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1

ORISE: Radiochemical analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiochemical analyses Radiochemical analyses ORISE techinican performs a radiochemical analysis To complement our environmental assessment and health physics capabilities, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a radiochemistry laboratory that facilitates the analysis of environmental samples and unique matrices. ORISE performs radiochemical analyses exclusively for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as provides support to the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and other federal agencies and state governments. Key laboratory capabilities include: Alpha spectroscopy Gamma spectroscopy Liquid scintillation spectroscopy Low-background gross alpha and beta assays Radiochemical analyses for alpha and beta emitters

2

Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor- space In Occupied Floor- space In Vacant Floor- space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 5 9 4 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 12 6 6 9 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 13 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 7 14 5 5 7 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 21 10 10 11 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 12 15 8 8 10 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 13 24 10 11 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 13 19 11 11 10 Over 500,000 26 18 18 34

3

Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore accidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

errors were embedded as an integral part of the oil well drilling opera- tion. To reduce the number assessment of the failure. The method is based on a knowledge model of the oil-well drilling process. All of non-productive time (NPT) during oil-well drilling. NPT exhibits a much lower declining trend than

Aamodt, Agnar

4

Radiochemical characteristics of tritium to be considered in fusion reactor facility design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of research and development related to radiochemical characteristics of tritium to be considered in a fusion reactor facility design are summarized. Reactions induced by...

S. O’hira; T. Hayashi; W. Shu; T. Yamanishi

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

RSE Table 7.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel...

6

RSE Table 10.12 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.12;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural...

7

RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

8

RSE Table 3.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,10

9

RSE Table 5.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

10

RSE Table 7.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" " "," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

11

RSE Table 5.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9

12

RSE Table 7.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" 9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,4,24,21,5,23,7,0,20

13

RSE Table 1.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

14

RSE Table 7.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam" " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

15

RSE Table 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",31,0,91,35,0,0,0,47 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",1,0,0,0,0,0,0,8

16

RSE Table 10.10 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" 0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",6,18,5,0,20,85,29,20,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

17

RSE Table 10.13 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",8,17,8,20,21,43,34,35,37,29 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

18

RSE Table 5.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Distillate" " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,10,2,10,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,19

19

RSE Table 4.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,17 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,46,45,8,57,0,0,3

20

RSE Table 5.8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" 8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,14,2,9,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,18

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RSE Table 5.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,2,3,6,2,3,9,2 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",0,11,4,14,2,9,13,0

22

RSE Table 7.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,20 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,42,45,8,57,0,0,4

23

RSE Table 10.11 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",20,32,21,0,16,68,65,73,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

24

RSE Table 7.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",8,21,14,7,9,13 " 20-49",4,6,15,4,13,4 " 50-99",3,6,4,3,6,8 " 100-249",3,8,17,2,5,7 " 250-499",4,1,9,7,1,37 " 500 and Over",1,7,4,1,1,1 "Total",2,3,7,2,1,11

25

Table 3b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Natural Gas Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standards Errors per Sq Ft b. Relative Standards Errors per Sq Ft Table 3b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas (thousand) Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 5 7 6 6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 7 12 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 5 9 8 8 10,001 to 25,000 6 18 18 18 25,001 to 50,000 9 21 18 18 50,001 to 100,000 8 12 9 9 100,001 to 200,000 8 13 13 13 200,001 to 500,000 11 21 16 16 Over 500,000 15 27 22 23 Principal Building Activity Education 12 11 9 8 Food Sales and Service 8 12 10 9 Health Care 15 21 17 13 Lodging 12 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 6 17 14 14 Office 7 24 24 24 Public Assembly 10 18 14 13 Public Order and Safety

26

"RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

27

Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective, Occupied, and Vacant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b.Relative Standard Errors b.Relative Standard Errors Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective Occupied, and Vacant Square Footage, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Occupied Floorspace (million square feet) Total Vacant Floorspace (million square feet) Occupied Square Footage as a Percent of Total All Buildings 3.7 3.8 3.9 8.2 0.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5.3 5.5 5.4 10.3 0.8 5,001 to 10,000 3.7 3.7 3.9 10.3 0.9 10,001 to 25,000 5.2 5 5.1 14.3 1.2 25,001 to 50,000 6.6 7 7.1 17.2 1.6 50,001 to 100,000 7.1 7.1 7.5 12 1.1 100,001 to 200,000 8.6 8.6 8.6 20 1.3 200,001 to 500,000 10.1 10.5 10.7 20.5 1.5 Over 500,000 25.8 20.3 21.9 34.2 4.6 Principal Building Activity Education 8.4 7.4 6.8 35.1 2.2 Food Sales and Service 7.5 8.7 8.6 29.9 2.6

28

Table 5b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 11 16 16 16 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 27 78 76 76 5,001 to 10,000 38 60 51 51 10,001 to 25,000 18 43 36 35 25,001 to 50,000 24 68 51 51 50,001 to 100,000 18 40 30 30 100,001 to 200,000 27 33 35 36 200,001 to 500,000 22 31 26 27 Over 500,000 42 26 14 10 Principal Building Activity Education 17 29 22 23 Food Sales and Service 67 93 207 150 Health Care 35 26 25 14 Lodging 30 40 30 29 Mercantile and Service 40 74 59 58 Office 23 28 26 27 Public Assembly 25 33 25 26 Public Order and Safety

29

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

30

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

31

"RSE Table C11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;" 1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","Sources","Local Utility",,"Natural Gas","Sources","Local Utility",,"Steam","Sources","Local Utility"

32

"RSE Table C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",4,0,3,0,1,0,2,6

33

"RSE Table N11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

34

"RSE Table C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

35

"RSE Table N8.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

36

"RSE Table C10.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat",," " " "," ",,"Cogeneration","Conventional","or Fluidized","Bed Boilers","with","Heat","Recovery","Combined-Cycle","Combustion","Turbines","with","Heat","Recovery","Recovered from","High-Temperature","Processes"

37

"RSE Table N11.4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;" 4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

38

"RSE Table E1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

39

"RSE Table C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" ,

40

"RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Facilities and Capabilities SHARE Radiochemical Engineering Development Center May 30, 2013 The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) comprises two facilities - Building 7920 and Building 7930. Building 7920 was designed and built as a hot cell facility that also houses glove box laboratories for radiological work, laboratories for nonradiological work, and a chemical make up area. Building 7920 is classified as a Category 2 nuclear facility. The building is a two-level structure containing heavily shielded hot cells, hot cell support areas, laboratories, a high bay area, and an office wing. Building 7930 was designed and built as a hot cell facility with glove box laboratory capabilities for radiological work and chemical makeup

42

"RSE Table E13.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",15,15,58,37 " 20-49",17,19,27,7 " 50-99",6,6,5,9 " 100-249",7,7,25,4 " 250-499",2,2,0,0 " 500 and Over",1,1,0,1 "Total",2,2,15,1 "Employment Size" " Under 50",16,16,90,35

43

"RSE Table C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost" "NAICS"," "," " "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities",1,2,0,0,0,0 ," Energy Audits",1,3,5,6,5,7 ," Electricity Load Control",1,3,4,7,6,7

44

"RSE Table N13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1,8,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,0,1,0,4 313,"Textile Mills",2,8,7,0,2 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,0,22,0,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",11,73,8,90,11

45

"RSE Table E7.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS",,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",2,2,2 ," 20-49",2,3,2 ," 50-99",3,3,2 ," 100-249",2,3,2 ," 250-499",3,3,3

46

"RSE Table E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;" E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",9,87,48,26,1,85,16,25 " 20-49",11,32,28,5,63,20,3,21 " 50-99",8,23,38,2,22,49,42,4

47

"RSE Table N1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" .3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",3 "Natural Gas",1 "Net Electricity",1 " Purchases",1 " Transfers In",9 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",15 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",3 "Coke and Breeze",2 "Residual Fuel Oil",4 "Distillate Fuel Oil",5 "Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids",1 "Other",2 " Asphalt and Road Oil (a)",0 " Lubricants (a)",0 " Naphtha < 401 Degrees (a)",0

48

"RSE Table N13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",8,9,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",0,0,0 313,"Textile Mills",0,0,0 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",0,0,0 314,"Textile Product Mills",90,90,0 315,"Apparel",0,0,0 316,"Leather and Allied Products",0,0,0

49

"RSE Table C10.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors" "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

50

"RSE Table E13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,52,15,4,4 " 20-49",2,14,17,33,2 " 50-99",2,31,6,10,2 " 100-249",1,13,7,9,1 " 250-499",2,2,2,1,2 " 500 and Over",1,2,1,1,1

51

"RSE Table N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS"," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",8,4,5 313,"Textile Mills",3,2,3 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,4,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",7,5,5

52

"RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" 2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" " Units: Percents." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" "NAICS"," ","of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",2,0,2,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",11,0,15,14,14

53

"RSE Table N5.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Black Liquor","Total(b)","Waste(c)","from Trees(d)","Processing(e)","Refuse(f)"

54

"RSE Table N11.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,3,3,1,1,0,0,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,4,16,41,4,22,3,0,15 313,"Textile Mills",2,2,5,14,3,5,1,0,5

55

"RSE Table C10.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;" " Unit: Percents." "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",3,1,2 ," Microwave Drying",5,1,3 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",7,1,3 ," Open-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Produce Steam",7,1,3 ," Gas-Driven Rotary Engines and/or Turbines",20,1,3 ," Membrane Separation",3,1,2 ," Irradiation",23,1,2 ," Freeze Concentration",9,1,3 ," Membrane Hyperfiltration to Separate Water from Food Products",4,1,3

56

"RSE Table E7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "Economic","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Characteristic(a)","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2,2,2 " 20-49",2,3,2 " 50-99",3,3,2 " 100-249",2,3,2 " 250-499",3,3,3 " 500 and Over",1,2,2 "Total",1,1,1 "Employment Size" " Under 50",2,3,3 " 50-99",3,3,3

57

"RSE Table E13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,"Total of" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,4,10 " 20-49",33,35,70 " 50-99",10,12,10 " 100-249",9,14,1 " 250-499",1,1,3 " 500 and Over",1,1,2 "Total",3,4,5 "Employment Size" " Under 50",42,44,21 " 50-99",20,21,73 " 100-249",16,16,38 " 250-499",1,2,1

58

Chemical and radiochemical characterization of depleted uranium in contaminated soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results of chemical and radiochemical characterization and fractionation of depleted uranium in soils contaminated during the Balkan conflict ... the paper. Alpha-spectrometric analysis of used depleted

M. B. Radenkovi?; A. B. Kandi?; I. S. Vukana?…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

RSE Table N8.1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" 1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,," "

60

RSE Table N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RSE Table S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

62

RSE Table N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

63

RSE Table N1.1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" 1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

64

RSE Table N6.1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2;" 1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

65

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

66

RSE Table S2.1 and S2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S2.1 and S2.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S2.1 and S2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S2.1 and S2.2;" S2.1 and S2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S2.1 and S2.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",5,0,8,0,0,0,0,7 21,"Tobacco Products",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

67

RSE Table E6.1 and E6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables E6.1 and E6.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E6.1 and E6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables E6.1 and E6.2;" E6.1 and E6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables E6.1 and E6.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",1,1,4,4,1,3,4,2 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",0,3,4,5,1,2,5,0

68

RSE Table E8.1 and E8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables E8.1 and E8.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E8.1 and E8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables E8.1 and E8.2;" E8.1 and E8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables E8.1 and E8.2;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,18,10,7,3,8 " 20-49",2,19,5,3,11,8 " 50-99",2,14,6,2,17,10 " 100-249",1,11,4,2,1,12 " 250-499",2,1,10,2,0,1 " 500 and Over",1,1,1,1,0,1

69

RSE Table N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2;" N2.1 and N2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N2.1 and N2.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",6,0,8,0,0,0,0,7 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",10,0,82,0,0,0,0,9 313,"Textile Mills",19,0,77,3,20,0,0,48 314,"Textile Product Mills",38,0,0,38,27,0,0,42

70

RSE Table S3.1 and S3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S3.1 and S3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S3.1 and S3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S3.1 and S3.2;" S3.1 and S3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S3.1 and S3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1,1,3,5,1,6,1,0,1 21,"Tobacco Products",4,5,23,53,10,24,1,0,32 22,"Textile Mill Products",2,2,4,16,3,7,1,0,4

71

U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, G. D. Searle form new company to market radiochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, G. D. Searle form new company to market radiochemicals ... Nuclear-Chicago markets about two thirds of products represented by these sales. ...

1968-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

> > : , - ' and Precipitation Collected in - Connection with Calibration-Test Flaring of Gas From Test Well, - I August 15-October 13, 197,0,, Project Rulison-8, 197 1 HGS 9 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal center, Denver, Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER SAMPLES FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IN CONNECTION WITH CALIBRATION-TEST FLARING OF GAS FROM TEST WELL, AUGUST.15-OCTDBER 13, 1970 PROJECT RULISON Hans C. Claassen and Paul T. Voegeli, Sr. CONTENTS Page Introduction..................... ................................... 1 Results.

73

Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Cold Fusion Error Unexpected Error Sorry An error was encountered. This error could be due to scheduled maintenance. Information about the error has been routed to the appropriate...

75

Radiochemical analysis of the polar agrochemicals validamycin and the metabolite melamine by ion-exchange chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Suitable analytical methods to determine the radiochemical purity of validamycin and melamine are not described in the literature. High performance ion-exchange chromatography for the detection of underivatize...

A. Fredenhagen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capabilities, supports the design and testing of advanced nuclear fuel recycling technologies. Expert Chemical is a critical facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supporting environmental, nuclear, national and development. Capabilities include comprehensive nuclear counting instrumentation radionuclide separations

77

Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations needing innovative processes and technical solutions for environmental cleanup, nuclear energy Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facility, the RPL houses specialized facilities for work with microgram in simple and complex media. Our staff can work with highly radioactive material, highly dispersible

78

Errors Today and Errors Tomorrow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...even though they encounter flaws when they or their family members are patients, do not see the flaws when they act as health care providers. The invisibility of injuries to patients makes them seem trivial or infrequent. Until we find ways to make errors and injuries routinely visible in local health... If the Institute of Medicine is right, then at the very least, 100 patients will die in hospitals in the United States today because of injuries from their care, not from their diseases. How many will die tomorrow? Tom Nolan, one of the leading quality-...

Berwick D.M.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

Estimation and Assessment of Errors Related to Antenna Pattern Distortion in CODAR SeaSonde High-Frequency Radar Ocean Current Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation-based investigation of errors in HF radar–derived, near-surface ocean current measurements is presented. The simulation model is specific to Coastal Ocean Dynamics Application Radar (CODAR) SeaSonde radar systems that employ a ...

Kenneth Laws; Jeffrey D. Paduan; John Vesecky

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

USE OF MOVING AVERAGES AND INTERPOLATION TO ESTIMATE MEDIAN-EFFECTIVE DOSE: I. Fundamental Formulas, Estimation of Error, and Relation to Other Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...median-effective dose; fundamental formulas, estimation of error, and...median-effective dose, in cases of a...150-154. 144 ESTIMATION OF MEDL4N-EFFECTIVE DOSE 31. EJUSSEY...The effects of radiations on biological systems...

William R. Thompson

1947-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Inorganic and Radiochemical Analysis of AW-101 and AN-107 Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the inorganic and radiochemical analytical results for AW-101 and AN-107 as received materials. The analyses were conducted in support of the BNFL Proposal No. 30406/29274 Task 5.0. The inorganic and radiochemical analysis results obtained from the as received materials are used to provide initial characterization information for subsequent process testing and to provide data to support permit application activities. Quality Assurance (QA) Plan MCS-033 provides the operational and quality control protocols for the analytical activities, and whenever possible, analyses were performed to SW-846 equivalent methods and protocols.

MW Urie; JJ Wagner; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; SK Fiskum; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis  

SciTech Connect

From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA`s radiochemistry department were accepted.

Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Separation of americium and curium from complex chemical and radiochemical mixtures  

SciTech Connect

This work describes a method for separation and radiochemical purification of nanogram levels of americium and curium from complex chemical and radiochemical mixtures containing tens of milligrams of elements such as aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, barium, titanium, potassium, and others, microgram levels of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium, and fission products. Extraction coefficients of americium and curium from these elements are measured. The separation from the macrocomponents was carried out by extraction of americium and curium with butyric acid in the presence of sulfosalicylic acid. Uranium, neptunium, and plutonium were separated from hydrochloric acid solutions, while the rare earth elements were separated from lithium chloride solutions using a column of anion exchange resin AV-17. Alpha measurements were carried out on americium and curium deposited electrolytically on tantalum cathodes. The chemical yield of americium and curium was identical of greater than or equal to 94%, separation time approx. 8 h.

Bochkarev, V.A.; Martynov, N.P.; Slivin, V.G.; Trikanov, A.E.; Fedyaeva, N.V.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Some radiochemical separations employed at the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research-Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several radiochemical separations have been employed at the Radiochemistry Division of the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research-Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commision, for the analysis of a number...

M. B. A. Vasconcellos

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Radiochemical Separation and Quantification of Tritium in Metallic Radwastes Generated from CANDU Type NPP - 13279  

SciTech Connect

As a destructive quantification method of {sup 3}H in low and intermediate level radwastes, bomb oxidation, sample oxidation, and wet oxidation methods have been introduced. These methods have some merits and demerits in the radiochemical separation of {sup 3}H radionuclides. That is, since the bomb oxidation and sample oxidation methods are techniques using heating at high temperature, the separation methods of the radionuclides are relatively simple. However, since {sup 3}H radionuclide has a property of being diffused deeply into the inside of metals, {sup 3}H which is distributed on the surface of the metals can only be extracted if the methods are applied. As an another separation method, the wet oxidation method makes {sup 3}H oxidized with an acidic solution, and extracted completely to an oxidized HTO compound. However, incomplete oxidized {sup 3}H compounds, which are produced by reactions of acidic solutions and metallic radwastes, can be released into the air. Thus, in this study, a wet oxidation method to extract and quantify the {sup 3}H radionuclide from metallic radwastes was established. In particular, a complete extraction method and complete oxidation method of incomplete chemical compounds of {sup 3}H using a Pt catalyst were studied. The radioactivity of {sup 3}H in metallic radwastes is extracted and measured using a wet oxidation method and liquid scintillation counter. Considering the surface dose rate of the sample, the appropriate size of the sample was determined and weighed, and a mixture of oxidants was added to a 200 ml round flask with 3 tubes. The flask was quickly connected to the distilling apparatus. 20 mL of 16 wt% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was given into the 200-ml round flask through a dropping funnel while under stirring and refluxing. After dropping, the temperature of the mixture was raised to 96 deg. C and the sample was leached and oxidized by refluxing for 3 hours. At that time, the incomplete oxidized {sup 3}H compounds were completely oxidized using the Pt catalysts and produced a stable HTO compound. After that, about a 20 ml solution was distilled in the separation apparatus, and the distillate was mixed with an ultimagold LLT as a cocktail solution. The solution in the vial was left standing for at least 24 hours. The radioactivity of {sup 3}H was counted directly using a liquid scintillation analyzer (Packard, 2500 TR/AB, Alpha and Beta Liquid Scintillation Analyzer). (authors)

Ahn, H.J.; Choi, K.C.; Choi, K.S.; Park, T.H.; Park, Y.J.; Song, K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-330 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-330 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Energy and Water Conservation Assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an energy and water conservation assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The assessment was performed in October 2013 by engineers from the PNNL Building Performance Team with the support of the dedicated RPL staff and several Facilities and Operations (F&O) department engineers. The assessment was completed for the Facilities and Operations (F&O) department at PNNL in support of the requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007.

Johnson, Stephanie R.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Boyd, Brian K.

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radiochemical procedures for analysis of Pu, Am, Cs and Sr in water, soil, sediments and biota samples  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Radioactivity Analysis Laboratory (ERAL) was established as an analytical facility. The primary function of ERAL is to provide fast and accurate radiological data of environmental samples. Over the years, many radiochemical procedures have been developed by the staffs of ERAL. As result, we have found that our procedures exist in many different formats and in many different notebooks, documents and files. Therefore, in order to provide for more complete and orderly documentation of the radiochemical procedures that are being used by ERAL, we have decided to standardize the format and compile them into a series of reports. This first report covers procedures we have developed and are using for the radiochemical analysis of Pu, Am, Cs, and Sr in various matrices. Additional analytical procedures and/or revisions for other elements will be reported as they become available through continuation of these compilation efforts.

Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Noshkin, V.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation of the possibility of using hydrogranulation in reprocessing radioactive wastes of radiochemical production facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radio-chemical production facilities are constantly accumulating liquid radioactive wastes (still residues as the result of evaporation of extraction and adsorption solutions etc.) which are a complex multicomponent mixtures. The wastes are frequently stored for extended periods of time while awaiting disposition and in some cases, and this is much worse, they are released into the environment. In this report, I would like to draw your attention to some results we have obtained from investigations aimed at simplifying handing of such wastes by the precipitation of hard to dissolve metal hydroxides, the flocculation of the above into granules with the help of surface-active agents (in this case a polyacrylamide - PAA), quickly precipitated and easily filtered. The precipitate may be quickly dried and calcinated, if necessary, and transformed into a dense oxide sinter. In other words it may be transformed into a material convenient for storage or burial.

Revyakin, V.; Borisov, L.M. [All Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Non-Organic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nebular Abundance Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The errors inherent to the use of the standard "ionization correction factor" ("i_CF") method of calculating nebular conditions and relative abundances of H, He, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in emission line nebulae have been investigated under conditions typical for planetary nebulae. The photoionization code CLOUDY was used to construct a series of model nebulae with properties spanning the range typical of PNe. Its radial "profiles" of bright, frequently observed optical emission lines were then summed over a variety of "apertures" to generate sets of emission line measurements. These resulting line ratios were processed using the i_CF method to "derive" nebular conditions and abundances. We find that for lines which are summed over the entire nebula the i_CF-derived abundances differ from the input abundances by less than 5% for He and O up to 25% or more for Ne, S, and Ar. For resolved observations, however, the discrepancies are often much larger and are systematically variable with radius. This effect is especially pronounced in low-ionization zones where nitrogen and oxygen are neutral or once-ionized such as in FLIERs, ansae and ionization fronts. We argue that the reports of stellar-enriched N in the FLIERs of several PNe are probably specious.

J. Alexander; B. Balick

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Errors of Nonobservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Errors of Nonobservation Errors of Nonobservation Finally, several potential sources of nonsampling error and bias result from errors of nonobservation. The 1994 MECS represents, in terms of sampling coverage, the mail frame of the 1994 ASM or 98 percent of the manufacturing universe, which is consistent with the 1991 MECS. Unit Nonresponse Even though the MECS is a legislatively mandated survey and sampled establishments are given sufficient opportunity and time to respond, nonresponse occurs in the MECS and is accounted for in a nonresponse adjustment of sampling weights. Clearly, had these adjustments not been performed, the estimates produced from only the responding establishments would not have been representative of the target universe for the MECS. Such estimates would have been biased. Adjusting the sampling weights to

93

Quantum error control codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major... Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Relationalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article contributes to the debate of the meaning of relationalism and background independence, which has remained of interest in theoretical physics from Newton versus Leibniz through to foundational issues for today's leading candidate theories of quantum gravity. I contrast and compose the substantially different Leibniz--Mach--Barbour (LMB) and Rovelli--Crane (RC) uses of the word `relational'. Leibniz advocated primary timelessness and Mach that `time is to be abstracted from change'. I consider 3 distinct viewpoints on Machian time: Barbour's, Rovelli's and my own. I provide four expansions on Barbour's taking configuration space to be primary: to (perhaps a weakened notion of) phase space, categorizing, perspecting and propositioning. Categorizing means considering not only object spaces but also the corresponding morphisms and then functors between such pairs. Perspecting means considering the set of subsystem perspectives; this is an arena in which the LMB and Rovelli approaches make contact. By propositioning, I mean considering the set of propositions about a physical (sub)system. I argue against categorization being more than a formal pre-requisite for quantization in general; however, perspecting is a categorical operation, and propositioning leads one to considering topoi, with Isham and Doering's work represents one possibility for a mathematically sharp implementation of propositioning. Further applications of this article are arguing for Ashtekar variables as being relational in LMB as well as just the usually-ascribed RC sense, relationalism versus supersymmetry, string theory and M-theory. The question of whether scale is relational is also considered, with quantum cosmology in mind.

Edward Anderson

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Automation of Column-based Radiochemical Separations: A Comparison of Fluidic, Robotic, and Hybrid Architectures  

SciTech Connect

Two automated systems have been developed to perform column-based radiochemical separation procedures. These new systems are compared with past fluidic column separation architectures, with emphasis on setting up samples and columns in parallel, and using disposable components so that no sample contacts any surface that any other sample has contacted. In the first new approach, a general purpose liquid handling robot has been modified and programmed to perform anion exchange separations using 2 mL column bed columns in 6 mL plastic disposable column bodies. In the second new approach, a fluidic system has been developed to deliver clean reagents through disposable manual valves to six disposable columns, with a mechanized fraction collector that positions four rows of six vials below the columns. The samples are delivered to the columns via a manual 3-port valve from disposable syringes. This second approach, a hybrid of fluidic and mechanized components, is simpler and faster in performing anion exchange procedures for the recovery and purification of plutonium from samples.

Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Owsley, Stanley L.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radiological consequences of a propagated fire accident in a radiochemical separations facility  

SciTech Connect

A radiological consequence analysis of a propagated fire accident in a Savannah River Site (SRS) radiochemical separations facility has been performed. This analysis supports the safety documentation for the SRS plutonium reprocessing facility. Included are the evaluation of the doses resulting from the exposure to the radioactive airborne release for co-located facility worker and the off-site individual receptors. Atmospheric dispersion calculations using qualified five-year (1987-1991) meteorological data were performed with the computer code AXAIR89Q, a validated computer code for radiological dose calculations. Radioactive source term estimates and assumptions of material composition and isotope distribution were based on existing permissible storage levels as defined in approved safety documentation. The fire accident scenario assumes that the fire propagates in the entire facility on four structural levels. Approximately 97% of the radioactive materials released occurs from levels three and four of the facility, which are not included in the ventilation pathway to the sand trap filter. Radiological analysis results indicate that the doses to co-located worker and off-site individual receptors are equal to 4.4 rem and 3.3 rem, respectively. Accident mitigators that were identified include provision for filtration capacity from levels three and four of the facility, and relocation of stored radioactive materials. Provision for filtration capacity would reduce the source term from an unfiltered activity of 53.6 Ci to a filtered activity of 2.0 Ci. Relocation of stored radioactive materials would result in a source term reduction from 53.6 Ci to 20 Ci. Limitations exist, however, that may make implementation of the identified mitigators difficult or prohibitive.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

Zhuo Wang; Kai Sun; Hen Fan; Vlatko Vedral

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Experimental Uncertainties (Errors) Sources of Experimental Uncertainties (Experimental Errors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the preparation of the lab report. A calculator should 1. Bevington, P. R., Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1969. 2. Taylor, J. R., An introduction to uncertainty analysis in the lab. In this laboratory, we keep to a very simple form of error analysis, our purpose being more

Mukasyan, Alexander

99

Data& Error Analysis 1 DATA and ERROR ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data& Error Analysis 1 DATA and ERROR ANALYSIS Performing the experiment and collecting data learned, you might get a better grade.) Data analysis should NOT be delayed until all of the data. This will help one avoid the problem of spending an entire class collecting bad data because of a mistake

Mukasyan, Alexander

100

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tensor Networks and Quantum Error Correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We establish several relations between quantum error correction (QEC) and tensor network (TN) methods of quantum many-body physics. We exhibit correspondences between well-known families of QEC codes and TNs, and demonstrate a formal equivalence between decoding a QEC code and contracting a TN. We build on this equivalence to propose a new family of quantum codes and decoding algorithms that generalize and improve upon quantum polar codes and successive cancellation decoding in a natural way.

Andrew J. Ferris and David Poulin

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Conceptual Modelling in Error Analysis in Computer-Assisted Language Learning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptual Modelling in Error Analysis in Computer- Assisted Language Learning Systems Thierry : "Conceptual Modelling in Error Analysis in Computer Assisted Language Learning Systems". The Bridge of the learner model. We review error analysis in second language learning and tutoring systems related

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

Unequal error protection of subband coded bits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source coded data can be separated into different classes based on their susceptibility to channel errors. Errors in the Important bits cause greater distortion in the reconstructed signal. This thesis presents an Unequal Error Protection scheme...

Devalla, Badarinath

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Communication error detection using facial expressions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic detection of communication errors in conversational systems typically rely only on acoustic cues. However, perceptual studies have indicated that speakers do exhibit visual communication error cues passively ...

Wang, Sy Bor, 1976-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

107

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System, October 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System August 2012 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Assessment Background ........................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

108

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System August 2012 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Assessment Background ........................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

109

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

110

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sorbent Testing For Solidification of Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate sorbents identified by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL. REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both organic and aqueous waste streams are discharged from REDC. The organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (Purex), Cleanex, and Pubex processes. The Purex waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. MSE had also been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes radioactive shielding material. The aqueous waste is a mixture of the raffinate streams from the various extraction processes plus the caustic solution that is used to dissolve the aluminum cladding from the irradiated targets. (authors)

Bickford, J. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., MT (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Chemical and radiochemical characteristics of groundwater in the Culebra Dolomite, southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The nation's first geologic repository for radioactive waste is being excavated in southeastern New Mexico at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Post-closure radioactive release scenarios from WIPP often involve hydrologic transport of radionuclides through the overlying Rustler Formation, in the Culebra Dolomite Member. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has conducted an investigation of the chemistry of culebra groundwater. Analysis revealed the following: salinities in Culebra groundwater generally increase from west to east; a Na-Cl type water dominates over most of the sampled area with a Ca-SO/sub 4/ type occurring in the southern to southwestern area; exclusive of the low-salinity southern area, most wells located on the same general flow path have similar ion ratios; dissolved uranium content in Culebra groundwater is relatively high, with marked disequilibrium between U-238 and U-234 activities; Ra-226 and Ra-228 are sometimes present in relatively large amounts; Th-228 was detected in samples from 5 wells; and Cs-137 was detected in several samples. 39 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Chapmen, J.B.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Cant Find Variable Mentioned in NEXT Statement 136 Floating Point Overflow (Number too Large) 137 No Corresponding GOSUB for this RETURN statement ...

114

ERROR ESTIMATIONS FOR INDIRECT MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 ERROR ESTIMATIONS FOR INDIRECT MEASUREMENTS: RANDOMIZED VS. DETERMINISTIC ALGORITHMS difficult or even impossible to directly measure the quantity in which we are interested: e.g., we cannot directly measure a distance to a distant galaxy or the amount of oil in a given well. Since we cannot

Kreinovich, Vladik

115

Error 401 on upload? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Error 401 on upload? Error 401 on upload? Home > Groups > Databus Hi, I get an HTTP error 401 when trying to upload data. My first thought is that this is related to the robot's credentials, but I've checked that carefully; robot is in a group with access to the table, etc. Is there something else that can cause error 401? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 23 September, 2013 - 13:02 1 answer Points: 0 uploading data using the GUI (csv upload button) or uploading data using json? What type of access does the group have to the database? Try adding the robot to the group directly as well as a work around and let me know what happens(we have people using the robots but perhaps there is an issue somewhere). Is your user and your api key working at all? (your user key is in the help section System Access on your version of databus). Deanhiller

116

Error 401 on upload? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Error 401 on upload? Error 401 on upload? Home > Groups > Databus Hi, I get an HTTP error 401 when trying to upload data. My first thought is that this is related to the robot's credentials, but I've checked that carefully; robot is in a group with access to the table, etc. Is there something else that can cause error 401? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 23 September, 2013 - 13:02 1 answer Points: 0 uploading data using the GUI (csv upload button) or uploading data using json? What type of access does the group have to the database? Try adding the robot to the group directly as well as a work around and let me know what happens(we have people using the robots but perhaps there is an issue somewhere). Is your user and your api key working at all? (your user key is in the help section System Access on your version of databus). Deanhiller

117

Error-tradeoff and error-disturbance relations for incompatible quantum measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...famously argued that “God does not play dice” (4) and could...measurement of the position q of a particle necessary...the spin of a spin-1/2 particle can turn out to be 100. Phys...cavity-qed experiment on wave-particle correlation. Phys Rev A 65...

Cyril Branciard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Human errors and structural failure probability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting the influence of human errors on structural failure probability is the topic of this paper. There are two principal reasons for needing this information. First, if errors are present after the design of a structure is completed, as is generally the case, this will provide the engineer with a measure of what effect such errors will have on the structural safety. Second, this information is directly useful in the optimisation of quality assurance expenditures, which can effectively be used for controlling the probability of structural failure due to errors. Simplified probabilistic models are developed to integrate human errors into structural risk assessment. Numerical examples illustrate the sensitivity of structural safety to errors.

Dan M. Frangopol

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Phase Errors and the Capture Effect  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show presents analysis of spectrograms and the phase error of filtered noise in a signal. When the filtered noise is smaller than the signal amplitude, the phase error can never exceed 90{deg}, so the average phase error over many cycles is zero: this is called the capture effect because the largest signal captures the phase and frequency determination.

Blair, J., and Machorro, E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

José J. Baldoví; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Ariño; Guillermo Mínguez Espallargas

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hard Data on Soft Errors: A Large-Scale Assessment of Real-World Error Rates in GPGPU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphics processing units (GPUs) are gaining widespread use in computational chemistry and other scientific simulation contexts because of their huge performance advantages relative to conventional CPUs. However, the reliability of GPUs in error-intolerant applications is largely unproven. In particular, a lack of error checking and correcting (ECC) capability in the memory subsystems of graphics cards has been cited as a hindrance to the acceptance of GPUs as high-performance coprocessors, but the impact of this design has not been previously quantified. In this article we present MemtestG80, our software for assessing memory error rates on NVIDIA G80 and GT200-architecture-based graphics cards. Furthermore, we present the results of a large-scale assessment of GPU error rate, conducted by running MemtestG80 on over 20,000 hosts on the Folding@home distributed computing network. Our control experiments on consumer-grade and dedicated-GPGPU hardware in a controlled environment found no errors. However, our su...

Haque, Imran S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Probability, Statistics, and the Theory of Errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 June 1933 research-article Probability, Statistics, and the Theory of Errors Harold Jeffreys The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Error analysis for resonant thermonuclear reaction rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed presentation is given of estimating uncertainties in thermonuclear reaction rates for stellar nucleosynthesis involving narrow resonances, starting from random errors in measured or calculated resonance and nuclear level properties. Special attention is given to statistical matters such as probability distributions, error propagation, and correlations between errors. Interpretation of resulting uncertainties in reaction rates and the distinction between symmetric and asymmetric errors are also discussed. Computing reaction rate uncertainties is described. We give examples from explosive nucleosynthesis by hydrogen burning on light nuclei.

William J. Thompson; C. Iliadis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal Hydraulic Simulations, Error Estimation and Parameter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Error Estimation and Parameter Sensitivity Studies in Drekar::CFD Thomas M. Smith, John N. Shadid, Roger P. Pawlowski, Eric C. Cyr and Timothy M. Wildey Sandia National...

125

Quantum Error Correction Beyond Completely Positive Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By introducing an operator sum representation for arbitrary linear maps, we develop a generalized theory of quantum error correction (QEC) that applies to any linear map, in particular maps that are not completely positive (CP). This theory of "linear quantum error correction" is applicable in cases where the standard and restrictive assumption of a factorized initial system-bath state does not apply.

A. Shabani; D. A. Lidar

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

QuarkNet Workshop: Beyond Human Error  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Error Human Error QuarkNet Workshop for High School Science Teachers 8:30 am to 4:00 pm, August 1 -3, 2012 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory This was a three-day workshop for high school science teachers. Measurement and error are key ingredients for all science applications. Both align with the Next Generation Science Standards, but many high school students struggle to understand the importance of error analysis and prevention. Over the three days we examined multiple experiments going on at Fermilab and discussed the ways that scientists take measurements and reduce error on these projects. Participants met and worked with scientists from Fermilab and University of Chicago to look at how error analysis takes place at Fermilab and bridged those ideas into high school classes. Teachers discussed lesson plans available at Fermilab and their own methods of teaching error analysis. Additionally, participants heard from high school students who participated in summer research as they presented their findings and linked students' learning back to the teachers' understanding of error recognition and analysis.

128

Meeting 12 February 25, 1999 Error Measure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The value of â?? is the corresponding eigenvalue. The eigen­ values are the roots of the characteristic distances is non­negative, so Q is pos­ itive semi­definite. The error of an edge contraction is obtained paraboloid as illustrated in Figure 3. In other words, the preimage of a constant error value ffl, E \\Gamma1

California at Berkeley, University of

129

Hopper Trouble Shooting and Error Messages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Error Messages Message or Symptom Fault Recommendation job hit wallclock time limit user or system Submit job for longer time or start job from last checkpoint and resubmit. If your job hung and produced no output contact consultants. received node failed or halted event for nid xxxx system One of the compute nodes assigned to the job failed. Resubmit the job PtlNIInit failed : PTL_NOT_REGISTERED user The executable is from an XT system (Franklin or Jaguar?) using portals. Recompile on Hopper and resubmit. error while loading shared libraries: libxxxx.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory mostly user, sometimes system Make sure environment variable CRAY_ROOTFS is set to DSL, also the modules loaded when building the dynamic executable is also loaded at run time. Report to consultants if still not resolved.

130

Scalable extraction of error models from the output of error detection circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate methods of assessing the performance of quantum gates are extremely important. Quantum process tomography and randomized benchmarking are the current favored methods. Quantum process tomography gives detailed information, but significant approximations must be made to reduce this information to a form quantum error correction simulations can use. Randomized benchmarking typically outputs just a single number, the fidelity, giving no information on the structure of errors during the gate. Neither method is optimized to assess gate performance within an error detection circuit, where gates will be actually used in a large-scale quantum computer. Specifically, the important issues of error composition and error propagation lie outside the scope of both methods. We present a fast, simple, and scalable method of obtaining exactly the information required to perform effective quantum error correction from the output of continuously running error detection circuits, enabling accurate prediction of large-scale behavior.

Austin G. Fowler; D. Sank; J. Kelly; R. Barends; John M. Martinis

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

An analysis of the accuracy of relative permeability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observations, sucn as water injection rate, oil production rate and pressure drop across the core sample, is an essential part in the prediction of reservoir rock properties. For many years, equations developed by Johnson, Bossier and Naumann (1) (or... as the measurement errors increase. A 1X error in measuring pressure drop and oil production can cause about 4X error in estimating relative permeabilities. However, the relationship between the measurement errors and estimation error is not linear...

Tao, Teh-Ming

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole, Quadrupole, and Sextupole Magnets using POISSON Ro be rt J. La ri<::::R~ i. September 10, 1985 Introduction LS-32 The computer program POISSON was used to calculate the dipole, quadru- pole, and sextupole magnets of the 6 GeV electron storage ring. A trinagular mesh must first be generated by LATTICE. The triangle size is varied over the "universe" at the discretion of the user. This note describes a series of test calculations that were made to help the user decide on the size of the mesh to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular mesh used to calculate a "perfect" dipole magnet is shown in

133

Spatial Error Metrics for Oceanographic Model Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A common problem with modern numerical oceanographic models is spatial displacement, including misplacement and misshapenness of ocean circulation features. Traditional error metrics, such as least squares methods, are ineffective in many such ...

Sean B. Ziegeler; James D. Dykes; Jay F. Shriver

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

ACS calibration pipeline testing: error propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ACS calibration pipeline testing: error propagation Doug Van Orsow, Max Mutchler, Warren Hack files (see ISRs 99-03 "CALACS Operation and Implementation" by Hack and 99-04 "ACS calibra- tion

Sirianni, Marco

135

Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized and unified framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this Letter, we describe these codes using the stabilizer formalism. This is achieved by adding a gauge group to stabilizer codes that defines an equivalence class between encoded states. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor’s 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 3 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure and a wider class of logical operations without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvements of the error threshold of fault-tolerant quantum computing.

David Poulin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Error Modeling for Hierarchical Lossless Image Compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method for error modeling applicable to the MLP algorithm for hierarchical lossless image compression. This method, based on a concept called the variability index, provides accurate models for pixel ...

Howard, Paul G.; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Diagnosing Forecast Errors in Tropical Cyclone Motion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a diagnostic approach that can be used to examine the sources of numerical model forecast error that contribute to degraded tropical cyclone (TC) motion forecasts. Tropical cyclone motion forecasts depend ...

Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.; Christopher A. Davis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Organizational Errors: Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this chapter is to promote research about organizational errors—i.e., the actions of multiple organizational participants that deviate from organizationally specified rules and can potentially result in adverse ...

Carroll, John Stephen

139

Assessment of Wind Speed Dependent Prediction Error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations in this chapter follow the idea that the prediction error quantitatively depends on the meteorological situation that has to be predicted. As a first approach the wind speed as a main indicator...

Dr. Matthias Lange; Dr. Ulrich Focken

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

State preservation by repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum computing becomes viable when a quantum state can be preserved from environmentally-induced error. If quantum bits (qubits) are sufficiently reliable, errors are sparse and quantum error correction (QEC) is capable of identifying and correcting them. Adding more qubits improves the preservation by guaranteeing increasingly larger clusters of errors will not cause logical failure - a key requirement for large-scale systems. Using QEC to extend the qubit lifetime remains one of the outstanding experimental challenges in quantum computing. Here, we report the protection of classical states from environmental bit-flip errors and demonstrate the suppression of these errors with increasing system size. We use a linear array of nine qubits, which is a natural precursor of the two-dimensional surface code QEC scheme, and track errors as they occur by repeatedly performing projective quantum non-demolition (QND) parity measurements. Relative to a single physical qubit, we reduce the failure rate in retrieving an input state by a factor of 2.7 for five qubits and a factor of 8.5 for nine qubits after eight cycles. Additionally, we tomographically verify preservation of the non-classical Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state. The successful suppression of environmentally-induced errors strongly motivates further research into the many exciting challenges associated with building a large-scale superconducting quantum computer.

J. Kelly; R. Barends; A. G. Fowler; A. Megrant; E. Jeffrey; T. C. White; D. Sank; J. Y. Mutus; B. Campbell; Yu Chen; Z. Chen; B. Chiaro; A. Dunsworth; I. -C. Hoi; C. Neill; P. J. J. O'Malley; C. Quintana; P. Roushan; A. Vainsencher; J. Wenner; A. N. Cleland; John M. Martinis

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A systems approach to reducing utility billing errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many methods for analyzing the possibility of errors are practiced by organizations who are concerned about safety and error prevention. However, in situations where the error occurrence is random and difficult to track, ...

Ogura, Nori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evolutionary Algorithm-Based Error Parameterization Methods for Data Assimilation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods of parameterizing model errors have a substantial effect on the accuracy of ensemble data assimilation. After a review of the current error-handling methods, a new blending error parameterization method was designed to combine the ...

Yulong Bai; Xin Li

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Error Detection and Recovery for Robot Motion Planning with Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robots must plan and execute tasks in the presence of uncertainty. Uncertainty arises from sensing errors, control errors, and uncertainty in the geometry of the environment. The last, which is called model error, has ...

Donald, Bruce Randall

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Comprehensive Quality Assurance Program for Personnel and Procedures in Radiation Oncology: Value of Voluntary Error Reporting and Checklists  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This report describes the value of a voluntary error reporting system and the impact of a series of quality assurance (QA) measures including checklists and timeouts on reported error rates in patients receiving radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A voluntary error reporting system was instituted with the goal of recording errors, analyzing their clinical impact, and guiding the implementation of targeted QA measures. In response to errors committed in relation to treatment of the wrong patient, wrong treatment site, and wrong dose, a novel initiative involving the use of checklists and timeouts for all staff was implemented. The impact of these and other QA initiatives was analyzed. Results: From 2001 to 2011, a total of 256 errors in 139 patients after 284,810 external radiation treatments (0.09% per treatment) were recorded in our voluntary error database. The incidence of errors related to patient/tumor site, treatment planning/data transfer, and patient setup/treatment delivery was 9%, 40.2%, and 50.8%, respectively. The compliance rate for the checklists and timeouts initiative was 97% (P<.001). These and other QA measures resulted in a significant reduction in many categories of errors. The introduction of checklists and timeouts has been successful in eliminating errors related to wrong patient, wrong site, and wrong dose. Conclusions: A comprehensive QA program that regularly monitors staff compliance together with a robust voluntary error reporting system can reduce or eliminate errors that could result in serious patient injury. We recommend the adoption of these relatively simple QA initiatives including the use of checklists and timeouts for all staff to improve the safety of patients undergoing radiation therapy in the modern era.

Kalapurakal, John A., E-mail: j-kalapurakal@northwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Zafirovski, Aleksandar; Smith, Jeffery; Fisher, Paul; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Barnard, Cynthia [Department of Quality Strategies, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Quality Strategies, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rave, Nick [Department of Physicians Services, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Physicians Services, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Investigation of oxides formed in the corrosion of SUS-304 in high-temperature water through the measurement of evolved hydrogen and radiochemical analyses  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion behavior of SUS-304 at 280/sup 0/C in deaerated water has been traced both through measuring H/sub 2/ gas, concomitantly formed with corrosion, and through radiochemical analysis of the corrosion layers. The calculated H/sub 2/ yield based on the reaction, M + x.H/sub 2/O = MO /sub x/ + x.H/sub 2/ (M: iron, chromium, nickel, manganese, and cobalt), agreed reasonably well with the observed H/sub 2/ yields, showing that iron is mainly in a magnetite form and chromium is in a Cr(III) state. More than 85% of the corrosion layers were recovered by repeating ultrasonic cleaning and electrostripping processes. The residual fraction was rich in chromium and dissolved in the subsequent electropolishing process. The total corrosion increases with the reaction time, although the ''inner layer'' tends to stay almost constant at a longer reaction time. In some cases, both neutron irradiated and nonirradiated SUS coexisted. Mutual transfer of the elements from one SUS to the other has been examined.

Tachikawa, E.; Hoshi, M.; Nakashima, M.; Sagawa, C.; Yonezawa, C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" Resolved: Running jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom: After the Hopper August 14...

147

Estimating the error in simulation prediction over the design space  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses the assessrnent of accuracy of simulation predictions. A procedure is developed to validate a simple non-linear model defined to capture the hardening behavior of a foam material subjected to a short-duration transient impact. Validation means that the predictive accuracy of the model must be established, not just in the vicinity of a single testing condition, but for all settings or configurations of the system. The notion of validation domain is introduced to designate the design region where the model's predictive accuracy is appropriate for the application of interest. Techniques brought to bear to assess the model's predictive accuracy include test-analysis coi-relation, calibration, bootstrapping and sampling for uncertainty propagation and metamodeling. The model's predictive accuracy is established by training a metalnodel of prediction error. The prediction error is not assumed to be systcmatic. Instead, it depends on which configuration of the system is analyzed. Finally, the prediction error's confidence bounds are estimated by propagating the uncertainty associated with specific modeling assumptions.

Shinn, R. (Rachel); Hemez, F. M. (François M.); Doebling, S. W. (Scott W.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bounds for Small-Error and Zero-Error Quantum Algorithms Harry Buhrman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bounds for Small-Error and Zero-Error Quantum Algorithms Harry Buhrman CWI Richard Cleve University algorithm with an auxiliary input r, which is uniformly distributed over some underlying sample space. In this case, for any x 2 f0;1gn, f(x) = 1 iff (9r 2 S)(A(x;r) = 1). Grover's quantum search algorithm [15

de Wolf, Ronald

149

Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults, 90089-0191. Phone: 213-740-6772. Email: barbersa@usc.edu #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS 2 Abstract (144 words) Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information

Mather, Mara

150

Retiming for Soft Error Minimization Under Error-Latching Window Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensitivity to naturally- occurring radiation and the consequent soft error rates of CMOS circuits. Moreover Soft error, also known as single-event upsets (SEU), caused by radiation-induced charged particles circuits [3]: electrical masking occurs when SEUs are attenuated before being latched because

Zhou, Hai

151

Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Transcript  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An example of case studies, mainly by showing photos of errors and good examples, then discussing the purpose of the home energy professional guidelines and certification. There may be more examples of what not to do only because these were good learning opportunities.

152

Adjoint Error Correction for Integral Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a combustor; the total heat ux into a high pressure turbine blade from the surrounding ow; average noise. As an example, consider the wake behind a wing. To adequately resolve the wake requires a #12;ne grid locally in which the grid resolution is rather coarse. Grid adaptation based on error estimates that look

Pierce, Niles A.

153

MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION OF ULTRASONIC ANEMOMETER ERRORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commonly show systematic errors depending on wind speed due to inaccurate ultrasonic transducer mounting three- dimensional wind speed time series. Results for the variance and power spectra are shown. 1 wind speeds with ultrasonic anemometers: The measu- red flow is distorted by the probe head

Heinemann, Detlev

154

Distribution of Wind Power Forecasting Errors from Operational Systems (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation offers new data and statistical analysis of wind power forecasting errors in operational systems.

Hodge, B. M.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation contains information on WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions.

156

Analysis of Solar Two Heliostat Tracking Error Sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the geometrical errors that reduce heliostat tracking accuracy at Solar Two. The basic heliostat control architecture is described. Then, the three dominant error sources are described and their effect on heliostat tracking is visually illustrated. The strategy currently used to minimize, but not truly correct, these error sources is also shown. Finally, a novel approach to minimizing error is presented.

Jones, S.A.; Stone, K.W.

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Analysis of Solar Two heliostat tracking error sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the geometrical errors that reduce heliostat tracking accuracy at Solar Two. The basic heliostat control architecture is described. Then, the three dominant error sources are described and their effect on heliostat tracking is visually illustrated. The strategy currently used to minimize, but not truly correct, these error sources is also shown. Finally, a novel approach to minimizing error is presented.

Stone, K.W.; Jones, S.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Error Notification, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Searched For Frequently Searched For Helpdesk Home Web Services BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Need Help Helpdesk Homepage Call the Helpdesk for 24x7 support Bus: 631.344.5522 Fax: 631-344-2140 Email: itdhelp@bnl.gov HTTP Error Forbidden: Page Access Rejected You are not authorized to view this page - This error is caused when the server has a list of IP addresses that are not allowed to access the site, and the IP address you are using is in this list. If the problem persists or if you believe you should be able to view this directory or page, please contact the Web server's administrator or call the Helpdesk by using the email address or phone number listed below. Some reasons for getting this notice: All people outside of the BNL Domain (130.199.0.0) will get this notice.

159

Error Notification, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Searched For Frequently Searched For Helpdesk Home Application Services BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Need Help Helpdesk Homepage Call the Helpdesk for 24x7 support Bus: 631.344.5522 Fax: 631-344-2140 Email: itdhelp@bnl.gov HTTP Error Forbidden: Page Access Rejected You are not authorized to view this page - This error is caused when the server has a list of IP addresses that are not allowed to access the site, and the IP address you are using is in this list. If the problem persists or if you believe you should be able to view this directory or page, please contact the Web server's administrator or call the Helpdesk by using the email address or phone number listed below. Some reasons for getting this notice: All people outside of the BNL Domain (130.199.0.0) will get this notice.

160

Unified and Generalized Approach to Quantum Error Correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a unified approach to quantum error correction, called operator quantum error correction. Our scheme relies on a generalized notion of a noiseless subsystem that is investigated here. By combining the active error correction with this generalized noiseless subsystems method, we arrive at a unified approach which incorporates the known techniques—i.e., the standard error correction model, the method of decoherence-free subspaces, and the noiseless subsystem method—as special cases. Moreover, we demonstrate that the quantum error correction condition from the standard model is a necessary condition for all known methods of quantum error correction.

David Kribs; Raymond Laflamme; David Poulin

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Correlated errors can lead to better performance of quantum codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A formulation for evaluating the performance of quantum error correcting codes for a general error model is presented. In this formulation, the correlation between errors is quantified by a Hamiltonian description of the noise process. We classify correlated errors using the system-bath interaction: local versus nonlocal and two-body versus many-body interactions. In particular, we consider Calderbank-Shor-Steane codes and observe a better performance in the presence of correlated errors depending on the timing of the error recovery. We also find this timing to be an important factor in the design of a coding system for achieving higher fidelities.

A. Shabani

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

Wind power forecast error smoothing within a wind farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smoothing of wind power forecast errors is well-known for large areas. Comparable effects within a wind farm are investigated in this paper. A Neural Network was taken to predict the power output of a wind farm in north-western Germany comprising 17 turbines. A comparison was done between an algorithm that fits mean wind and mean power data of the wind farm and a second algorithm that fits wind and power data individually for each turbine. The evaluation of root mean square errors (RMSE) shows that relative small smoothing effects occur. However, it can be shown for this wind farm that individual calculations have the advantage that only a few turbines are needed to give better results than the use of mean data. Furthermore different results occurred if predicted wind speeds are directly fitted to observed wind power or if predicted wind speeds are first fitted to observed wind speeds and then applied to a power curve. The first approach gives slightly better RMSE values, the bias improves considerably.

Nadja Saleck; Lueder von Bremen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API error-handling specifications are often not documented, ... , we present a novel framework for mining API error-handling specifications automatically from API client code, without any user input. ... to disti...

Mithun Acharya; Tao Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hardware-efficient autonomous quantum error correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new method to autonomously correct for errors of a logical qubit induced by energy relaxation. This scheme encodes the logical qubit as a multi-component superposition of coherent states in a harmonic oscillator, more specifically a cavity mode. The sequences of encoding, decoding and correction operations employ the non-linearity provided by a single physical qubit coupled to the cavity. We layout in detail how to implement these operations in a practical system. This proposal directly addresses the task of building a hardware-efficient and technically realizable quantum memory.

Zaki Leghtas; Gerhard Kirchmair; Brian Vlastakis; Robert Schoelkopf; Michel Devoret; Mazyar Mirrahimi

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Risk assessment of loss of structural integrity of a floating production platform due to gross errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last years The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, as well as Statoil, has put increased focus on how gross errors related to structural integrity are influencing the safety of offshore installations. Also, the loss of the P36, a floating platform outside Brazil in 2001, emphasised the importance to control gross errors in large projects. On this basis, a work to assess the risk of loss of the structural integrity of the Kristin platform, during operation, due to failure from gross errors was initiated. The Kristin platform is a permanently moored ring-pontoon semi-submersible production unit planned to be placed in the south-west part of Haltenbanken area in the North Sea in 2005. The water depth at the site is approximately 315 m. The objective of this work was to quantify the risk contribution from gross errors related to structural integrity and to pinpoint the most critical items that may govern the probability of gross error for the Kristin platform. Some of the main findings from this work are presented in this paper.

Inge Lotsberg; Odd Olufsen; Gunnar Solland; Jan Inge Dalane; Sverre Haver

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Standard errors of parameter estimates in the ETAS model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Standard errors of parameter estimates in the ETAS model Abstract Point process models of seismic catalogs and in short- term earthquake forecasting. The standard errors of parameter estimates of conventional standard error estimates based on the Hessian matrix of the log- likelihood function of the ETAS

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

168

ABSTENTION REDUCES ERRORS DECISION ABSTAINING N-VERSION GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduces errors when applied to an E. coli promoter sequence classification problem [1]. Genetic-off between abstention rate and error reduction. 1 INTRODUCTION This paper investigates the effect by human experts) [2]. Abstention reduces the number of errors, potentially avoiding overfitting [2

Fernandez, Thomas

169

ABSTENTION REDUCES ERRORS DECISION ABSTAINING NVERSION GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduces errors when applied to an E. coli promoter sequence classification problem [1]. Genetic­off between abstention rate and error reduction. 1 INTRODUCTION This paper investigates the effect by human experts) [2]. Abstention reduces the number of errors, potentially avoiding overfitting [2

Fernandez, Thomas

170

Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core Nontechnical Skills In normal flight operations, crews are faced with a variety of external threats and commit a range of errors of these threats and errors therefore forms an essential element of enhancing performance and minimizing risk

171

Categorization of Software Errors that led to Security Breaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Categorization of Software Errors that led to Security Breaches Wenliang Du Email: duw University, W. Lafayette, IN 47907, USA Abstract A set of errors known to have led to security breaches in computer systems was analyzed. The analysis led to a categorization of these errors. After examining

Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

172

Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code Mithun Acharya and Tao Xie Department}@csc.ncsu.edu Abstract. API error-handling specifications are often not documented, necessi- tating automated present a novel framework for mining API error- handling specifications automatically from API client code

Xie, Tao

173

Session Cookie Error, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Session Cookie Error Session Cookie Error We're Sorry, either you don't have Session Cookies enabled in your browser or your session has expired. Some functions in this site will not work properly without it enabled. Please enable session cookies, then go back and try again or close and re-open your browser to view these web pages correctly. What is a Cookie? What are Cookies used for? What are Persistent Cookies? What are Session Cookies? How can I control or enable which Cookies I want to accept? Need help? What is a Cookie? A "cookie" is a small piece of information that is sent by a web server to be stored on a web browser, so that it can later be read back from that browser the next time this unique visitor returns to that web server. This becomes useful for having the browser remember specific information about this visitor like location of their last visit, time spent, or user preferences (like style sheets). The cookie is a text file that is saved in the browser's directory and is stored in RAM while the browser is running. Also, the cookie may be stored on the computer's hard drive once you log off from that web site or web server.

174

Algorithms for BoundedError Correlation of High Dimensional Data in Microarray Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algorithms for Bounded­Error Correlation of High Dimensional Data in Microarray Experiments #3 of clustering continuous valued data has been well studied in literature. Its application to microarray analysis are relatively un­ explored. An instance of analysis of discrete­attributed data arises in detecting co

Szpankowski, Wojciech

175

Significance of gauge line error in orifice measurement  

SciTech Connect

Pulsation induced gauge line amplification can cause errors in the recorded differential signal used to calculate flow. Its presence may be detected using dual transmitters (one connected at the orifice taps, the other at the end of the gauge lines) and comparing the relative peak to peak amplitudes. Its affect on recorded differential may be determined by averaging both signals with a PC based data acquisition and analysis system. Remedial action is recommended in all cases where amplification is detected. Use of close connect, full opening manifolds, is suggested to decouple the gauge lines` resonant frequency from that of the excitation`s, by positioning the recording device as close to the process signal`s origin as possible.

Bowen, J.W. [ANR Pipeline Co., Detroit, MI (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

On-line Self Error Detection with Equal Protection Against All Errors Mark G. Karpovsky, Konrad J. Kulikowski, Zhen Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-line Self Error Detection with Equal Protection Against All Errors Mark G. Karpovsky, Konrad J and storage. We also present several design techniques for memories with self-error-detection based on the pro. The proposed robust codes require slightly larger overhead than standard and widely-used linear codes

Karpovsky, Mark

177

Neoclassical toroidal viscosity and error-field penetration in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

A model for field error penetration is developed that includes nonresonant as well as the usual resonant field error effects. The nonresonant components cause a neoclassical toroidal viscous torque that tries to keep the plasma rotating at a rate comparable to the ion diamagnetic frequency. The new theory is used to examine resonant error-field penetration threshold scaling in ohmic tokamak plasmas. Compared to previous theoretical results, the plasma is found to be less susceptible to error-field penetration and locking, by a factor that depends on the nonresonant error-field amplitude.

Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Organic Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating various sorbents to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both aqueous and organic waste streams are discharged from REDC. Organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX), Cleanex, and Pubex processes.1 The PUREX waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. An aqueous waste stream is also produced from these separation processes. MSE has been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes specially formulated radioactive shielding materials developed by Science and Technology Applications, LLC. This paper will focus on the sorbent testing work. Based on work performed at Savannah River Site (SRS) (Refs. 1, 2), ORNL tested and evaluated three sorbents capable of solidifying the PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex waste streams and a composite of the three organic waste streams: Imbiber Beads{sup R} IMB230301 (Imbiber Beads), Nochar A610 Petro Bond, and Petroset II Granular{sup TM} (Petroset II-G). Surrogates of the PUREX, Pubex, Cleanex, and a composite organic waste were used for the bench-scale testing. Recommendations resulting from the ORNL testing included follow-on testing by MSE for two of the three sorbents: Nochar Petro Bond and Petroset II-G. MSE recommended that another clay sorbent, Organoclay BM-QT-199, be added to the test sequence. The sorbent/surrogate combinations were tested at bench scale, 19-liter (L) [5-gallon (gal)] bucket scale, and 208-L (55-gal) drum scale. The testing performed by MSE will help ORNL select the right solidification materials and wasteform generation methods for the design of a new treatment facility. The results could also be used to help demonstrate that ORNL could meet the waste acceptance criteria for the ultimate disposal site for the waste-forms. The organics will be solidified as transuranic waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and the aqueous waste stream will be grouted and disposed of at the Nevada Test Site as low-level waste if real waste testing indicates similar results to the surrogate testing. The objective of this work was to identify a sorbent capable of solidifying PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex organic wastes individually and a composite of the three organic waste streams. The sorbent and surrogate combinations must also be compatible with processing equipment and maintain stability under a variety of conditions that could occur during storage/shipment of the solidified wastes. (authors)

Bickford, J.; Foote, M. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Montana (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors  

SciTech Connect

A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Error compensation in insertion-region magnets  

SciTech Connect

In heavy ion storage rings, intra-beam scattering (IBS) between high charge state ions results in a large beam emittance during storage. The ultimate machine performance depends on achieving the highest possible magnetic field quality and alignment accuracy in the insertion-region (IR) triplet magnets during low-{beta} operation when the beam size is the largest in the triplets. Therefore, effective compensation of magnet construction errors and misalignments is crucial. Heavy-ion beams (Au{sup 79+} will be accelerated and stored for 10 hours in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the energy of 100 GeV/u in two separated rings consisting of superconducting magnets. Due to strong IBS, the transverse beam emittance grows from 10{pi} mm-mr at injection to more than 40{pi} mm-mr at storage. Dipoles and riplets of quadrupoles of large bore are placed on both sides of the six interaction points (IP). In order to maximize the luminosity at two IPs with proposed experiments, the nearby triplets are designed to enable the collision {beta}-function to be reduced to {beta} = 1 m. Consequently, the rms transverse beam size becomes large at the triplets ({beta}{sub max} = 1400 m), increasing from {sigma} = 2.3 mm to 4.7 mm during the period of storage. At the end of storage, the 5{sigma} beam size becomes about 71% of the coil radius (65 mm). The goal if IR triplet error compensation is to ensure satisfactory magnetic field quality and beam long-term stability up to this 5{sigma} radius.

Wei, Jie

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Does an awareness of differing types of spreadsheet errors aid end-users in identifying spreadsheets errors?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research presented in this paper establishes a valid, and simplified, revision of previous spreadsheet error classifications. This investigation is concerned with the results of a web survey and two web-based gender and domain-knowledge free spreadsheet error identification exercises. The participants of the survey and exercises were a test group of professionals (all of whom regularly use spreadsheets) and a control group of students from the University of Greenwich (UK). The findings show that over 85% of users are also the spreadsheet's developer, supporting the revised spreadsheet error classification. The findings also show that spreadsheet error identification ability is directly affected both by spreadsheet experience and by error-type awareness. In particular, that spreadsheet error-type awareness significantly improves the user's ability to identify, the more surreptitious, qualitative error.

Purser, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Model error in weather forecasting D. Orrell 1,2 , L. Smith 1,3 , J. Barkmeijer 4 , and T. Palmer 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

numerical weather prediction mod­ els. A simple law is derived to relate model error to likely shadowingModel error in weather forecasting D. Orrell 1,2 , L. Smith 1,3 , J. Barkmeijer 4 , and T. Palmer 4 in the model, and inac­ curate initial conditions (Bjerknes, 1911). Because weather models are thought

Smith, Leonard A

183

Heliostat image drift behavior for different error sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drift is ubiquitous in heliostat fields and may be caused by diverse geometrical inaccuracies during heliostat installation and operation. This phenomenon is studied for three important primary errors in the present paper: Angular offset in the drive mechanism pedestal tilt and canting error. Each error produces characteristic signatures but there is a diversity of behavior depending on the error parameters and location of the heliostat. The variation of the extent of drift curves is studied as a function of distance for fixed error parameters. It is found that in general this extent is not proportional to distance except for far heliostats and depends on a complicated manner on the different parameters involved. Moreover even though the extent of drift curves becomes proportional to distance for far heliostats the convergence is very slow and very variable with the error parameters.

Rafael E. Cabanillas; Claudio A. Estrada

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Parallel Worldline Numerics: Implementation and Error Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an overview of the worldline numerics technique, and discuss the parallel CUDA implementation of a worldline numerics algorithm. In the worldline numerics technique, we wish to generate an ensemble of representative closed-loop particle trajectories, and use these to compute an approximate average value for Wilson loops. We show how this can be done with a specific emphasis on cylindrically symmetric magnetic fields. The fine-grained, massive parallelism provided by the GPU architecture results in considerable speedup in computing Wilson loop averages. Furthermore, we give a brief overview of uncertainty analysis in the worldline numerics method. There are uncertainties from discretizing each loop, and from using a statistical ensemble of representative loops. The former can be minimized so that the latter dominates. However, determining the statistical uncertainties is complicated by two subtleties. Firstly, the distributions generated by the worldline ensembles are highly non-Gaussian, and so the standard error in the mean is not a good measure of the statistical uncertainty. Secondly, because the same ensemble of worldlines is used to compute the Wilson loops at different values of $T$ and $x_\\mathrm{ cm}$, the uncertainties associated with each computed value of the integrand are strongly correlated. We recommend a form of jackknife analysis which deals with both of these problems.

Dan Mazur; Jeremy S. Heyl

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nonlinear local error bounds via a change of metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2014 ... Abstract: In this work, we improve the approach of Corvellec-Motreanu to nonlinear error bounds for lowersemicontinuous functions on ...

Dominique Azé

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

Error Detection, Factorization and Correction for Multi-View Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery  

SciTech Connect

Scene reconstruction from video sequences has become a prominent computer vision research area in recent years, due to its large number of applications in fields such as security, robotics and virtual reality. Despite recent progress in this field, there are still a number of issues that manifest as incomplete, incorrect or computationally-expensive reconstructions. The engine behind achieving reconstruction is the matching of features between images, where common conditions such as occlusions, lighting changes and texture-less regions can all affect matching accuracy. Subsequent processes that rely on matching accuracy, such as camera parameter estimation, structure computation and non-linear parameter optimization, are also vulnerable to additional sources of error, such as degeneracies and mathematical instability. Detection and correction of errors, along with robustness in parameter solvers, are a must in order to achieve a very accurate final scene reconstruction. However, error detection is in general difficult due to the lack of ground-truth information about the given scene, such as the absolute position of scene points or GPS/IMU coordinates for the camera(s) viewing the scene. In this dissertation, methods are presented for the detection, factorization and correction of error sources present in all stages of a scene reconstruction pipeline from video, in the absence of ground-truth knowledge. Two main applications are discussed. The first set of algorithms derive total structural error measurements after an initial scene structure computation and factorize errors into those related to the underlying feature matching process and those related to camera parameter estimation. A brute-force local correction of inaccurate feature matches is presented, as well as an improved conditioning scheme for non-linear parameter optimization which applies weights on input parameters in proportion to estimated camera parameter errors. Another application is in reconstruction pre-processing, where an algorithm detects and discards frames that would lead to inaccurate feature matching, camera pose estimation degeneracies or mathematical instability in structure computation based on a residual error comparison between two different match motion models. The presented algorithms were designed for aerial video but have been proven to work across different scene types and camera motions, and for both real and synthetic scenes.

Hess-Flores, M

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

A pilot study for errors of commission for a boiling water reactor using the CESA method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) typically focuses on the errors leading to the non-performance of required actions (Errors of Omission, EOOs). On the other hand, Errors Of Commission (EOCs) refer to inappropriate, undesired actions that aggravate an accident scenario. The challenges to their treatment in PSA relate to both their identification (which error events should be included in the PSA) and to the quantification of their probabilities. This paper presents the results from a plant-specific study to identify potential EOC vulnerabilities and quantify their risk significance. The study addresses a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in Switzerland. It is one of the first EOC analyses ever made for BWRs. The Commission Error Search and Assessment (CESA) method was used to identify EOC scenarios. The EOC probabilities were estimated using the elicitation approach developed as part of the ATHEANA method (A Technique for Human Event Analysis), with input from interviews with plant personnel (with oral as well as written questions). The basis for the quantification was a qualitative analysis of the scenario, the operator response and its procedural basis, and of the opportunities for the EOC and its recovery. The results suggest that the contribution to risk of the most important \\{EOCs\\} is comparable to that of the most important errors of omission, i.e. the required actions typically treated in a PSA; thus, they highlight the significance of \\{EOCs\\} in the overall risk profile of the plant. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a systematic treatment of \\{EOCs\\} for large-scale applications and contributes to understanding the importance of \\{EOCs\\} in the plant risk profile.

L. Podofillini; V.N. Dang; O. Nusbaumer; D. Dres

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Synthesis of Feedforward Networks in Supremum Error Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Synthesis of Feedforward Networks in Supremum Error Bound Krzysztof Ciesielski, Jaroslaw P. Sacha of Colorado at Denver, USA; e-mail: KCios@carbon.cudenver.edu #12;SYNTHESIS OF FEEDFORWARD NETWORKS 2 Abstract synthesis. The result can also be used to estimate complexity of the maximum-error network and

Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris

189

Synthesis of Feedforward Networks in Supremum Error Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Synthesis of Feedforward Networks in Supremum Error Bound Krzysztof Ciesielski, Jarosl/aw P is with the University of Colorado at Denver, USA; e­mail: KCios@carbon.cudenver.edu #12; SYNTHESIS OF FEEDFORWARD network synthesis. The result can also be used to estimate complexity of the maximum­error network and

Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris

190

PERIOD ERROR ESTIMATION FOR THE KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (KEBC) describes 2165 eclipsing binaries identified in the 115 deg{sup 2} Kepler Field based on observations from Kepler quarters Q0, Q1, and Q2. The periods in the KEBC are given in units of days out to six decimal places but no period errors are provided. We present the PEC (Period Error Calculator) algorithm, which can be used to estimate the period errors of strictly periodic variables observed by the Kepler Mission. The PEC algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that observation of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series observation can be unambiguously identified. The PEC algorithm can be efficiently programmed using just a few lines of C computer language code. The PEC algorithm was used to develop a simple model that provides period error estimates for eclipsing binaries in the KEBC with periods less than 62.5 days: log {sigma}{sub P} Almost-Equal-To - 5.8908 + 1.4425(1 + log P), where P is the period of an eclipsing binary in the KEBC in units of days. KEBC systems with periods {>=}62.5 days have KEBC period errors of {approx}0.0144 days. Periods and period errors of seven eclipsing binary systems in the KEBC were measured using the NASA Exoplanet Archive Periodogram Service and compared to period errors estimated using the PEC algorithm.

Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Plavchan, Peter [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. API error-handling specifications are often not documented, necessitating automated specification mining. Automated mining of error-handling specifications is challenging for procedural languages such as C, which lack explicit exception-handling mechanisms. Due to the lack of explicit exception handling, error-handling code is often scattered across different procedures and files making it difficult to mine error-handling specifications through manual inspection of source code. In this paper, we present a novel framework for mining API errorhandling specifications automatically from API client code, without any user input. In our framework, we adapt a trace generation technique to distinguish and generate static traces representing different API run-time behaviors. We apply data mining techniques on the static traces to mine specifications that define correct handling of API errors. We then use the mined specifications to detect API error-handling violations. Our framework mines 62 error-handling specifications and detects 264 real error-handling defects from the analyzed open source packages. 1 1

Mithun Acharya; Tao Xie

192

Modeling and Predicting Pointing Errors in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to complement Fitts' law's predictive model of pointing speed. However, their model was based on one-dimensional time, error prediction, error rates. ACM Classification Keywords: H.5.2 [Information interfaces and presentation]: User interfaces ­ theory and methods; H.1.2 [Models and principles]: User/machine systems

Anderson, Richard

193

Optimal Audio Transmission over Error-Prone Wireless Links  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Optimal Audio Transmission over Error-Prone Wireless Links Ala' Khalifeh, Student Member IEEE for transmitting high quality audio sequences over error-prone wireless links. Our framework introduces apparatus and technique to optimally protect a stored audio sequence transmitted over a wireless link while considering

Yousefi'zadeh, Homayoun

194

Audio quality for a simple forward error correcting code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio quality for a simple forward error correcting code Yvan Calas LIRMM - University the audio quality offered by a simple Forward Error Correction (FEC) code used in audio applications like Freephone or Rat. This coding technique consists in adding to every audio packet a redundant information

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

A Sensing Error Aware MAC Protocol for Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive radios (CR) are intelligent radio devices that can sense the radio environment and adapt to changes in the radio environment. Spectrum sensing and spectrum access are the two key CR functions. In this paper, we present a spectrum sensing error aware MAC protocol for a CR network collocated with multiple primary networks. We explicitly consider both types of sensing errors in the CR MAC design, since such errors are inevitable for practical spectrum sensors and more important, such errors could have significant impact on the performance of the CR MAC protocol. Two spectrum sensing polices are presented, with which secondary users collaboratively sense the licensed channels. The sensing policies are then incorporated into p-Persistent CSMA to coordinate opportunistic spectrum access for CR network users. We present an analysis of the interference and throughput performance of the proposed CR MAC, and find the analysis highly accurate in our simulation studies. The proposed sensing error aware CR MAC p...

Hu, Donglin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

KVP meter errors induced by plastic wrap  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine whether erroneous kVp meter readings, induced by plastic wrap, affected the actual kVp (output) of a dental X-ray machine. To evaluate the effect of plastic wrap on dental X-ray machine kVp meters, a radiation output device was used to measure output in mR/ma.s. An intraoral dental X-ray unit (S.S. White Model {number sign}90W) was used to make the exposures. First, the kVp meter was not covered with plastic wrap and output readings were recorded at various kVp settings with the milliamperage and time held constant. Secondly, the same kVp settings were selected before the plastic wrap was placed. Milliamperage and time were again held to the same constant. The X-ray console was then covered with plastic wrap prior to measuring the output for each kVp. The wrap possessed a static charge. This charge induced erroneous kVp meter readings. Out-put readings at the various induced kVp settings were then recorded. A kVp of 50 with no wrap present resulted in the same output as a kVp of 50 induced to read 40 or 60 kVp by the presence of wrap. Similar results were obtained at other kVp settings. This indicates that the plastic wrap influences only the kVp meter needle and not the actual kilovoltage of the X-ray machine. Dental X-ray machine operators should select kVp meter readings prior to placing plastic wrap and should not adjust initial settings if the meter is deflected later by the presence of wrap. The use of such a procedure will result in proper exposures, fewer retakes, and less patient radiation. If plastic wrap leads to consistent exposure errors, clinicians may wish to use a 0.5% sodium hypochlorite disinfectant as an alternative to the barrier technique.

Jefferies, D.; Morris, J.W.; White, V.P. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

U-178: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain 8: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-178: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges May 29, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in VMware vMA PLATFORM: Version(s): vMA 4.0, 4.1, 5 patch 1 (5.0.0.1) ABSTRACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. Reference Links: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027099 CVE-2012-2752 Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A local user can exploit a library loading error to cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target system with elevated privileges. Impact: Privilege escalation Solution: The vendor has issued a fix (vSphere Management Assistant 5.0 Patch 2 (5.0.0.2)). Addthis Related Articles T-591: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

198

Measuring worst-case errors in a robot workcell  

SciTech Connect

Errors in model parameters, sensing, and control are inevitably present in real robot systems. These errors must be considered in order to automatically plan robust solutions to many manipulation tasks. Lozano-Perez, Mason, and Taylor proposed a formal method for synthesizing robust actions in the presence of uncertainty; this method has been extended by several subsequent researchers. All of these results presume the existence of worst-case error bounds that describe the maximum possible deviation between the robot`s model of the world and reality. This paper examines the problem of measuring these error bounds for a real robot workcell. These measurements are difficult, because of the desire to completely contain all possible deviations while avoiding bounds that are overly conservative. The authors present a detailed description of a series of experiments that characterize and quantify the possible errors in visual sensing and motion control for a robot workcell equipped with standard industrial robot hardware. In addition to providing a means for measuring these specific errors, these experiments shed light on the general problem of measuring worst-case errors.

Simon, R.W.; Brost, R.C.; Kholwadwala, D.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Phase errors and predicted spectral performance of a prototype undulator  

SciTech Connect

A prototype undulator has been used to study different magnetic end-configurations and shimming techniques for straightening the beam trajectory. Field distributions obtained by Hall probe measurements were analyzed in terms of trajectory, phase errors, and on-axis brightness for the purpose of correlating predicted spectral intensity with the calculated phase errors. Two device configurations were analyzed. One configuration had a full-strength first magnet at each end and the next-to-last pole was recessed to make the trajectory through the middle of the undulator parallel to the undulator axis. For the second configuration, the first permanent magnet at each end was replaced by a half-strength magnet to reduce the trajectory displacement and the next-to-last pole was adjusted appropriately, and shims were added to straighten the trajectory. Random magnetic field errors can cause trajectory deviations that will affect the optimum angle for viewing the emitted radiation, and care must be taken to select the appropriate angle when calculating the phase errors. This angle may be calculated from the average trajectory angle evaluated at the location of the poles. For the second configuration, we find an rms phase error of less than 3{degrees} and predict 87% of the ideal value of the on-axis brightness for the third harmonic. We have also analyzed the gap dependence of the phase errors and spectral brightness and have found that the rms phase error remain small at all gap settings.

Dejus, R.J.; Vassrman, I.; Moog, E.R.; Gluskin, E.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Model based Open-loop Correction of Heliostat Tracking Errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The heliostat field is by far the most expensive part of a typical Central Receiver (CR) plant. To achieve high conversion efficiencies, heliostats with very high tracking accuracy are needed, but errors are introduced due to manufacturing-, installation- and alignment tolerances as well control system granularity. Mechanical error profiles are unique for every heliostat and cause tracking errors that vary over the course of days and seasons and therefore cannot be corrected by once-off angle offset corrections. Developments in microcontroller technology drives decentralization of CR control systems. Powerful open-loop error correction algorithms can run on low cost heliostat local controllers, enabling high tracking accuracy from lower cost heliostats with reduced tolerances. A prototype array of 18 heliostats, each 1 ft2 in size, was constructed to validate the field control system functionality and final tracking accuracy. Tests were conducted at SU's solar laboratory with an 18m tower and heliostat slant ranges of around 40 m. Prototype experiments indicate a daily open-loop RMS normal vector tracking error below 1 mrad. Strong correlation exists between successive days’ residual error curves, indicating that further model refinements may be possible, including frequency spectrum analysis (using FFT) to identify and correct for mechanism-specific periodic drivetrain errors.

K. Malan; P. Gauché

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Error of law and flawed administrative acts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, if so, what form that intervention should take”.49 This applies to claimants seeking a declaration of incompatibility under section 4 of the Human Rights Act 1998 as it does to those seeking other remedies.50 It relates back to our first principle... ), [2008] 2 C.M.L.R. 57, Admin. Ct., and [2008] EWHC 1409 (Admin), [2008] A.C.D. 70, DC. 48 R. v Inland Revenue Commissioners, ex parte National Federation of Self-Employed and Small Businesses Ltd [1982] A.C. 617, HL. 49 R. v Panel on Take...

Feldman, David

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sensitivity to Error Fields in NSTX High Beta Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

It was found that error field threshold decreases for high ? in NSTX, although the density correlation in conventional threshold scaling implies the threshold would increase since higher ? plasmas in our study have higher plasma density. This greater sensitivity to error field in higher ? plasmas is due to error field amplification by plasmas. When the effect of amplification is included with ideal plasma response calculations, the conventional density correlation can be restored and threshold scaling becomes more consistent with low ? plasmas. However, it was also found that the threshold can be significantly changed depending on plasma rotation. When plasma rotation was reduced by non-resonant magnetic braking, the further increase of sensitivity to error field was observed.

Jong-Kyu Park, Jonathan E. Menard, Stefan P. Gerhardt, Richard J. Buttery, Steve A. Sabbagh, Ronald E. Bell and Benoit P. LeBlanc

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Global Consequences of the Bioenergy Greenhouse Gas Accounting Error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Like the global financial crisis, which resulted in part from misguided accounting of mortgages, global policies to expand transportation biofuels and bioelectricity reflect an accounting error. Although the carb...

Tim Searchinger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Synthesis of Feedforward Networks in Supremum Error Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis of Feedforward Networks in Supremum Error Bound Krzysztof@c* *arbon.cudenver.edu #12;SYNTHESIS OF FEEDFORWARD NETWORKS and a linear output. This result is applied to formulate a new * *method of neural network synthesis

Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris

205

A Priori Error Estimates for Some Discontinuous Galerkin Immersed ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimate in a mesh-dependant energy norm is derived, and this error ... 0 (Th), integrate both sides on each element K ? Th, and apply the Green's formula to.

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

206

An Approximation Algorithm for Constructing Error Detecting Prefix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 2, 2006 ... Hamming prefix code with an additive error of at most O(log log log n) bits ...... (b) represents both the tree T after the removal of the leaves at.

2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann1 and Paul Houston2 1 Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology DLR (German Aerospace Center) Lilienthalplatz 7

Hartmann, Ralf

208

Purchasing Power Parity: Error Correction Models and Structural Breaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines purchasing power parity (PPP) behavior using error correction models (ECM) and allowing for structural breaks. We distinguish four different objectives: first, this paper examines which var...

Amalia Morales Zumaquero; Rodrigo Peruga Urrea

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Kinetic energy error in the NIMROD spheromak simulations Carl Sovinec  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetic energy error in the NIMROD spheromak simulations Carl Sovinec 10/25/00 Dmitri Ryutov at the ends (as in the spheromak simulations), it may lead to compression in a boundary layer.] The maximum

Sovinec, Carl

210

Detector error and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The question of how data collected in the spin-½ Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment become compatible with local realism for increasing detector error is investigated in two ways. (1) It is shown that data obtained in any experiment with three settings of one detector axis and any number of settings of the other will be compatible with local realism if the detector error is such that data obtained with any two settings of each detector axis are compatible with local realism. (The error rate must be more than 7.96% for this to be so.) (2) It is shown that a detector error rate of 14.64% is enough to mask nonclassical correlations in any experiment with any number of settings of both detector axes; this improves on the figure of 21.13% given by Mermin and Schwarz.

Anupam Garg

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Inhomogeneous Background Error Modeling and Estimation over Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the analysis increments in a variational data assimilation scheme is strongly driven by the formulation of the background error covariance matrix, especially in data-sparse areas such as the Antarctic region. The gridpoint ...

Yann Michel; Thomas Auligné

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Probabilistic state estimation in regimes of nonlinear error growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State estimation, or data assimilation as it is often called, is a key component of numerical weather prediction (NWP). Nearly all implementable methods of state estimation suitable for NWP are forced to assume that errors ...

Lawson, W. Gregory, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Advisory on the reporting error in the combined propane stocks...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Advisory on the reporting error in the combined propane stocks for PADDs 4 and 5 Release Date: June 12, 2013 The U.S. Energy Information Administration issued the following...

214

Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions over Multiple Timescales: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we examine the shape of the persistence model error distribution for ten different wind plants in the ERCOT system over multiple timescales. Comparisons are made between the experimental distribution shape and that of the normal distribution.

Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

US-LHC IR magnet error analysis and compensation  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

Wei, J.; Ptitsin, V.; Pilat, F.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gelfand, N.; Wan, W.; Holt, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

US-LHC IR MAGNET ERROR ANALYSIS AND COMPENSATION.  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

WEI, J.

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Computer correction of resistance errors in polarization data. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

RESIST is a short microcomputer program that detects and corrects resistance (IR) errors in cathodic polarization data. It requires a minute or less to calculate the corrosion rate, the cathodic Tafel constant, and the resistance.

Gandhi, R.H.; Greene, N.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Tracing of Error in a Time Series Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A physical (e.g. astrophysical, geophysical, meteorological etc.) data may appear as an output of an experiment or it may contain some sociological, economic or biological information. Whatever be the source of a time series data some amount of noise is always expected to be embedded in it. Analysis of such data in presence of noise may often fail to give accurate information. Although text book data filtering theory is primarily concerned with the presences of random, zero mean errors; but in reality, errors in data are often systematic rather than random. In the present paper we produce different models of systematic error in the time series data. This will certainly help to trace the systematic error present in the data and consequently that can be removed as possible to make the data compatible for further study.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Jay D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Theodore J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

220

An error correcting procedure for imperfect supervised, nonparametric classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ERROR CORRECTING PROCEDJJRE FOR IMPERFECTI, Y SUPERVISED, NONPARAMETRIC CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by DENNIS RAY FERRELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Head f Depart en ) (Member) (Member) PE y (Memb ei) (Member) August 1973 ABSTRACT An Error Correcting Procedure For Imperfectly Supervised, Nonparametric Classification (August 1973) Dennis Ray Ferrell, B. S. , I, omar University Directed by...

Ferrell, Dennis Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

iReduct: Differential Privacy with Reduced Relative Errors Xiaokui Xiao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xkxiao@ntu.edu.sg Department of Computer Science Cornell University Ithaca, NY, USA {gbender. Experiments on real data demonstrate the effectiveness of our solution. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.2

Keinan, Alon

222

RSE Table 5.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

idual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)"...

223

RSE Table N6.3 and N6.4. Relative Standard Errors for Tables...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"...

224

Hard Data on Soft Errors: A Large-Scale Assessment of Real-World Error Rates in GPGPU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-GPGPU hardware in a controlled environment found no errors. However, our survey on Folding@home finds that carried out on over 50,000 GPUs on the Folding@home distributed computing network. MemtestG80

Pratt, Vaughan

225

Bayesian Semiparametric Density Deconvolution and Regression in the Presence of Measurement Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the literature on measurement error problems is quite extensive, solutions to even the most fundamental measurement error problems like density deconvolution and regression with errors-in-covariates are available only under numerous...

Sarkar, Abhra

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Estimation of the error for small-sample optimal binary filter design using prior knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal binary filters estimate an unobserved ideal quantity from observed quantities. Optimality is with respect to some error criterion, which is usually mean absolute error MAE (or equivalently mean square error) for the binary values. Both...

Sabbagh, David L

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations: what it takes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The uncertainty principle being a cornerstone of quantum mechanics, it is surprising that in nearly 90 years there have been no direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations. This lacuna was due to the absence of two essential ingredients: appropriate measures of measurement error (and disturbance), and precise formulations of such relations that are {\\em universally valid}and {\\em directly testable}. We formulate two distinct forms of direct tests, based on different measures of error. We present a prototype protocol for a direct test of measurement uncertainty relations in terms of {\\em value deviation errors} (hitherto considered nonfeasible), highlighting the lack of universality of these relations. This shows that the formulation of universal, directly testable measurement uncertainty relations for {\\em state-dependent} error measures remains an important open problem. Recent experiments that were claimed to constitute invalidations of Heisenberg's error-disturbance relation are shown to conform with the spirit of Heisenberg's principle if interpreted as direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations for error measures that quantify {\\em distances between observables}.

Paul Busch; Neil Stevens

2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic global error Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DesignRule Checking John Ousterhout Summary: ; when the violation is corrected, the error paint will go away automatically. Error paint is written... a layout with Magic, the...

229

T-719:Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

719:Apache modproxyajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service T-719:Apache modproxyajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service September 16, 2011 -...

230

Heralded quantum gates with integrated error detection in optical cavitites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and analyze heralded quantum gates between qubits in optical cavities. They employ an auxiliary qubit to report if a successful gate occurred. In this manner, the errors, which would have corrupted a deterministic gate, are converted into a non-unity probability of success: once successful the gate has a much higher fidelity than a similar deterministic gate. Specifically, we describe that a heralded , near-deterministic controlled phase gate (CZ-gate) with the conditional error arbitrarily close to zero and the success probability that approaches unity as the cooperativity of the system, C, becomes large. Furthermore, we describe an extension to near-deterministic N- qubit Toffoli gate with a favorable error scaling. These gates can be directly employed in quantum repeater networks to facilitate near-ideal entanglement swapping, thus greatly speeding up the entanglement distribution.

J. Borregaard; P. Kómár; E. M. Kessler; A. S. Sørensen; M. D. Lukin

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

The minimum variance of the squared error adaptive algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the coefficient error l 0&@, & k(2k ? 1) E[n ']T~? (2. 18) where p ? = =maximal eigenvalue of R. In practice, finding p, maybe difficult; however, the maximal eigenvalue of a positive definite matrix can be above bounded by its trace and in this case, tr... large and thus, p is very small. Without these assumptions, some of the analysis breaks down; that is why the "low noise" case is tr?ated separately. Also, it is possible to observe differences in the mean squared error and the variance of the squared...

Gray, Steven Deward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fitting Pulsar Wind Tori. II. Error Analysis and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have applied the torus fitting procedure described in Ng & Romani (2004) to PWNe observations in the Chandra data archive. This study provides quantitative measurement of the PWN geometry and we characterize the uncertainties in the fits, with statistical errors coming from the fit uncertainties and systematic errors estimated by varying the assumed fitting model. The symmetry axis $\\Psi$ of the PWN are generally well determined, and highly model-independent. We often derive a robust value for the spin inclination $\\zeta$. We briefly discuss the utility of these results in comparison with new radio and high energy pulse measurements

Ng, C -Y

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Current Concepts: Disclosing Harmful Medical Errors to Patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...organizations, and legislators in the United States and other countries are moving to bridge the gap by developing standards, programs, and laws that encourage transparent communication with patients after harmful errors have been made. In the United States, the National Quality Forum (NQF), an organization... Historically, fear of malpractice litigation made clinicians cautious about informing patients when they made mistakes in their care. This article reviews recent efforts by regulators, hospitals, accreditation organizations, and legislators to encourage and facilitate discussions between health care providers and patients when patients are harmed by medical errors.

Gallagher T.H.Studdert D.Levinson W.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Improved energy confinement in spheromaks with reduced field errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An increase in the global energy confinement time (?E) was obtained in the CTX spheromak by replacing the high-field-error mesh-wall flux conserver with a low-field-error solid-wall flux conserver. The maximum ?E is now 0.18 ms, an order of magnitude greater than previously reported values of ?0.017 ms. Both ?E and the magnetic energy decay time (?W) now increase with central electron temperature, which was not previously observed. These new results are consistent with a previously proposed energy-loss mechanism associated with high edge helicity dissipation.

F. J. Wysocki; J. C. Fernández; I. Henins; T. R. Jarboe; G. J. Marklin

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Error estimates and specification parameters for functional renormalization  

SciTech Connect

We present a strategy for estimating the error of truncated functional flow equations. While the basic functional renormalization group equation is exact, approximated solutions by means of truncations do not only depend on the choice of the retained information, but also on the precise definition of the truncation. Therefore, results depend on specification parameters that can be used to quantify the error of a given truncation. We demonstrate this for the BCS–BEC crossover in ultracold atoms. Within a simple truncation the precise definition of the frequency dependence of the truncated propagator affects the results, indicating a shortcoming of the choice of a frequency independent cutoff function.

Schnoerr, David [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Boettcher, Igor, E-mail: I.Boettcher@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Pawlowski, Jan M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wetterich, Christof [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Analysis of transmission errors in pyramid vector quantizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

codes of length RL for transmission over a. binary symmetric channel. The natural binary code (NBC), the Gray code (GC) and the folded binary code (FBC) will be used to study the effect of channel noise in this thesis. The bit error probability p... binary code (FBC) leads to smaller channel error variance than say the natural binary code (NBC) or the Gray code (GC) [15, 17]. This is illustrated in Figure 4 for the scalar quantization of a source at a, rate of 3 bits per symbol. Notice that one...

Ifesinachukwu, Gozie Kenneth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fitting Pulsar Wind Tori. II. Error Analysis and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have applied the torus fitting procedure described in Ng & Romani (2004) to PWNe observations in the Chandra data archive. This study provides quantitative measurement of the PWN geometry and we characterize the uncertainties in the fits, with statistical errors coming from the fit uncertainties and systematic errors estimated by varying the assumed fitting model. The symmetry axis $\\Psi$ of the PWN are generally well determined, and highly model-independent. We often derive a robust value for the spin inclination $\\zeta$. We briefly discuss the utility of these results in comparison with new radio and high energy pulse measurements

C. -Y. Ng; Roger W. Romani

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Relational EPR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the EPR-type correlations from the perspective of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics. We argue that these correlations do not entail any form of 'non-locality', when viewed in the context of this interpretation. The abandonment of strict Einstein realism implied by the relational stance permits to reconcile quantum mechanics, completeness, (operationally defined) separability, and locality.

Matteo Smerlak; Carlo Rovelli

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Quantum error correction with degenerate codes for correlated noise  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a quantum packing bound on the minimal resources required by nondegenerate error-correction codes for any kind of noise. We prove that degenerate codes can outperform nondegenerate ones in the presence of correlated noise, by exhibiting examples where the quantum packing bound is violated.

Chiribella, Giulio [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. North, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara; Perinotti, Paolo [Quit group, Dipartimento di Fisica 'A. Volta', via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Quantum Error Correction of Continuous Variable States against Gaussian Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a continuous variable error correction protocol that can correct the Gaussian noise induced by linear loss on Gaussian states. The protocol can be implemented using linear optics and photon counting. We explore the theoretical bounds of the protocol as well as the expected performance given current knowledge and technology.

T. C. Ralph

2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MULTI­TARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN # Abstract. Important quantities in aerodynamic flow simulations are the aerodynamic force coe subject classifications. 65N12,65N15,65N30 1. Introduction. In aerodynamic computations like compressible

Hartmann, Ralf

242

Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann, Joachim Held-oriented mesh refinement for single and multiple aerodynamic force coefficients as well as residual-based mesh refinement applied to various three-dimensional lam- inar and turbulent aerodynamic test cases defined

Hartmann, Ralf

243

MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MULTITARGET ERROR ESTIMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN AERODYNAMIC FLOW SIMULATIONS RALF HARTMANN Abstract. Important quantities in aerodynamic flow simulations are the aerodynamic force coefficients including Navier-Stokes equations AMS subject classifications. 65N12,65N15,65N30 1. Introduction. In aerodynamic

Hartmann, Ralf

244

Analysis of possible systematic errors in the Oslo method  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we have reviewed the Oslo method, which enables the simultaneous extraction of the level density and {gamma}-ray transmission coefficient from a set of particle-{gamma} coincidence data. Possible errors and uncertainties have been investigated. Typical data sets from various mass regions as well as simulated data have been tested against the assumptions behind the data analysis.

Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Buerger, A.; Goergen, A.; Nyhus, H. T.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Toft, H. K.; Tveten, G. M.; Wikan, K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Krticka, M. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Betak, E. [Institute of Physics SAS, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University, 74601 Opava (Czech Republic); Schiller, A.; Voinov, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Maximum Norm Error Estimators For Three Dimensional Elliptic Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bariloche, CNEA, 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentina. y Departamento de Matem#19;atica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires, Argentina. 1 #12; behaviour of the Green, error estimators for the energy norm for this method were introduced and analyzed in [7, 8, 13, 16]. Our

Duran, Ricardo

246

Stateful Testing: Finding More Errors in Code and Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The generated test cases are designed to violate the dynamically inferred contracts (invariants) characterizing the existing test suite. As a consequence, they are in a good position to detect new faults, and alsoStateful Testing: Finding More Errors in Code and Contracts Yi Wei · Hannes Roth · Carlo A. Furia

Meyer, Bertrand

247

Expressive Power and Approximation Errors of Restricted Boltzmann Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Expressive Power and Approximation Errors of Restricted Boltzmann Machines Guido F. Montufar1 Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) depending on the number of units that they contain, and which are representative Machine (RBM) [23, 10] is a learning system con- sisting of two layers of binary stochastic units

248

Deformable Organisms and Error Learning for Brain Segmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deformable Organisms and Error Learning for Brain Segmentation Gautam Prasad1,2 , Anand A. Joshi3 be easily incorporated into the plan. We validate this framework by creating a plan to locate the brain in 3D magnetic resonance images of the head (skull-stripping). This is important for surgical planning

Boyer, Edmond

249

Sensitivity of OFDM Systems to Synchronization Errors and Spatial Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Input Single Output SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio STBC Space-Time Block Codes STTC Space-Time Trellis Codes SVD Singular Value Decomposition UWB Ultra Wideband WSSUS Wide Sense Stationary Uncorrelated Scattering ZP Zero Padding ix TABLE... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Sensitivity of Multi-Band ZP-OFDM Ultra Wideband Receivers to Synchronization Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2. System Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16...

Zhou, Yi

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction  

SciTech Connect

The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kastengren, Alan L [ANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Deterministic transmission of an arbitrary single-photon polarization state through bit-flip error channel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present two error-tolerance transmission protocols of a single-photon polarization state when bit-flip error is taken into account. For achieving the transmission target of the single-photon state, the first protocol needs to encode it to a nonmaximally ... Keywords: Bit-flip error channel, Error-tolerance transmission, Parity analysis

Li Dong, Jun-Xi Wang, Hong-Zhi Shen, Dan Li, Xiao-Ming Xiu, Ya-Jun Gao, X. X. Yi

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

PROPANE: an environment for examining the propagation of errors in software  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to produce reliable software, it is important to have knowledge on how faults and errors may affect the software. In particular, designing efficient error detection mechanisms requires not only knowledge on which types of errors to detect but ... Keywords: error propagation analysis, fault injection, software development tools, software reliability

Martin Hiller; Arshad Jhumka; Neeraj Suri

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Determining Error Bounds for Hypothesis Tests in Risk Assessment: A Research Agenda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities) for the consequences of these errors, default error bounds are typically used. However, while for the error bounds on a case-by-case basis. This would make explicit the anticipated consequences of errors Introduction: The Problem Statistical inference is not deductively valid: the truth of a statement made about

Parsons, Simon

254

Thermalization, Error Correction, and Memory Lifetime for Ising Anyon Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider two-dimensional lattice models that support Ising anyonic excitations and are coupled to a thermal bath. We propose a phenomenological model for the resulting short-time dynamics that includes pair creation, hopping, braiding, and fusion of anyons. By explicitly constructing topological quantum error-correcting codes for this class of system, we use our thermalization model to estimate the lifetime of the quantum information stored in the encoded spaces. To decode and correct errors in these codes, we adapt several existing topological decoders to the non-Abelian setting. We perform large-scale numerical simulations of these two-dimensional Ising anyon systems and find that the thresholds of these models range from 13% to 25%. To our knowledge, these are the first numerical threshold estimates for quantum codes without explicit additive structure.

Courtney G. Brell; Simon Burton; Guillaume Dauphinais; Steven T. Flammia; David Poulin

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method and system for reducing errors in vehicle weighing systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system (10, 23) for determining vehicle weight to a precision of <0.1%, uses a plurality of weight sensing elements (23), a computer (10) for reading in weighing data for a vehicle (25) and produces a dataset representing the total weight of a vehicle via programming (40-53) that is executable by the computer (10) for (a) providing a plurality of mode parameters that characterize each oscillatory mode in the data due to movement of the vehicle during weighing, (b) by determining the oscillatory mode at which there is a minimum error in the weighing data; (c) processing the weighing data to remove that dynamical oscillation from the weighing data; and (d) repeating steps (a)-(c) until the error in the set of weighing data is <0.1% in the vehicle weight.

Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Abercrombie, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Magnetic error analysis of recycler pbar injection transfer line  

SciTech Connect

Detailed study of Fermilab Recycler Ring anti-proton injection line became feasible with its BPM system upgrade, though the beamline has been in existence and operational since year 2000. Previous attempts were not fruitful due to limitations in the BPM system. Among the objectives are the assessment of beamline optics and the presence of error fields. In particular the field region of the permanent Lambertson magnets at both ends of R22 transfer line will be scrutinized.

Yang, M.J.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Systematic intensity errors caused by spectral truncation: origin and remedy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray absorption by the monochromator determines the wavelength dispersion in the monochromated X-ray beam and explains the values of 0.03, 0.14 and 0.16 for graphite(002)-monochromated Cu, Mo and Rh radiation. To eliminate the systematic intensity truncation errors, caused by the large wavelength dispersion, a correction is proposed based on the applied scan angle and the real beam spectrum.

Lenstra, A.T.H.

2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

Wind and Load Forecast Error Model for Multiple Geographically Distributed Forecasts  

SciTech Connect

The impact of wind and load forecast errors on power grid operations is frequently evaluated by conducting multi-variant studies, where these errors are simulated repeatedly as random processes based on their known statistical characteristics. To generate these errors correctly, we need to reflect their distributions (which do not necessarily follow a known distribution law), standard deviations, auto- and cross-correlations. For instance, load and wind forecast errors can be closely correlated in different zones of the system. This paper introduces a new methodology for generating multiple cross-correlated random processes to simulate forecast error curves based on a transition probability matrix computed from an empirical error distribution function. The matrix will be used to generate new error time series with statistical features similar to observed errors. We present the derivation of the method and present some experimental results by generating new error forecasts together with their statistics.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiochemical Separation & Processing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the mid-1960s, the REDC has been the production, storage, and distribution center for the heavy element research and distribution program of DOE, producing significant quantities...

260

RADIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF NEUTRON DEFICIENT ACTINIDE ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097, Paper 10 (1965). V.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R 5097 Paper 12 (1965). K.M.Isotope Targets and Foils, AERE-R-5097 Paper 11 (1965). M.

Williams, Kimberly Eve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RADIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF NEUTRON DEFICIENT ACTINIDE ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Column Chromatography 2. Americium and Curium t IV. COUNTINGberkellum, curium, and americium compared with theirfor the separation of curium and americium (trans- plutonium

Williams, Kimberly Eve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Algebraic and information-theoretic conditions for operator quantum error correction  

SciTech Connect

Operator quantum error correction is a technique for robustly storing quantum information in the presence of noise. It generalizes the standard theory of quantum error correction, and provides a unified framework for topics such as quantum error correction, decoherence-free subspaces, and noiseless subsystems. This paper develops (a) easily applied algebraic and information-theoretic conditions that characterize when operator quantum error correction is feasible; (b) a representation theorem for a class of noise processes that can be corrected using operator quantum error correction; and (c) generalizations of the coherent information and quantum data processing inequality to the setting of operator quantum error correction.

Nielsen, Michael A.; Poulin, David [School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Algebraic and information-theoretic conditions for operator quantum error correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operator quantum error correction is a technique for robustly storing quantum information in the presence of noise. It generalizes the standard theory of quantum error correction, and provides a unified framework for topics such as quantum error correction, decoherence-free subspaces, and noiseless subsystems. This paper develops (a) easily applied algebraic and information-theoretic conditions that characterize when operator quantum error correction is feasible; (b) a representation theorem for a class of noise processes that can be corrected using operator quantum error correction; and (c) generalizations of the coherent information and quantum data processing inequality to the setting of operator quantum error correction.

Michael A. Nielsen and David Poulin

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

Propagation of errors associated with scaling foliage biomass from field measurements to remote sensing data over a northern Canadian national park  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract If a change detection result based on time series of remote sensing data indicates that there was a 10% increase in an ecosystem property between two years over a specific land area, does it mean there was a real change in the ecosystem property, or could it be merely an estimation error? This question must be addressed before ecosystem managers or policy makers can use the result with confidence for addressing related environmental or natural resource management issues. One means of answering this question is through systematic error propagation analysis. In this study, we analyzed error propagation for detecting inter-annual changes in foliage biomass over Wapusk National Park, Canada. Specifically, we first estimated uncertainties in all input data, including sampling errors in foliage and random errors in AVHRR and Landsat data. Secondly, we evaluated the error propagation from inputs to the remote sensing-derived foliage biomass estimates (including the Landsat-based foliage biomass, AVHRR-derived foliage biomass, and the inter-annual changes in foliage biomass), and determined the threshold of detectable change in foliage biomass. Finally, we investigated approaches that can reduce the threshold. Our results indicated that over Wapusk National Park during 1985–2006, the threshold for a clear-sky AVHRR pixel between two single years was ~ 40% with a confidence level of 84%, and can be reduced to 10% for a land cover class with more than 10 clear-sky AVHRR pixels between two 5-year “State of Park” reporting periods.

W. Chen; P. Zorn; Z. Chen; R. Latifovic; Y. Zhang; J. Li; J. Quirouette; I. Olthof; R. Fraser; D. Mclennan; J. Poitevin; H.M. Stewart; R. Sharma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

T-669: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny Service T-669: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny Service July 15, 2011 - 2:14am Addthis PROBLEM:...

266

T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute...

267

Verification and mitigation of the power-induced measurement errors for airport pseudolites in LAAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certain GPS receivers exhibit a power-induced measurement error when the input signal power exceeds ... using laboratory test to characterize the power-induced measurement error in NovAtel Millennium and Beeline ...

Sai Kiran; Chris Bartone

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fault tree analysis of commonly occurring medication errors and methods to reduce them  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medication errors occur in health care settings and they continue to Pose significant challenges to hospital administrators, Physicians, Pharmacists and nurses. These medication errors may occur due to a lack of knowledge, substandard performance...

Cherian, Sandhya Mary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetyltransferase facilitates error-free...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facilitates error-free Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acetyltransferase facilitates error-free Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 BioMed...

270

V-194: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host V-194: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local...

271

U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Adobe AcrobatReader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-064: Adobe AcrobatReader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute...

272

U-243: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service U-243: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny...

273

Error Estimation and Adaptive Model Reduction Applied to Offshore Wind Turbine Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently developed error estimation methods provide a powerful tool for the efficient creation of componentwise reduced models. Error estimation methods consist in estimating the contribution of each component to...

S. N. Voormeeren; B. P. Nortier; D. J. Rixen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

275

Changes in Medical Errors after Implementation of a Handoff Program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generalized-estimating-equation z-tests that accounted for clustering based on the date of the handoff discussion or document with a fixed effect for site. To compare time–motion data before and after the intervention, we used a generalized-estimating-equation z-test, accounting for clustering according... The authors developed an intervention to improve the quality of the handoff of hospitalized patients; it was associated with reductions in medical errors and in preventable adverse events. Handoff duration, time with patients, and time spent on computers did not change.

Starmer A.J.; Spector N.D.; Srivastava R.

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Reducing Quantum Errors and Improving Large Scale Quantum Cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noise causes severe difficulties in implementing quantum computing and quantum cryptography. Several schemes have been suggested to reduce this problem, mainly focusing on quantum computation. Motivated by quantum cryptography, we suggest a coding which uses $N$ quantum bits ($N=n^2$) to encode one quantum bit, and reduces the error exponentially with $n$. Our result suggests the possibility of distributing a secure key over very long distances, and maintaining quantum states for very long times. It also provides a new quantum privacy amplification against a strong adversary.

T. Mor

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Topological Quantum Computation and Error Correction by Biological Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Topological examination of phospholipid dynamics in the Far from Equilibrium state has demonstrated that metabolically active cells use waste heat to generate spatially patterned membrane flows by forced convection and shear. This paper explains the resemblance between this nonlinear membrane model and Witten Kitaev type Topological Quantum Computation systems, and demonstrates how this self-organising membrane enables biological cells to circumvent the decoherence problem, perform error correction procedures, and produce classical level output as shielded current flow through cytoskeletal protein conduit. Cellular outputs are shown to be Turing compatible as they are determined by computable in principle hydromagnetic fluid flows, and importantly, are Adaptive from an Evolutionary perspective.

J T Lofthouse

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

278

Error Estimation for High Speed Flows Using Continuous and Discrete Adjoints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fullest extent possible) strategy to control the error in multi-physics simulations of Scramjet propulsion

Alonso, Juan J.

279

The Baryonic Tully Fisher Relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We validate the baryonic Tully Fisher (BTF) relation by exploring the Tully Fish er (TF) and BTF properties of optically and HI-selected disk galaxies. The data includes galaxies from: Sakai et al. (2000) calibrator sample; McGaugh et al. (2000: MC2000) I-band sample; and 18 newly acquired HI-selected field dwarf galaxies observed with the ANU 2.3m telescope and the ATNF Parkes telescope from Gurovich's thesis sample (2005). As in MC2000, we re-cast the TF and BTF relations as relationships between baryo n mass and W_{20}. First we report some numerical errors in MC2000. Then, we c alculate weighted bi-variate linear fits to the data, and finally we compare the fits of the intrinsically fainter dwarfs with the brighter galaxies of Sakai et al. (2000). With regards to the local calibrator disk galaxies of Sakai et al. (2000), our results suggest that the BTF relation is indeed tighter than the T F relation and that the slopes of the BTF relations are statistically flatter th an the equivalent TF relations. Further, for the fainter galaxies which include the I-band MCG2000 and HI-selected galaxies of Gurovich's thesis sample, we calc ulate a break from a simple power law model because of what appears to be real c osmic scatter. Not withstanding this point, the BTF models are marginally better models than the equivalent TF ones with slightly smaller reduced chi^2.

Sebastian Gurovich; Stacy S. McGaugh; Ken C. Freeman; Helmut Jerjen; Lister Staveley-Smith; W. J. G. De Blok

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Localization in Ad Hoc and Sensor Wireless Networks with Bounded Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

region can be found with a mean error of one foot and a two-foot error bound. Keywords: Localization, error bound, sensor network, position, distance estimates 1 Introduction Advancements in low-power of a networked sensor include: (1) small physical size, (2) low power consumption, (3) limited processing power

Terwilliger, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nonparametric estimates of standard error: The jackknife, the bootstrap and other methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1974) for a neat review of the jackknife...briefly discusses why standard errors are of interest...that any resampling plan having P exchangeable...purpose ofestimating a standard error? At the most...results in terms of standard errors rather than...unthinkable. SIAM Review 21, 460-80. EFRON......

BRADLEY EFRON

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Musical Acoustics Lab, C. Bertulani, 2012 PreLab 1 -Measurement and error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab 1 - Measurement and error Measurement involves reading some sort of scale. The scale marking spacing thus expects that random errors should cancel on average, that is, many measurements of the same number of measurements. The error estimate on a single scale reading can be taken as the smallest step

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

283

Maintaining Standards: Differences between the Standard Deviation and Standard Error, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Standards: Differences between the Standard Deviation and Standard Error, and When to Use Each David L Streiner, PhD1 Many people confuse the standard deviation (SD) and the standard error of the findings. (Can J Psychiatry 1996;41:498­502) Key Words: statistics, standard deviation, standard error

California at Santa Cruz, University of

284

Robust and Flexible Error Handling in the AristaFlow BPM Suite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on novel error handling procedures and capabilities using the flexibility provided by ad-hoc changes applications and to study how adaptive process management technology can be applied to deal with errorsRobust and Flexible Error Handling in the AristaFlow BPM Suite Andreas Lanz, Manfred Reichert

Pfeifer, Holger

285

Static Detection of API Error-Handling Bugs via Mining Source Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Static Detection of API Error-Handling Bugs via Mining Source Code Mithun Acharya and Tao Xie}@csc.ncsu.edu Abstract Incorrect handling of errors incurred after API invoca- tions (in short, API errors) can lead to security and robust- ness problems, two primary threats to software reliability. Correct handling of API

Young, R. Michael

286

A Displacement-Based Error Measure Applied in a Regional Ensemble Forecasting System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Errors in regional forecasts often take the form of phase errors, where a forecasted weather system is displaced in space or time. For such errors, a direct measure of the displacement is likely to be more valuable than traditional measures. A ...

Christian Keil; George C. Craig

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Determining Error Bounds for Hypothesis Tests in Risk Assessment: A Research Agenda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) for the consequences of these errors, default error bounds are typically used. However, while these may be appropriate­by­case basis. This would make explicit the anticipated consequences of errors and the trade­offs involved Statistical inference is not deductively valid: the truth of a statement made about a sam­ ple (for example

McBurney, Peter

288

Threshold analysis with fault-tolerant operations for nonbinary quantum error correcting codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possibility of catastrophic spread of errors which might render the error correction techniques ineffective. Hence, in this thesis we concentrate on how various operations can be carried out fault-tolerantly so that the errors are not propagated in the same...

Kanungo, Aparna

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Matt Duckham Page 1 Implementing an object-oriented error sensitive GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matt Duckham Page 1 Implementing an object-oriented error sensitive GIS Matt Duckham Department in the handling of uncertainty within GIS, the production of what has been described as an error sensitive GIS of opportunities, but also impediments to the implemen- tation of such an error sensitive GIS. An important barrier

Duckham, Matt

290

Effects of imbalance and geometric error on precision grinding machines  

SciTech Connect

To study balancing in grinding, a simple mechanical system was examined. It was essential to study such a well-defined system, as opposed to a large, complex system such as a machining center. The use of a compact, well-defined system enabled easy quantification of the imbalance force input, its phase angle to any geometric decentering, and good understanding of the machine mode shapes. It is important to understand a simple system such as the one I examined given that imbalance is so intimately coupled to machine dynamics. It is possible to extend the results presented here to industrial machines, although that is not part of this work. In addition to the empirical testing, a simple mechanical system to look at how mode shapes, balance, and geometric error interplay to yield spindle error motion was modelled. The results of this model will be presented along with the results from a more global grinding model. The global model, presented at ASPE in November 1996, allows one to examine the effects of changing global machine parameters like stiffness and damping. This geometrically abstract, one-dimensional model will be presented to demonstrate the usefulness of an abstract approach for first-order understanding but it will not be the main focus of this thesis. 19 refs., 36 figs., 10 tables.

Bibler, J.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The sensitivity of patient specific IMRT QC to systematic MLC leaf bank offset errors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patient specific IMRT QC is performed routinely in many clinics as a safeguard against errors and inaccuracies which may be introduced during the complex planning, data transfer, and delivery phases of this type of treatment. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting systematic errors in MLC leaf bank position with patient specific checks. Methods: 9 head and neck (H and N) and 14 prostate IMRT beams were delivered using MLC files containing systematic offsets ({+-}1 mm in two banks, {+-}0.5 mm in two banks, and 1 mm in one bank of leaves). The beams were measured using both MAPCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) and the aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Comparisons with calculated fields, without offsets, were made using commonly adopted criteria including absolute dose (AD) difference, relative dose difference, distance to agreement (DTA), and the gamma index. Results: The criteria most sensitive to systematic leaf bank offsets were the 3% AD, 3 mm DTA for MAPCHECK and the gamma index with 2% AD and 2 mm DTA for the EPID. The criterion based on the relative dose measurements was the least sensitive to MLC offsets. More highly modulated fields, i.e., H and N, showed greater changes in the percentage of passing points due to systematic MLC inaccuracy than prostate fields. Conclusions: None of the techniques or criteria tested is sufficiently sensitive, with the population of IMRT fields, to detect a systematic MLC offset at a clinically significant level on an individual field. Patient specific QC cannot, therefore, substitute for routine QC of the MLC itself.

Rangel, Alejandra; Palte, Gesa; Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2, Canada and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive North West, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effect of Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity on Error-Field Penetration Thresholds in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A model for field-error penetration is developed that includes nonresonant as well as the usual resonant field-error effects. The nonresonant components cause a neoclassical toroidal viscous torque that keeps the plasma rotating at a rate comparable to the ion diamagnetic frequency. The new theory is used to examine resonant error-field penetration threshold scaling in Ohmic tokamak plasmas. Compared to previous theoretical results, we find the plasma is less susceptible to error-field penetration and locking, by a factor that depends on the nonresonant error-field amplitude.

Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609 (United States)

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

Virtual machining considering dimensional, geometrical and tool deflection errors in three-axis CNC milling machines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Virtual manufacturing systems can provide useful means for products to be manufactured without the need of physical testing on the shop floor. As a result, the time and cost of part production can be decreased. There are different error sources in machine tools such as tool deflection, geometrical deviations of moving axis and thermal distortions of machine tool structures. Some of these errors can be decreased by controlling the machining process and environmental parameters. However other errors like tool deflection and geometrical errors which have a big portion of the total error, need more attention. This paper presents a virtual machining system in order to enforce dimensional, geometrical and tool deflection errors in three-axis milling operations. The system receives 21 dimensional and geometrical errors of a machine tool and machining codes of a specific part as input. The output of the system is the modified codes which will produce actual machined part in the virtual environment.

Mohsen Soori; Behrooz Arezoo; Mohsen Habibi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Statistical Error analysis of Nucleon-Nucleon phenomenological potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon-Nucleon potentials are commonplace in nuclear physics and are determined from a finite number of experimental data with limited precision sampling the scattering process. We study the statistical assumptions implicit in the standard least squares fitting procedure and apply, along with more conventional tests, a tail sensitive quantile-quantile test as a simple and confident tool to verify the normality of residuals. We show that the fulfilment of normality tests is linked to a judicious and consistent selection of a nucleon-nucleon database. These considerations prove crucial to a proper statistical error analysis and uncertainty propagation. We illustrate these issues by analyzing about 8000 proton-proton and neutron-proton scattering published data. This enables the construction of potentials meeting all statistical requirements necessary for statistical uncertainty estimates in nuclear structure calculations.

R. Navarro Perez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Dosimetric influences of rotational setup errors on head and neck carcinoma intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric influence of the residual rotational setup errors on head and neck carcinoma (HNC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with routine 3 translational setup corrections and the adequacy of this routine correction. A total of 66 kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image sets were acquired on the first day of treatment and weekly thereafter for 10 patients with HNC and were registered with the corresponding planning CT images, using 2 3-dimensional (3D) rigid registration methods. Method 1 determines the translational setup errors only, and method 2 determines 6-degree (6D) setup errors, i.e., both rotational and translational setup errors. The 6D setup errors determined by method 2 were simulated in the treatment planning system and were then corrected using the corresponding translational data determined by method 1. For each patient, dose distributions for 6 to 7 fractions with various setup uncertainties were generated, and a plan sum was created to determine the total dose distribution through an entire course and was compared with the original treatment plan. The average rotational setup errors were 0.7°± 1.0°, 0.1°±1.9°, and 0.3°±0.7° around left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) axes, respectively. With translational corrections determined by method 1 alone, the dose deviation could be large from fraction to fraction. For a certain fraction, the decrease in prescription dose coverage (V{sub p}) and the dose that covers 95% of target volume (D{sub 95}) could be up to 15.8% and 13.2% for planning target volume (PTV), and the decrease in V{sub p} and the dose that covers 98% of target volume (D{sub 98}) could be up to 9.8% and 5.5% for the clinical target volume (CTV). However, for the entire treatment course, for PTV, the plan sum showed that the average V{sub p} was decreased by 4.2% and D{sub 95} was decreased by 1.2 Gy for the first phase of IMRT with a prescription dose of 50 Gy. For CTV, the plan sum showed that the average V{sub p} was decreased by 0.8% and D{sub 98}, relative to prescription dose, was not decreased. Among these 10 patients, the plan sum showed that the dose to 1-cm{sup 3} spinal cord (D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}) increased no more than 1 Gy for 7 patients and more than 2 Gy for 2 patients. The average increase in D{sub 1cm{sup 3}} was 1.2 Gy. The study shows that, with translational setup error correction, the overall CTV V{sub p} has a minor decrease with a 5-mm margin from CTV to PTV. For the spinal cord, a noticeable dose increase was observed for some patients. So to decide whether the routine clinical translational setup error correction is adequate for this HNC IMRT technique, the dosimetric influence of rotational setup errors should be evaluated carefully from case to case when organs at risk are in close proximity to the target.

Fu, Weihua, E-mail: fuw@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yang, Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Relational Database SQL: Querying the Relational DB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: auto-completion and command history Weigang Qiu Relational Database & SQL #12;Relational Database SQLRelational Database SQL: Querying the Relational DB Workshop: the "genome" Database Relational Database & SQL Weigang Qiu Department of Biological Sciences Hunter College BIOL 425 Computational

Qiu, Weigang

297

A CLIPPING METHOD TO MITIGATE THE IMPACT OF CATASTROPHIC PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ERRORS ON WEAK LENSING TOMOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

We use a mock catalog of galaxies based on the COSMOS galaxy catalog, including information on photometric redshift (photo-z) and spectral energy distribution types of galaxies, in order to study how to define a galaxy subsample suitable for weak lensing tomography feasible with optical (and near-IR) multi-band data. Since most useful cosmological information arises from the sample variance limited regime for upcoming lensing surveys, a suitable subsample can be obtained by discarding a large fraction of galaxies that have less reliable photo-z estimations. We develop a method to efficiently identify photo-z outliers by monitoring the width of the posterior likelihood function of redshift estimation for each galaxy. This clipping method may allow us to obtain clean tomographic redshift bins (here three bins are considered) that have almost no overlap, by discarding more than {approx}70% of galaxies with ill-defined photo-zs corresponding to the number densities of remaining galaxies less than {approx}20 arcmin{sup -2} for a Subaru-type deep survey. Restricting the ranges of magnitudes and redshifts and/or adding near-IR data help us obtain a cleaner redshift binning. Using the Fisher information matrix formalism, we propagate photo-z errors into biases in the dark energy equation of state parameter w. We find that, by discarding most of the ill-defined photo-z galaxies, the bias in w can be reduced to a level comparable to the marginalized statistical error; however, the residual small systematic bias remains due to asymmetric scatters around the relation between photometric and true redshifts. We also use the mock catalog to estimate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) for measuring the angular cross-correlations of galaxies between finer photo-z bins, finding higher S/N values for the bins that include photo-z outliers.

Nishizawa, Atsushi J. [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aobaku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takada, Masahiro [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hamana, Takashi; Furusawa, Hisanori, E-mail: nishizawa@astr.tohoku.ac.j [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka City, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Artificial neural network-based error compensation procedure for low-cost encoders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An artificial neural network-based error compensation method is proposed for improving the accuracy of resolver-based 16-bit encoders by compensating for their respective systematic error profiles. The error compensation procedure, for a particular encoder, involves obtaining its error profile by calibrating it on a precision rotary table, training the neural network by using a part of these data and then determining the corrected encoder angle by subtracting the ANN-predicted error from the measured value of the encoder angle. Since it is not guaranteed that all the resolvers will have exactly similar error profiles because of the inherent differences in their construction on a micro scale, the ANN has been trained on one error profile at a time and the corresponding weight file is then used only for compensating the systematic error of this particular encoder. The systematic nature of the error profile for each of the encoders has also been validated by repeated calibration of the encoders over a period of time and it was found that the error profiles of a particular encoder recorded at different epochs show near reproducible behaviour. The ANN-based error compensation procedure has been implemented for four encoders by training the ANN with their respective error profiles and the results indicate that the accuracy of encoders can be improved by nearly an order of magnitude from quoted values of ? ±6 arc-min to ? ±0.65 arc-min when their corresponding ANN-generated weight files are used for determining the corrected encoder angle.

V K Dhar; A K Tickoo; S K Kaul; R Koul; B P Dubey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Method and apparatus for detecting timing errors in a system oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting timing errors in a system oscillator for an electronic device, such as a power supply, includes the step of comparing a system oscillator signal with a delayed generated signal and generating a signal representative of the timing error when the system oscillator signal is not identical to the delayed signal. An LED indicates to an operator that a timing error has occurred. A hardware circuit implements the above-identified method.

Gliebe, Ronald J. (Library, PA); Kramer, William R. (Bethel Park, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Reed-Solomon error-correction as a software patch mechanism.  

SciTech Connect

This report explores how error-correction data generated by a Reed-Solomon code may be used as a mechanism to apply changes to an existing installed codebase. Using the Reed-Solomon code to generate error-correction data for a changed or updated codebase will allow the error-correction data to be applied to an existing codebase to both validate and introduce changes or updates from some upstream source to the existing installed codebase.

Pendley, Kevin D.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Implications of Monte Carlo Statistical Errors in Criticality Safety Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Most criticality safety calculations are performed using Monte Carlo techniques because of Monte Carlo's ability to handle complex three-dimensional geometries. For Monte Carlo calculations, the more histories sampled, the lower the standard deviation of the resulting estimates. The common intuition is, therefore, that the more histories, the better; as a result, analysts tend to run Monte Carlo analyses as long as possible (or at least to a minimum acceptable uncertainty). For Monte Carlo criticality safety analyses, however, the optimization situation is complicated by the fact that procedures usually require that an extra margin of safety be added because of the statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations. This additional safety margin affects the impact of the choice of the calculational standard deviation, both on production and on safety. This paper shows that, under the assumptions of normally distributed benchmarking calculational errors and exact compliance with the upper subcritical limit (USL), the standard deviation that optimizes production is zero, but there is a non-zero value of the calculational standard deviation that minimizes the risk of inadvertently labeling a supercritical configuration as subcritical. Furthermore, this value is shown to be a simple function of the typical benchmarking step outcomes--the bias, the standard deviation of the bias, the upper subcritical limit, and the number of standard deviations added to calculated k-effectives before comparison to the USL.

Pevey, Ronald E.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

A surrogate-based uncertainty quantification with quantifiable errors  

SciTech Connect

Surrogate models are often employed to reduce the computational cost required to complete uncertainty quantification, where one is interested in propagating input parameters uncertainties throughout a complex engineering model to estimate responses uncertainties. An improved surrogate construction approach is introduced here which places a premium on reducing the associated computational cost. Unlike existing methods where the surrogate is constructed first, then employed to propagate uncertainties, the new approach combines both sensitivity and uncertainty information to render further reduction in the computational cost. Mathematically, the reduction is described by a range finding algorithm that identifies a subspace in the parameters space, whereby parameters uncertainties orthogonal to the subspace contribute negligible amount to the propagated uncertainties. Moreover, the error resulting from the reduction can be upper-bounded. The new approach is demonstrated using a realistic nuclear assembly model and compared to existing methods in terms of computational cost and accuracy of uncertainties. Although we believe the algorithm is general, it will be applied here for linear-based surrogates and Gaussian parameters uncertainties. The generalization to nonlinear models will be detailed in a separate article. (authors)

Bang, Y.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Trapped Ion Quantum Error Correcting Protocols Using Only Global Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum error-correcting codes are many-body entangled states that are prepared and measured using complex sequences of entangling operations. Each element of such an entangling sequence introduces noise to delicate quantum information during the encoding or reading out of the code. It is important therefore to find efficient entangling protocols to avoid the loss of information. Here we propose an experiment that uses only global entangling operations to encode an arbitrary logical qubit to either the five-qubit repetition code or the five-qubit code, with a six-ion Coulomb crystal architecture in a Penning trap. We show that the use of global operations enables us to prepare and read out these codes using only six and ten global entangling pulses, respectively. The proposed experiment also allows the acquisition of syndrome information during readout. We provide a noise analysis for the presented protocols, estimating that we can achieve a six-fold improvement in coherence time with noise as high as $\\sim 1\\%$ on each entangling operation.

Joseph F. Goodwin; Benjamin J. Brown; Graham Stutter; Howard Dale; Richard C. Thompson; Terry Rudolph

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Minimum error discrimination between similarity-transformed quantum states  

SciTech Connect

Using the well-known necessary and sufficient conditions for minimum error discrimination (MED), we extract an equivalent form for the MED conditions. In fact, by replacing the inequalities corresponding to the MED conditions with an equivalent but more suitable and convenient identity, the problem of mixed state discrimination with optimal success probability is solved. Moreover, we show that the mentioned optimality conditions can be viewed as a Helstrom family of ensembles under some circumstances. Using the given identity, MED between N similarity transformed equiprobable quantum states is investigated. In the case that the unitary operators are generating a set of irreducible representation, the optimal set of measurements and corresponding maximum success probability of discrimination can be determined precisely. In particular, it is shown that for equiprobable pure states, the optimal measurement strategy is the square-root measurement (SRM), whereas for the mixed states, SRM is not optimal. In the case that the unitary operators are reducible, there is no closed-form formula in the general case, but the procedure can be applied in each case in accordance to that case. Finally, we give the maximum success probability of optimal discrimination for some important examples of mixed quantum states, such as generalized Bloch sphere m-qubit states, spin-j states, particular nonsymmetric qudit states, etc.

Jafarizadeh, M. A. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sufiani, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran 19395-1795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazhari Khiavi, Y. [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Error analysis of nuclear forces and effective interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nucleon-Nucleon interaction is the starting point for ab initio Nuclear Structure and Nuclear reactions calculations. Those are effectively carried out via effective interactions fitting scattering data up to a maximal center of mass momentum. However, NN interactions are subjected to statistical and systematic uncertainties which are expected to propagate and have some impact on the predictive power and accuracy of theoretical calculations, regardless on the numerical accuracy of the method used to solve the many body problem. We stress the necessary conditions required for a correct and self-consistent statistical interpretation of the discrepancies between theory and experiment which enable a subsequent statistical error propagation and correlation analysis. We comprehensively discuss an stringent and recently proposed tail-sensitive normality test and provide a simple recipe to implement it. As an application, we analyze the deduced uncertainties and correlations of effective interactions in terms of Moshinsky-Skyrme parameters and effective field theory counterterms as derived from the bare NN potential containing One-Pion-Exchange and Chiral Two-Pion-Exchange interactions inferred from scattering data.

R. Navarro Perez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Eccentricity Error Correction for Automated Estimation of Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip Arthroplasty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eccentricity Error Correction for Automated Estimation of Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip. Wire markers are typically attached to the polyethylene acetabular component of the prosthesis so

St Andrews, University of

307

Systematic Errors in Measuring the Energy of Wet Steam with Dry-Steam Meters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic errors are considered in measuring mass flow rate, specific enthalpy, thermal power, and energy for wet steam by means of meters intended for dry saturated steam.

E. G. Abarinov; K. S. Sarelo

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SPPI ORIGINAL PAPER October 11, 2011 GROSS ERRORS IN THE IPCC-AR4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPPI ORIGINAL PAPER October 11, 2011 GROSS ERRORS IN THE IPCC-AR4 REPORT REGARDING PAST & FUTURE FIGURE AND GEORGE WILL QUOTE.....................

Gray, William

309

The Importance of Run-time Error Detection Glenn R. Luecke 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iowa State University's High Performance Computing Group, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, USA State University's High Performance Computing Group for evaluating run-time error detection capabilities

Luecke, Glenn R.

310

Evaluation of Heliostat Field Global Tracking Error Distributions by Monte Carlo Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several error sources can contribute to the global tracking error of heliostats. These sources can be, for instance, angular offset in the reference position of the tracking mechanisms, imperfect leveling of the heliostat pedestal, lack of perpendicularity between the tracking axes, lack of precise clock synchronization. All these possible errors are characterized by angles that have very specific numerical values for each heliostat in a central receiver installation. However, they are intrinsically random in nature, and the errors in different heliostats are independent from each other. In principle, the overall drift behavior of the heliostats can be characterized by a statistical distribution of tracking errors. This global distribution characterizes the angular deviation of the heliostat normal and is used in ray tracing simulations of heliostat fields. It is usually assumed to be Gaussian, although some authors argue in favor of other types of distributions. In the present work, the dependence of the global tracking error distribution on the above mentioned primary error sources is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Random values are assumed for the different error parameters, and the resulting global tracking error distributions are evaluated for different times of the year for a heliostat field.

L.A. Díaz-Félix; M. Escobar-Toledo; J. Waissman; N. Pitalúa-Díaz; C.A. Arancibia-Bulnes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Beam from Deuteron Breakup”, inexperiments of atmospheric neutron effects on deep sub-Neutron Soft Errors in Xilinx FPGAs at Lawrence Berkeley

George, Jeffrey S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Abstract Error Groups Via Jones Unitary Braid Group Representations at q=i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we classify a type of abstract groups by the central products of dihedral groups and quaternion groups. We recognize them as abstract error groups which are often not isomorphic to the Pauli groups in the literature. We show the corresponding nice error bases equivalent to the Pauli error bases modulo phase factors. The extension of these abstract groups by the symmetric group are finite images of the Jones unitary representations (or modulo a phase factor) of the braid group at q=i or r=4. We hope this work can finally lead to new families of quantum error correction codes via the representation theory of the braid group.

Yong Zhang

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

313

Error bounds for some semidefinite programming approaches to ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 9, 2010 ... of minimizing a polynomial p over the unit hypercube Q = [0, 1]n. When p ...... hypercube would be to relate the quadratic module Mr(g) and the ...

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

314

V-009: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

has issued a fix (11.6.8.638). Addthis Related Articles U-166: Adobe Shockwave Player Memory Corruption Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-018: Adobe Flash Player...

315

Tomato Fruit Antioxidants in Relation to Salinity and Greenhouse Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tomato Fruit Antioxidants in Relation to Salinity and Greenhouse Climate ... Blocks were positioned to account for experimental error due to minor light gradients in the greenhouse. ... Tomato extracts (15 ?L injection) were eluted with a methanol/MTBE gradient over an 80 min run. ...

David L. Ehret; Kevin Usher; Tom Helmer; Glenn Block; Dan Steinke; Brenda Frey; Tallie Kuang; Moussa Diarra

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Drift-magnetohydrodynamical model of error-field penetration in tokamak plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drift-magnetohydrodynamical model of error-field penetration in tokamak plasmas A. Cole and R published magnetohydrodynamical MHD model of error-field penetration in tokamak plasmas is extended to take in ohmic tokamak plasmas. © 2006 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2178167 I. INTRODUCTION

Fitzpatrick, Richard

317

Fast Illumination-invariant Background Subtraction using Two Views: Error Analysis, Sensor Placement and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast Illumination-invariant Background Subtraction using Two Views: Error Analysis, Sensor£ Abstract Background modeling and subtraction to detect new or moving objects in a scene is an important a detailed analysis of such errors. Then, we propose a sensor configuration that eliminates false de

Paragios, Nikos

318

Device and Architecture Concurrent Optimization for FPGA Transient Soft Error Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Device and Architecture Concurrent Optimization for FPGA Transient Soft Error Rate Yan Lin and Lei-level transient soft errors in circuit elements other than configuration memory, and transient SER can no longer be ignored. We then de- velop an efficient, yet accurate, transient SER evaluation method, called trace based

He, Lei

319

Simple Loran Cycle Error Detection Algorithms for Maritime Harbor Entrance Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple Loran Cycle Error Detection Algorithms for Maritime Harbor Entrance Approach Operations cycle. This paper details and examines some of the algorithms being developed and analyzed by SC127. SC 127 is developing simplified eLoran cycle error detection algorithms for the eLoran HEA MPS. Correct

Stanford University

320

Illustrating the AADL error modeling annex (v.2) using a simple safety-critical medical device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developing and certifying safety-critical and highly reliable systems almost always includes significant emphasis on hazard analysis and risk assessment. There have been substantial improvements in automation and formalization of other aspects of critical ... Keywords: aadl, error analysis, error modeling, formal architecture, hazard analysis, risk assessment

Brian Larson; John Hatcliff; Kim Fowler; Julien Delange

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluation of servo, geometric and dynamic error sources on five axis high-speed machine tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many sources of errors exist in the manufacturing process of complex shapes. Some approximations occur at each step from the design geometry to the machined part. The aim of the paper is to present a method to evaluate the effect of high speed and high dynamic load on volumetric errors at the tool center point. The interpolator output signals and the machine encoder signals are recorded and compared to evaluate the contouring errors resulting from each axis follow-up error. The machine encoder signals are also compared to the actual tool center point position as recorded with a non-contact measuring instrument called CapBall to evaluate the total geometric errors. The novelty of the work lies in the method that is proposed to decompose the geometric errors in two categories: the quasi-static geometric errors independent from the speed of the trajectory and the dynamic geometric errors, dependent on the programmed feed rate and resulting from the machine structure deflection during the acceleration of its axes...

Andolfatto, Loïc; Mayer, René

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Tunable, Software-based DRAM Error Detection and Correction Library for HPC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Tunable, Software-based DRAM Error Detection and Correction Library for HPC David Fiala1 , Kurt B State University { dfiala | fmuelle }@ncsu.edu 2 Scalable System Software, Sandia National Laboratories soft error frequency rate. As a result, additional software will be needed to address this challenge

Mueller, Frank

323

The Impact of Background Error on Incomplete Observations for 4D-Var Data Assimilation with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Background Error on Incomplete Observations for 4D-Var Data Assimilation with the FSU on the 4D- Var data assimilation, twin experiments were carried out with the dy- namical core of the new is also investigated. Keywords: Data assimilation, incomplete observations, background error. 1

Navon, Michael

324

Adjoint goal-based error norms for adaptive mesh ocean modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint goal-based error norms for adaptive mesh ocean modelling P.W. Power a , M.D. Piggott a,*, F. The use of dynamically-adaptive meshes has many potential advantages but needs to be guided by an error where resolution should be changed. A barotropic wind driven gyre problem is used to demonstrate

Navon, Michael

325

Measurement and Analysis of the Error Characteristics of an InBuilding Wireless Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on fiber or electrical connections have excellent error characteris­ tics but that wireless networksMeasurement and Analysis of the Error Characteristics of an In­Building Wireless Network David fdavide,prsg@cs.cmu.edu Abstract There is general belief that networks based on wireless technolo­ gies

Eckhardt, Dave

326

Goal-oriented error estimation for reduced basis method, with application to certified sensitivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of interest computed using the reduced model is tainted by a reduction error. We present a new, efficiently- tions (PDEs). These models require input data (e.g., the physical features of the considered system papers showed that using an adapted basis could lead to a great improvement of reduction error

Boyer, Edmond

327

Dimension Augmentation and Combinatorial Criteria for Efficient Error-resistant DNA Self-assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dimension Augmentation and Combinatorial Criteria for Efficient Error-resistant DNA Self-assembly Abstract DNA self-assembly has emerged as a rich and promising primitive for nano-technology. Experimental-correction mech- anisms have been proposed for the tile model of self- assembly. These error-correction mechanisms

Goel, Ashish

328

Priority-Based Broadcasting of Sensitive Data in Error-Prone Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in its Binary-Coded Decimal (BCD) representation. In BCD, each decimal digit is represented as a 4 bits that benefits from network coding. We also consider the case of burst errors and discuss how can we make our--Symbol-level coding, broadcasting, reliability, burst error, random linear network coding, priority, wireless networks

Wu, Jie

329

Object calculus and the object-oriented analysis and design of an error-sensitive GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Object calculus and the object-oriented analysis and design of an error-sensitive GIS MATT DUCKHAM of an error-sensitive GIS Abstract. The use of object-oriented analysis and design (OOAD) in GIS research of the key contemporary issues in GIS. This paper examines the application of one particular OO formalism

Duckham, Matt

330

Analysis and Repair of Name Tagger Errors Heng Ji Ralph Grishman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Repair of Name Tagger Errors Heng Ji Ralph Grishman Department of Computer Science New feedback from subsequent stages in an information extraction pipeline: name structure parsing, cross' pipelined system archi- tectures, NE tagging is one of the first steps in the pipeline. NE errors adversely

331

Error Modeling in the ACT-R Production System Christian Lebire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error Modeling in the ACT-R Production System Christian Lebière Department of Psychology Carnegie to extend the ACT-R production system to model human errors in the performance of a high-level cognitive be successfully duplicated in production system models. Introduction ACT-R (Anderson, 1993) is a model of human

Reder, Lynne

332

T-571: Linux Kernel dns_resolver Key Processing Error Lets Local Users Deny  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Linux Kernel dns_resolver Key Processing Error Lets Local 1: Linux Kernel dns_resolver Key Processing Error Lets Local Users Deny Services T-571: Linux Kernel dns_resolver Key Processing Error Lets Local Users Deny Services March 7, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Linux Kernel dns_resolver Key Processing Error Lets Local Users Deny Services. PLATFORM: Linux Kernel 2.6.37 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. A local user can cause denial of service conditions. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID:1025162 Latest Stable Kernel CVE-2011-1076 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: When a DNS resolver key is instantiated with an error indication, a local user can attempt to read the key to trigger a null pointer dereference and cause a kernel crash. A local user can cause the target system to crash.

333

U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote 4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 19, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Adobe Acrobat Reader Version(s): 10.1.1 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Adobe Acrobat/Reader, this vulnerability is being actively exploited against Windows-based systems. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026432 APSB11-30 CVE-2011-4369 JC3-CIRC Tech Bulletin U-054 APSA11-04 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the PRC

334

T-669: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny Service |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny 69: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny Service T-669: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny Service July 15, 2011 - 2:14am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. A local user can cause denial of service conditions. PLATFORM: 2.6.39 and prior versions ABSTRACT: Linux Kernel GFS2 Allocation Error Lets Local Users Deny Service. references LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025776 Linux Kernel Updates CVE-2011-2689 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A local user can invoke the gfs2_fallocate() function in 'fs/gfs2/file.c' in certain cases to allocate a non-blksize aligned amount, resulting in an error in subsequent code that requires blksize aligned offsets. Impact: A local user can cause denial of service conditions on the target system.

335

U-243: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error 3: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service U-243: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service August 24, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service PLATFORM: Version(s): 0.9.13 and prior ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in libvirt. reference LINKS: libvirt SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027437 Secunia Advisory SA50118 Bugtraq ID: 54748 CVE-2012-3445 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion A remote user can send a specially crafted RPC call with the number of parameters set to zero to libvirtd to trigger a memory access error in virTypedParameterArrayClear() and cause the target service to crash. Impact:

336

V-194: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local 4: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host V-194: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host July 8, 2013 - 12:24am Addthis PROBLEM: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host PLATFORM: Citrix XenServer 5.0 - 6.2 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Citrix XenServer. REFERENCE LINKS: CTX138134 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028740 CVE-2013-1432 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A local administrative user on a PV guest can exploit a memory management page reference counting error to gain access on the target host server. IMPACT: A local user on the guest operating system can obtain access on the target

337

U-039: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error 9: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c U-039: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c November 16, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c. PLATFORM: Versions of BIND, 9.4-ESV, 9.6-ESV, 9.7.x, 9.8.x ABSTRACT: A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. Organizations across the Internet are reporting crashes interrupting service on BIND 9 nameservers performing recursive queries. Affected servers crash after logging an error in query.c with the following message: "INSIST(! dns_rdataset_isassociated(sigrdataset))" Multiple versions are reported as being affected, including all currently supported release versions of ISC BIND 9. ISC is actively investigating the root cause and

338

V-109: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users 09: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-109: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code March 12, 2013 - 12:11am Addthis PROBLEM: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Google Chrome prior to 25.0.1364.160 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Google Chrome. REFERENCE LINKS: Stable Channel Update SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028266 CVE-2013-0912 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a type confusion error in WebKit and execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges

339

Methods and apparatus using commutative error detection values for fault isolation in multiple node computers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus perform fault isolation in multiple node computing systems using commutative error detection values for--example, checksums--to identify and to isolate faulty nodes. When information associated with a reproducible portion of a computer program is injected into a network by a node, a commutative error detection value is calculated. At intervals, node fault detection apparatus associated with the multiple node computer system retrieve commutative error detection values associated with the node and stores them in memory. When the computer program is executed again by the multiple node computer system, new commutative error detection values are created and stored in memory. The node fault detection apparatus identifies faulty nodes by comparing commutative error detection values associated with reproducible portions of the application program generated by a particular node from different runs of the application program. Differences in values indicate a possible faulty node.

Almasi, Gheorghe (Ardsley, NY) [Ardsley, NY; Blumrich, Matthias Augustin (Ridgefield, CT) [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY) [Croton-On-Hudson, NY; Coteus, Paul (Yorktown, NY) [Yorktown, NY; Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY) [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY) [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY) [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Hoenicke, Dirk I. (Ossining, NY) [Ossining, NY; Singh, Sarabjeet (Mississauga, CA) [Mississauga, CA; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Wernau, DE) [Wernau, DE; Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY) [Brewster, NY; Vranas, Pavlos (Bedford Hills, NY) [Bedford Hills, NY

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

V-194: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local 4: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host V-194: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host July 8, 2013 - 12:24am Addthis PROBLEM: Citrix XenServer Memory Management Error Lets Local Administrative Users on the Guest Gain Access on the Host PLATFORM: Citrix XenServer 5.0 - 6.2 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Citrix XenServer. REFERENCE LINKS: CTX138134 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028740 CVE-2013-1432 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A local administrative user on a PV guest can exploit a memory management page reference counting error to gain access on the target host server. IMPACT: A local user on the guest operating system can obtain access on the target

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote 4: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-064: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 19, 2011 - 9:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Acrobat/Reader PRC Memory Corruption Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Adobe Acrobat Reader Version(s): 10.1.1 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Adobe Acrobat/Reader, this vulnerability is being actively exploited against Windows-based systems. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026432 APSB11-30 CVE-2011-4369 JC3-CIRC Tech Bulletin U-054 APSA11-04 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the PRC

342

U-038: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c 8: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c U-038: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c November 16, 2011 - 8:37am Addthis PROBLEM: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c. PLATFORM: Multiple version of BIND 9. Specific versions under investigation ABSTRACT: A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. Organizations across the Internet are reporting crashes interrupting service on BIND 9 nameservers performing recursive queries. Affected servers crash after logging an error in query.c with the following message: "INSIST(! dns_rdataset_isassociated(sigrdataset))" Multiple versions are reported as being affected, including all currently supported release versions of ISC BIND 9. ISC is actively investigating the root cause and

343

T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets 45: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code January 28, 2011 - 7:21am Addthis PROBLEM: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RealPlayer 14.0.1 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in RealPlayer. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. reference LINKS: Security Tracker Alert CVE-2010-4393 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted AVI file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a heap corruption error in 'vidplin.dll' and execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the

344

Validity and limitations of gas-drive relative permeability measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural porous media. Calculations were xnade of the total pressure drop across the test specixnen necessary to xnaintain an error of less than 5 percent in uncorrected K /K and K values from gas-drive g 0 Qo 42 40 FIGURE I6- TYPICAL CAPILLARY... to be in error by g 0 po some factor different from R. 4. Gas relative perxneabilities calculated from gas-drive data and Bossier's method, were found to be correct within 3 per- cent of the true values under all conditions. 5. Welge's xnethod...

Gupta, Anand Kumar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Numerical estimation of the relative entropy of entanglement  

SciTech Connect

We propose a practical algorithm for the calculation of the relative entropy of entanglement (REE), defined as the minimum relative entropy between a state and the set of states with positive partial transpose. Our algorithm is based on a practical semidefinite cutting plane approach. In low dimensions the implementation of the algorithm in matlab provides an estimation for the REE with an absolute error smaller than 10{sup -3}.

Zinchenko, Yuriy [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Friedland, Shmuel [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7045 (United States); Gour, Gilad [Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7045 (United States); Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Human Bathtub: Safety and Risk Predictions Including the Dynamic Probability of Operator Errors  

SciTech Connect

Reactor safety and risk are dominated by the potential and major contribution for human error in the design, operation, control, management, regulation and maintenance of the plant, and hence to all accidents. Given the possibility of accidents and errors, now we need to determine the outcome (error) probability, or the chance of failure. Conventionally, reliability engineering is associated with the failure rate of components, or systems, or mechanisms, not of human beings in and interacting with a technological system. The probability of failure requires a prior knowledge of the total number of outcomes, which for any predictive purposes we do not know or have. Analysis of failure rates due to human error and the rate of learning allow a new determination of the dynamic human error rate in technological systems, consistent with and derived from the available world data. The basis for the analysis is the 'learning hypothesis' that humans learn from experience, and consequently the accumulated experience defines the failure rate. A new 'best' equation has been derived for the human error, outcome or failure rate, which allows for calculation and prediction of the probability of human error. We also provide comparisons to the empirical Weibull parameter fitting used in and by conventional reliability engineering and probabilistic safety analysis methods. These new analyses show that arbitrary Weibull fitting parameters and typical empirical hazard function techniques cannot be used to predict the dynamics of human errors and outcomes in the presence of learning. Comparisons of these new insights show agreement with human error data from the world's commercial airlines, the two shuttle failures, and from nuclear plant operator actions and transient control behavior observed in transients in both plants and simulators. The results demonstrate that the human error probability (HEP) is dynamic, and that it may be predicted using the learning hypothesis and the minimum failure rate, and can be utilized for probabilistic risk analysis purposes. (authors)

Duffey, Romney B. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, ON, L5K 1B2 (Canada); Saull, John W. [International Federation of Airwothiness, 14 Railway Approach, East Grinstead, West Sussex, RH19 1BP (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Toward a model of unreliability to study error prevention supports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......performing an unrequired action plan related to the real state of...Each strip contains the flight plan data of an aircraft. The planner...NUREG/CR-1278, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington D...action slips, Psychological Review 88 (1988) 1-15. [17......

F Vanderhaegen

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Error Analysis on ClosedForm Solutions for Kinematic Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and even for designing a robot head or a robot arm when considering the calibration task. In this paper, we@iis.sinica.edu.tw #12; 2 Abstract Many closed­form solutions have been developed for calibrating robot kinematic method using 3D point measurements for calibrating robot kinematic parameters. Relatively less work has

Chen, Sheng-Wei

349

A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in the 1D correction case, the 2D algorithm leaves the portal dosimetry process virtually unchanged in the central portion of the detector, and thus these correction algorithms are not needed for centrally located fields of moderate size (at least, in the case of 6 MV beam energy).Conclusion: The 2D correction improves the portal dosimetry results for those fields for which the 1D correction proves insufficient, especially in the inplane, off-axis regions of the detector. This 2D correction neglects the relatively smaller discrepancies that may be caused by backscatter from nonuniform machine components downstream from the detecting layer.

Bailey, Daniel W. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

mLynx: Relational Mutual Information Nicola Di Mauro, Teresa M.A. Basile, Stefano Ferilli, and Floriana Esposito  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mLynx: Relational Mutual Information Nicola Di Mauro, Teresa M.A. Basile, Stefano Ferilli of the most relevant features minimizing a Bayesian classifier's probability error. #12;2 Nicola Di Mauro

Di Mauro, Nicola

351

U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error 3: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 16, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token 4.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the target application to execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026426 ESA-2011-039 Secunia Advisory: SA45665 Securityfocus Advisory CVE-2011-4141 RSA Online Fraud Resource Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA SecurID Software Token. A remote user

352

U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error 63: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-063: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code December 16, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA SecurID Software Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: RSA SecurID Software Token 4.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the target application to execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026426 ESA-2011-039 Secunia Advisory: SA45665 Securityfocus Advisory CVE-2011-4141 RSA Online Fraud Resource Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in RSA SecurID Software Token. A remote user

353

T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType Library  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType Library Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType Library Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code April 25, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: Adobe Reader and Acrobat X (10.0.2) and earlier 10.x and 9.x versions for Windows and Macintosh operating systems ABSTRACT: A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the CoolType library and execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run

354

U-041: Google Chrome Out-of-Bounds Write Error Lets Remote Users Execute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Google Chrome Out-of-Bounds Write Error Lets Remote Users 1: Google Chrome Out-of-Bounds Write Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-041: Google Chrome Out-of-Bounds Write Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 18, 2011 - 9:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Google Chrome Out-of-Bounds Write Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Version(s) prior to 15.0.874.121 ABSTRACT: A remote user can create HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: Stable Channel Update CVE-2011-3900 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026338 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Google Chrome. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user,

355

U-037: Linux Kernel NFSv4 ACL Attribute Processing Error Lets Remote Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Linux Kernel NFSv4 ACL Attribute Processing Error Lets 7: Linux Kernel NFSv4 ACL Attribute Processing Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-037: Linux Kernel NFSv4 ACL Attribute Processing Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 16, 2011 - 7:43am Addthis PROBLEM: Linux Kernel NFSv4 ACL Attribute Processing Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Kernel version 2.6.x ABSTRACT: A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. reference LINKS: The Linux Kernel Archives CVE-2011-4131 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026324 Linux Kernel [PATCH 1/1] NFSv4 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. Impact: A remote server can return specially crafted data to the connected target

356

V-009: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets 09: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-009: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code October 24, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Adobe Shockwave Player 11.6.7.637 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Shockwave. REFERENCE LINKS: Adobe Security bulletin SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027692 CVE-2012-4172 CVE-2012-4173 CVE-2012-4174 CVE-2012-4175 CVE-2012-4176 CVE-2012-5273 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted content that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a buffer overflow and execute arbitrary code on

357

Error Threshold for Color Codes and Random Three-Body Ising Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the error threshold of color codes, a class of topological quantum codes that allow a direct implementation of quantum Clifford gates suitable for entanglement distillation, teleportation, and fault-tolerant quantum ...

Bombin, Hector

358

Error and uncertainty in estimates of Reynolds stress using ADCP in an energetic ocean state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) To that end, the space-time correlations of the error, turbulence, and wave processes are developed and then utilized to find the extent to which the environmental and internal processing parameters contribute to ...

Rapo, Mark Andrew.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reduced Basis Approximation and a Posteriori Error Estimation for the Parametrized Unsteady Boussinesq Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present reduced basis (RB) approximations and associated rigorous a posteriori error bounds for the parametrized unsteady Boussinesq equations. The essential ingredients are Galerkin projection onto a ...

Knezevic, David J.

360

OPTIMAL ERROR ESTIMATES FOR CORRECTED TRAPEZOIDAL ERIK TALVILA AND MATTHEW WIERSMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMAL ERROR ESTIMATES FOR CORRECTED TRAPEZOIDAL RULES ERIK TALVILA AND MATTHEW WIERSMA Abstract WIERSMA Here, B(x, y) = (x)(y)/(x + y) is the beta function. See [4, Theorem 3.22]. (This corrects

Talvila, Erik

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ultrasonic thickness measurements on corroded steel members: a statistical analysis of error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose is to determine the suitability of ultrasonic thickness testing of corroded tubular members for the offshore industry. The research can be divided into two parts: 1) determining the error in an ultrasonic thickness measurement associated...

Konen, Keith Forman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Reward Prediction Error Signaling in Posterior Dorsomedial Striatum Is Action Specific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neural correlates of reward prediction errors (RPEs) have been found in dorsal striatum. Such signals may be important for updating associative action representations within striatum. In order that the appropriate ...

Ogawa, Masaaki

363

Overlapping Stokes Smoothings: Survival of the Error Function and Canonical Catastrophe Integrals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...separate (as described by catastrophe theory) and while the subdominant exponentials they contribute switch on and off (as described by the error-function smoothing of the Stokes phenomenon). Two sorts of asymptotic singularity are thereby...

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

Benestad, R E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

C3Bio.org - Knowledge Base: Tools: Help! I'm getting a Java error...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Help I'm getting a Java error Knowledge Base Main page Categories All Articles Login & Registration 9 Members & Groups 4 Miscellaneous 5 Tips 5 Tools 3 Help I'm...

366

Parameter Estimation Using Ensemble Based Data Assimilation in the Presence of Model Error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work explores the potential of on-line parameter estimation as a technique for model error treatment under an imperfect model scenario, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system, using a simple atmospheric general circulation model and an ...

Juan Ruiz; Manuel Pulido

367

Microstrip post production tuning bar error and compact resonators using negative refractive index metamaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, two separate research topics are undertaken both in the general area of compact RF/microwave circuit design. The first topic involves characterizing the parasitic effects and error due to unused post-production tuning bars...

Scher, Aaron David

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Local Estimation of Modeling Error in Multi-Scale Modeling of Heterogeneous Elastic Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of an investigation toward the development of a new methodology of local estimation of modeling error in the analysis of linear elastostatic problems of heterogeneous solids. Due to the ...

Moody, Tristan

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Combined wavelet video coding and error control for internet streaming and multicast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several years, advances in Internet video streaming have been tremendous. Originally designed without error protection, Receiver-driven layered multicast (RLM) has proved to be a very effective scheme for scalable video multicast. Though...

Chu, Tianli

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Goal-oriendted local a posteriori error estimator for H(div)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 15, 2011 ... is how to identify regions for refining the current discretization and how to ..... [8] R. E. Bank and A. Weiser, Some a posteriori error estimators for ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method of Reducing the Error of Transferring the Size of a Unit of Laser Radiation Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is considered of reducing the error of transferring the size of a unit of laser radiation energy for a secondary standard of the units of average power and energy of laser radiation by using the readi...

A. N. Shchipunov

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Phase errors in diffraction-limited imaging: contrast limits for sparse aperture masking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fizeau 1868; Michelson 1891; Schwarzschild 1896), it was the use of closure...errors dominate due to tip/tilt mirror bandwidth) but as this depends...Nityananda R. ARA (1986) 24:127. Schwarzschild K. Astron. Nachr. (1896) 139......

M. J. Ireland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Effects of Rain Rate and Wind Magnitude on SeaWinds Scatterometer Wind Speed Errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rain within the footprint of the SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite causes more significant errors than existed with its predecessor, the NASA scatterometer (NSCAT) on Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-I (ADEOS-I). Empirical ...

David E. Weissman; Mark A. Bourassa; Jeffrey Tongue

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Errors in Estimating River Discharge from Remote Sensing based on Manning's Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

° inclination; all rivers, lakes, reservoirs observed at least twice every 22 days. Will measure reach (2008) estimated errors in width resulting from water coherence time effects (due to wind and turbulence

Washington at Seattle, University of

375

Efficient error correction for speech systems using constrained re-recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient error correction of recognition output is a major barrier in the adoption of speech interfaces. This thesis addresses this problem through a novel correction framework and user interface. The system uses constraints ...

Yu, Gregory T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Correcting Form I-94 Errors If an error is found on your Form I-94 or passport stamp, please notify the ISSO at isso@brandeis.edu or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is at the following: U.S. Customs and Border Protection Boston, Logan International Airport Terminal E, Lower Level the ISSO at isso@brandeis.edu or 781 736 3480. If you are still at the airport while you notice the error the airport, you do not necessarily have to return to the same airport you flew through but you do need to go

Fraden, Seth

377

Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Migration error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Given the sensitivity of imaging accuracy to the velocity used in migration, migration founded (as in practice) on the erroneous assumption that a medium is isotropic can be expected to be inaccurate for steep reflectors. Here, we estimate errors in interpreted reflection time and lateral position as a function of reflector dip for transversely isotropic models in which the axis of symmetry is vertical and the medium velocity varies linearly with depth. We limit consideration to media in which ratios of the various elastic moduli are independent of depth. Tests with reflector dips up to 120 degrees on a variety of anisotropic media show errors that axe tens of wavelengths for dips beyond 90 degrees when the medium (unrealistically) is homogeneous. For a given anisotropy, the errors are smaller for inhomogeneous media; the larger the velocity gradient, the smaller the errors. For gradients that are representative of the subsurface, lateral-position errors tend to be minor for dips less than about 60 degrees, growing to two to five wavelengths as dip passes beyond 90 degrees. These errors depend on reflector depth and average velocity to the reflector only through their ratio, i.e., migrated reflection time. Migration error, which is found to be unrelated to the ratio of horizontal to vertical velocity, is such that reflections with later migrated reflection times tend to be more severely over-migrated than are those with earlier ones. Over a large range of dips, migration errors that arise when anisotropy is ignored but inhomogeneity is honored tend to be considerably smaller than those encountered when inhomogeneity is ignored in migrating data from isotropic, inhomogeneous media.

Larner, K.; Cohen, J.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Migration error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Given the sensitivity of imaging accuracy to the velocity used in migration, migration founded (as in practice) on the erroneous assumption that a medium is isotropic can be expected to be inaccurate for steep reflectors. Here, we estimate errors in interpreted reflection time and lateral position as a function of reflector dip for transversely isotropic models in which the axis of symmetry is vertical and the medium velocity varies linearly with depth. We limit consideration to media in which ratios of the various elastic moduli are independent of depth. Tests with reflector dips up to 120 degrees on a variety of anisotropic media show errors that axe tens of wavelengths for dips beyond 90 degrees when the medium (unrealistically) is homogeneous. For a given anisotropy, the errors are smaller for inhomogeneous media; the larger the velocity gradient, the smaller the errors. For gradients that are representative of the subsurface, lateral-position errors tend to be minor for dips less than about 60 degrees, growing to two to five wavelengths as dip passes beyond 90 degrees. These errors depend on reflector depth and average velocity to the reflector only through their ratio, i.e., migrated reflection time. Migration error, which is found to be unrelated to the ratio of horizontal to vertical velocity, is such that reflections with later migrated reflection times tend to be more severely over-migrated than are those with earlier ones. Over a large range of dips, migration errors that arise when anisotropy is ignored but inhomogeneity is honored tend to be considerably smaller than those encountered when inhomogeneity is ignored in migrating data from isotropic, inhomogeneous media.

Larner, K.; Cohen, J.K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Validation of error estimators and superconvergence by a computer-based approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESTIMATORS FOR PATCHWISE UNIFORM MESHES 5. 1 The methodology for checking the estimators. 5. 2 Numerical study of the estimators. . . . . 5. 3 Major results. 58 . . 58 65 160 CHAPTER VI STUDY OF THE ERROR ESTIMATORS FOR GENERAL MESHES . . 6. 1... Definition of the robustness index 6. 2 The computational methodology for general grids . . 6. 3 Numerical studies of robustness of various error estimators . . 6. 4 Major results. vn Page 164 164 166 167 , 198 CHAPTER VII STUDY OF SUPERCONVERGENCE...

Upadhyay, Chandra Shekhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Solution-verified reliability analysis and design of bistable MEMS using error estimation and adaptivity.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results for an FY06 ASC Algorithms Level 2 milestone combining error estimation and adaptivity, uncertainty quantification, and probabilistic design capabilities applied to the analysis and design of bistable MEMS. Through the use of error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement, solution verification can be performed in an automated and parameter-adaptive manner. The resulting uncertainty analysis and probabilistic design studies are shown to be more accurate, efficient, reliable, and convenient.

Eldred, Michael Scott; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Neckels, David; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Notz, Patrick K.; Adams, Brian M.; Carnes, Brian; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Bichon, Barron J.; Copps, Kevin D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Quantification of model mismatch errors of the dynamic energy distribution in a stirred-tank reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTIFICATION OF MODEL MISMATCH ERRORS OF THE DYNAMIC ENERGY DISTRIBUTION IN A STIRRED- TANK REACTOR A Thesis by MARK RAYMOND KIMMICH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 198i Major Subject: Chemical Engineering QUANTIFICATION OF MODEL MISMATCH ERRORS OF THE DYNAMIC ENERGY DISTRIBUTION IN A STIRRED-TANK REACTOR A Thesis by MARK RAYMOND KIMMICH Approved as to style and content by...

Kimmich, Mark Raymond

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

T-719:Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9:Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users 9:Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service T-719:Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service September 16, 2011 - 11:30am Addthis PROBLEM: Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service PLATFORM: Apache version(s) prior to 2.2.21 ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause the backend server to remain in an error state until the retry timeout expires. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026054 Apache Releases CVE-2011-3348 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apache mod_proxy_ajp. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. When mod_proxy_ajp is used together with mod_proxy_balancer, a remote user can send specially crafted HTTP requests to place the backend server in an error state until the retry

384

Orifice-meter measurement errors caused by gas-system pulsations can be controlled  

SciTech Connect

Pulsation-induced inaccuracies in orifice meter gas-flow measurement can be eliminated or at least better controlled. In today's increasingly competitive gas-supply marketplace, such errors can no longer be ignored. In some instances, pulsations have caused errors of 30-50% in volumes. Policies and procedures of Arkla Energy Resources, Shreveport, La., reflect current efforts to combat the problem. Orifice-meter pulsation error can be divided into three categories: those associated with the primary element itself (across the flange taps); those in the gauge line/manifold/transducer system;; and those within the recording and analysis system. Each category is significant in that total meter error contains all three types (box). While it would be desirable to segregate the problems and solve them independently, it is very difficult to do. It becomes apparent quickly that all three occur in many cases. The focus of this discussion is on primary-element errors; if these are reduced, other errors tend to be minimal.

Gegg, D. (Arkla Energy Resources, Shreveport, LA (US))

1989-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs based contour error reduction in CNC machines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new approach for reducing the contour errors in two-dimensional CNC machines is presented in this study. In the approach proposed here, two pre-trained nonlinear autoregressive networks with exogenous inputs (NARX), one for each axis, are used to predict the output position of the machine in the next sampling instant. The contour error in the next instant is then estimated and, based on this, the required compensation terms to be added to the reference input positions to reduce the contour error are determined. In the proposed approach, the compensation terms can be updated through an iteration process which reduces the contour error each time. Simulation experiments applying this approach to linear, circular and parabolic contours show that, even without extensive training of the NARX models, the contour errors can be significantly reduced. Actual experiments conducted on a small two-axis CNC machine confirm the effectiveness of this approach in reducing contour errors for linear, circular, parabolic and a free-form “goggles” contours.

Feng Huo; Aun-Neow Poo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Applying lessons learned to enhance human performance and reduce human error for ISS operations  

SciTech Connect

A major component of reliability, safety, and mission success for space missions is ensuring that the humans involved (flight crew, ground crew, mission control, etc.) perform their tasks and functions as required. This includes compliance with training and procedures during normal conditions, and successful compensation when malfunctions or unexpected conditions occur. A very significant issue that affects human performance in space flight is human error. Human errors can invalidate carefully designed equipment and procedures. If certain errors combine with equipment failures or design flaws, mission failure or loss of life can occur. The control of human error during operation of the International Space Station (ISS) will be critical to the overall success of the program. As experience from Mir operations has shown, human performance plays a vital role in the success or failure of long duration space missions. The Department of Energy`s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is developed a systematic approach to enhance human performance and reduce human errors for ISS operations. This approach is based on the systematic identification and evaluation of lessons learned from past space missions such as Mir to enhance the design and operation of ISS. This paper describes previous INEEL research on human error sponsored by NASA and how it can be applied to enhance human reliability for ISS.

Nelson, W.R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Managing Errors to Reduce Accidents in High Consequence Networked Information Systems  

SciTech Connect

Computers have always helped to amplify and propagate errors made by people. The emergence of Networked Information Systems (NISs), which allow people and systems to quickly interact worldwide, has made understanding and minimizing human error more critical. This paper applies concepts from system safety to analyze how hazards (from hackers to power disruptions) penetrate NIS defenses (e.g., firewalls and operating systems) to cause accidents. Such events usually result from both active, easily identified failures and more subtle latent conditions that have resided in the system for long periods. Both active failures and latent conditions result from human errors. We classify these into several types (slips, lapses, mistakes, etc.) and provide NIS examples of how they occur. Next we examine error minimization throughout the NIS lifecycle, from design through operation to reengineering. At each stage, steps can be taken to minimize the occurrence and effects of human errors. These include defensive design philosophies, architectural patterns to guide developers, and collaborative design that incorporates operational experiences and surprises into design efforts. We conclude by looking at three aspects of NISs that will cause continuing challenges in error and accident management: immaturity of the industry, limited risk perception, and resource tradeoffs.

Ganter, J.H.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information Sarah C. Creel to assess what types of pitch information adults use in recognition. Fixation and error data suggest recognition rapidly. Further, adults use both absolute and relative pitch information in recognition

Gentner, Timothy

389

hal-00136662,version1-14Mar2007 Relational Abstract Domains for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generic. 2 Related Work Abstract Domains. A key component in Abstract-Interpretation-based anal- yseshal-00136662,version1-14Mar2007 Relational Abstract Domains for the Detection of Floating-Point Run-Time Errors Antoine Min´e DI-´Ecole Normale Sup´erieure de Paris, France, mine@di.ens.fr Abstract We present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

Algebraic Structure of the Minimum Error Discrimination Problem for Linearly Independent Density Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum error discrimination problem for ensembles of linearly independent pure states are known to have an interesting structure; for such a given ensemble the optimal POVM is given by the pretty good measurment of another ensemble which can be related to the former ensemble by a bijective mapping $\\mathscr{R}$ on the "space of ensembles". In this paper we generalize this result to ensembles of general linearly independent states (not necessarily pure) and also give an analytic expression for the inverse of the map, i.e., for $\\mathscr{R}^{-1}$. In the process of proving this we also simplify the necessary and sufficient conditions that a POVM needs to satisfy to maximize the probability of success for the MED of an LI ensemble of states. This simplification is then employed to arrive at a rotationally invariant necessary and sufficient conditions of optimality. Using these rotationally invariant conditions it is established that every state of a LI mixed state ensemble can be resolved to a pure state decomposition so that the corresponding pure state ensemble (corresponding to pure states of all mixed states together) has as its optimal POVM a pure state decomposition of the optimal POVM of mixed state ensemble. This gives the necessary and sufficient conditions for the PGM of a LI ensemble to be its optimal POVM; another generalization for the pure state case. Also, these rotationally invariant conditions suggest a technique to give the optimal POVM for an ensemble of LI states. This technique is polynomial in time and outpeforms standard barrier-type interior point SDP in terms of computational complexity.

Tanmay Singal; Sibasish Ghosh

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

Understanding Causal Coherence Relations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research reported in this dissertation focuses on the cognitive processes and representations involved in understanding causal coherence relations in text. Coherence relations are the… (more)

Mulder, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Extreme density-driven delocalization error for a model solvated-electron system  

SciTech Connect

Delocalization (or charge-transfer) error is one of the scarce but spectacular failures of density-functional theory. It is particularly apparent in extensively delocalized molecules, and manifests in the calculation of bandgaps, reaction barriers, and dissociation limits. Even though delocalization error is always present in the self-consistent electron density, the differences from reference densities are often quite subtle and the error tends to be driven by the exchange-correlation energy expression. In this article, we propose a model system (the Kevan model) where approximate density functionals predict dramatically different charge distributions because of delocalization error. The model system consists of an electron trapped in a water hexamer and is a finite representation of an experimentally observed class of solids: electrides. The Kevan model is of fundamental interest because it allows the estimation of charge transfer error without recourse to fractional charge calculations, but our results are also relevant in the context of the modeling of confined electrons in density-functional theory.

Johnson, Erin R., E-mail: ejohnson29@ucmerced.edu; Otero-de-la-Roza, A., E-mail: aoterodelaroza@ucmerced.edu; Dale, Stephen G., E-mail: sdale@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Measuring gas emissions from livestock buildings: A review on uncertainty analysis and error sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measuring gaseous and particulate emissions from livestock houses has been the subject of intensive research over the past two decades. Currently, there is general agreement regarding appropriate methods to measure emissions from mechanically ventilated buildings. However, measuring emissions from naturally ventilated buildings remains an elusive target primarily because there is no reference method for measuring building ventilation rate. Ventilation rates and thus building emissions estimates for naturally ventilated buildings are likely to contain greater errors compared with those from mechanically ventilated buildings. This work reviews the origin and magnitude of errors associated with emissions from naturally ventilated buildings as compared to those typically found in mechanical ventilation. Firstly, some general concepts of error analysis are detailed. Then, typical errors found in the literature for each measurement technique are reviewed, and potential sources of relevant systematic and random errors are identified. The emission standard uncertainty in mechanical ventilation is at best 10% or more of the measured value, whereas in natural ventilation it may be considerably higher and there may also be significant unquantifiable biases. A reference method is necessary to obtain accurate emissions estimates, and for naturally ventilated structures this suggests the need for a new means of ventilation measurement. The results obtained from the analysis of information in this review will be helpful to establish research priorities, and to optimize research efforts in terms of quality of emission measurements.

Salvador Calvet; Richard S. Gates; GuoQiang Zhang; Fernando Estellés; Nico W.M. Ogink; Søren Pedersen; Daniel Berckmans

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

An Optical Survey of the Position Error Contours of Unidentified High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources at Galactic Latitude b >|20| degrees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the most recent results of an optical survey of the position error contours ("error boxes") of unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources.

S. D. Bloom; D. A. Dale; R. Cool; K. Dupczak; C. Miller; A. Haugsjaa; C. Peters; M. Tornikoski; P. Wallace; M. Pierce

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

T-624: Novell eDirectory LDAP-SSL Memory Allocation Error Lets Remote Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Novell eDirectory LDAP-SSL Memory Allocation Error Lets 4: Novell eDirectory LDAP-SSL Memory Allocation Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service T-624: Novell eDirectory LDAP-SSL Memory Allocation Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service May 17, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Novell eDirectory. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. A remote user can send specially crafted data to cause the target service to crash. On Netware-based systems, the system may crash. PLATFORM: Red Hat Enterprise, SuSE,AIX, HP/UX, Solaris, Windows 2000, 2003 ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. reference LINKS: Novell eDirectory - LDAP-SSL SECURELIST.ORG SecurityFocus BugTrackID: 47858 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Novell eDirectory. A remote user can cause

396

T-598: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information 8: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From Different Requests to Remote Users T-598: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From Different Requests to Remote Users April 8, 2011 - 5:35am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. A remote user may be able to obtain information from a different request. PLATFORM: Apache Tomcat v7.0.0 - v7.0.11 ABSTRACT: When using HTTP pipelining, the system may return information from a different request to a remote user. The vulnerability resides in the HTTP BIO connector. reference LINKS: Apache Tomcat Security Alert CVE-2011-1475 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025303 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Changes introduced to the HTTP BIO connector to support Servlet 3.0

397

T-573: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote 3: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-573: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code March 9, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Vulnerability in Remote Desktop Client Could Allow Remote Code Execution. PLATFORM: Remote Desktop Connection Client Version(s): 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, 7.0 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Windows Remote Desktop Client. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. reference LINKS: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS11-017 SecurityTracker Alert ID:1025172 CVE-2011-0029 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Moderate Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted DLL file on a remote share (e.g., WebDAV, SMB share). When the target user opens a valid Remote

398

V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets 5: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users Login Anonymously V-235: Cisco Mobility Services Engine Configuration Error Lets Remote Users Login Anonymously September 5, 2013 - 12:33am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Cisco Mobility Services Engine. A remote user can login anonymously. PLATFORM: Cisco Mobility Services Engine ABSTRACT: A vulnerability in Cisco Mobility Services Engine could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to connect to a database replication port anonymously via Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028972 CVE-2013-3469 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is due to the misconfiguration of the Oracle SSL service. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by connecting to an

399

A Direct Error Measure for Affine Models of Nonlinear Algebraic Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Direct Error Measure for Affine Models of Nonlinear Algebraic Systems A Direct Error Measure for Affine Models of Nonlinear Algebraic Systems Speaker(s): David Lorenzetti Date: June 2, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The Newton-Raphson solution of a nonlinear system iterately linearizes the equations, then steps to the solution of the resulting affine model. When a step exceeds the predictive range of its model, the method can diverge. The traditional response -- aggregating the equations into a cost function, and applying a minimization method -- suppresses information about how each equation model performs. Direct error measures examine the equations individually, allowing finer control over step lengths. The seminar will develop one such measure through the geometry of simple one- and two-dimensional examples, then present results from a suite of larger

400

V-228: RealPlayer Buffer Overflow and Memory Corruption Error Let Remote  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: RealPlayer Buffer Overflow and Memory Corruption Error Let 8: RealPlayer Buffer Overflow and Memory Corruption Error Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-228: RealPlayer Buffer Overflow and Memory Corruption Error Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code August 27, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Two vulnerabilities were reported in RealPlayer PLATFORM: RealPlayer 16.0.2.32 and prior ABSTRACT: A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system REFERENCE LINKS: Security Tracker Alert ID 1028953 RealNetworks Security Bulletin CVE-2013-4973 CVE-2013-4974 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can create a specially crafted RMP file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a stack overflow and execute arbitrary code on the target system. A remote user can create a specially crafted RealMedia file that, when

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

V-018: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption 8: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-018: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 7, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Adobe Flash Player 11.4.402.287 and prior for Windows and OS X; 11.2.202.243 and prior for Linux ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Flash Player. REFERENCE LINKS: Adobe Vulnerability identifier: APSB12-24 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027730 CVE-2012-5274 CVE-2012-5275 CVE-2012-5276 CVE-2012-5277 CVE-2012-5278 CVE-2012-5279 CVE-2012-5280 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Flash Player. A remote user

402

T-598: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information 8: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From Different Requests to Remote Users T-598: Apache Tomcat HTTP BIO Connector Error Discloses Information From Different Requests to Remote Users April 8, 2011 - 5:35am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. A remote user may be able to obtain information from a different request. PLATFORM: Apache Tomcat v7.0.0 - v7.0.11 ABSTRACT: When using HTTP pipelining, the system may return information from a different request to a remote user. The vulnerability resides in the HTTP BIO connector. reference LINKS: Apache Tomcat Security Alert CVE-2011-1475 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025303 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Changes introduced to the HTTP BIO connector to support Servlet 3.0

403

Error compensation in distance relays caused by wind power plants in the power grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents the Prony method as a filtering technique for distance relays. First, the effect of non-filtered frequency components generated by wind power plants in distance relays is evaluated in a simplified model of a doubly fed induction generator, resulting in an error of apparent impedance measurement. Then, the effects of non-filtered frequency components for typical distance relay are presented. The error in apparent impedance measurement is evaluated in reach and operation time of the relay; a distorted characteristic of the mho distance relay is shown in the impedance plane. Finally, Prony method as a filtering technique is implemented as a solution of the apparent impedance measurement error, and the simulated case and a real fault event are evaluated to validate the proposed distance relay algorithm. Thus the asynchronous frequency components of voltage and current signals are identified and filtered, as a result the performance of the distance relay is enhanced.

L.A. Trujillo Guajardo; A. Conde Enríquez; Z. Leonowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Maps for general open quantum systems and a theory of linear quantum error correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that quantum subdynamics of an open quantum system can always be described by a Hermitian map, irrespective of the form of the initial total system state. Since the theory of quantum error correction was developed based on the assumption of completely positive (CP) maps, we present a generalized theory of linear quantum error correction, which applies to any linear map describing the open system evolution. In the physically relevant setting of Hermitian maps, we show that the CP-map based version of quantum error correction theory applies without modifications. However, we show that a more general scenario is also possible, where the recovery map is Hermitian but not CP. Since non-CP maps have non-positive matrices in their range, we provide a geometric characterization of the positivity domain of general linear maps. In particular, we show that this domain is convex, and that this implies a simple algorithm for finding its boundary.

A. Shabani; D. A. Lidar

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Error correcting code with chip kill capability and power saving enhancement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are disclosed for detecting memory chip failure in a computer memory system. The method comprises the steps of accessing user data from a set of user data chips, and testing the user data for errors using data from a set of system data chips. This testing is done by generating a sequence of check symbols from the user data, grouping the user data into a sequence of data symbols, and computing a specified sequence of syndromes. If all the syndromes are zero, the user data has no errors. If one of the syndromes is non-zero, then a set of discriminator expressions are computed, and used to determine whether a single or double symbol error has occurred. In the preferred embodiment, less than two full system data chips are used for testing and correcting the user data.

Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Husdon, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Flynn, William T. (Rochester, MN); Marcella, James A. (Rochester, MN); Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY); Trager, Barry M. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Winograd, Shmuel (Scarsdale, NY)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Joint Seasonal ARMA Approach for Modeling of Load Forecast Errors in Planning Studies  

SciTech Connect

To make informed and robust decisions in the probabilistic power system operation and planning process, it is critical to conduct multiple simulations of the generated combinations of wind and load parameters and their forecast errors to handle the variability and uncertainty of these time series. In order for the simulation results to be trustworthy, the simulated series must preserve the salient statistical characteristics of the real series. In this paper, we analyze day-ahead load forecast error data from multiple balancing authority locations and characterize statistical properties such as mean, standard deviation, autocorrelation, correlation between series, time-of-day bias, and time-of-day autocorrelation. We then construct and validate a seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model to model these characteristics, and use the model to jointly simulate day-ahead load forecast error series for all BAs.

Hafen, Ryan P.; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Ning

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

HUMAN ERROR QUANTIFICATION USING PERFORMANCE SHAPING FACTORS IN THE SPAR-H METHOD  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a cognitively based human reliability analysis (HRA) quantification technique for estimating the human error probabilities (HEPs) associated with operator and crew actions at nuclear power plants. The method described here, Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method, was developed to aid in characterizing and quantifying human performance at nuclear power plants. The intent was to develop a defensible method that would consider all factors that may influence performance. In the SPAR-H approach, calculation of HEP rates is especially straightforward, starting with pre-defined nominal error rates for cognitive vs. action-oriented tasks, and incorporating performance shaping factor multipliers upon those nominal error rates.

Harold S. Blackman; David I. Gertman; Ronald L. Boring

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Experimental Analysis of Work-piece's Diametrical Error in Ultrasonic-Vibration-Assisted Turning  

SciTech Connect

Vibration at an ultrasonic frequency is superimposed on the ordinary cutting motion in ultrasonic-vibration-assisted turning (UAT). This combinatory cutting motion results in reduction of the cutting force and surface roughness, and improvement of the dimensional tolerances compared with conventional turning (CT). The advantages obtainable from UAT has made this process suitable for machining hard-to-cut and brittle materials such as super-alloys and ceramics, as well as ordinary materials. The elastic deflection of work-pieces is primarily responsible for the diametrical errors of the machined parts. This is of course more obvious for slender work-pieces. The influence of UAT process on the diametrical error has not yet been investigated. This has been partly undertaken by the authors of the present paper. It has been experimentally illustrated in this paper that ultrasonic vibration superimposed on the tool tip can result in reduction of the diametrical error and thus reduced scrap rate is ensued.

Soleimanimehr, H.; Nategh, M. J.; Gholamzadeh, B. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Large-Scale Uncertainty and Error Analysis for Time-dependent Fluid/Structure Interactions in Wind Turbine Applications  

SciTech Connect

The following is the final report covering the entire period of this aforementioned grant, June 1, 2011 - May 31, 2013 for the portion of the effort corresponding to Stanford University (SU). SU has partnered with Sandia National Laboratories (PI: Mike S. Eldred) and Purdue University (PI: Dongbin Xiu) to complete this research project and this final report includes those contributions made by the members of the team at Stanford. Dr. Eldred is continuing his contributions to this project under a no-cost extension and his contributions to the overall effort will be detailed at a later time (once his effort has concluded) on a separate project submitted by Sandia National Laboratories. At Stanford, the team is made up of Profs. Alonso, Iaccarino, and Duraisamy, post-doctoral researcher Vinod Lakshminarayan, and graduate student Santiago Padron. At Sandia National Laboratories, the team includes Michael Eldred, Matt Barone, John Jakeman, and Stefan Domino, and at Purdue University, we have Prof. Dongbin Xiu as our main collaborator. The overall objective of this project was to develop a novel, comprehensive methodology for uncertainty quantification by combining stochastic expansions (nonintrusive polynomial chaos and stochastic collocation), the adjoint approach, and fusion with experimental data to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties from random variable, random field, and model form sources. The expected outcomes of this activity were detailed in the proposal and are repeated here to set the stage for the results that we have generated during the time period of execution of this project: 1. The rigorous determination of an error budget comprising numerical errors in physical space and statistical errors in stochastic space and its use for optimal allocation of resources; 2. A considerable increase in efficiency when performing uncertainty quantification with a large number of uncertain variables in complex non-linear multi-physics problems; 3. A solution to the long-time integration problem of spectral chaos approaches; 4. A rigorous methodology to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, to emphasize the most important variables via dimension reduction and dimension-adaptive refinement, and to support fusion with experimental data using Bayesian inference; 5. The application of novel methodologies to time-dependent reliability studies in wind turbine applications including a number of efforts relating to the uncertainty quantification in vertical-axis wind turbine applications. In this report, we summarize all accomplishments in the project (during the time period specified) focusing on advances in UQ algorithms and deployment efforts to the wind turbine application area. Detailed publications in each of these areas have also been completed and are available from the respective conference proceedings and journals as detailed in a later section.

Alonso, Juan J. [Stanford University; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Stanford University

2013-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low delay and area efficient soft error correction in arbitration logic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided an arbitration logic device for controlling an access to a shared resource. The arbitration logic device comprises at least one storage element, a winner selection logic device, and an error detection logic device. The storage element stores a plurality of requestors' information. The winner selection logic device selects a winner requestor among the requestors based on the requestors' information received from a plurality of requestors. The winner selection logic device selects the winner requestor without checking whether there is the soft error in the winner requestor's information.

Sugawara, Yutaka

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Estimating rock properties in two phase petroleum reservoirs: an error analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 60x10 1. 16x10 4. 16x10 1. 01 9. 13x10 1. 51 2. 07%10 6. 51x10 5. 42x10 8. 18 3. 16x10 26 function approximated in the tt parameter space gives a mean prediction error which is essentially zero. However, using the permeability estimates obtained.... G ver (Mem er) . L. Curry . D. Ho land ( d of Department) December 1983 ABSTRACT Estimating Rock Properties In Two Phase Petroleum Reservoirs: An Error Analysis. (December 1983) Anthony Ian Paul B. Sc. , Imperial College, London University...

Paul, Anthony Ian

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect

The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Case-control studies of genetic and environmental factors with error in measurement of environmental factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) are binary and probability of disease is known. Environmental variable is measured with error with misclassi cation probabilities pr(W = 0jX = 1) = 0:20 and pr(W = 1jX = 0) = 0:10. The results are based on a simulation study with 500 replications for 1000... variant (G), and environmental covariate (X) are binary and probability of disease is unknown. Environmen- tal variable is measured with error with misclassi cation probabilities pr(W = 0jX = 1) = 0:20 and pr(W = 1jX = 0) = 0:10. The results are based on a...

Lobach, Iryna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

Graff, Pierre [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Doctoral School BioSE (EA4360), Nancy (France); Kirby, Neil [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Lambert, Louise [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal (Canada); Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fire Protection Related Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fire Protection related sites for Department of Energy, Non-DOE Government and Non-Government information.

416

Modeling conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain with WAsP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the vertical wind speed W changes linearly with the downwind position x. This could crudely mimic the flow over to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured

417

Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R farm. However, there are a number of biases inherent in satellite retrieval of wind speeds which wind farms speculative. Here we quantify these biases and derive theoretical and empirical estimates

418

ArchShield: architectural framework for assisting DRAM scaling by tolerating high error rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DRAM scaling has been the prime driver for increasing the capacity of main memory system over the past three decades. Unfortunately, scaling DRAM to smaller technology nodes has become challenging due to the inherent difficulty in designing smaller geometries, ... Keywords: dynamic random access memory, error correction, hard faults

Prashant J. Nair; Dae-Hyun Kim; Moinuddin K. Qureshi

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Computing trade-offs in robust design: Perspectives of the mean squared error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers often identify robust design as one of the most effective engineering design methods for continuous quality improvement. When more than one quality characteristic is considered, an important question is how to trade off robust design solutions. ... Keywords: Bi-objective robust design, Lexicographic weighted-Tchebycheff method, Mean-squared-error model, Quality control, Weighted-sums method

Sangmun Shin; Funda Samanlioglu; Byung Rae Cho; Margaret M. Wiecek

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NASA/TM--2012216007 Performance Data Errors in Air Carrier Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA/TM--2012­216007 Performance Data Errors in Air Carrier Operations: Causes and Countermeaures Benjamin A. Berman San Jose State University R. Key Dismukes NASA Ames Research Center Kimberly K. Jobe San Jose State University June 2012 #12;ii NASA STI Program...in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Visual comparison of software cost estimation models by regression error characteristic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The well-balanced management of a software project is a critical task accomplished at the early stages of the development process. Due to this requirement, a wide variety of prediction methods has been introduced in order to identify the best strategy ... Keywords: Estimation by analogy, Regression analysis, Regression error characteristic curves, Software cost estimation

Nikolaos Mittas; Lefteris Angelis

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Error estimation and anisotropic mesh refinement for 3d laminar aerodynamic flow simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error estimation and anisotropic mesh refinement for 3d laminar aerodynamic flow simulations Tobias Leichta,b , Ralf Hartmann,a,b aInstitute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, DLR (German Aerospace Center-dimensional laminar aerodynamic flow simulations. The optimal order symmetric interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin

Hartmann, Ralf

423

Error Analysis of Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat-Exchanger Text-Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to reduce the measurement error of heat transfer in water and air side for finned-tube heat-exchanger as little as possible, and design a heat-exchanger test-board measurement system economically, based on the principle of test-board system...

Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Efficient Small Area Estimation in the Presence of Measurement Error in Covariates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small area estimation is an arena that has seen rapid development in the past 50 years, due to its widespread applicability in government projects, marketing research and many other areas. However, it is often difficult to obtain error-free data...

Singh, Trijya

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Lavers & Jones: Band resighting errors 19 Marine Ornithology 36: 1923 (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavers & Jones: Band resighting errors 19 Marine Ornithology 36: 19­23 (2008) 19 INTRODUCTION identifiable (Anderson et al. 1985, Pollock 1991). Band wear and loss clearly violate these assumptions and to incorporate factors such as band loss and band wear into survival analyses (Schwarz & Stobo 1999, Conn et al

Jones, Ian L.

426

Assignment on Algebra for Coding Theory EE512: Error Control Coding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of polynomials with coefficients from Z18. Find a, b Z18 (a = 1) such that 2x(x + 1) = 2x(ax + b) in Z18[xAssignment on Algebra for Coding Theory EE512: Error Control Coding Questions marked (Q) or (F

Thangaraj, Andrew

427

A Time{Dependent Born{Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Small Error Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Time{Dependent Born{Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Small Error Estimates George A{ Oppenheimer approximation for molecular quantum mechanics. We study molecular systems whose electron masses. The small parameter that governs the approximation is the usual Born{Oppenheimer expansion parameter #15

Joye, Alain

428

A Time--Dependent Born--Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Small Error Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Time--Dependent Born--Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Small Error Estimates George A--dependent Born-- Oppenheimer approximation for molecular quantum mechanics. We study molecular systems whose parameter that governs the approximation is the usual Born--Oppenheimer expansion parameter #, where # 4

Hagedorn, George A.

429

A Time--Dependent Born--Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Small Error Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Time--Dependent Born--Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Small Error Estimates George A accurate time--dependent Born-- Oppenheimer approximation for molecular quantum mechanics. We study is the usual Born--Oppenheimer expansion parameter ffl, where ffl 4 is the ratio of the electron mass divided

430

A Time--Independent Born--Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Accurate Error Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Time--Independent Born--Oppenheimer Approximation with Exponentially Accurate Error Estimates, we construct quasimodes that are exponentially accurate in the square of the Born--Oppenheimer that governs the approximation is the usual Born--Oppenheimer parameter #, where # 4 is the electron mass

431

On the Chemical Basis of Trotter-Suzuki Errors in Quantum Chemistry Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the most anticipated applications of quantum computing, the scaling of known upper bounds on the complexity of these algorithms is daunting. Prior work has bounded errors due to Trotterization in terms of the norm of the error operator and analyzed scaling with respect to the number of spin-orbitals. However, we find that these error bounds can be loose by up to sixteen orders of magnitude for some molecules. Furthermore, numerical results for small systems fail to reveal any clear correlation between ground state error and number of spin-orbitals. We instead argue that chemical properties, such as the maximum nuclear charge in a molecule and the filling fraction of orbitals, can be decisive for determining the cost of a quantum simulation. Our analysis motivates several strategies to use classical processing to further reduce the required Trotter step size and to estimate the necessary number of steps, without requiring additional quantum resources. Fina...

Babbush, Ryan; Wecker, Dave; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Wiebe, Nathan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radial Error Feedback Geometric Adaptive Control for Bar Turning in CNC Turning Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radial Error Feedback Geometric Adaptive Control for Bar Turning in CNC Turning Centers by Chun Fan-6046 liu@eng.fsu.edu, indwang1@eng.fsu.edu Abstract In-process measurement and control of CNC machines can adaptive control (REFGAC) system for bar turning in CNC turning centers. REFGAC system was design to com

Collins, Emmanuel

433

Discretization error estimation and exact solution generation using the method of nearby problems.  

SciTech Connect

The Method of Nearby Problems (MNP), a form of defect correction, is examined as a method for generating exact solutions to partial differential equations and as a discretization error estimator. For generating exact solutions, four-dimensional spline fitting procedures were developed and implemented into a MATLAB code for generating spline fits on structured domains with arbitrary levels of continuity between spline zones. For discretization error estimation, MNP/defect correction only requires a single additional numerical solution on the same grid (as compared to Richardson extrapolation which requires additional numerical solutions on systematically-refined grids). When used for error estimation, it was found that continuity between spline zones was not required. A number of cases were examined including 1D and 2D Burgers equation, the 2D compressible Euler equations, and the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The discretization error estimation results compared favorably to Richardson extrapolation and had the advantage of only requiring a single grid to be generated.

Sinclair, Andrew J. (Auburn University Auburn, AL); Raju, Anil (Auburn University Auburn, AL); Kurzen, Matthew J. (Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA); Roy, Christopher John (Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA); Phillips, Tyrone S. (Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Iterative Dense Correspondence Correction Through Bundle Adjustment Feedback-Based Error Detection  

SciTech Connect

A novel method to detect and correct inaccuracies in a set of unconstrained dense correspondences between two images is presented. Starting with a robust, general-purpose dense correspondence algorithm, an initial pose estimate and dense 3D scene reconstruction are obtained and bundle-adjusted. Reprojection errors are then computed for each correspondence pair, which is used as a metric to distinguish high and low-error correspondences. An affine neighborhood-based coarse-to-fine iterative search algorithm is then applied only on the high-error correspondences to correct their positions. Such an error detection and correction mechanism is novel for unconstrained dense correspondences, for example not obtained through epipolar geometry-based guided matching. Results indicate that correspondences in regions with issues such as occlusions, repetitive patterns and moving objects can be identified and corrected, such that a more accurate set of dense correspondences results from the feedback-based process, as proven by more accurate pose and structure estimates.

Hess-Flores, M A; Duchaineau, M A; Goldman, M J; Joy, K I

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

New Constructions of Non-Adaptive and Error-Tolerance Pooling Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

probability ¢ of having a positive. Group testing strategies can also be either adaptive or non in test outcomes. Test errors could be either ¤¦¥ § , i.e. a negative pool is identified as positive another column. A ¡ -disjunct ©FP matrix S can be used to design a non-adaptive group testing algorithm

Ngo, Hung Q.

436

New Constructions of NonAdaptive and ErrorTolerance Pooling Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fix some probability p of having a positive. Group testing strategies can also be either adaptive to design a non­adaptive group testing algorithm on n items by associating the columns with the items). If there are no more than d positives and the test outcomes are error­free, then it is easy to see that the test outcom

Ngo, Hung Q.

437

Cross-layer packet prioritization for error-resilient transmission of IPTV system over wireless network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel cross-layer packet prioritization scheme that overcomes the limitations of conventional video prioritization schemes for IPTV system. In the conventional schemes, the Extend profile or frame unit is used for prioritization ... Keywords: IPTV system, error-resilient video streaming, per-packet prioritization algorithm

Kyungmin Go; Sungwon Kang; Yohaan Yoon; Myungchul Kim; Ben Lee

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

When Errors Become the Rule: Twenty Years with Transformation-Based Learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transformation-based learning (TBL) is a machine learning method for, in particular, sequential classification, invented by Eric Brill [Brill 1993b, 1995a]. It is widely used within computational linguistics and natural language processing, but surprisingly ... Keywords: Transformation-based learning, brill tagging, computational linguistics, error-driven rule learning, natural language processing, sequential classification, supervised learning

Marcus Uneson

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Errors and Uncertainty in Mineral Resource and Ore Reserve Estimation: The Importance of Getting it Right  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Macquarie University, Sydney. BUTCHER, R.J...of London Publishing House, Bath, p. 37-45...errors can give the mine opera-tor significant problems...Macquarie University, Sydney. BUTCHER, R.J...of London Publishing House, Bath, p. 37-45...

SIMON C. DOMINY; MARK A. NOPPÉ; ALWYN E. ANNELS

440

930 IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS, VOL. 15, 2008 Robust Error Square Constrained Filter Design for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processing, signal processing, communication, and control engineering [1]. However, filtering performance may provides an energy bounded gain from the noise inputs to the estimation error without the need uncertainties and non-Gaussian noises, but its design is too conservative and there is no provision to ensure

Li, Yongmin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Time Zone Dependence of Diurnal Cycle Errors in Surface Temperature Analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface temperatures from both the NCEP analysis and ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) in January 2008 over the Africa–Eurasian region were compared with surface station measurements to study analysis errors in the diurnal cycle, with data sampled ...

X. Zou; Z-K. Qin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Effects of Spectral Error in Efficiency Measurements of GaInAs-Based Concentrator Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect

This technical report documents a particular error in efficiency measurements of triple-absorber concentrator solar cells caused by incorrect spectral irradiance -- specifically, one that occurs when the irradiance from unfiltered, pulsed xenon solar simulators into the GaInAs bottom subcell is too high. For cells designed so that the light-generated photocurrents in the three subcells are nearly equal, this condition can cause a large increase in the measured fill factor, which, in turn, causes a significant artificial increase in the efficiency. The error is readily apparent when the data under concentration are compared to measurements with correctly balanced photocurrents, and manifests itself as discontinuities in plots of fill factor and efficiency versus concentration ratio. In this work, we simulate the magnitudes and effects of this error with a device-level model of two concentrator cell designs, and demonstrate how a new Spectrolab, Inc., Model 460 Tunable-High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (T-HIPSS) can mitigate the error.

Osterwald, C. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Moriarty, T.; Steiner, M. A.; Emery, K. A.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Error estimation of bathymetric grid models derived from historic and contemporary datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Error estimation of bathymetric grid models derived from historic and contemporary datasets and rapidly collecting dense bathymetric datasets. Sextants were replaced by radio navigation, then transit, to digitized contours; the test dataset shows examples of all of these types. From this database, we assign

New Hampshire, University of

444

Time-and Space-efficient Error Calculation for Multiresolution Direct Volume Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gyulassy1 , Lars Linsen1,2 , and Bernd Hamann1 1 Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV such that the error made when visualizing the subset (compared to a visualization of the full data set) is smaller datasets is a common task used in many fields, including medicine, physics, and other sciences. Complexity

Linsen, Lars

445

Performance Analysis of Error Control Codes for Wireless Sensor Networks Gopinath Balakrishnan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-intensive as the average energy consumption per useful bit grows exponentially with the constraint length of the code using VHDL. Implementation on FPGA and ASIC design is carried out and the energy consumption is measured scheme to reduce the bit error rate (BER). Due to the stringent energy constraint in sensor networks

Yang, Mei

446

Numerical queue solution of thermal noise-induced soft errors in subthreshold CMOS devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power consumption requirements drive CMOS scaling to ever lower supply voltages, reducing the stability margin with respect to thermal noise and raising the probability for thermally-induced soft errors. Given the long time scale of noise-induced soft ... Keywords: CMOS logic devices, Markov process, laplace transform, monte carlo method, poisson distribution, reliability

Pooya Jannaty; Florian C. Sabou; R. Iris Bahar; Joseph Mundy; William R. Patterson; Alexander Zaslavsky

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Avoidable errors in deposited macromolecular structures: an impediment to efficient data mining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dual role of the Protein Data Bank as a repository of all macromolecular structures and as the major source of structural metadata for further analysis is discussed and suggestions are made on how to identify models that contain errors and could potentially degrade the quality of meta analyses.

Dauter, Z.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Detecting API Documentation Errors Hao Zhong1,2 Zhendong Su2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting API Documentation Errors Hao Zhong1,2 Zhendong Su2 1 Institute of Software, Chinese@cs.ucdavis.edu Abstract When programmers encounter an unfamiliar API library, they often need to refer to its documentations, tutorials, or discussions on de- velopment forums to learn its proper usage. These API documents

Su, Zhendong

449

Time Step Sensitivity of Nonlinear Atmospheric Models: Numerical Convergence, Truncation Error Growth, and Ensemble Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1973; Oran and Boris 1987; Murray 1989; Gershenfeld 1999). Weather and climate prediction models, which to the initial conditions, which is a major source of uncertainty in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP; eTime Step Sensitivity of Nonlinear Atmospheric Models: Numerical Convergence, Truncation Error

Judd, Kevin

450

A game-theory approach to configuration of detection software with decision errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The modern computer and communication networks that firms rely on have become more complex due to their dynamic, distributed and heterogeneous features; it is therefore increasingly important to characterize the interaction between a firm and a user to ensure information security. Recently, a game-theory approach has been widely employed to investigate this issue, including the optimal configurations of the detection software. However, for both the firm and the user, inaccuracies may persist in the gap between strategic decisions and actual actions, due to the effects of irrationality and the error-prone nature of the devices that carry their commands. This paper analyzes the effects of decision errors on the optimal strategies of both the firm and the user and, in particular, on the optimal configurations of the detection software. We finally demonstrate that decision errors can promote several pure equilibrium strategies and that fine-tuning these configurations quickly becomes difficult. Furthermore, we find that decision errors can drastically influence the optimal configurations and expected costs for a firm.

Xing Gao; Weijun Zhong; Shue Mei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Bias correction for selecting the minimal-error classifier from many machine learning models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......predict independent testing data. When test datasets are not available, cross-validation...LOOCV or when the size of the left-out test set is too small, and this estimate was...classifier to estimate the error rate on the test dataset, nestedCV resulted in an overestimate......

Ying Ding; Shaowu Tang; Serena G. Liao; Jia Jia; Steffi Oesterreich; Yan Lin; George C. Tseng

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Disentangling between low order telescope aberrations and segmentation errors using a Shack-Hartmann sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Southern Hemisphere Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, Garching, Germany A BST R A C T The shape correction of the mirrors is a crucial operation to obtain diffraction limited images in actively controlled telescopes. If the mirror is not monolithic, the segmentation errors introduced by piston, tip and tilt of the segments

Liske, Jochen

453

Error Bounds for the Large Time Step Glimm Scheme Applied to Scalar Conservation Laws 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Glimm scheme under the restriction of Courant numbers up to 1=2. 1. Introduction The large time step solution of (1) generated from the LTS Glimm scheme, #1;x the spatial mesh length and #1;t the time stepError Bounds for the Large Time Step Glimm Scheme Applied to Scalar Conservation Laws 1 Jinyang

454

Time-to-Detect Trends in Precipitable Water Vapor with Varying Measurement Error  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study determined the theoretical time-to-detect (TTD) global climate model (GCM) precipitable water vapor (PWV) 100-yr trends when realistic measurement errors are considered. Global trends ranged from 0.055 to 0.072 mm yr?1 and varied ...

Jacola Roman; Robert Knuteson; Steve Ackerman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A FEW MATHEMATICAL ERRORS IN THE RECENT EDITION OF THE ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ENCYCLOPAeDIA BRITANNICA. | Journal Article DECEMBER 1, 1911] A FEW MATHEMATICAL ERRORS IN THE RECENT EDITION OF THE ENCYCLOP.EDIA BRITANNICA As a large number of students do not have easy access to extensive special literature, they are led to regard general...

G. A. MILLER

1911-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems Jinxing multi-item production system under demand uncertainty and a rolling time horizon. The output from parameters, thus improving the performance of production systems. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Xie, Jinxing

457

Improving End of Life Care: an Information Systems Approach to Reducing Medical Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, quality of care, end of life, electronic health records Introduction This research will evaluate the waysImproving End of Life Care: an Information Systems Approach to Reducing Medical Errors TAMANG S. a, CUNY, USA b Department of Research, Metropolitan Jewish Health System, NY, USA Abstract. Chronic

Kopec, Danny

458

Dynamics and Structure of Forecast Error Covariance in the Core of a Developing Hurricane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cloud-resolving forecasts from the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) was used to study error gradients of wind, temperature, and pressure to be concentrated farther from the mean vortex center share a similar axisymmetric transition about the origin, while maintaining a large degree of local

459

Dose calculation errors due to inaccurate representation of heterogeneity correction obtained from computerized tomography  

SciTech Connect

Computerized tomography (CT) is used routinely in evaluating radiation therapy isodose plans. With the introduction of 3D algorithms such as the voxel raytrace, which determines inhomogeneity corrections from actual CT Hounsfield numbers, caution must be used when evaluating isodose calculations. Artifacts from contrast media and dental work, radiopaque markers placed by the treatment planner, and changing bowel and rectal air patterns all have the potential to introduce error into the calculation due to inaccurate assessment of high or low density. Radiopaque makers such as x-spot BB's or solder wire are placed externally on the patient. Barium contrast media introduced at the time of simulation may be necessary to visualize specific anatomical structures on the CT images. While these localization and visualization tools may be necessary, it is important to understand the effects they may introduce in the planning process. Other problems encountered are patient specific and out of the control of the treatment planner. These include high- and low-density streaking caused by dental work, which produce computational errors due to overestimation, and small bowel and rectal air, the patterns of which change on a daily basis and may result in underestimation of structure density. It is important for each treatment planner to have an understanding of how this potentially tainted CT information may be applied in dose calculations and the possible effects they may have. At our institution, the voxel raytrace calculation is automatically forced any time couch angle is introduced. Errors in the calculation from the above mentioned situations may be introduced if a heterogeneity correction is applied. Examples of potential calculation errors and the magnitude of each will be discussed. The methods used to minimize these errors and the possible solutions will also be evaluated.

Williams, Greg; Tobler, Matthew; Gaffney, David; Moeller, John; Leavitt, Dennis

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Identification and correction of systematic error in NOAA AVHRR long-term satellite data record  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic error in long-term satellite data records resulting from inter-sensor differences or other persistent influences such as satellite orbital drift can greatly affect the use of these data to monitor land surface dynamics and trends. In this research an identification and correction procedure for systematic error is developed and used to evaluate the NOAA AVHRR long-term satellite data record produced by the Canada Center for Remote Sensing (CCRS). The record is composed of observations acquired by seven AVHRR sensors during the period 1985–2011. It includes two types of AVHRR sensor: AVHHR-2 flown onboard NOAA-9, -11, and ?14, and AVHRR-3 onboard NOAA-16, -17, -18 and ?19. Systematic error between sensors was identified through evaluation of synchronized nadir overpass (SNO) observations. The first order systematic error correction was derived from SNO comparison and then further optimized using a reference calibration target. Examination showed considerable difference between AVHRR-2 and AVHRR-3 measurements, which are largely attributed to differences in sensor design characteristics, uncertainty in sensor radiometric calibration, and imperfections in data processing. The results also show overall higher consistency between data from missions with AVHRR-3 than with AVHRR-2 sensors. The developed approach for correction of systematic error in time series was validated based on statistical analysis of eight independent pseudo-invariant targets not used for the initial correction development. Trends in these targets largely caused by the difference between AVHRR-2 and ?3 sensors are shown to be removed or reduced after the correction was applied.

Rasim Latifovic; Darren Pouliot; Craig Dillabaugh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NREL: News - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links The U.S. Department of Energy provides news online: EERE Network News News and Blog Science News Science and Technology Highlights from the National Laboratories...

462

Thermodynamics and scale relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

Robert Carroll

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

463

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;#12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES VOLUME II Part 2 #12;� '�;- py as- b^ Section Research, 7, 288, 1954). #12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS nnd Related Processes By EUGENE I. RABINOWITCH Research Professor, Photosynthesis Research Labora- tory, Department of Botany, University of Illinois. Formerly

Govindjee

464

An FPGA-Based Framework for Run-time Injection and Analysis of Soft Errors in Microprocessors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-specified memory elements of an entire microprocessor (MIPS32) running application software. While the framework is applicable to arbitrary software, we demonstrate its usage by characterizing soft errors effects on several software filters used in aviation for probabilistic sensor data fusion. I. INTRODUCTION Soft errors cause

Teschner, Matthias

465

Integrative Biomarker Discovery for Breast Cancer Metastasis from Gene Expression and Protein Interaction Data Using Error-tolerant Pattern Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrative Biomarker Discovery for Breast Cancer Metastasis from Gene Expression and Protein Interaction Data Using Error-tolerant Pattern Mining Rohit Gupta Smita Agrawal+ Navneet Rao Ze Tian rohit- ers. In this paper, we propose a novel error-tolerant pattern mining approach for integrated analysis

Kumar, Vipin

466

A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3 4 MEASUREMENTS Richardson et al. 1 January 13, 2006 Abstract1 Measured surface-atmosphere fluxes of energy open-path, gas analyzer is22 used.23 #12;RANDOM ERRORS IN ENERGY AND CO2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS Richardson

467

An error analysis of a finite element method for a system of nonlinear advection--diffusion--reaction equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present an analysis of a finite element method for solving a system of nonlinear advection-diffusion-reaction equations. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the numerical solution, and obtain a prior error estimates optimal in H^1 ... Keywords: Advection--diffusion--reaction, Error estimate, Finite element, Nonlinear

Biyue Liu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Estimation of errors in the inverse modeling of accidental release of atmospheric pollutant: Application to the reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation of errors in the inverse modeling of accidental release of atmospheric pollutant difficulty when inverting the source term of an atmospheric tracer dispersion problem is the estimation of the prior errors: those of the atmospheric transport model, those ascribed to the representativity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

"Show Preview" button is not working; gives error | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Show Preview" button is not working; gives error "Show Preview" button is not working; gives error Home > Groups > Utility Rate Submitted by Ewilson on 3 January, 2013 - 09:52 1 answer Points: 0 Eric, thanks for reporting this. I checked with stakeholders (http://en.openei.org/community/node/657) and decided since the edit view and the "show preview" view would be nearly identical, it wasn't worth keeping the show preview button. However, "Show changes" will show text changes for the utility rates, which is valuable when making a change. Thanks for reporting - this bug is now fixed! Ryan Rmckeel on 17 May, 2013 - 10:30 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content FYI, OpenEI now accommodates t... Very useful information. Thank... The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated

470

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover. C. N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1) Introduction In observing the cloudless sky, one can often notice that the area near the sun is whiter and brighter than the rest of the hemisphere. Additionally, even a slight haze will make a large angular area of the horizon whiter and brighter when the sun is low on the horizon. The human eye has an amazing ability to handle a range of light intensity spanning orders of magnitude. But one of the persistent problems in using sky images to infer fractional sky cover is the intensity range limitations of the camera detector. It is desirable to have bright enough images to be able to detect thin clouds, yet this often means the part of the image near the

471

An Investigation of Coupling of the Internal Kink Mode to Error Field Correction Coils in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The coupling of the internal kink to an external m/=1/1 pertubation if studied for profiles that are known to result in a saturated internal kink in the limit of a cylindrical tokamak. It is found from 3D equilibrium calculations that, for A 30 circular plasmas and A=3 elliptical shapes, this coupling of the boundary perturbation to the internal kink is strong; the amplitude of the m/n=1/1 structure at q=1 is large compared to the amplitude applied at the plasma boundary. It is proposed that this excitation, which could readily be applied with error field correction coils, be explored as a mechanism for controlling sawtooth amplitudes in high performance tokamak discharges. This saturated internal kink, resulting from small field errors in proposed as an explanation for the TEXTOR measurements of q0 and the distinction between sawtooth effects on the q-profile observed in TEXTOR and DIII-D.

Lazarus, Edward Alan [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals are discussed: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multico...

Scafetta, Nicola

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

THE APPLICATION OF FIXED AND RANDOM ERROR TO SHIPPER/RECEIVER DIFFERENCES  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine if a statistically significant difference exists between shipper and receiver measurements, a statistical combination of the shipper's and receiver's limit-of-error (LOE) is calculated to determine the shipper/receiver limit-of-error, LOES/R. The shipper's and receiver's LOE may possess random and systematic components. Depending on the interpretation of the systematic and random components, the determination of the LOES/R can be performed by several different calculational methods. These calculational methods and their associated underlying assumptions are reviewed in the context of the LANL shipper receiver program. This paper, by presenting the assumptions that form the basis of a site-specific shipper/receiver difference calculation, can assist those individuals responsible for calculating LOES/R.

B. G. SCOTT

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Variational Assimilation for Xenon Dynamical Forecasts in Neutronic using Advanced Background Error Covariance Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data assimilation method consists in combining all available pieces of information about a system to obtain optimal estimates of initial states. The different sources of information are weighted according to their accuracy by the means of error covariance matrices. Our purpose here is to evaluate the efficiency of variational data assimilation for the xenon induced oscillations forecasts in nuclear cores. In this paper we focus on the comparison between 3DVAR schemes with optimised background error covariance matrix B and a 4DVAR scheme. Tests were made in twin experiments using a simulation code which implements a mono-dimensional coupled model of xenon dynamics, thermal, and thermal-hydraulic processes. We enlighten the very good efficiency of the 4DVAR scheme as well as good results with the 3DVAR one using a careful multivariate modelling of B.

Ponçot, Angélique; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Gratton, Serge; Thual, Olivier

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Variational assimilation for xenon dynamical forecasts in neutronic using advanced background error covariance matrix modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Data assimilation method consists in combining all available pieces of information about a system to obtain optimal estimates of initial states. The different sources of information are weighted according to their accuracy by the means of error covariance matrices. Our purpose here is to evaluate the efficiency of variational data assimilation for the xenon induced oscillations forecasts in nuclear cores. In this paper we focus on the comparison between 3DVAR schemes with optimised background error covariance matrix B and a 4DVAR scheme. Tests were made in twin experiments using a simulation code which implements a mono-dimensional coupled model of xenon dynamics, thermal, and thermal–hydraulic processes. We enlighten the very good efficiency of the 4DVAR scheme as well as good results with the 3DVAR one using a careful multivariate modelling of B.

Angélique Ponçot; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Bertrand Bouriquet; Patrick Erhard; Serge Gratton; Olivier Thual

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Superconducting switch concept applied to superconducting undulator phase-error correction  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting undulator (SCU) technology has the potential to significantly enhance the performance of synchrotron radiation sources for storage ring and FEL applications. Since 2002, our team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been performing R and D on superconducting undulators, including the fabrication of three Nb{sub 3}Sn prototypes. We have demonstrated experimentally the possibility to provide the prototype with trim coils that could be used for phase error correction. The research effort that we report here demonstrates the possibility to add degrees of freedom to the field correction provided by these coils in a cryogenic environment. By means of bridge of superconducting switches, we can modify the current direction through a trim coil. Here we describe the design of the experimental bridge we fabricated, the results we obtained and finally the generalized concept one could plan to apply to correct the phase errors with trim coils connected to a network of superconducting bridges.

Madur, A.; Trillaud, F.; Dietderich, D.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R. [LBNL, 1 Cyclotron Road, BERKELEY, CA, 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Calculation of the Johann error for spherically bent x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

New x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers, currently operating on Alcator C-Mod, NSTX, EAST, and KSTAR, record spectral lines of highly charged ions, such as Ar{sup 16+}, from multiple sightlines to obtain profiles of ion temperature and of toroidal plasma rotation velocity from Doppler measurements. In the present work, we describe a new data analysis routine, which accounts for the specific geometry of the sightlines of a curved-crystal spectrometer and includes corrections for the Johann error to facilitate the tomographic inversion. Such corrections are important to distinguish velocity induced Doppler shifts from instrumental line shifts caused by the Johann error. The importance of this correction is demonstrated using data from Alcator C-Mod.

Wang, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Podpaly, Y. [Plasma Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Mesurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Measurements Z. Li, M. C. Cribb, and F.-L. Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko and Y. Luo Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Radiation measurements have been widely employed for evaluating cloud parameterization schemes and model simulation results. As the most comprehensive program aiming to improve cloud parameteri- zation schemes, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has an essential goal to make observations on the scale of a general circulation model gridbox, so as to define the physics underlying some of the important parameterizations in the general circulation models used in climate change

480

Tradeoff between energy and error in the discrimination of quantum-optical devices  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of energy-error tradeoff in the discrimination between two linear passive quantum optical devices with a single use. We provide an analytical derivation of the optimal strategy for beamsplitters and an iterative algorithm converging to the optimum in the general case. We then compare the optimal strategy with a simpler strategy using coherent input states and homodyne detection. It turns out that the former requires much less energy in order to achieve the same performances.

Bisio, Alessandro; Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro [Quit group, Dipartimento di Fisica ''A. Volta'', via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo IV, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiochemical relative error" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

while ll 6= ERROR do tcl tuple of ctcl corresponding to ll.tid cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding to cdb.tid cr lca #12;rst tuple t of li cl such that t.class >= ca.name caf while lca 6= ERROR and lca.class = ca.name do lia tuple of logical images corresponding to lca.tid cr lcb #12;rst tuple next tuple of li cl in alphabetic order can lca next tuple of li cl in alphabetic order can Plan P4P

Samet, Hanan

482

Tradeoff between energy and error in the discrimination of quantum-optical devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the problem of energy-error tradeoff in the discrimination between two linear passive quantum optical devices with a single use. We provide an analytical derivation of the optimal strategy for beamsplitters and an iterative algorithm converging to the optimum in the general case. We then compare the optimal strategy with a simpler strategy using coherent input states and homodyne detection. It turns out that the former requires much less energy in order to achieve the same performances.

Alessandro Bisio; Michele Dall'Arno; Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

483

Analytic Study of Performance of Error Estimators for Linear Discriminant Analysis with Applications in Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Aniruddha Datta Guy L. Curry Head of Department, Costas N. Georghiades December 2010 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Analytic Study of Performance of Error Estimators for Linear Discriminant Analysis with Applications in Genomics... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 133 x LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Minimum sample size, n, (n0 = n1 = n) for desired (n;0:5) in univariate case. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 67 II Genes selected using the validity-goodness model selection...

Zollanvari, Amin

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

484

Investigating the Correlation Between Wind and Solar Power Forecast Errors in the Western Interconnection: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Wind and solar power generations differ from conventional energy generation because of the variable and uncertain nature of their power output. This variability and uncertainty can have significant impacts on grid operations. Thus, short-term forecasting of wind and solar generation is uniquely helpful for power system operations to balance supply and demand in an electricity system. This paper investigates the correlation between wind and solar power forecasting errors.

Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

An Optimized Autoregressive Forecast Error Generator for Wind and Load Uncertainty Study  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a first-order autoregressive algorithm to generate real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast errors. The methodology aims at producing random wind and load forecast time series reflecting the autocorrelation and cross-correlation of historical forecast data sets. Five statistical characteristics are considered: the means, standard deviations, autocorrelations, and cross-correlations. A stochastic optimization routine is developed to minimize the differences between the statistical characteristics of the generated time series and the targeted ones. An optimal set of parameters are obtained and used to produce the RT, HA, and DA forecasts in due order of succession. This method, although implemented as the first-order regressive random forecast error generator, can be extended to higher-order. Results show that the methodology produces random series with desired statistics derived from real data sets provided by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The wind and load forecast error generator is currently used in wind integration studies to generate wind and load inputs for stochastic planning processes. Our future studies will focus on reflecting the diurnal and seasonal differences of the wind and load statistics and implementing them in the random forecast generator.

De Mello, Phillip; Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

486

Error distribution and correction of the predicted wave characteristics over the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind-waves are the most important environmental parameter for the design of coastal and offshore structures, sediment transport, coastal erosion etc. Therefore, an accurate evaluation of the wave climate is of great importance. Due to the lack of long term measurements, nowadays numerically modeled wave data are widely used for determining the wave climate. The numerically simulated wave data are continuous in time and space, but generally inaccurate in enclosed and semi-enclosed basins mainly due to the inaccurate wind input data. The main goal of this study is to develop a new and efficient approach to improve the hindcasted wave parameters in the Persian Gulf. Hence, the third generation SWAN model was employed for the wave modeling forced by the 6-hourly ECMWF wind data with a resolution of 0.5°. A new methodology was introduced for the distribution of wave prediction errors from discrete observation points to the other points of interest. It was found that the proposed method which considers the wave generation physics, leads to a significant improvement in the predicted wave parameters. In addition, it was revealed that the improvements in prediction of waves with higher wave heights and longer periods are more than those of others. This was shown to be due to the higher correlation between high values of output parameters which contain larger errors. The influence radius in the error distribution procedure was found to be near 2° (~200 km).

Mohammad Hadi Moeini; Amir Etemad-Shahidi; Vahid Chegini; Iraj Rahmani; Mona Moghaddam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ~0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the ± 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA. Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The r

Maxwell, S.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Rapid Radiochemical Analyses in Support of Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 13196  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples [1, 2]. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90}Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation [3, 4]. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ?0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the ± 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA [5, 6, 7] Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples [8]. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. [9, 10] Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid te

Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and Precipitation Collected October Conjunction With the First Production Test, Project Rulison-9, HGSlO DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image...

490

A radiochemical study of the mechanism of polishing glass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In an effort to determine whether glass flows when polished uranium glasses were fused to non uranium glasses and polishings carried out in a direction… (more)

Smith, John Graham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

de Sitter special relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special relativity based on the de Sitter group is introduced, which is the theory that might hold up in the presence of a non-vanishing cosmological constant. Like ordinary special relativity, it retains the quotient character of spacetime, and a notion of homogeneity. As a consequence, the underlying spacetime will be a de Sitter spacetime, whose associated kinematics will differ from that of ordinary special relativity. The corresponding modified notions of energy and momentum are obtained, and the exact relationship between them, which is invariant under a re-scaling of the involved quantities, explicitly exhibited. Since the de Sitter group can be considered a particular deformation of the Poincar\\'e group, this theory turns out to be a specific kind of deformed (or doubly) special relativity. Some experimental consequences, as well as the causal structure of spacetime--modified by the presence of the de Sitter horizon--are briefly discussed.

R. Aldrovandi; J. P. Beltran Almeida; J. G. Pereira

2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

492

General relativity and experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

T. Damour

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

493

Recursive relational urban design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes a methodology for the act of urban design that is recursive and centered around explicit relational operations, enabled by taking advantage of computation and parametric techniques. It contains iterative ...

Hillman, Dessen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Testing the Accuracy and Stability of Spectral Methods in Numerical Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accuracy and stability of the Caltech-Cornell pseudospectral code is evaluated using the KST representation of the Einstein evolution equations. The basic "Mexico City Tests" widely adopted by the numerical relativity community are adapted here for codes based on spectral methods. Exponential convergence of the spectral code is established, apparently limited only by numerical roundoff error. A general expression for the growth of errors due to finite machine precision is derived, and it is shown that this limit is achieved here for the linear plane-wave test. All of these tests are found to be stable, except for simulations of high amplitude gauge waves with nontrivial shift.

Michael Boyle; Lee Lindblom; Harald Pfeiffer; Mark Scheel; Lawrence E. Kidder

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

495

Breast Patient Setup Error Assessment: Comparison of Electronic Portal Image Devices and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Matching Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging fractions, EPID images of the treatment beams were recorded. Registrations of the bony anatomy for CBCT to planning CT and EPID to digitally reconstructed-radiographs (DRRs) were compared. In addition, similar measurements of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were acquired. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were performed for clinical and phantom registrations. Systematic and random setup errors were quantified for CBCT and EPID-driven correction protocols in the EPID coordinate system (U, V), with V parallel to the cranial-caudal axis and U perpendicular to V and the central beam axis. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of clinical EPID and CBCT registrations yielded 4 to 6-mm limits of agreement, indicating that both methods were not compatible. The EPID-based setup errors were smaller than the CBCT-based setup errors. Phantom measurements showed that CBCT accurately measures setup error whereas EPID underestimates setup errors in the cranial-caudal direction. In the clinical measurements, the residual bony anatomy setup errors after offline CBCT-based corrections were {Sigma}{sub U} = 1.4 mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 1.7 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.6 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 3.1 mm. Residual setup errors of EPID driven corrections corrected for underestimation were estimated at {Sigma}{sub U} = 2.2mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 3.3 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.9 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 2.9 mm. Conclusion: EPID registration underestimated the actual bony anatomy setup error in breast cancer patients by 20% to 50%. Using CBCT decreased setup uncertainties significantly.

Topolnjak, Rajko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

496

occur at relatively lower temperatures. Di-and triiodides vaporize at around 1273 K during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Actinides: Chemistry, vol. 18 of Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, K. A. Gschneidner Jr. et al. Radiochem. 20, 1 (1977). 8. G. Meyer, Chem. Rev. 88, 93 (1988). 9. G. Czack et al., Gmelin Handbook. Matsumoto, Mater. Sci. Forum 315­ 317, 268 (1999). 19. H. Bergmann, Ed., Gmelin Handbook of Inorganic

Segall, Paul

497

Looking beyond special relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity was proposed a little over a hundred years back. It remained a bedrock of twentieth century physics right up to Quantum Field Theory. However, the failure over several decades to provide a unified description of Electromagnetism and Gravitation or alternatively, Quantum Theory and General Relativity has finally lead researchers to abandon the differentiable spacetime manifold on which all of the above was based. In the most recent approaches we consider a spacetime that is discretized or is noncommutative. This immediately leads to corrections to the Special Theory of Relativity, more specifically to Lorentz Symmetry. It is quite significant that there are observational indicators, particularly in ultra high energy cosmic rays which suggest that such corrections are indeed there. We examine the whole issue in this paper.

B. G. Sidharth

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

498

Error tolerance of two-basis quantum-key-distribution protocols using qudits and two-way classical communication  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the error tolerance of quantum cryptographic protocols using d-level systems. In particular, we focus on prepare-and-measure schemes that use two mutually unbiased bases and a key-distillation procedure with two-way classical communication. For arbitrary quantum channels, we obtain a sufficient condition for secret-key distillation which, in the case of isotropic quantum channels, yields an analytic expression for the maximally tolerable error rate of the cryptographic protocols under consideration. The difference between the tolerable error rate and its theoretical upper bound tends slowly to zero for sufficiently large dimensions of the information carriers.

Nikolopoulos, Georgios M.; Ranade, Kedar S.; Alber, Gernot [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Derivation and generalization of the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities  

SciTech Connect

Field analysis method is used to derive the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities. This dispersion relation is then extended to the general case in which the rising-sun magnetron can be with multi-group cavities of different shapes and sizes, and from which the dispersion relations of conventional magnetron, rising-sun magnetron, and magnetron-like device can be obtained directly. The results show that the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the dispersion relation are less than 3%, the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the cutoff frequencies of ? mode are less than 2%. In addition, the influences of each structure parameter of the magnetron on the cutoff frequency of ? mode and on the mode separation are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively, which may be of great interest to designing a frequency tuning magnetron.

Shi, Di-Fu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Wang, Hong-Gang; Li, Wei [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Improving nuclear mass predictions through the Garvey-Kelson relations  

SciTech Connect

We describe a procedure to improve the nuclear mass predictions obtained by means of the Garvey-Kelson iterative process. This is achieved by reducing the degrees of freedom involved in the process, expressing the Garvey-Kelson relations in terms of one-neutron and one-proton separation energies, and using a theoretical estimation for them. This approach has the effect that the intrinsic error associated with the iterative process grows significantly more slowly. This leads to a better quality of nuclear mass predictions and therefore extends the range for which the predictions are accurate. We test these ideas using different mass models.

Morales, Irving O. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, F-14076 Caen (France); Frank, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z