The Royal Society. The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions (2001) The Royal......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fragment capture device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

Payne, Lloyd R. (Los Lunas, NM); Cole, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Biochip scanner device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Belgovskiy, Alexander I. (Mayfield Heights, OH); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electrochromic optical switching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source. 3 figs.

Lampert, C.M.; Visco, S.J.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Electrochromic optical switching device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochromic cell is disclosed which comprises an electrochromic layer, a polymerizable organo-sulfur layer which comprises the counter electrode of the structure, and an ionically conductive electronically insulating material which comprises the separator between the electrodes. In a preferred embodiment, both the separator and the organo-sulfur electrode (in both its charged and uncharged states) are transparent either to visible light or to the entire solar spectrum. An electrochromic device is disclosed which comprises such electrodes and separator encased in glass plates on the inner surface of each of which is formed a transparent electrically conductive film in respective electrical contact with the electrodes which facilitates formation of an external electrical connection or contact to the electrodes of the device to permit electrical connection of the device to an external potential source.

Lampert, Carl M. (El Sobrante, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ion manipulation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nonaqueous Electrical Storage Device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical capacitor is disclosed that features two, separated, high surface area carbon cloth electrodes sandwiched between two current collectors fabricated of a conductive polymer having a flow temperature greater than 130.degree. C., the perimeter of the electrochemical capacitor being sealed with a high temperature gasket to form a single cell device. The gasket material is a thermoplastic stable at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C., preferably a polyester or a polyurethane, and having a reflow temperature above 130.degree. C. but below the softening temperature of the current collector material. The capacitor packaging has good mechanical integrity over a wide temperature range, contributes little to the device equivalent series resistance (ESR), and is stable at high potentials. In addition, the packaging is designed to be easily manufacturable by assembly line methods. The individual cells can be stacked in parallel or series configuration to reach the desired device voltage and capacitance.

McEwen, Alan B. (Melrose, MA); Evans, David A. (Seekonk, MA); Blakley, Thomas J. (Woburn, MA); Goldman, Jay L. (Mansfield, MA)

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Radio-frequency dispersive detection of donor atoms in a field-effect transistor  

SciTech Connect

Radio-frequency dispersive read-out can provide a useful probe to nano-scale structures, such as nano-wire devices, especially, when the implementation of charge sensing is not straightforward. Here, we demonstrate dispersive “gate-only” read-out of phosphor donors in a silicon nano-scale transistor. The technique enables access to states that are only tunnel-coupled to one contact, which is not easily achievable by other methods. This allows us to locate individual randomly placed donors in the device channel. Furthermore, the setup is naturally compatible with high bandwidth access to the probed donor states and may aid the implementation of a qubit based on coupled donors.

Verduijn, J., E-mail: a.verduijn@unsw.edu.au; Rogge, S. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)] [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Vinet, M. [CEA/LETI-MINATEC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)] [CEA/LETI-MINATEC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Precision alignment device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

Jones, N.E.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Phononic crystal devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook  

SciTech Connect

This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

358

Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002 Science commissioned Pipeline, 2002 The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory Pakefield OF SURVEY 5 2.1 Pipeline description 5 2.2 Occupancy 6 2.3 Gamma dose rate measurements 7 3 SURVEY FINDINGS

359

Radiological Survey Data for 38 Grove Avenue, Rochelle Park,...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

K e l l e r , D i r e c t o r T e c h n i c a l S e r v i c e s D i v i s i o n 0ak Ridge Operations 0ffice The radiological survey data for the subject vicinity property has been...

360

External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Similarly, site assessment and cleanup...routinely at risk from many...case of a nuclear power plant accident...radiological assessments and may be...responsible for terrorism preparedness...Monitoring and Assessment Center...after the nuclear power plant accident......

Gladys A. Klemic; Paul D. Bailey; Kevin M. Miller; Matthew A. Monetti

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......routinely at risk from many...case of a nuclear power plant accident...radiological attack, but its...responsible for terrorism preparedness...support of nuclear power plants. 3. Managing...Attachment G-Terrorism, is a supplement...actions for nuclear incidents......

Gladys A. Klemic; Paul D. Bailey; Kevin M. Miller; Matthew A. Monetti

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......associated health risks. A framework...routinely at risk from many...case of a nuclear power plant accident...Homeland Security (DHS...radiological attack, but its...responsible for terrorism preparedness...of nuclear power plants. 3. Managing...Attachment G-Terrorism, is a supplement...actions for nuclear incidents...Homeland Security Working Group......

Gladys A. Klemic; Paul D. Bailey; Kevin M. Miller; Matthew A. Monetti

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 ?Sv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity.

Marco Durante; Mariagabriella Pugliese

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident The First­22 March 1996 Eric Voice Abstract: The human health consequences of the Chernobyl accident in 1986 have are discussed with particular focus on thyroid cancers and exposures to iodine-131. Key words: Chernobyl

Shlyakhter, Ilya

365

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (Suggested 4 Year Plan)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures II Clinical Experience Medical Terminology Radiation Protection II Elementary Radiation ProtectionBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (Suggested 4 Year Plan) Please note that this is a potential plan for completing your degree within four years. The order of classes does not necessarily need

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

366

24.01.01.M5 Radiological Safety Page 1 of 3 UNIVERSITY RULE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiological Safety Page 3 of 3 1.5 Employees, visitors and students shall only work with radiation sources24.01.01.M5 Radiological Safety Page 1 of 3 UNIVERSITY RULE 24.01.01.M5 Radiological Safety 25, 2011 Next scheduled review: March 25, 2014 Rule Statement Environmental Health and Safety (EHS

367

Methods and apparatus for controlling dispersions of nanoparticles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrically reconfigurable metamaterial with spatially varied refractive index is proposed for applications such as optical devices and lenses. The apparatus and method comprises a metamaterial in which the refractive indices are modified in space and time by applying one or more electric fields. The metamaterials are electrically controllable and reconfigurable, and consist of metal (gold, silver, etc.) particles of different shapes, such as rods, with dimension much smaller than the wavelength of light, dispersed in a dielectric medium. The metamaterial is controlled by applying a non-uniform electric field that causes two effects: (1) It aligns the metallic anisometric particles with respect to the direction of the applied electric field and (2) It redistributes particles in space, making their local concentration position dependent.

Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Golovin, Andrii B

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Device Oriented Project Controller  

SciTech Connect

This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Condensate removal device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

Maddox, James W. (Newport News, VA); Berger, David D. (Alexandria, VA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solar Innovator | Alta Devices  

SciTech Connect

Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Multiple gap photovoltaic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reversible chemisorption on highly dispersed Ru catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorptions have been studied by static gas volumetric measurement on a range of highly dispersed Y-zeolite-supported ruthenium catalysts prepared by ion exchange. At ambient temperature, the absorption isotherms indicated two distinct types of adsorption - reversible (composed of both physisorption and weak chemisorption) and irreversible (strongly chemisorbed). The catalysts were highly dispersed and had average particle diameters ranging from 0.9 to 1.6 nm. Reversible hydrogen chemisorption was found to be a function of average particle diameter and dispersion. On the other hand, reversible carbon monoxide chemisorption seemed to be mainly due to interaction with the support.

Yang, C.H.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comparison of the scientific quality of spanish radiologists that publish in international radiology journals and in Spanish radiology journals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective To determine that the quality, measured by the Hirsch index, of Spanish authors who publish in international radiology journals with an impact factor (AJR, European Radiology, Investigative Radiology, Radiographics, and Radiology) is higher of those who publish only in Spanish journals or in both types of journals. Material and methods We analyzed a total of 6 radiology journals, including 5 international journals and one national (Radiología). We selected Spanish authors of original articles published in 2008 and 2009 who were working at Spanish centers when their articles were written. We classified the authors into three categories: a) those who published only in international journals; b) those who published only in Radiología, and c) those who published in Radiología and in an international journal. We calculated the Hirsch index score for each author and analyzed the groups using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test, the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, and the median test to evaluate the differences. Results Of the 440 identified Spanish authors as having published in the two-year period, 248 (56 %) published only in Radiología, 172 (39 %) only in international journals, and 20 (5 %) in both. The mean Hirsch index score for the group of authors who published only in Radiología (1.15 ± 2.35) was lower than for those who published only in international journals (2.59 ± 3.39). Authors who published in both international journals and Radiología had the highest score on the Hirsch index (4.1 ± 3.89) (P < .001). Conclusions The Spanish authors with the highest prestige and quality publish both in international journals and in Radiología.

L. Martí-Bonmatí; A.I. Catalá-Gregori; A. Miguel-Dasit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-1 4-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Elements of a Radiological Control Program Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify factors that influence the scope and magnitude of a Radiological Control Program at any nuclear facility. 2. Identify typical elements of a Radiological Control Program. Training Aids: Overhead Transparencies (OTs): OT 4.1 - OT 4.5 (may be supplemented or substituted with updated or site-specific information) Handouts - "List of Radiological Control Program Elements" "Elements of a Radiological Control Program" Equipment Needs: Overhead projector Screen Flip chart Markers Masking tape Student Materials: Student's Guide

375

Derivation and generalization of the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities  

SciTech Connect

Field analysis method is used to derive the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities. This dispersion relation is then extended to the general case in which the rising-sun magnetron can be with multi-group cavities of different shapes and sizes, and from which the dispersion relations of conventional magnetron, rising-sun magnetron, and magnetron-like device can be obtained directly. The results show that the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the dispersion relation are less than 3%, the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the cutoff frequencies of ? mode are less than 2%. In addition, the influences of each structure parameter of the magnetron on the cutoff frequency of ? mode and on the mode separation are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively, which may be of great interest to designing a frequency tuning magnetron.

Shi, Di-Fu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Wang, Hong-Gang; Li, Wei [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

377

Dispersed Project Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersed Project Wind Farm Dispersed Project Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Dispersed Project Wind Farm Facility Dispersed Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lincoln County MN Coordinates 44.4039°, -96.2646° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4039,"lon":-96.2646,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

The High Shear Rheological Properties of Dispersions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extremely high shear rates are applied to pigment dispersions during various scale-up and manufactring processes in several industries. As reported in ... responsible for failures in coating processes. Several additives

V. Ribitsch; J. Pfragner

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Polariton dispersion of periodic quantum well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the polariton dispersion relations of a periodic quantum-well structure with a period in the vicinity of half the exciton resonance wavelength, i.e., the Bragg structure. We classified polariton mod...

A. V. Mintsev; L. V. Butov; C. Ell; S. Mosor…

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Transport and Dispersion in Complex Terrain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......recently along the mountain-plains interface near DOE's Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado. ASCOT meteorological experiments in January and February 1991 were coordinated with Rocky Flats tracer releases for airflow and dispersion model evaluations......

C.E. Elderkin; P.H. Gudiksen

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Dispersion in African Easterly Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The existence of an upstream (eastward) group velocity for African easterly waves (AEWs) is shown based on single-point lag regressions using gridded reanalysis data from 1990 to 2010. The eastward energy dispersion is consistent with the ...

Michael Diaz; Anantha Aiyyer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Introduction JACQUELINE P. WILLIAMS, AMY K. HUSER, & DAVID J. BRENNER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an improvised nuclear device (IND) or a radiological dispersal device (RDD) (Homeland Security Council 2006 that terrorist groups continue to pursue the acquisition of nuclear or radiological devices to use against, Kaminski J, Norman MK, Maidment B, Hatchett R. 2010. NIAID/NIH radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures

Brenner, David Jonathan

383

ADVANTAGES OF INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL CONSTITUENTS SIMULTANEOUSLY IN SOIL AND GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect

At some sites both chemical and radiological investigation of soil and groundwater is required for overall site characterization. While the planning and execution of investigation activities is usually completed to fulfill regulatory (i.e., United States Environmental Protection Agency or United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission) requirements, coordination of chemical and radiological investigation programs may provide an opportunity for reducing the duration of investigation activities and reducing overall project costs. There are several similarities in the chemical and radiological investigation processes that one can take advantage of in program design and execution to efficiently plan and execute chemical and radiological investigations simultaneously. At sites where both chemical and radiological constituents are being investigated in soil and groundwater, various steps can be taken during the investigation processes to combine chemical and radiological investigation and characterization activities. With proper planning, investigating chemical and radiological constituents simultaneously in soil and groundwater can reduce the project schedule and provide cost savings for overall characterization of the site.

Downey, H.; Shephard, E.; Walter, N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gunshot triangulation device testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gunshot triangulation device testing Gunshot triangulation device testing Report to the Fermilab Community Advisory Board, Oct. 28, 2010 The Fermilab security director outlined for the board last month a recurring problem of people shooting guns near the edges of the laboratory and bullets coming onto the site. Fermilab is installing a system to triangulate the gunshots to improve police response time. This will require a set-up calibration of two dozen gunshots during a total of 6 minutes at the laboratory site. The board was asked for recommendations about how and whom to inform of the test firing. In response to the board discussion, Fermilab plans to take the following actions: ï‚· The test firing will occur during the mid-day of a week day to minimize the number of residents

385

Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

Light modulating device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity.

Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Light modulating device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Support and maneuvering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof. 9 figs.

Wood, R.L.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

389

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

Meigs, R.A.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Support and maneuvering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support and maneuvering device includes an elongated flexible inflatable enclosure having a fixed end and a movable end. The movable end is collapsible toward the fixed end to a contracted position when the enclosure is in a noninflated condition. Upon inflation, the movable end is movable away from the fixed end to an extended position. The movable end includes means for mounting an article such as a solar reflector thereon. The device also includes a plurality of position controlling means disposed about the movable end to effect adjusting movement of portions thereof by predetermined amounts and for controlling an angle at which the article disposed at the movable end is oriented. The plurality of position controlling means limits a suitable number degrees of freedom of the movable end for transmitting a steering motion thereto and for controlling the position thereof.

Wood, Richard L. (Arvada, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Role of polymeric dispersant functional groups in the dispersion behaviour of titania pigment particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption of polymeric dispersants onto titania pigment particles has been investigated ... the type of polymer functional group, using polyacrylic acid and modified polyacrylamides. The polyacrylamides incl...

S. Farrokhpay; G. Morris; D. Fornasiero; P. Self

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dispersion Tolerance Enhancement in Electronic Dispersion Compensation Using Full Optical-Field Reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We experimentally verify the feasibility of receiver-side electronic dispersion compensation using optical-field reconstruction, and theoretically increase the fundamental limit of...

Zhao, Jian; McCarthy, Mary E; Gunning, Paul; Ellis, Andrew D

394

Energy Management on Handheld Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Handheld devices are becoming ubiquitous and as their capabilities increase, they are starting to displace laptop computers - much as laptop computers have displaced desktop computers in many roles. Handheld devices are evolving from today's PDAs, organizers, ...

Marc A Viredaz; Lawrence S Brakmo; William R Hamburgen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h h ' . * ' 1. MI). q-8 RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE FUTURA CHEMICAL COMPANY FACILITY 9200 LATTY AVENUE HAZELWOOD, MISSOURI L.W. Cole J.D. Berger W.O. Helton B.M. Putnam T.J. Sowell C.F. Weaver R.D. Condra September 9, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Under Interagency Agreement DOE No. 40-770-80 NRC Fin. No. A-9093-0 Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy I_--___- ". TABLE OF CONTENTS Page List of Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.

396

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Instructor's Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." L 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. L 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. References: 1. Gollnick, Daniel, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 2nd Edition, Pacific

397

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contamination Control Contamination Control Instructor's Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination control program and list actions that contribute to its success. 2.05.04 State the basic principles of contamination control and list examples of implementation methods. 2.05.05 List and describe the possible engineering control methods used for contamination control. 2.05.06

398

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRU TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT

399

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41-2001 41-2001 April 2001 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

400

I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-I a.d *4dk *-f--l- -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt of the Air Force In Cooperation W ith: Southwest District Office Ohio Environmental Protection Agency - O h io Cnvironmwhl Protection Agenty Bureau of Radiological Health Ohio Department of Health. I Lb ^U .L*-u i-.-r- --- , .., II ,.--(_ ~_ -_- --- -_ _.. ;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unit Analysis & Conversion Unit Analysis & Conversion Instructor's Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified units. 1.02.04 Using the formula provided, convert a given temperature measurement to specified units. References: 1. "Health Physics and Radiological Health Handbook"; Scinta, Inc; 1989. 2. DOE-HDBK-1010-92 (June 1992) "Classical Physics" DOE Fundamental Handbook; US

402

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contamination Control Contamination Control Study Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination control program and list actions that contribute to its success. 2.05.04 State the basic principles of contamination control and list examples of implementation methods. 2.05.05 List and describe the possible engineering control methods used for contamination control. 2.05.06

403

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

404

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALARA ALARA Study Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. INTRODUCTION All personnel at a facility must be committed to the ALARA philosophy. The RCT can play a major role in establishing and maintaining that commitment by understanding its concepts. This lesson will familiarize the student with the ALARA concepts and the

405

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide Study Guide 2.14-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Personnel Decontamination Module Number: 2.14 Objectives: 2.14.01 List the three factors which determine the actions taken in decontamination of personnel. i 2.14.02 List the preliminary actions and notifications required by the RCT for an individual suspected to be contaminated. i 2.14.03 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when contamination of clothing is confirmed. i 2.14.04 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when skin contamination is confirmed. i 2.14.05 List the steps for using decontamination reagents to decontaminate personnel. INTRODUCTION In our work environment, one of the major concerns of radiological control is the prevention of personnel contamination. When personnel contamination has been

406

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unit Analysis & Conversion Unit Analysis & Conversion Study Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified units. 1.02.04 Using the formula provided, convert a given temperature measurement to specified units. INTRODUCTION A working knowledge of the unit analysis and conversion process is necessary for the Radiological Control Technician. It is useful for air and water sample activity

407

Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation  

SciTech Connect

Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1988 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standard or industry committees are also listed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of (1) internal dosimetry, (2) in vivo measurements, (3) external dosimetry, (4) instrument calibration and evaluation, (5) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards), and (6) radiological records. 23 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes  

SciTech Connect

The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office has analyzed the meteorological and radiological data collected for the following atmospheric nuclear tests: TRINITY; EASY of the Tumbler-Snapper series; ANNIE, NANCY, BADGER, SIMON, and HARRY of the Upshot-Knothole series; BEE and ZUCCHINI of the Teapot series; BOLTZMANN and SMOKY of the Plumbbob series; and SMALL BOY of the Dominic II series. These tests were chosen as having the greatest impact on nearby downwind populated locations, contributing approximately 80% of the collective estimated exposure. This report describes the methods of analysis used in deriving fallout-pattern contours and estimated fallout arrival times. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of estimating fallout arrival times from the meteorological data are described. Comparisons of fallout patterns resulting from these analyses with earlier analyses show insignificant differences in the areas covered or people exposed.

Quinn, V.E. (Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications  

SciTech Connect

We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Surface Contamination Guidelines/Radiological Clearance of Property  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Table IV-1, DOE O 5400.5, DOE Draft 441.XX, Authorized Limits govern the control and clearance of personal and real property. They are radionuclide concentrations or activity levels approved by DOEto permit the clearance of property under DOE radiological control for either restricted or unrestricted use, consistent with DOE’s radiation protection framework and standards for workers, the general public, and the environment.

413

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technical Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Access Control and Work Area Setup 10 Access Control and Work Area Setup Study Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: i 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. i 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. i 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. i 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. i 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. i 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and the

414

Nanotube resonator devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiography Device | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiography Device Radiography Device Radiography Device This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a radiography device (Class 7 - Radioactive). This exercise manual is one in a series of five scenarios developed by the Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program. Responding agencies may include several or more of the following: local municipal and county fire, police, sheriff, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel; state, local, and federal emergency response teams; emergency response contractors; and other emergency response resources that could potentially be provided by the carrier and the originating facility (shipper). Radiography Device.docx

416

Stretchable and foldable electronic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Choi, Won Mook; Song, Jizhou; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dae Hyeong

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Stretchable and foldable electronic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are stretchable, foldable and optionally printable, processes for making devices and devices such as semiconductors, electronic circuits and components thereof that are capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Strain isolation layers provide good strain isolation to functional device layers. Multilayer devices are constructed to position a neutral mechanical surface coincident or proximate to a functional layer having a material that is susceptible to strain-induced failure. Neutral mechanical surfaces are positioned by one or more layers having a property that is spatially inhomogeneous, such as by patterning any of the layers of the multilayer device.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Quantifying seed dispersal kernels from truncated seed-tracking data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have lower survival than those that disperse further away from conspecifics (Janzen 1970; Comita et al

Bermingham, Eldredge

419

Fluid flow monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fluid flow monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Instability of nonlinear dispersive solitary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider linear instability of solitary waves of several classes of dispersive long wave models. They include generalizations of KDV, BBM, regularized Boussinesq equations, with general dispersive operators and nonlinear terms. We obtain criteria for the existence of exponentially growing solutions to the linearized problem. The novelty is that we dealt with models with nonlocal dispersive terms, for which the spectra problem is out of reach by the Evans function technique. For the proof, we reduce the linearized problem to study a family of nonlocal operators, which are closely related to properties of solitary waves. A continuation argument with a moving kernel formula is used to find the instability criteria. These techniques have also been extended to study instability of periodic waves and of the full water wave problem.

Zhiwu Lin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Instability of nonlinear dispersive solitary waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider linear instability of solitary waves of several classes of dispersive long wave models. They include generalizations of KDV, BBM, regularized Boussinesq equations, with general dispersive operators and nonlinear terms. We obtain criteria for the existence of exponentially growing solutions to the linearized problem. The novelty is that we dealt with models with nonlocal dispersive terms, for which the spectra problem is out of reach by the Evans function technique. For the proof, we reduce the linearized problem to study a family of nonlocal operators, which are closely related to properties of solitary waves. A continuation argument with a moving kernel formula are used to find the instability criteria. Recently, these techniques have also been extended to study instability of periodic waves and to the full water wave problem.

Lin, Zhiwu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

Nevitt, Michael V. (Wheaton, IL); Aldred, Anthony T. (Wheaton, IL); Chan, Sai-Kit (Darien, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL "The radiological control program discussed in DOE-STD-1098-2008 goes beyond the scope of, and includes more details than, the documented radiation protection program (RPP) required by 10 CFR 835, -Occupational Radiation Protection.‖ To ensure implementation of a comprehensive and coherent radiological control program that exceeds basic requirements and provides a substantial safety margin, DOE encourages its contractors to implement the provisions of DOE-STD-1098- 2008 to the extent appropriate to facility hazards and operations, consistent with DOE's integrated safety management program. Should any conflicts arise between the site-specific radiological control manual and the documented RPP, the

425

Casimir energy, dispersion, and the Lifshitz formula  

SciTech Connect

Despite suggestions to the contrary, we show in this paper that the usual dispersive form of the electromagnetic energy density must be used to derive the Lifshitz force between parallel dielectric media. This conclusion follows from the general form of the quantum vacuum energy, which is the basis of the multiple-scattering formalism. As an illustration, we explicitly derive the Lifshitz formula for the interaction between parallel dielectric semispaces, including dispersion, starting from the expression for the total energy of the system. The issues of constancy of the energy between parallel plates and of the observability of electrostrictive forces are briefly addressed.

Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Parashar, Prachi; Brevik, Iver [Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics and Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019-2061 (United States); Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Nonlinear time-fractional dispersive equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study some cases of time-fractional nonlinear dispersive equations (NDEs) involving Caputo derivatives, by means of the invariant subspace method. This method allows to find exact solutions to nonlinear time-fractional partial differential equations by separating variables. We first consider a third order time-fractional NDE that admits a four-dimensional invariant subspace and we find a similarity solution. We also study a fifth order NDE. In this last case we find a solution involving Mittag-Leffler functions. We finally observe that the invariant subspace method permits to find explicit solutions for a wide class of nonlinear dispersive time-fractional equations.

P. Artale Harris; R. Garra

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Fuel vapor control device  

SciTech Connect

A fuel vapor control device is described having a valve opening and closing a passage connecting a carburetor and a charcoal canister according to a predetermined temperature. A first coil spring formed by a ''shape memory effect'' alloy is provided to urge the valve to open the passage when the temperature is high. A second coil spring urges the valve to close the passage. A solenoid is provided to urge an armature against the valve to close the passage against the force of the first coil spring when the engine is running. The solenoid heats the first coil spring to generate a spring force therein when the engine is running. When the engine is turned off, the solenoid is deactivated, and the force of the first spring overcomes the force of the second spring to open the passage until such time as the temperature of the first spring drops below the predetermined temperature.

Ota, I.; Nishimura, Y.; Nishio, S.; Yogo, K.

1987-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ceramics for fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors.

Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

False color viewing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electrical safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical safety device for use in power tools that is designed to automatically discontinue operation of the power tool upon physical contact of the tool with a concealed conductive material. A step down transformer is used to supply the operating power for a disconnect relay and a reset relay. When physical contact is made between the power tool and the conductive material, an electrical circuit through the disconnect relay is completed and the operation of the power tool is automatically interrupted. Once the contact between the tool and conductive material is broken, the power tool can be quickly and easily reactivated by a reset push button activating the reset relay. A remote reset is provided for convenience and efficiency of operation.

White, David B. (Greenock, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effects of dispersants and soluble counter-ions on aqueous dispersibility of nano-sized zirconia powder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of different dispersants and water leaching on aqueous dispersibility of zirconia powder was studied. Zeta potentials of aqueous solutions containing nano-sized zirconia powder and different dispersants, such as ammonium polyacrylic acid (PAA-NH4) and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and water leaching were characterized. Better dispersion of nano-sized zirconia powder in aqueous solutions was achieved with the addition of dispersant and water leaching.

Zhipeng Xie; Jingtao Ma; Qing Xu; Yong Huang; Yi-Bing Cheng

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory , OAS-L-12-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho's Radiological and Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory OAS-L-12-02 February 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 21, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Eastern Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy owns and operates the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) through the Idaho Operations Office (Idaho). RESL is a reference measurements laboratory specializing in analytical chemistry, radiation measurements and calibrations, and quality assurance. RESL had been located at the Idaho National Laboratory

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual radiological environmental Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures 24.01.01.A1.05 RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY Approved: December 6, 1999 Revised: October 5, ... Source: Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection:...

435

Development of an ambient lighting monitoring system for radiological image viewing application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient lighting plays a very important role in radiological image viewing environment. Excessive room ambient lighting (or illuminance) degrades image contrast, introducing veiling glare, diffuse reflectivity...

Ahmad Azlan Che; K. H. Ng; N. F. Mohd. Nasir…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Extension of DOE N 441.1, Radiological Protection for DOE Activities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Notice extends DOE N 441.1, Radiological Protection for DOE Activities, dated 9-30-95 until 6-30-00.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

NNSA Continues to Assist Vietnam in Enhancing its Nuclear/Radiological...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to Assist Vietnam in Enhancing its NuclearRadiological Emergency Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

438

RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiologic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Laboratory, Argonne, IL Presented at Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory Web Conference June 27, 2012 Presentation Outline RESRAD Family of Codes Overview ...

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess radiological risk Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Medicine 7 TRAINING & QUALIFICATIONS PROGRAM OFFICE Summary: and the policies and procedures in place to minimize their risk. Radiological Worker 1 Training is...

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted radiology proceedings Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

staffing is maintained in CT, MR, Vascular... and outpatient populations are served from pediatric to adult. Within their role, the Radiology nurses Source: Duke University,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial radiological monitoring Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

staffing is maintained in CT, MR, Vascular... and outpatient populations are served from pediatric to adult. Within their role, the Radiology nurses Source: Duke University,...

442

Analysis of Operation TEAPOT nuclear test BEE radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the BEE nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analysis of operation TEAPOT nuclear test ZUCCHINI radiological and meterological data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the ZUCCHINI nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1986 fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip. Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...

445

Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response  

SciTech Connect

A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises.

Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Alta Devices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Devices Devices Jump to: navigation, search Name Alta Devices Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Product California-based stealth mode company developing low-cost compound-PV-semiconductors. Website https://www.altadevices.com/ References Alta Devices[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL National Center for Photovoltaics Partnership Year 2010 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2010/802.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Alta Devices is a company located in Santa Clara, California . References ↑ "Alta Devices" Retrieved from

447

DOE-STD-1098-99; Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1098-99 July 1999 Reaffirmation December 2004 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National

448

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact cyclone filter train for the removal of hazardous and radiologi particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

Bench, Thomas R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact cyclone filter train is disclosed for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium. This filter train permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired. 3 figs.

Bench, T.R.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1990  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford site-wide radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1990. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological records keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program, program changes and enhancements, associated tasks, investigations and studies, and related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are discussed as applicable. 22 refs., 10 figs., 19 tabs.

Lyon, M; Bihl, D E; Fix, J J; Piper, R K; Freolich, T J; Leonowich, J A; Lynch, T P

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1993  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1993. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Olsen, P.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1992  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report of calendar year 1992. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M; Bihl, D E; Fix, J J; Piper, R K; Froelich, T J; Lynch, T P

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1997  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1997. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological exposure record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Johnson, M.L.; Lynch, T.P.; Piper, R.K.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hanford radiological protection support services. Annual report for 1995  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1995. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Carbaugh, E.H. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1996  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1996. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological exposure record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Schulze, S.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1994  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for the calendar year 1994. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program- related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Piper, R.K.; Froelich, T.J.; Olsen, P.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

Certain sitewide radiation protection services operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations office and Hanford contractor are documented in this annual report on these services provided during calendar year 1989. These activities include internal dosimetry, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological records keeping. In each case the routine program, program changes, associated tasks, investigations, and studies, as well as related publications, presentations, and other professional activities are discussed as applicable. 26 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Study of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plant using coal releases great amounts of harmful gases to produce the electric energy head: Study of pollutant dispersion in urban environments #12;Abstract Computational simulations can mechanics with the use of computer models and simulations. In this study the simulations of the complex

Allen, Gabrielle

460

A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollution due to the use of agricultural pesticide is a major concern to- day, regarding both public health dispersion and to propose an useful air pollution prediction tool, using fluid mechanics equations and open un outil de prediction de la pollution de l'air . Ce travail concerne la modélisation de la dérive

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Localized overlap algorithm for unexpanded dispersion energies  

SciTech Connect

First-principles-based, linearly scaling algorithm has been developed for calculations of dispersion energies from frequency-dependent density susceptibility (FDDS) functions with account of charge-overlap effects. The transition densities in FDDSs are fitted by a set of auxiliary atom-centered functions. The terms in the dispersion energy expression involving products of such functions are computed using either the unexpanded (exact) formula or from inexpensive asymptotic expansions, depending on the location of these functions relative to the dimer configuration. This approach leads to significant savings of computational resources. In particular, for a dimer consisting of two elongated monomers with 81 atoms each in a head-to-head configuration, the most favorable case for our algorithm, a 43-fold speedup has been achieved while the approximate dispersion energy differs by less than 1% from that computed using the standard unexpanded approach. In contrast, the dispersion energy computed from the distributed asymptotic expansion differs by dozens of percent in the van der Waals minimum region. A further increase of the size of each monomer would result in only small increased costs since all the additional terms would be computed from the asymptotic expansion.

Rob, Fazle; Szalewicz, Krzysztof [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Misquitta, Alston J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Podeszwa, Rafa? [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-006 Katowice (Poland)] [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-006 Katowice (Poland)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

8, 67936824, 2008 dispersion rates in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns, it is shown that initial buoyancy fluxes at ship stack have minor effect on plume dilution rate modeling and measurement (remote or "in-situ") studies of ship exhaust25 effects must dealACPD 8, 6793­6824, 2008 Ship plume dispersion rates in convective BL F. Chosson et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

463

Dispersal Pathways for Particle-Associated Pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sediments in the bight apex revealed that...muddy Christiaensen Basin, adjacent to the...for the New York Bight apex, Hudson-Raritan...ing Christiaensen Basin (12 percent by weight...0. May 1974 Aug Bight apex as highly dispersive...the Christiaensen Basin and the Hudson Shelf...

Robert A. Young; Donald J. P. Swift; Thomas L. Clarke; George R. Harvey; Peter R. Betzer

1985-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

Phonon dispersion of graphite J. Maultzsch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the acoustic branches below 400 cm-1 were measured by inelastic neutron scattering [1]. The optical phonons. The phonon dispersion of graphite was determined by inelastic X-ray scattering along the -K, K-M, and -K. This coupling dominates the scattering mechanism in both electronic transport and Raman scattering. Many

Nabben, Reinhard

465

Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home Karen E Mabry * Judy A Stamps * Author...habitat similar to that at our study site, home ranges were 0.11-0.15ha, and no between-sex difference in adult home range size was detected (Kalcounis-Ruppell...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Radiological review of conditions created during & after a fire on the Hanford Site in the BC Crib controlled area & areas of radiological concern  

SciTech Connect

The radiological implications of fighting a wildland fire in the BC Crib controlled area with the surrounding Soil Contamination Area (SCA) and for fighting a wildland fire in the genera1 600 Area are addressed in this document. The primary focus is on the BC Crib controlled area; however, the 600 Area radiological concerns are much lower and generally have the same constraints as the BC Crib controlled area. This analysis addresses only radiological hazards and does not address any physical hazards or industrial hygiene hazards.

EVANS, C.L.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Devices are disclosed for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways (1) intravascularly, (2) extravascularly, (3) by vessel puncture, and (4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting. 6 figs.

Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

Microbiopsy/precision cutting devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Devices for performing tissue biopsy on a small scale (microbiopsy). By reducing the size of the biopsy tool and removing only a small amount of tissue or other material in a minimally invasive manner, the risks, costs, injury and patient discomfort associated with traditional biopsy procedures can be reduced. By using micromachining and precision machining capabilities, it is possible to fabricate small biopsy/cutting devices from silicon. These devices can be used in one of four ways 1) intravascularly, 2) extravascularly, 3) by vessel puncture, and 4) externally. Additionally, the devices may be used in precision surgical cutting.

Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Automated control of microfluidics devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In order for microfluidics devices to be marketable, they must be inexpensive and easy to use. Two projects were pursued in this study for this… (more)

Gerstel, Ian.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fourier Transform Luminescence Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Thin Films and Devices  

SciTech Connect

We have been successful in adapting Fourier transform (FT) Raman accessories and spectrophotometers for sensitive measurements of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of photovoltaic materials and devices. In many cases, the sensitivity of the FT technique allows rapid room-temperature measurements of weak luminescence spectra that cannot be observed using dispersive PL spectrophotometers. We present here the results of a number of studies of material and device quality obtained using FT-luminescence spectroscopy, including insights into bandgap variations, defect and impurity effects, and relative recombination rates. We also describe our approach to extending the range of the FT-Raman spectrophotometer to cover the region from 11,500 to 3700 cm-1, enabling FT-luminescence measurements to be made from 1.42 to 0.46 eV, and our investigation of FT-PL microspectroscopy.

Webb, J. D.; Keyes, B. M.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Wanlass, M. W.; Ramanathan, K.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Olson, M. R.; Dippo, P.; Jones, K. M.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

472

The use of panoramic radiology in dental practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives: Approximately 1.5 million panoramic radiographs are taken annually in the general dental service in England and Wales. The aim of this review was to assess the clinical role of panoramic radiology in the diagnosis of diseases associated with the teeth and to consider its value in routine screening of patients. Method: This was carried out by critical review of the literature. Results: In addition to common problems with radiographic technique and processing, there are limitations in image quality inherent to panoramic radiology. These factors contribute to a reduced diagnostic accuracy for caries diagnosis, demonstration of periodontal bone support and periapical pathology when compared with intraoral radiography. Routine screening is unproductive for large proportions of dentate and edentulous populations, while in those cases where pathology is detected the diagnostic accuracy can be questioned. Furthermore, the ‘detection’ of asymptomatic anomalies may have no effect on patient management. Attempts to develop and test panoramic radiographic selection criteria are reviewed. Conclusion: New, high-yield selection criteria for panoramic radiography are proposed as a means of reducing unnecessary examinations, limiting radiation doses and reducing financial costs to patients and health service providers. However, research is indicated to develop further and to test such selection criteria.

V.E. Rushton; K. Horner

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NV/YMP radiological control manual, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) are located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental US since 1951. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for US defense-generated waste, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, and non-nuclear test operations such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC). Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level nuclear waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Planned future remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 2, represents DOE-accepted guidelines and best practices for implementing Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain Project Radiation Protection Programs in accordance with the requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. These programs provide protection for approximately 3,000 employees and visitors annually and include coverage for the on-site activities for both personnel and the environment. The personnel protection effort includes a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program accredited dosimetry and personnel bioassay programs including in-vivo counting, routine workplace air sampling, personnel monitoring, and programmatic and job-specific As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations.

Gile, A.L. [comp.] [comp.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary  

SciTech Connect

A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

1981-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

Radiological survey results at 4400 Piehl Road, Ottawa Lake, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan. The survey was performed in September, 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if materials containing uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Baker Brothers facility in Toledo, Ohio had been transported off-site to this neighboring area. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the house and attached garage, beta-gamma scans of the hard surfaces outside, and the collection of soil, water, and dust samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that the majority of the measurements on the property were within DOE guidelines. However, the presence of isolated spots of uranium contamination were found in two areas where materials were allegedly transported to the property from the former Baker Brothers site. Uranium uptake by persons on the property by ingestion is fairly unlikely, but inhalation is a possibility. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the residential property at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan be considered for inclusion under FUSRAP.

Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Temperature differential detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

C:\Documents and Settings\schwalm\Desktop\RDDRPTF14MAY03.wpd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL DISPERSAL DEVICES: RADIOLOGICAL DISPERSAL DEVICES: AN INITIAL STUDY TO IDENTIFY RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS OF GREATEST CONCERN AND APPROACHES TO THEIR TRACKING, TAGGING, AND DISPOSITION Report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Secretary of Energy May 2003 Prepared by The DOE/NRC Interagency Working Group on Radiological Dispersal Devices Page ii May 7, 2003 Table of Contents Page No. Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.0 Issues and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.1 Identifying Radioactive Materials of Greatest Concern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.2 Tracking and Inventorying Radioactive Sources

478

Mobile Device Policy & Program Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Mobile Device Policy & Program Considerations To BYOD or not to BYOD (bring to manage the use of mobile devices within their corporate resources. Every business will naturally have different mobility requirements, and developing a policy in the first place, let alone an appropriate policy

Fisher, Kathleen

479

NETL: Pressure Swing Absorption Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Project No.: DE-FE0001323 New Jersey Institute of Technology is developing an advanced pressure swing absorption-based (PSAB) device via laboratory-based experiments. The device will be used to accomplish a cyclic process to process low temperature post-shift-reactor synthesis gas resulting from the gasification process into purified hydrogen at high pressure for use by the combustion turbine of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The overall goal of the proposed work is to develop an advanced PSAB device and cyclic process for use in a coal-fired IGCC plant to produce purified hydrogen at high pressure and a highly purified CO2 stream suitable for use or sequestration.

480

Notes on Conformal Invisibility Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a consequence of the wave nature of light, invisibility devices based on isotropic media cannot be perfect. The principal distortions of invisibility are due to reflections and time delays. Reflections can be made exponentially small for devices that are large in comparison with the wavelength of light. Time delays are unavoidable and will result in wave-front dislocations. This paper considers invisibility devices based on optical conformal mapping. The paper shows that the time delays do not depend on the directions and impact parameters of incident light rays, although the refractive-index profile of any conformal invisibility device is necessarily asymmetric. The distortions of images are thus uniform, which reduces the risk of detection. The paper also shows how the ideas of invisibility devices are connected to the transmutation of force, the stereographic projection and Escheresque tilings of the plane.

Ulf Leonhardt

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiological dispersal device" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Colossal Light-Induced Refractive-Index Modulation for Neutrons in Holographic Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystals  

SciTech Connect

We report strong diffraction of cold neutrons from an only 30 {mu}m thick holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) transmission grating. The light-induced refractive-index modulation for neutrons is about 10{sup -6}, i.e., nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than in the best photo-neutron-refractive materials probed up to now. This makes H-PDLCs a promising candidate for fabricating neutron-optical devices.

Fally, Martin; Ellabban, Mostafa A. [Nonlinear Physics Group, Faculty of Physics, Universitaet Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Drevensek-Olenik, Irena [Nonlinear Physics Group, Faculty of Physics, Universitaet Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, and J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pranzas, Klaus P.; Vollbrandt, Juergen [GKSS Forschungszentrum, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide, Part 4 of 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessor Training Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide iii Table of Contents Regulatory Documents.....................................................................................

483

Radiological risk evaluation for risk-based design criteria of the multiple canister overpack packaging  

SciTech Connect

The Multiple Canister Overpack (MCO) cask will be used in the transportation of irradiated nuclear fuel from the K Basins to a Canister Storage Building. This report presents the radiological risk evaluation, which is used in the development of the design criteria for the MCO cask. The radiological risk evaluation ensures compliance with the onsite transportation safety program.

Green, J.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

484

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology -Associate of Applied Science [RE-AAS-RADT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology - Associate of Applied Science [RE-AAS-RADT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Oct-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester Introduction to Radiologic Technology 2 C RADT 14005 Clinical Education I 1 C RADT 14006 Radiographic

Sheridan, Scott

485

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology Associate of Technical Study [RE-ATS-RADT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology ­ Associate of Technical Study [RE-ATS-RADT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 1 | Last Updated: 25-Nov-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester, but students must be advised by the director of radiologic technology, housed at the Salem Campus. Course

Sheridan, Scott

486

Ris-R-819(EN) The Radiological Exposure ofMan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-819(EN) The Radiological Exposure ofMan from Ingestion ofCs-137 and Sr-90 in Seafood from describes a limited radiological assessment of the collective doses to man from the intake of seafood from-137« 5.2 Results for Sr-90 9 6 Collective Doses 10 6.1 Assumptions Concerning Seafood Consumption 10 6

487

2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Particle dispersion by random waves in the rotating Boussinesq system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical and numerical study of horizontal particle dispersion due to random waves in the three-dimensional rotating and stratified Boussinesq system, which serves as a simple model to study the dispersion ...

Ferrari, Raffaele

489

Viscosity model of high-viscosity dispersing system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-viscosity dispersing system is formed by dispersing the solid particles in the high-viscosity continuous medium. It is very easy to ... the rheology behavior becomes complicated. The apparent viscosity of th...

Xian-fu Wei ???; Na Wang ??…

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

491

Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

Hull, Lawrence M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of dispersion modeling by State Air Pollution hics. Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAS) is increasing. Dispersion modeling provides a quick and efficient means of determining the downwind impact of pollutant release from a source. The SAPRAS...

Fritz, Bradley Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

493

Geographic dispersion in teams : its history, experience, measurement, and change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis begins with the simple argument that geographic dispersion has gone surprisingly unexamined despite its role as the domain-defining construct for geographically dispersed teams (a.k.a. "virtual teams"). The ...

O'Leary, Michael Boyer, 1969-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Paper Number -1-Simulation model of dispersions in turning process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper Number -1- Simulation model of dispersions in turning process Wolff Valery 1, Lefebvre Arnaud. In this paper, an extent of the simulation model of dispersions in turning process first exposed in [W1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

495

Dispersion-free radial transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

496

HIGHLY DISPERSED ALLOY CATHODE CATALYST FOR DURABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding high performance materials Pt/C cathode B.S.E. Pt PtCo/C cathode IrB.S.E. Pt Co PtIrCo/C cathodeHIGHLY DISPERSED ALLOY CATHODE CATALYST FOR DURABILITY T. D. Jarvi UTC Power Corporation Electrochemical Area Loss Activity at 900 mVRHE (IR-Free) 0.44 A/mg Pt Specific Activity at 900 m

497

WIPP radiological assistance team dispatched to Los Alamos as precautionary measure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched To Los Alamos as Precautionary Measure CARLSBAD, N.M., May 11, 2000 - A team of radiological experts has been dispatched from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in response to a week-long forest fire that is threatening Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), one of the nation's premiere research laboratories. "We are responding completely as a precautionary measure," said Jere Galle, team leader for the WIPP Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. "It is our understanding that nuclear materials at LANL are not in harm's way. Our primary concern, however, is always to protect human health and the environment." The RAP team's mission is to provide radiological assistance to federal agencies, state,

498

U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

Jakubowski, F.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

International Journal of Biomechatronics and Biomedical Robotics (IJBBR) 1 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or a radiological dispersion device scenario (Pellmar, 2005). If there is an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND of a radiological or nuclear threat, there is an urgent need to improve the speed and efficiency of biodosimetric a top priority need to help the nation prepare for the eventuality of a terrorist nuclear attack

Simaan, Nabil

500

Dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma has been derived. The result can be...

S. S. De; Bithika Ghosh; Manasi Mal; B. Ghosh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z