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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

6

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document This document specifies the top-level...

8

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review The main goal of this complex-wide review was to obtain feedback from DOE sites...

9

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management February 2006 Evaluation of technical impact on the Yucca Mountain Project technical basis resulting from issues raised by emails of former...

11

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of...

12

Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial...

13

CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-33, Rev. 0) The following provides an overview of the typical activities that will be performed to collect information to evaluate the management of radioactive wastes and implementation of integrated safety management. The following Inspection Activities apply to all Inspection Criteria listed below: Review radioactive waste management and control processes and implementing procedures. Interview personnel including waste management supervision, staff, and subject matter experts. Review project policies, procedures, and corresponding documentation related to ISM core function

14

Radioactive waste management in the former USSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste materials--and the methods being used to treat, process, store, transport, and dispose of them--have come under increased scrutiny over last decade, both nationally and internationally. Nuclear waste practices in the former Soviet Union, arguably the world's largest nuclear waste management system, are of obvious interest and may affect practices in other countries. In addition, poor waste management practices are causing increasing technical, political, and economic problems for the Soviet Union, and this will undoubtedly influence future strategies. this report was prepared as part of a continuing effort to gain a better understanding of the radioactive waste management program in the former Soviet Union. the scope of this study covers all publicly known radioactive waste management activities in the former Soviet Union as of April 1992, and is based on a review of a wide variety of literature sources, including documents, meeting presentations, and data base searches of worldwide press releases. The study focuses primarily on nuclear waste management activities in the former Soviet Union, but relevant background information on nuclear reactors is also provided in appendixes.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

17

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RW-0583 RW-0583 QA:N/A Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management EVALUATION OF TECHNICAL IMPACT ON THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT TECHNICAL BASIS RESULTING FROM ISSUES RAISED BY EMAILS OF FORMER PROJECT PARTICIPANTS February 2006 This page intentionally left blank. Table of Contents Executive Summary .............................................................................................................v 1. Introduction..............................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................1 1.2 Role of the USGS in Yucca Mountain Work.................................................2

18

CHAPTER 5-RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ore pitchblende was discovered in the 1750's near Joachimstal in what is now the Czech Republic. Used as a colorant in glazes, uranium was identified in 1789 as the active ingredient by chemist Martin Klaproth. In 1896, French physicist Henri Becquerel studied uranium minerals as part of his investigations into the phenomenon of fluorescence. He discovered a strange energy emanating from the material which he dubbed 'rayons uranique.' Unable to explain the origins of this energy, he set the problem aside. About two years later, a young Polish graduate student was looking for a project for her dissertation. Marie Sklodowska Curie, working with her husband Pierre, picked up on Becquerel's work and, in the course of seeking out more information on uranium, discovered two new elements (polonium and radium) which exhibited the same phenomenon, but were even more powerful. The Curies recognized the energy, which they now called 'radioactivity,' as something very new, requiring a new interpretation, new science. This discovery led to what some view as the 'golden age of nuclear science' (1895-1945) when countries throughout Europe devoted large resources to understand the properties and potential of this material. By World War II, the potential to harness this energy for a destructive device had been recognized and by 1939, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman showed that fission not only released a lot of energy but that it also released additional neutrons which could cause fission in other uranium nuclei leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction and an enormous release of energy. This suggestion was soon confirmed experimentally by other scientists and the race to develop an atomic bomb was on. The rest of the development history which lead to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is well chronicled. After World War II, development of more powerful weapons systems by the United States and the Soviet Union continued to advance nuclear science. It was this defense application that formed the basis for the commercial nuclear power industry.

Marra, J.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT This Fiscal Year 2008 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Letter Report presents an evaluation of the adequacy of the one mill per kilowatt-hour fee paid by commercial nuclear power generators for the permanent disposal of their spent nuclear fuel by the Government. This evaluation recommends no fee change. CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT More Documents & Publications FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear

20

Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Summary In response to the the requirement of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in the Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Mission Plan is divided into two parts. Part I describes the overall goals, objectives, and strategy for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It explains that, to meet the directives of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the DOE intends to site, design, construct., and start operating a mined geologic repository by January 31, 1998. The Act specifies that the costs of these

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Radioactive waste management and decommissioning of accelerator facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Austria). EPAC. 2 International Atomic Energy Agency. Management of radioactive waste...Association, October 2008: Buenos Aires, Argentina. Argentina: SAR editor. 5 International Atomic Energy Agency. Classification of radioactive......

Luisa Ulrici; Matteo Magistris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info Start Date 1986 State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Atlantic Compact Commission The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the region. The states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and South Carolina are party to this compact

25

Radioactive Waste Management in Non-Nuclear Countries - 13070  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper challenges internationally accepted concepts of dissemination of responsibilities between all stakeholders involved in national radioactive waste management infrastructure in the countries without nuclear power program. Mainly it concerns countries classified as class A and potentially B countries according to International Atomic Energy Agency. It will be shown that in such countries long term sustainability of national radioactive waste management infrastructure is very sensitive issue that can be addressed by involving regulatory body in more active way in the infrastructure. In that way countries can mitigate possible consequences on the very sensitive open market of radioactive waste management services, comprised mainly of radioactive waste generators, operators of end-life management facilities and regulatory body. (authors)

Kubelka, Dragan; Trifunovic, Dejan [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)] [SORNS, Frankopanska 11, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22, 2009 June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-33, Rev. 0) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS...

27

Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex begins with a global to regional perspective regarding the location of low-level and mixed low-level waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site. For decades, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has served as a vital disposal resource in the nation-wide cleanup of former nuclear research and testing facilities. State-of-the-art waste management sites at the NNSS offer a safe, permanent disposal option for U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Department of Defense facilities generating cleanup-related radioactive waste.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit Program Info Start Date 1981 State Alaska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Northwest Interstate Compact The Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management, enacted in 1981, was ratified by Congress in 1985. The Compact is a cooperative effort of the party states to protect their citizens, and maintain and enhance economic viability, while sharing the responsibilities

29

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CRD addresses the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3-Change 1, ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets'', by providing the Secretarial Acquisition Executive (Level 0) scope baseline and the Program-level (Level 1) technical baseline. The Secretarial Acquisition Executive approves the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) critical decisions and changes against the Level 0 baseline; and in turn, the OCRWM Director approves all changes against the Level 1 baseline. This baseline establishes the top-level technical scope of the CRMWS and its three system elements, as described in section 1.3.2. The organizations responsible for design, development, and operation of system elements described in this document must therefore prepare subordinate project-level documents that are consistent with the CRD. Changes to requirements will be managed in accordance with established change and configuration control procedures. The CRD establishes requirements for the design, development, and operation of the CRWMS. It specifically addresses the top-level governing laws and regulations (e.g., ''Nuclear Waste Policy Act'' (NWPA), 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 63, 10 CFR Part 71, etc.) along with specific policy, performance requirements, interface requirements, and system architecture. The CRD shall be used as a vehicle to incorporate specific changes in technical scope or performance requirements that may have significant program implications. Such may include changes to the program mission, changes to operational capability, and high visibility stakeholder issues. The CRD uses a systems approach to: (1) identify key functions that the CRWMS must perform, (2) allocate top-level requirements derived from statutory, regulatory, and programmatic sources, and (3) define the basic elements of the system architecture and operational concept. Project-level documents address CRD requirements by further defining system element functions, decomposing requirements into significantly greater detail, and developing designs of system components, facilities, and equipment. The CRD addresses the identification and control of functional, physical, and operational boundaries between and within CRWMS elements. The CRD establishes requirements regarding key interfaces between the CRWMS and elements external to the CRWMS. Project elements define interfaces between CRWMS program elements. The Program has developed a change management process consistent with DOE Order 413.3-Change 1. Changes to the Secretarial Acquisition Executive and Program-level baselines must be approved by a Program Baseline Change Control Board. Specific thresholds have been established for identifying technical, cost, and schedule changes that require approval. The CRWMS continually evaluates system design and operational concepts to optimize performance and/or cost. The Program has developed systems analysis tools to assess potential enhancements to the physical system and to determine the impacts from cost saving initiatives, scientific and technological improvements, and engineering developments. The results of systems analyses, if appropriate, are factored into revisions to the CRD as revised Programmatic Requirements.

C.A. Kouts

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Radioactive waste management in the former USSR. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste materials--and the methods being used to treat, process, store, transport, and dispose of them--have come under increased scrutiny over last decade, both nationally and internationally. Nuclear waste practices in the former Soviet Union, arguably the world`s largest nuclear waste management system, are of obvious interest and may affect practices in other countries. In addition, poor waste management practices are causing increasing technical, political, and economic problems for the Soviet Union, and this will undoubtedly influence future strategies. this report was prepared as part of a continuing effort to gain a better understanding of the radioactive waste management program in the former Soviet Union. the scope of this study covers all publicly known radioactive waste management activities in the former Soviet Union as of April 1992, and is based on a review of a wide variety of literature sources, including documents, meeting presentations, and data base searches of worldwide press releases. The study focuses primarily on nuclear waste management activities in the former Soviet Union, but relevant background information on nuclear reactors is also provided in appendixes.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)...

32

Memorandum of Understanding between the US Department of Energy and the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency of France  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memorandum of Understanding between the US Department of Energy and the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency of France concerning cooperation in the field of radioactive waste management.

33

Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Not Listed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

CONCEPTUAL DATA MODELING OF THE INTEGRATED DATABASE FOR THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of a database system that can manage radioactive waste collectively on a network has been carried out. A conceptual data modeling that is based on the theory of information engineering (IE), which is the first step of the whole database development, has been studied to manage effectively information and data related to radioactive waste. In order to establish the scope of the database, user requirements and system configuration for radioactive waste management were analyzed. The major information extracted from user requirements are solid waste, liquid waste, gaseous waste, and waste related to spent fuel. The radioactive waste management system is planning to share information with associated companies.

Park, H.S; Shon, J.S; Kim, K.J; Park, J.H; Hong, K.P; Park, S.H

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

explain Generation-04.02 Volume, including the waste and any stabilization or absorbent media; No, Yes Generation-04.02.01 If No, please explain Generation-04.03 Weight of the...

38

Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Radioactive Waste Management Activities - 13005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of these criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration. (authors)

McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008 MS-6322, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008 MS-6322, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Saunders, Mark [Fairfield Services Group, PO Box 31468, KNOxville, TN 37930 (United States)] [Fairfield Services Group, PO Box 31468, KNOxville, TN 37930 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......people living in long-term-contaminated...Radioactive waste management in...longer-term storage and appropriate...appropriate for the long-term assessment...long-lived radioactive wastes in planned exposure...People Living in Long-term Contaminated...from Radioactive Waste Management in......

Daisuke Sugiyama; Takatoshi Hattori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria; Approach,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the guiding principles and core functions of integrated safety management (ISM), conduct of operations, maintenance, engineering, materials handling, occupational safety,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Order Module--DOE O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

35.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 35.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Order Module--DOE O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, was issued by DOE in September 1988. As early as 1990, DOE began analyzing, assessing, and reviewing the process of implementing the Order. DOE revised the Order on radioactive waste management for several reasons: - After thorough technical reviews and analyses, DOE and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board concluded that DOE Order 5820.2A did not adequately address the Department's radioactive waste management and disposal practices. -There had been significant advances in radioactive waste management practices and changes in DOE since the Order was issued in 1988. - Risk-based and performance-based requirements were determined to be

42

Order Module--DOE O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Order Module--DOE O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, was issued by DOE in September 1988. As early as 1990, DOE began analyzing, assessing, and reviewing the process of implementing the Order. DOE revised the Order on radioactive waste management for several reasons: - After thorough technical reviews and analyses, DOE and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board concluded that DOE Order 5820.2A did not adequately address the Department's radioactive waste management and disposal practices. -There had been significant advances in radioactive waste management practices and changes in DOE since the Order was issued in 1988. - Risk-based and performance-based requirements were determined to be

43

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal year 1988. An epilogue chapter reports significant events from the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 1988 through March 1989. The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPA) of 1987 made significant changes to the NWPA relating to repository siting and monitored retrievable storage and added new provisions for the establishment of several institutional entities with which OCRWM will interact. Therefore, a dominant theme throughout this report is the implementation of the policy focus and specific provisions of the Amendments Act. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

NONE

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Teaching Radioactive Waste Management in an Undergraduate Engineering Program - 13269  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Ontario Institute of Technology is Ontario's newest university and the only one in Canada that offers an accredited Bachelor of Nuclear Engineering (Honours) degree. The nuclear engineering program consists of 48 full-semester courses, including one on radioactive waste management. This is a design course that challenges young engineers to develop a fundamental understanding of how to manage the storage and disposal of various types and forms of radioactive waste, and to recognize the social consequences of their practices and decisions. Students are tasked with developing a major project based on an environmental assessment of a simple conceptual design for a waste disposal facility. They use collaborative learning and self-directed exploration to gain the requisite knowledge of the waste management system. The project constitutes 70% of their mark, but is broken down into several small components that include, an environmental assessment comprehensive study report, a technical review, a facility design, and a public defense of their proposal. Many aspects of the project mirror industry team project situations, including the various levels of participation. The success of the students is correlated with their engagement in the project, the highest final examination scores achieved by students with the strongest effort in the project. (authors)

Ikeda, Brian M. [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)] [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Research trends in radioactive waste management: a global perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study is aimed at analysing the growth of literature on radioactive waste management. International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database is used as a data source to analyse the focused areas of this field for the period 1970-2011. Journal Citation Report-2010 is used for eliciting information related to journal impact factors. The database contained a total of 101,419 publications covered by all the channels of communication during the period. The study analyses the broad features focusing on its publication growth characteristics, country-wise distribution of publications, domain-wise publications and activity index, various methods of radioactive waste disposal, institutions active in the field, communication channels, and journals preferred for publication by the scientists and the highly cited publications.

B.S. Kademani; Ganesh Surwase; Anil Sagar; Lalit Mohan; K. Bhanumurthy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Management of low-level radioactive wastes around the world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the status of various practices used throughout the world for managing low-level radioactive wastes. Most of the information in this review was obtained through the DOE-sponsored International Program Support Office (IPSO) activities at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at Richland, Washington. The objective of IPSO is to collect, evaluate, and disseminate information on international waste management and nuclear fuel cycle activities. The center's sources of information vary widely and include the proceedings of international symposia, papers presented at technical society meetings, published topical reports, foreign trip reports, and the news media. Periodically, the information is published in topical reports. Much of the information contained in this report was presented at the Fifth Annual Participants' Information Meeting sponsored by DOE's Low-Level Waste Management Program Office at Denver, Colorado, in September of 1983. Subsequent to that presentation, the information has been updated, particularly with information provided by Dr. P. Colombo of Brookhaven National Laboratory who corresponded with low-level waste management specialists in many countries. The practices reviewed in this paper generally represent actual operations. However, major R and D activities, along with future plans, are also discussed. 98 refs., 6 tabls.

Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.; Colombo, P.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Radioactive waste management and decommissioning of accelerator facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the removed radioactive waste shall be treated and processed for either long-term storage or disposal. delayed...facility itself becomes a long-term storage that shall be...dismantling resources, waste storage space or development......

Luisa Ulrici; Matteo Magistris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Transportation Program: Tribal Initiatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNICATIONS BREAKOUT COMMUNICATIONS BREAKOUT SESSION Jay Jones Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management April 22, 2004 Albuquerque, New Mexico 2 Session Overview * Meeting objectives and expectations * Topic Group Background and History * Transportation information products - Information Product Survey results - Alliance for Transportation Research Institute Assessments * Discussion on future DOE communications * Information Display 3 Objectives and Expectations * OCRWM communications approach - Transportation Strategic Plan Collaborative effort with stakeholders Two-way interactions with program participants and public - provide information and receive feedback * Implement communications strategy - Identify stakeholders and issues - Engage nationally, regionally and with States - Participate through discussion and issue resolution

49

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is administered by the Compact Commission. The Compact provides for rotating responsibility for the region's low-level...

50

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report covers the activities and expenditures of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987, which ended on September 30, 1987. The activities and accomplishments of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987 are discussed in chapters 1 through 9 of this report. The audited financial statements of the Nuclear Waste Fund are provided in chapter 10. Since the close of the fiscal year, a number of significant events have occurred. Foremost among them was the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (Amendments Act) on December 21, 1987, nearly 3 months after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report. As a result, some of the plans and activities discussed in chapters 1 through 9 are currently undergoing significant change or are being discontinued. Most prominent among the provisions of the Amendments Act is the designation of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the only candidate first repository site to be characterized. Therefore, the site characterization plans for Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington, discussed in chapter 3, will not be issued. The refocusing of the waste management program under the Amendments Act is highlighted in the epilogue, chapter 11. 68 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

No Time Wasted. 25 years COVRA: Radioactive Waste Management in the Netherlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time will render radioactive waste harmless. How can we manage the time radioactive substances remain harmful? Just 'wait and see' or 'marking time' is not an option. We need to isolate the waste from our living environment and control it as long as necessary. December 2007 was a time to commemorate, as the national waste management organisation of the Netherlands, COVRA, celebrated its 12. anniversary. During this period of 25 years a stable policy has been formulated and implemented. For the situation in the Netherlands, it was obvious that a period of long term storage was needed. Both the small volume of waste and the limited financial possibilities are determining factors. Time is needed to let the volume of waste grow and to let the money, needed for disposal, grow in a capital growth fund. A historical overview of the activities of COVRA is presented and lessons learned over a period of 25 years are given. (authors)

Codee, H.D.K.; Verhoef, E.V. [COVRA N.V., Vlissingen (Netherlands)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Program integration on the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent development and implementation of a revised Program Approach for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) was accomplished in response to significant changes in the environment in which the program was being executed. The lack of an interim storage site, growing costs and schedule delays to accomplish the full Yucca Mountain site characterization plan, and the development and incorporation of a multi-purpose (storage, transport, and disposal) canister (MPC) into the CRWMS required a reexamination of Program plans and priorities. Dr. Daniel A. Dreyfus, the Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), established top-level schedule, targets and cost goals and commissioned a Program-wide task force of DOE and contractor personnel to identify and evaluate alternatives to meet them. The evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain site by 1998 and the repository license application data of 2001 were maintained and a target date of January 1998 for MPC availability was established. An increased multi-year funding profile was baselined and agreed to by Congress. A $1.3 billion reduction in Yucca Mountain site characterization costs was mandated to hold the cost to $5 billion. The replanning process superseded all previous budget allocations and focused on program requirements and their relative priorities within the cost profiles. This paper discusses the process for defining alternative scenarios to achieve the top-level program goals in an integrated fashion.

Trebules, V.B. [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States). Program Management Div.; King, M.H. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems Inc., Vienna, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Waste Disposal Site and Radioactive Waste Management (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes the considerations of the Commission in determining whether to approve the establishment and operation of a disposal site for nuclear waste. If a permit is issued, the...

54

2005 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2005 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. In additon to providing groundwater monitoring results, this report also includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Ny County, Nevada.

Bechtel Nevada

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

New Extraction Technologies for Management of Radioactive Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different variants reprocessing of high-level radioactive wastes are considered. The extraction of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements and actinides by various extractants is analyzed. Advantages and disadv...

V. V. Babain; A. Yu. Shadrin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

EM Prepares Report for Convention on Safety of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. EM supported DOE in its role as the lead technical agency to produce a report recently for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management.

58

Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

18th U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference. Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference explored the latest developments in low-level radioactive waste management through presentations from professionals in both the public and the private sectors and special guests. The conference included two continuing education seminars, a workshop, exhibits, and a tour of Envirocare of Utah, Inc., one of America's three commercial low-level radioactive waste depositories.

None

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Maine State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maine State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Maine. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Maine. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested partices including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant goverment agencies and activities, all of which may impact management practices in Maine.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the last decade to ensure the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of comprehensive State and Federal regulations governing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, and the enactment of Federal laws making States responsible for the disposal of such waste generated within their borders.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Management of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry, which accounts for about 20% of the total electricity supply, is a vital part of the nation`s energy resource. While it generates approximately one-third of the commercial low-level radioactive waste produced in the country, it has achieved one of the most successful examples in waste minimization. On the other hand, progress on development of new disposal facilities by the state compacts is currently stalled. The milestones have been repeatedly postponed, and the various Acts passed by Congress on nuclear waste disposal have not accomplished what they were intended to do. With dwindling access to waste disposal sites and with escalating disposal costs, the power plant utilities are forced to store wastes onsite as an interim measure. However, such temporary measures are not a permanent solution. A national will is sorely needed to break out of the current impasse.

Devgun, J.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Florida State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Florida. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Florida. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Florida.

none,

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Vermont State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vermont State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Vermont. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Vermont. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Vermont.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Washington State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Washington. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Washington. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Washington.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Mississippi State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippi State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state an federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Mississippi. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Mississippi. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Mississippi.

none,

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

North Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in North Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in North Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in North Carolina.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Kentucky State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kentucky State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Kentucky. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Kentucky. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Kentucky.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

New Jersey State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Jersey state Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in New Jersey. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in New Jersey. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in New Jersey.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Massachusetts State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Massachusetts State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Massachusetts. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Massachusetts. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Massachusetts.

Not Available

1981-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Utah State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Utah State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Utah. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Utah. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Utah.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

74

Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following document is a letter from the Secretary of Energy to the Honorable Joseph R. Biden regardingthe U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual...

75

Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report is to present an analysis of the adequacy of the fee being paid by nuclear power utilities...

76

1989 OCRWM [Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management] Bulletin compilation and index  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The OCRWM Bulletin is published by the Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This document is a compilation of issues from the 1989 calendar year. A table of contents and one index have been provided to assist in finding information contained in this year`s Bulletins. The pages have been numbered consecutively at the bottom for easy reference. 7 figs.

NONE

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management. Low-level radioactive waste disposal: commercial facilities no longer operating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication discusses three commercial facilities-no longer operating-that have received and now contain low-level radioactive waste. The facilities are located at West Valley, New York; Maxey Flats, Kentucky; and Sheffield, Illinois. All three of the facilities were selected and developed in the 1960s. The onset of water management problems caused the closure of the sites at West Valley and Maxey Flats in 1975 and 1977, respectively. Closure of the Sheffield site occurred in 1978, after the operator experienced site problems and consequent lengthy delays in its license renewal procedures. The document provides detailed explanation of the history, basis for closure, and current status of each facility. This information is intended, primarily, to assist state officials-executive, legislative, and agency-in planning for, establishing, and managing low-level waste disposal facilities.

Berlin, R.E.; Tuite, P.T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

RADIATION PROTECTION, RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT AND SITE MONITORING AT THE NUCLEAR SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL AND EDUCATIONAL CENTRE IRT-SOFIA AT INRNE-BAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......related to radioactive waste treatments and interim...site to the temporary storage of radioactive waste operated by SE . Removal...The comprehensive long-term monitoring of the IRT...protection and radioactive waste management in the design......

Al. Mladenov; D. Stankov; Tz. Nonova; K. Krezhov

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Management of the Radioactive Waste Generated by Cernavoda NPP, Romania, an Example of International Cooperation - 13449  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design criteria and constraints for the development of the management strategy for radioactive waste generated from operating and decommissioning of CANDU Nuclear Units from Cernavoda NPP in Romania, present many specific aspects. The main characteristics of CANDU type waste are its high concentrations of tritium and radiocarbon. Also, the existing management strategy for radioactive waste at Cernavoda NPP provides no treatment or conditioning for radioactive waste disposal. These characteristics embodied a challenging effort, in order to select a proper strategy for radioactive waste management at present, when Romania is an EU member and a signatory country of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The helping of advanced countries in radioactive waste management, directly or into the frame of the international organizations, like IAEA, become solve the aforementioned challenges at adequate level. (authors)

Barariu, Gheorghe [National Authority for Nuclear Activities - Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects - SITON, 409 Atomistilor Str., P.O. Box 5204, Mg4, Magurele (Romania)] [National Authority for Nuclear Activities - Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects - SITON, 409 Atomistilor Str., P.O. Box 5204, Mg4, Magurele (Romania)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive 023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

82

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

83

EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

84

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5.1 5.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE Change No: 0 DOE O 435.1 Level: Familiar Date: 6/15/01 1 DOE O 435.1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to 1. Discuss the purpose and scope of DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. Note: If you think that you can complete the practice at the end of this level without working through the instructional material and/or the examples, complete the practice now. The course manager will check your work. You will need to complete the practice in this level successfully before taking the criterion test.

85

Current Regulations and Guidance - New Approaches for Risk-Informed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the historical foundations and future challenges for commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management in the United States. LLRW has been managed at government facilities since the beginning of the nuclear age and in the commercial sector since the early 1960's. Over the intervening years many technical, management and regulatory changes have occurred. Significant progress has been made in waste form, waste packaging and in recognizing radionuclides important to performance of disposal technologies and disposal facilities. This presentation will examine approaches using existing regulations and risk-informed approaches to improve guidance, licensing and management of LLRW. (authors)

Ryan, M.T. Ph.D.; CHP [Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and Materials, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Company of Radioactive Waste of Spain Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Used Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Company of Radioactive Waste of Spain Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Used Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management

87

Training Activities on Radioactive Waste Management at Moscow SIA -Radon-: Experience, Practice, Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of radioactive waste relates to the category of hazardous activities. Hence the requirements to the professional level of managers and personnel working in this industry are very high. Education, training and examination of managers, operators and workers are important elements of assuring safe and efficient operation of radioactive waste management sites. The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon'), in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 10 years. The paper summarizes the current experience of the SIA 'Radon' in the organisation and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

Batyukhnova, O.G.; Arustamov, A.E.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Agrinenko, V.V. [SUE SIA -Radon-, The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M.I. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building (United Kingdom); Drace, Z. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radioactive Waste Management at the New Conversion Facility of 'TVEL'{sup R} Fuel Company - 13474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project on the new conversion facility construction is being implemented by Joint Stock Company (JSC) 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises' (SGChE) within TVEL{sup R} Fuel Company. The objective is to construct the up-to-date facility ensuring the industrial and environmental safety with the reduced impact on the community and environment in compliance with the Russian new regulatory framework on radioactive waste (RW) management. The history of the SGChE development, as well as the concepts and approaches to RW management implemented by now are shown. The SGChE future image is outlined, together with its objectives and concept on RW management in compliance with the new act 'On radioactive waste management' adopted in Russia in 2011. Possible areas of cooperation with international companies are discussed in the field of RW management with the purpose of deploying the best Russian and world practices on RW management at the new conversion facility. (authors)

Indyk, S.I.; Volodenko, A.V. [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation); Tvilenev, K.A.; Tinin, V.V.; Fateeva, E.V. [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures of fuel containing materials can be fairly useful for the entire world's nuclear community and can help make nuclear energy safer.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Building the institutional capacity for managing commercial high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1981, the Office of Nuclear Waste Management of the Department of Energy contracted with the National Academy of Public Administration for a study of institutional issues associated with the commercial radioactive waste management program. The two major sets of issues which the Academy was asked to investigate were (1) intergovernmental relationships, how federal, state, local and Indian tribal council governments relate to each other in the planning and implementation of a waste management program, and (2) interagency relationships, how the federal agencies with major responsibilities in this public policy arena interact with each other. The objective of the study was to apply the perspectives of public administration to a difficult and controversial question - how to devise and execute an effective waste management program workable within the constraints of the federal system. To carry out this task, the Academy appointed a panel composed of individuals whose background and experience would provide the several types of knowledge essential to the effort. The findings of this panel are presented along with the executive summary. The report consists of a discussion of the search for a radioactive waste management strategy, and an analysis of the two major groups of institutional issues: (1) intergovernmental, the relationship between the three major levels of government; and (2) interagency, the relationships between the major federal agencies having responsibility for the waste management program.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comprehensive low-level radioactive waste management plan for the Commonwealth of Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of the Comprehensive Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Plan for the Commonwealth of Kentucky discusses the alternatives that have been examined to manage the low-level radioactive waste currently generated in the state. Part II includes a history of the commercial operation of the Maxey Flats Nuclear Waste Disposal Site in Fleming County, Kentucky. The reasons for closure of the facility by the Human Resources Cabinet, the licensing agency, are identified. The site stabilization program managed by the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet is described in Chapter VI. Future activities to be conducted at the Maxey Flats Disposal Site will include site stabilization activities, routine operations and maintenance, and environmental monitoring programs as described in Chapter VII.

Carr, R.M.; Mills, D.; Perkins, C.; Riddle, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail.

Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management fiscal year 1996 annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1996 a revised program strategy was developed that reflects Administration policy and responds to sharply reduced funding and congressional guidance while maintaining progress toward long-term objectives. The program is on track, working toward an early, comprehensive assessment of the viability of the Yucca Mountain site; more closely determining what will be required to incorporate defense waste into the waste management system; pursuing a market-driven strategy for waste acceptance, storage, and transportation; and preserving the core capability to respond to an interim storage contingency. Overall, the elements of an integrated system for managing the Nation`s spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste are emerging, more soundly conceived, and more modestly designed, as the OCRWM works toward the physical reality of waste shipments to Federal facilities.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on-site, and two off-site management alternatives.

97

Knowledge management for radioactive waste disposal: moving from theory to practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exponential growth in the knowledge base for radioactive waste management is a cause for concern in many national programmes. In Japan, this problem is exacerbated by a volunteering approach to siting of a deep geological repository, which requires particular flexibility in the tailoring of site characterisation plans, repository concepts and associated Performance Assessments (PAs). Recognition of this situation led, in 2005, to initiation by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) of an ambitious project to develop an advanced Knowledge Management System (KMS) aimed to facilitate its role as the supplier of background R&D support to both regulators and implementers of geological disposal. The paper will review progress to date in this work, with emphasis on tailoring of existing Knowledge Engineering tools and methods to radioactive waste management requirements, and outline future developments and challenges.

Hitoshi Makino; Kazumasa Hioki; Hiroyuki Umeki; Hiroyasu Takase; Ian G. McKinley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

15, 2010 15, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A10FN009) SUBJECT: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement Audit Report No.: OAS-FS-11-03 TO: Director, Office of Standard Contract Management The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) Fiscal Year 2010 balance sheet and the related statements of net cost, changes in net position, and budgetary resources. To fulfill the Office of Inspector General's audit responsibilities, we contracted with the independent public accounting firm of KPMG LLP (KPMG) to conduct the audit, subject to our review. KPMG is responsible for expressing an opinion on OCRWM's

99

11 - Ukraine: experience of radioactive waste (RAW) management and contaminated site clean-up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: A succinct description of the experience of radioactive waste management in Ukraine, which accumulated when using nuclear energy and developed as a result of the accident at Chernobyl nuclear power plant, is given in this chapter. In addition, the chapter summarizes the current state of the Chernobyl area contamination and the experience of Ukraine in decontamination and clean-up of the contaminated territories.

V. Shestopalov; I. Shybetskyi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

Y. E.Townsend

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

OCRWM annual report to Congress FY 1999 [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1999, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) continued to make significant progress in its characterization of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, candidate geologic repository site. Although OCRWM's appropriation for Fiscal Year 1999 was lower than requested, the Program accomplished all three success measures in the Secretary's Fiscal Year 1999 Performance Agreement with the President and completed important work in many other areas. This Annual Report reviews this work and looks toward future activities.

None

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex Administrative Boundary Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A package sent to the Bureau of Land Management containing a property description, a notice of intent to relinquish, aerial photos, and engineering drawings

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Application of Field-Flow Fractionation to Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Marcus N. Myers; Kathy A. Graff; J. Calvin Giddings

104

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

106

Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

2003 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program, Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2003 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semi-annually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halides (TOX), tritium, and major cations/anions. Results from all samples collected in 2003 were within established criteria. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and confirm that any previous detections of TOC and TOX were false positives. Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevations. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year. Other information in the report includes a Cumulative Chronology for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the current groundwater sampling procedure.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The OCRWM Enterprise. A publication of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This serial contains the following articles related to radioactive waste management: Cross-drift excavation heralds new phase in site characterization; International conference to feature in-depth tour of Yucca Mountain; OCRWM releases revised draft RFP for waste acceptance and transportation; Busted Butte tests important to viability assessment and licensing process; Regional transportation committees meet to address national issues; OCRWM Home Page is tops and getting better; OCRWM addresses public comments in repository EIS process; Researchers turn up the heat on Yucca Mountain rock; El Nino helps scientists study water movement at Yucca Mountain; Smaller tunnel boring machine begins big excavation job at Yucca Mountain; and Transportation group works to ensure coordination.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Contamination Issues at the Chernobyl Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The destruction of the Unit 4 reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant resulted in the generation of radioactive contamination and radioactive waste at the site and in the surrounding area (referred to as the Exclusion Zone). In the course of remediation activities, large volumes of radioactive waste were generated and placed in temporary near surface waste-storage and disposal facilities. Trench and landfill type facilities were created from 1986 to 1987 in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone at distances 0.5 to 15 km from the NPP site. This large number of facilities was established without proper design documentation, engineered barriers, or hydrogeological investigations and they do not meet contemporary waste-safety requirements. Immediately following the accident, a Shelter was constructed over the destroyed reactor; in addition to uncertainties in stability at the time of its construction, structural elements of the Shelter have degraded as a result of corrosion. The main potential hazard of the Shelter is a possible collapse of its top structures and release of radioactive dust into the environment. A New Safe Confinement (NSC) with a 100-years service life is planned to be built as a cover over the existing Shelter as a longer-term solution. The construction of the NSC will enable the dismantlement of the current Shelter, removal of highly radioactive, fuel-containing materials from Unit 4, and eventual decommissioning of the damaged reactor. More radioactive waste will be generated during NSC construction, possible Shelter dismantling, removal of fuel containing materials, and decommissioning of Unit 4. The future development of the Exclusion Zone depends on the future strategy for converting Unit 4 into an ecologically safe system, i.e., the development of the NSC, the dismantlement of the current Shelter, removal of fuel containing material, and eventual decommissioning of the accident site. To date, a broadly accepted strategy for radioactive waste management at the reactor site and in the Exclusion Zone, and especially for high-level and long-lived waste, has not been developed.

Napier, Bruce A.; Schmieman, Eric A.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Protecting Lake Ontario - Treating Wastewater from the Remediated Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Facility - 13227  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Port Granby Project is part of the larger Port Hope Area Initiative, a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and marginally contaminated soils (MCS). The Port Granby Project involves the relocation and remediation of up to 0.45 million cubic metres of such waste from the current Port Granby Waste Management Facility located in the Municipality of Clarington, Ontario, adjacent to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. The waste material will be transferred to a new suitably engineered Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) to be located inland approximately 700 m from the existing site. The development of the LTWMF will include construction and commissioning of a new Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) designed to treat wastewater consisting of contaminated surface run off and leachate generated during the site remediation process at the Port Granby Waste Management Facility as well as long-term leachate generated at the new LTWMF. Numerous factors will influence the variable wastewater flow rates and influent loads to the new WWTP during remediation. The treatment processes will be comprised of equalization to minimize impacts from hydraulic peaks, fine screening, membrane bioreactor technology, and reverse osmosis. The residuals treatment will comprise of lime precipitation, thickening, dewatering, evaporation and drying. The distribution of the concentration of uranium and radium - 226 over the various process streams in the WWTP was estimated. This information was used to assess potential worker exposure to radioactivity in the various process areas. A mass balance approach was used to assess the distribution of uranium and radium - 226, by applying individual contaminant removal rates for each process element of the WTP, based on pilot scale results and experience-based assumptions. The mass balance calculations were repeated for various flow and load scenarios. (authors)

Freihammer, Till; Chaput, Barb [AECOM, 99 Commerce Drive, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3P 0Y7 (Canada)] [AECOM, 99 Commerce Drive, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3P 0Y7 (Canada); Vandergaast, Gary [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Arey, Jimi [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ontario (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas.

Stewart, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This...

115

Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan [JAVYS, PLc. - Nuclear and Decommisioning Company, PLc. (Slovakia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Report to Congress: 1995 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the progress of states and compact regions during calendar year 1995 in establishing new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on United States policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

1996 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress. Report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (the Act), Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the activities during calendar year 1996 related to the establishment of new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress in developing new disposal facilities, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on US policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Management of Low-Level Radioactive Waste from Research, Hospitals and Nuclear Medical Centers in Egypt - 13469  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of radioisotopes and radiation sources in medical diagnosis and therapy is an important issue. Physicians can use radioisotopes to diagnose and treat diseases. Methods of treatment, conditioning and management of low level radioactive wastes from the use of radiation sources and radioisotopes in hospitals and nuclear medicine application, are described. Solid Radioactive waste with low-level activity after accumulation, minimization, segregation and measurement, are burned or compressed in a compactor according to the international standards. Conditioned drums are transported to the interim storage site at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) represented in Hot Labs and Waste Management Center (HLWMC) for storage and monitoring. (authors)

Hasan, M.A.; Selim, Y.T.; Lasheen, Y.F. [Hot Labs and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Labs and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for information exchange relating to operation of...

125

Development of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management National Transportation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Director of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) designated development of the National Transportation Plan (NTP) as one of his four strategic objectives for the program. The Office of Logistics Management (OLM) within OCRWM was tasked to develop the plan, which will accommodate state, local, and tribal concerns and input to the greatest extent practicable. The plan will describe each element of the national transportation system that OCRWM is developing for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The plan will bring together OCRWM's approach for acquiring capital assets (casks, rail cars, and a rail line in Nevada) and its operational planning efforts in a single, comprehensive document. It will also provide a timetable for major transportation decisions and milestones needed to support a 2017 start date for shipments to the Yucca Mountain repository. The NTP will be revised to incorporate new developments and decisions as they are finalized. This paper will describe the elements of the NTP, its importance in providing a comprehensive overview of the national transportation system, and the role of stakeholders in providing input on the NTP and the national transportation system. (authors)

Macaluso, C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Offner, J.; Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Final Environmental Impact Statement (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste Management Operations Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Savannah River Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do Do E/EIS-0062 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT mATEIUIENT (Supplement to ERDA-1537, September 1977) Waste ~ Management Operations Savannah River Plant ! Aiken, South Carolina Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage April 1980 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON. D.C.20545 1980 WL 94273 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Waste Management Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Wednesday, July 9, 1980 *46154 Record of Decision Decision. The decision has been made to complete the construction of the 14 double-shell tanks and use them to store defense high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Background. The SRP, located near Aiken, South Carolina, is a major installation of the

128

Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

V. Yucel

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual, requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The conclusions of the optimization are found to be insensitive to all input parameters, the monetary value of the health detriment over a range of values from $200,000 to $15,000,000 per person-Sv, and the period of integration of collective dose. A 2.5 m (8.2 ft) closure cover at the Area 5 RWMS can meet all applicable regulatory requirements and maintain radionuclide releases ALARA.

Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel report assesses the technical options for the safe and permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) managed by the Department of Energy. Specifically, it considers whether DOE-managed HLW and SNF should be disposed of with commercial SNF and HLW in one geologic repository or whether there are advantages to developing separate geologic disposal pathways for some DOE-managed HLW and SNF. The report recommends that the Department begin implementation of a phased, adaptive, and consent-based strategy with development of a separate mined repository for some DOE-managed HLW and cooler DOE-managed SNF.

132

1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

2008 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) including calendar year 2008 results. Each of the three Pilot Wells was sampled on March 11, 2008, and September 10, 2008. These wells were sampled for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also monitored. Results from all samples collected in 2008 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. Other information in the report includes an updated Cumulative Chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

2006 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) for calendar year 2006. Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 were sampled in April and October 2006 for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also monitored. Results from all samples collected in 2006 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. Other information in the report includes an updated Cumulative Chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

David B. Hudson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Emergence of collective action and environmental networking in relation to radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores the relationship between the national environmental movement and nuclear technology in relation to a local emergent group. The historical development of nuclear technology in this conutry has followed a path leading to continued fear and mistrust of waste management by a portion of the population. At the forefront of opposition to nuclear technology are people and groups endorsing environmental values. Because of the antinuclear attitudes of environmentalists and the value orientation of appropriate technologists in the national environmental movement, it seems appropriate for local groups to call on these national groups for assistance regarding nuclear-related issues. A case study is used to illustrate how a local action group, once integrated into a national environmental network, can become an effective, legitimate participant in social change. The formation, emergence, mobilization, and networking of a local group opposed to a specific federal radioactive waste management plan is described based on organizational literature. However, inherent contradictions in defining the local versus national benefits plus inherent problems within the environmental movement could be acting to limit the effectiveness of such networks. 49 refs.

Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

INFX GUIDE: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BILATERAL AGREEMENTS FOR COOPERATION IN THE FIELD OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT (INFX: INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have increased the magnitude and scope of their cooperative activities with other nations in the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management field, a need has developed for ready sources of information concerning foreign waste management programs, DOE technology exchange policies, bilateral fuel cycle and waste management agreements and plans and activities to implement those agreements. The INFX (International InLormation E~change) Guide is one of a series of documents that have been prepared to provide that information. The INFX Guide has been compiled under the charter of PNL's International Support Office (IPSO) to maintain for DOE a center to collect, organize, evaluate and disseminate information on foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. Because the information in this document is constantly subject to change, the document is assembled in loose-leaf form to accommodate frequent updates.

Harman, K. M.; Lakey, L. T.; Leigh, I. W.; Jeffs, A. G.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

140

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Summary of non-US national and international radioactive waste management programs 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many nations and international agencies are working to develop improved technology and industrial capability for neuclear fuel cycle and waste management operations. The effort in some countries is limited to research in university laboratories on treating low-level waste from reactor plant operations. In other countries, national nuclear research institutes are engaged in major programs in all phases of the fuel cycle and waste management, and there is a national effort to commercialize fuel cycle operations. Since late 1976, staff members of Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been working under US Department of Energy sponsorship to assemble and consolidate openly available information on foreign and international nuclear waste management programs and technology. This report summarizes the information collected on the status of fuel cycle and waste management programs in selected countries making major efforts in these fields as of the end of May 1981.

Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Unsaturated zone characterization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six undisturbed soil samples of near-surface sediments were collected from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) for physical and hydrologic characterization in the laboratory. Of these samples, three were obtained from the wall of Pit No. 3 and three from the floor. Physical properties measured on all samples were dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}) and solid particle density ({rho}{sub s}). Average dry bulk densities for the wall and floor samples were 1.47 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.45 g/cm{sup 3}, while solid particle densities were 2.34 g/cc and 2.53 g/cc, respectively. Based on these values, the average porosity for the wall samples was computed to be 0.372 and for the floor samples, 0.427. Moisture content-pressure head relations for each sample were determined using the pressure plate method. The moisture characteristic curves generated from these data have shapes similar to those of a silty sand, with volumetric moisture contents of less than 7% at 33.4 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was estimated using the computer model of van Genuchten (1978), which is based on the theoretical developments of Mualem (1976). Results indicate that at near-surface in situ moisture contents, the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for both wall and floor samples is less than 10{sup {minus}8} cm/sec. 15 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Daffern, D.D.; Ebeling, L.L.; Cox, W.B.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nevada National Security Site 2012 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2012 results. During 2012, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater samples were collected at UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 on March 21, August 7, August 21, and September 11, 2012, and static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 19, June 6, August 2, and October 15, 2012. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Final results from samples collected in 2012 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nevada Test Site 2009 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program, Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2009 results. During 2009, groundwater at each of the three pilot wells was sampled on March 10, 2009, and August 18, 2009, and water levels at each of the three pilot wells were measured on February 17, May 6, August 17, and November 10, 2009. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2009 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nevada Test Site 2002 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2002 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Results from all samples collected in 2002 were within established criteria. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act(RCRA) regulated unit within the RWMS-5 and confirm that the detections of TOC and TOX in 2000 were false positives. Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (ILs) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevation. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

Y. E. Townsend

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nevada Test Site 2001 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2001 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (ILs) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Due to detections of TOC and TOX in some samples collected in 2000, a plan, as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), was executed to collect an increased number and type of samples in 2001. Results from all samples collected in 2001 were below ILs. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 RWMS and confirm that the detections of TOC and TOX in 2000 were false positives. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevation. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year.

Y. E. Townsend

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Risk assessment for the on-site transportation of radioactive wastes for the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the risk assessment performed for the on-site transportation of radioactive wastes in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Risks for the routine shipment of wastes and the impacts from potential accidental releases are analyzed for operations at the Hanford Site (Hanford) near Richland, Washington. Like other large DOE sites, hanford conducts waste management operations for all wastes types; consequently, the impacts calculated for Hanford are expected to be greater than those for smaller sites. The risk assessment conducted for on-site transportation is intended to provide an estimate of the magnitude of the potential risk for comparison with off-site transportation risks assessed for the WM PEIS.

Biwer, B.M.; Monette, F.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIS-0046: Management of Commercially Generated Radioactive Waste, Washington, D.C.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statement analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented.

154

1 INTRODUCTION In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in claystone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in claystone formations, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000

Boyer, Edmond

155

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Radioactive Waste Management - A Priority Thematic Area Within The Euratom 6th Framework Programme (2002-2006)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The European Union's Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development and the specific EURATOM Framework Programme for Research and Training in Nuclear Energy (2002-2006)-EURATOM FP6--are the major building blocks for the European Commission to strengthen the foundations of the European Research Area, an open market for knowledge and science in Europe. The absence of a broadly agreed approach for radioactive waste management and disposal in the European Union caused the European Commission to raise the issue to a priority key area of research and development within EURATOM FP6. The sub-programme is aimed at looking to a widely agreed approach to waste disposal and will explore also the technical and economic potential of concepts for nuclear energy generation able to make better use of fissile material and generate less waste. To achieve these goals, participating research institutions are invited to invest in durable and structured partnerships by implementing ''new instruments'' for projects--Integrated Projects and Network of Excellence. In 2002 the European Commission consulted the research community on its readiness to prepare actions that use these ''new instruments'' for research topics in the priority area ''management of radioactive waste'' to assist in preparation of the work programme 2002-2006 of the EURATOM FP6. In parallel and under the last call for proposals of EURATOM FP5 the Commission launched two topic-related ''Thematic Networks'' that are bringing European research forces together and will create potential interest for future development within FP6.

Raynal, M.; von Maravic, H.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

158

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

Slatton, Clint

160

Radioactive waste management integrated data base: a bibliography. [Approximately 1100 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this indexed bibliography is to organize and collect the literature references on waste generation and treatment, characteristics, inventories, and costs. The references were captured into a searchable information file, and the information file was sorted, indexed, and printed for this bibliography. A completion of approximately 1100 references to nuclear waste management, the first of a series, is completed. Each reference is categorized by waste origin (commercial, defense, institutional, and foreign) and by subject area: (1) high-level wastes, (2) low-level wastes, (3) TRU wastes, (4) airborne wastes, (5) remedial action (formerly utilized sites, surplus facilities, and mill tailings), (6) isolation, (7) transportation, (8) spent fuel, (9) fuel cycle centers, and (10) a general category that covers nonspecific wastes. Five indexes are provided to assist the user in locating documents of interest: author, author affiliation (corporate authority), subject category, keyword, and permuted title. Machine (computer) searches of these indexes can be made specifying multiple constraints if so desired. This bibliography will be periodically updated as new information becomes available. In addition to being used in searches for specific data, the information file can also be used for resource document collection, names and addresses of contacts, and identification of potential sources of data.

Johnson, C.A.; Garland, P.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Possible Applications of the Mssbauer Technique in Waste Management Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

S. L. Ruby

162

Rock Alteration and Mineral Transformations for Nuclear Waste Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Philip A. Helmke

163

Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

ENTERPRISE SRS: LEVERAGING ONGOING OPERATIONS TO ADVANCE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is repurposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, strategic view of SRS as a united endeavor for all things nuclear as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with ongoing missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research (hereafter referred to as the Center). The key objective of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear materials management advancements and large-scale deployment of the technology by using SRS assets (e.g. facilities, staff, and property) for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. The Center will coordinate the demonstration of R&D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R&D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the R&D team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of the Center will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, the Center also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform R&D demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOEs critical nuclear material missions (e.g., processing in H-Canyon and plutonium storage in K-Area). These demonstrations can be accomplished in a more cost-effective manner through the use of existing facilities in conjunction with ongoing missions. Essentially, the R&D program would not need to pay the full operational cost of a facility, just the incremental cost of performing the demonstration. Current Center activities have been focused on integrating advanced safeguards monitoring technology demonstrations into the SRS H-Canyon and advanced location technology demonstrations into K-Area Materials Storage. These demonstrations are providing valuable information to researchers and program owners. In addition these demonstrations are providing the Center with an improved protocol for demonstration management that can be exercised across the entire SRS (and to offsite venues) to ensure that future demonstrations are done efficiently and provide an opportunity to use these unique assets for multiple purposes involving national laboratories, academia, and commercial entities. Key among the envisioned future use of SRS assets is the demonstration of new radioactive waste management technologies critical for advancing the mission needs of the DOE-EM program offices in their efforts to cleanup 107 sites across the United States. Of particular interest is the demonstration of separations technologies in H-Canyon. Given the modular design of H-Canyon, those demonstrations would be accomplished using a process frame. The demonstration equipment would be installed on the process frame and that frame would then be positioned into an H-Canyon cell so that the demonstration is performed in a radiological environment involving prototypic nuclear materials.

Murray, A.; Wilmarth, B.; Marra, J.; Mcguire, P.; Wheeler, V.

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

166

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes Maryland's entrance into the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, which seeks to promote interstate cooperation for the proper management and disposal...

168

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

169

Geologic processes in the RWMC area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Implications for long term stability and soil erosion at the radioactive waste management complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is the disposal and storage facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Transuranic waste and mixed wastes were also disposed at the RWMC until 1970. It is located in the southwestern part of the INEL about 80 km west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. The INEL occupies a portion of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), a low-relief, basalt, and sediment-floored basin within the northern Rocky Mountains and northeastern Basin and Range Province. It is a cool and semiarid, sagebrush steppe desert characterized by irregular, rolling terrain. The RWMC began disposal of INEL-generated wastes in 1952, and since 1954, wastes have been accepted from other Federal facilities. Much of the waste is buried in shallow trenches, pits, and soil vaults. Until about 1970, trenches and pits were excavated to the basalt surface, leaving no sediments between the waste and the top of the basalt. Since 1970, a layer of sediment (about 1 m) has been left between the waste and the basalt. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has developed regulations specific to radioactive-waste disposal, including environmental standards and performance objectives. The regulation applicable to all DOE facilities is DOE Order 5820.2A (Radioactive Waste Management). An important consideration for the performance assessment of the RWMC is the long-term geomorphic stability of the site. Several investigators have identified geologic processes and events that could disrupt a radioactive waste disposal facility. Examples of these {open_quotes}geomorphic hazards{close_quotes} include changes in stream discharge, sediment load, and base level, which may result from climate change, tectonic processes, or magmatic processes. In the performance assessment, these hazards are incorporated into scenarios that may affect the future performance of the RWMC.

Hackett, W.R.; Tullis, J.A.; Smith, R.P. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

ANALYSES AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF AN UPDATED ITER RADIOACTIVE WASTE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSES AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF AN UPDATED ITER RADIOACTIVE WASTE ASSESSMENT S. ZHENG,a * R aimed at updating the ITER radioactive inventory assessment and assisting the waste manage- ment operations, and waste management processes and services. KEYWORDS: ITER, radioactive waste management

173

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Radioactive Waste Management - It's Role in contributing and achieving Sustainability. R1.13 The French strategy of waste management: technical and political dimensions of sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sustainability of an energy policy depends on the manner in which it satisfies environmental, economical and social requirements. Nuclear energy is not an exception. The objectives of the future nuclear systems, as defined in the Generation IV International Forum, tend to optimize the ability of nuclear energy to satisfy sustainable development goals. In this regard, they involve strong commitments concerning waste management policy : five designs in six are based on a closed fuel cycle, in order to minimize the volume and radiotoxicity of final waste, and to recycle the fissile materials to save natural resources. Since its beginnings, the French civil nuclear programme has considered a long-term perspective and has developed spent fuel reprocessing. The French current industrial technology has already permitted to recycle 96% of spent fuel materials, to save 30% of natural resources, to reduce by 5 the amount of waste and to reduce by 10 the waste radiotoxicity, all these benefits for less than 6% of the kWh total cost. This strategy has always been criticized by the nuclear opponents, precisely because they saw that it was a sustainable way, and didn't accept to consider nuclear energy as a sustainable source of power. Two arguments were put forward these criticisms. First, the cost of reprocessing versus once-through cycle and second, the risk of proliferation induced by U-Pu partitioning process. These arguments were also invoked in international debates, and they have also been pleaded by the anti-nukes during the National Debate on HLLLW, at the end of 2005, preceding the vote of a new law in 2006 by the French parliament. Fortunately they have not convinced public opinion in France nor political decision-makers. A majority of people with no regard to technical background understand that recycling and saving the natural resources are sustainable principles. And, from a technical point of view, the 6% over cost does not seem significant considering the economics of nuclear power. Lastly, the risk proliferation is more related to the front-end technologies than to the back-end ones. So, the 2006 French Law 'for a sustainable radioactive waste management' has reinforced the closed-cycle strategy and has paved the way for a long-term development of nuclear energy in the 21. century and beyond, towards the third and fourth generations of nuclear systems. It has defined an R and D programme including the continuation of partitioning-transmutation of minor actinides and their recycling in 4. generation fast reactors. In parallel, the French president has committed the French Atomic Energy Commission to implement a 4. generation prototype reactor by 2020, with international cooperation, to guarantee the permanence of technology progress. In this regard, the waste management strategy can't be built without taking into account the perspectives of development of nuclear energy. These perspectives must include the best available technologies and, in the other hand, an adaptation to the political evolutions of societies. (authors)

Bazile, F. [CEA Saclay, French Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Div., 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Annotated bibliography of radioactive waste management publications at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, January 1978 through July 1982. [831 abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography lists publications (831 abstracts) from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Department of Energy sponsored research and development programs from January 1978 through July of 1982. The abstracts are grouped in subject categories, as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., High-Level Radioactive Wastes. Three indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: personal author, subject, and report number. Cited are research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers. Excluded are technical progress reports. Since 1978 the Nuclear Waste Management Quarterly Progress Report has been published under the series number PNL-3000. Beginning in 1982, this publication has been issued semiannually, under the series number PNL-4250. This bibliography is the successor to two others, BNWL-2201 (covering the years 1965-1976) and PNL-4050 (1975-1978). It is intended to provide a useful reference to literature in waste management written or compiled by PNL staff.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste. The Compact is administered by a commission, which can regulate and impose fees on in-state radioactive waste generators. The states of Arizona, California,

177

Chapter 22 - Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses safe disposal of radioactive waste in order to provide safety to workers and the public. Radioactive wastes arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, and from beneficial uses of isotopes and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. In the United States spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. A multi-barrier system involving packaging and geological media will provide protection of the public over the centuries the waste must be isolated. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In other countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes (LLWs) come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Establishment of regional disposal sites by interstate compacts has generally been unsuccessful in the United States. Decontamination of defense sites will be long and costly. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, April 1984-September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; and supporting studies. 33 figures, 13 tables.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, October 1984-March 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following studies on radioactive waste management: defense waste technology; nuclear waste materials characterization center; and supporting studies. 19 figs., 29 tabs.

McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Addendum 1 Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A disposal authorization statement (DAS) was issued by the U.S. Department of Energy/Headquarters (DOE/HQ) on December 5, 2000, authorizing the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office to continue the operation of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site for the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste. Prior to the issuance of the DAS, the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) had conducted reviews of the performance assessment (PA) and the composite analysis (CA) for the Area 5 RWMS, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order DOE O 435.1. A brief history of the reviews is as follows. (The reviews were conducted by independent review teams chartered by the LFRG; the review findings and recommendations were issued in review team reports to the LFRG.) The LFRG accepted the initial PA, with conditions, on August 30, 1996. Revision 2.1 to the PA was issued in January 1998, implementing the conditions of acceptance of the 1996 PA. The LFRG reviewed Revision 2.1 as part of the Area 5 RWMS CA review during 2000, and found it acceptable. The CA and the Supplemental Information provided in response to issues identified during the initial review of the CA were accepted by the LFRG. The Supplemental Information (including the responses to four key issues) is included in the Review Team Report to the LFRG, which recommends that it be incorporated into the CA and issued to all known holders of the CA. The Area 5 RWMS DAS requires that the Supplemental Information generated during the DOE/HQ review of the CA be incorporated into the CA within one year of the date of issuance of the DAS. This report, the first addendum to the Area 5 CA, is prepared to fulfill that requirement. The Supplemental Information includes the following: Issues Identified in the Review Team Report; Crosswalk Presentation; and Maintaining Doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable. A summary of this information is included in this report, with the complete text presented in the appendices.

Vefa Yucel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiological Protection Policy for the Disposal of Radioactive...Contaminated Areas after a Nuclear Accident or a Radiation...SITUATIONS RESULTING FROM A NUCLEAR ACCIDENT. | In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive......

Daisuke Sugiyama; Takatoshi Hattori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Neutron Products Incorporated Sealed Source Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Neutron Products Incorporated (NPI) Sealed Sources waste stream (DRTK000000056, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream consists of 850 60Co sealed sources (Duratek [DRTK] 2013). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream requires a special analysis (SA) because the waste stream 60Co activity concentration exceeds the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

Shott, Gregory

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 27, 2011 July 27, 2011 End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters. July 27, 2011 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended.

184

Recommendations for management of greater-than-Class-C low-level radioactive waste: Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report sets forth the Department's findings and recommendations for ensuring the safe management and disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with concentrations of radionuclides that exceed the limits established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for Class C LLW. Chapters are devoted to: Identification of Greater-Than Class-C Low-Level Waste; Regulatory Needs and Legislative Authorities; Proposed Actions to Ensure the Safe Management of Greater-Than-Class-C Low-Level Waste; System Considerations for Waste Disposal; Funding Options; Requirements for Implementation; and Schedule and Cost. Three Appendices are included: Public Law 99-240, Section 3(b); Greater-Than-Class-C Low-Level Waste Types and Quantities; and Descriptions of Systems Considerations for Waste Disposal. (LM)

Not Available

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EIS-0074: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to analyze the environmental implications of the proposed selection of a strategy for long- term management of the high- level radioactive wastes generated as part of the national defense effort at the Department's Idaho Chemical Processing Plant a t the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

186

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy October 2009 #12 Safety (Germany) Peter De Preter: National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials

187

Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Program Info State Michigan Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Quality Federal laws passed in 1980 and 1985 made each state responsible for the low-level radioactive waste produced within its borders. Act 204 of 1987 created the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority (LLRWA) to fulfill state responsibilities under federal law for managing and assuring disposal capacity for the low-level radioactive waste produced in Michigan. The LLRWA began a facility siting process in 1989 under the statutory limits of Act 204. The LLRWA eventually determined that it was impossible to find a

188

Memorandum of Understanding between US Department of Energy and the Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

between The Department of Energy of the United States of America and The Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management of the Republic of Hungary for Information Exchange Relating to Operation of Modular Vault Systems for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel 1. Participants The United States Department of Energy (DOE), a Participant to this Memorandum of Understanding (Memorandum), is the agency responsible for the management of radioactive wastes produced by or in the possession of tla U.S. Government (&mmercial reactor nuclear waste excluded) within the United Stztes, including spent nuclear fuel (SNF). DOE is the owner, operator, and licensee of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) MVDS and the Hanford Canister Storage Building (CSB). DOE's Idaho Operations Office (DOE-

189

Radioactive Waste Incineration: Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. In some cases, the resulting ash may have high concentrations of materials such as Plutonium or Uranium that are valuable materials for recycling. Incineration can also be effective in treating waste that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Despite these advantages, the number of operating incinerators currently in the US currently appears to be small and potentially declining. This paper describes technical, regulatory, economic and political factors that affect the selection of incineration as a preferred method of treating radioactive waste. The history of incinerator use at commercial and DOE facilities is summarized, along with the factors that have affected each of the sectors, thus leading to the current set of active incinerator facilities. In summary: Incineration has had a long history of use in radioactive waste processing due to their ability to reduce the volume of the waste while destroying hazardous chemicals and biological material. However, combinations of technical, regulatory, economic and political factors have constrained the overall use of incineration. In both the Government and Private sectors, the trend is to have a limited number of larger incineration facilities that treat wastes from a multiple sites. Each of these sector is now served by only one or two incinerators. Increased use of incineration is not likely unless there is a change in the factors involved, such as a significant increase in the cost of disposal. Medical wastes with low levels of radioactive contamination are being treated effectively at small, local incineration facilities. No trend is expected in this group. (authors)

Diederich, A.R.; Akins, M.J. [WorleyParsons, Reading, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

RADIATION PROTECTION CHALLENGES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE FROM HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......CERN, as at many other high-energy accelerator facilities, radioactive...and valid for other high-energy accelerators, is that extensive...Association. Buenos Aires, Argentina. October 2008, SAR editor, Argentina. 3 Walter N. , Cellerier......

Luisa Ulrici; Yvon Algoet; Luca Bruno; Matteo Magistris

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup » Waste Management Cleanup » Waste Management Waste Management November 12, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada. September 24, 2013 Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Completing the Office of River Protection (ORP) mission of stabilizing 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste stored in Hanford's 177 tanks is one of the Energy Department's highest priorities. This Framework document outlines a phased approach for beginning tank waste treatment while continuing to resolve technical issues with the Pretreatment and

192

Radioactive waste at Ward Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Data Base for 1992: U.S. Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections and Characteristics, publi. DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8 (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC, 1989), p. 113. 2. T. Taylor, quoted by S. Salesky...

Earl Budin

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste long-lived radioactive wastes must be managed in a safe way for human health and for the environment. That is the raison why the French agency for the management of radioactive waste (ANDRA) is engaged to study

Boyer, Edmond

194

1992 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress; Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress States and compact regions made during 1992 in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1992 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to section 7 (b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act.

NONE

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unconsciously Unconsciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Positive Behaviors Unconsciously Positive Behaviors Education Motivation Repetition Permanent Change Figure 1 - The Phases of Behavior Change Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Energy Conservation Plan Summary: Development and implementation of this plan is being treated as a project. This serves two purposes. First, it increases familiarity with the precepts of project management and DOE Order 413. Secondly, project management provides a great structure for organizing and implementing the activities that will facilitate energy savings through behavioral changes. A project structure also helps define how the effort will begin and what constitutes success at the

196

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

due to releases of radionuclides and chemicals from the high-level radioactive waste tanks, Fast Flux Test Facility decommissioning, and waste management activities over long...

197

Statement of Intent by The United States Department of Energy and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in the Field of Used Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management, Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Intent by The United States Department of Energy and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in the Field of Used Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management, Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration.

198

Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site February 2001 Post Office Box 98521 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161-0002 Telephone: (800) 553-6847 Fax: (703) 605-6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.fedworld.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available for a processing fee to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Telephone: (865) 576-8401 Fax: (865) 576-5728 E-mail: reports@adonis.osti.gov NEVADA TEST SITE 2000 DATA REPORT: GROUNDWATER MONITORING PROGRAM AREA 5 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SITE February 2001 Worked Performed Under Contract No. DE-AC08-96NV11718 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Prepared by: P.O. Box 98521 Groundwater Monitoring Program Nevada Test Site ii Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Groundwater Monitoring Program Nevada Test Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site iii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................ iii LIST OF FIGURES .................................................... iv LIST OF TABLES ..................................................... v LIST OF ACRONYMS ................................................. vi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................. vii Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program ...... viii I.

Bechtel Nevada Department; Bechtel Nevada

199

DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Radioactive Waste DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste 1. Summary Comments on Draft Branch Technical Position on a Performance Assessment Methodology for Low-Level Radioactive...

200

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and...

202

Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fiscal Year 1994 annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The events of Fiscal Year 1994 made it a notable year in OCRWN`s history. Highlights include formulation of a new program approach; intensive consultation with other parties to build confidence in that approach; the delivery, assembly, and initial testing of the tunnel boring machine that is now digging into Yucca Mountain; steps toward acquisition of a standardized multipurpose canister system and planning for the accompanying environmental impact statement; and solicitation, through a Federal Register notice, of utilities` and other interested parties` recommendations toward resolving key waste-acceptance issues.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 As required by Section 304(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, Public Law 97-425, the following document is the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report for the years ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 as required by Section 302(c)(l) ofNWPA. The information in this report is current only as of September 30, 2009, and does not reflect actions or changes that have occurred since then.

205

Rev August 2006 Radiation Safety Manual Section 14 Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev August 2006 Radiation Safety Manual Section 14 ­ Radioactive Waste Page 14-1 Section 14 Radioactive Waste Contents A. Proper Collection, Disposal, and Packaging and Putrescible Animal Waste.........................14-8 a. Non-Radioactive Animal Waste

Wilcock, William

206

2 - Radioactive waste (RAW) categories, characterization and processing route selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The principal approach to radioactive waste management is to transform as generated waste to a waste package suitable for safe long-term storage or ultimate disposal. A waste characterization system allows an assessment of the potential risks connected with waste handling and disposal and also allows the waste to be classified into groups (streams) according to their properties and projected processing routes. A properly selected waste classification system also enables the selection of the proper processing technology for each class of waste, tailored to waste volume, properties and available technologies in each country or waste processing organization. Long-term safe disposal of processed waste is a basic requirement of all waste classification and waste processing schemes discussed in this chapter.

R. Burcl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott Fraser, Joe Hawes, Craig Herrmann, Jim Book, John Lee, John Perry, Josh Knipp, Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil McCoy, Trent Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and

208

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott Fraser, Joe Hawes, Craig Herrmann, Jim Book, John Lee, John Perry, Josh Knipp, Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil McCoy, Trent Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the

209

Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria; Approach, and Lines of Inquiry; CRAD 64-33  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1.0 PURPOSE 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Independent Oversight, the Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations' (ES&H) mission is to assess the effectiveness of those environment, safety, and health systems and practices used by field organizations in implementing Integrated Safety Management and to provide clear, concise, and independent evaluations of performance in protecting our workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards associated with Department of Energy (DOE) activities and sites. A key to success is the rigor and comprehensiveness of our process; and as with any process, we continually stnve to improve and \ provide additional value and insight to field operations. Integral to this is our commitment to enhance our program. Therefore, we have revised our Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines

210

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

211

Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from off site, while others suggested that the Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and...

212

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008

213

Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

ANNUAL TRANSPORTATION REPORT FY 2008 Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) February 2009 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security...

214

Finding of no significant impact for the interim action for cleanup of Pit 9 at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0854, for an interim action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The proposed action would be conducted at Pit 9, Operable Unit 7--10, located at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The proposed action consists of construction of retrieval and processing buildings, excavation and retrieval of wastes from Pit 9, selective physical separation and chemical extraction, and stabilization of wastes either through thermal processing or by forming a stabilized concentrate. The proposed action would involve limited waste treatment process testing and full-scale waste treatment processing for cleaning up pre-1970 Transuranic (TRU) wastes in Pit 9. The purpose of this interim action is to expedite the overall cleanup at the RWMC and to reduce the risks associated with potential migration of Pit 9 wastes to the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring two low-level radioactive waste disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

Shott, Gregory [NSTec

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

2006 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2006) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted as an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 2000; 2002). The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2006 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2006 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, and closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities, were reviewed in FY 2006 for determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

Gregory J, Shott, Vefa Yucel

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

2004 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (Bechtel Nevada, 2000) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, and reports the results in an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2004 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PA and CA results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2004 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed in FY 2004 for the determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for the determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

Vefa Yucel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive 00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008 EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste

220

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, Donald K. (Knoxville, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the NTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual M 435.1-1 requires that performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities be maintained by the field offices. This plan describes the activities performed to maintain the PA and the CA for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This plan supersedes the Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (DOE/NV/11718--491-REV 1, dated September 2002). The plan is based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a), DOE Manual M 435.1-1 (DOE, 1999b), the DOE M 435.1-1 Implementation Guide DOE G 435.1-1 (DOE, 1999c), and the Maintenance Guide for PAs and CAs (DOE, 1999d). The plan includes a current update on PA/CA documentation, a revised schedule, and a section on Quality Assurance.

Vefa Yucel

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Radioactive and mixed waste - risk as a basis for waste classification. Symposium proceedings No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of risks from radioactive and chemical materials has been a major environmental concern in the United states for the past two or three decades. Risk management of these materials encompasses the remediation of past disposal practices as well as development of appropriate strategies and controls for current and future operations. This symposium is concerned primarily with low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes. Individual reports were processed separately for the Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1995-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (one site is in Area 3 and the other is in Area 5) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV). The current DOE Order governing management of radioactive waste is 435.1. Associated with DOE Order 435.1 is a Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) and Guidance (DOE G 435.1-1). The Manual and Guidance specify that preliminary closure and monitoring plans for a low-level waste (LLW) management facility be developed and initially submitted with the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for that facility. The Manual and Guidance, and the Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued for the Area 3 RWMS further specify that the preliminary closure and monitoring plans be updated within one year following issuance of a DAS. This Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) fulfills both requirements. Additional updates will be conducted every third year hereafter. This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring both RWMSs, and is based on guidance issued in 1999 by the DOE for developing closure plans. The plan does not follow the format suggested by the DOE guidance in order to better accommodate differences between the two RWMSs, especially in terms of operations and site characteristics. The modification reduces redundancy and provides a smoother progression of the discussion. The closure and monitoring plans were integrated because much of the information that would be included in individual plans is the same, and integration provides efficient presentation and program management. The ICMP identifies the regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment where they are located, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the sites.

S. E. Rawlinson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas...

229

Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New radioactive waste staging facility Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste staging facility The 4-acre complex will include multiple staging buildings...

230

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

231

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions...

232

Waste management strategies and disposal design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solution to the problem of long-term radioactive waste management (RWM) comprises a technical and social dimension, i. e. it must not only be technically achievable, but also publicly acceptable. The technic...

Christian Streffer; Carl Friedrich Gethmann; Georg Kamp

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

235

Comment response document for the Secretary of Energy`s ``Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program``  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 29, 1989, the Secretary of Energy published his ``Report to Congress on the Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program`` (Report), and sent copies to numerous interested parties for their review and comment. This document summarizes comments received on the Report and presents the DOE`s current responses to those comments as a basis for further discussions. Included as appendixes are a list of commenters, a crosswalk showing where each comment is addressed, the comment letters themselves with specific comments delineated, and the DOE`s response to those letters. Twenty-five individuals or organizations submitted comments on the Report. The DOE identified 130 individual comments and classified them into the following seven categories: Management, Institutional, Regulatory, Transportation, Monitored Retrievable Storage, Scheduling, and Yucca Mountain. For the responses, comments were than grouped into more specific topics under each of the major headings. The DOE attempted to respond to all comments.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office, under contract DE-AC06-87RL10930. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive materials that have been buried and stored in the 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities since startup in 1944 through calendar year 1991. This report does not include solid radioactive wastes in storage or disposed of in other areas or facilities such as the underground tank farms, or backlog wastes. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria, (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office, under contract DE-AC06-87RL10930. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive material that has been buried and stored in the 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities from startup in 1944 through calendar year 1994. This report does not include backlog waste: solid radioactive wastes in storage or disposed of in other areas or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Areas radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive materials that have been buried and stored in the 200 Areas radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities since startup in 1944 through calendar year 1993. This report does not include backlog waste, solid radioactive waste in storage or disposed of in other areas, or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, ``Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria,`` (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

. . . . . . -- SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S t a r t u p t h r o u g h 1 9 5 9 September 1 9 6 0 _- R E C O R D - W O R K S T E C H N I C A L D E P A R T M E N T 1 J. E. C o l e , W i l n i 1 4 W. P. 3ebbii 3 H. Worthington, Wilm 16 C. $?. P~.t-Lei-s~:; - 5 J. D. E l l e t t - 17 E. C. Morris 6 F. H. Endorf 19 3 . L. &tier 7 K. W. F r e n c h 20 bi. C . 3 e i n i g 8 J. K. Lower 2 1 2. 3 . 3 G : - x r 9 K. W. M i l l e t t 22 R . FJ . V 2 x 7 : W ~ ~ C k 1 c - 2 J. B. Tinker, W i h L-, i . c . E?-ens 4 W F i l e P. 3 . K t B U ? & J. A. Monier, Jr. 13. : . A. KcClesrer. 1 0 M. 2 . Wahl . - 23 C. Ashley C. W. J. Wende 24 T I S F i l e 11 J. W. Morris - 2s T'pC File D. E. Waters 26 P3D F i l e , 736-C R. B. Fenninger 33 V l ~ a l Records F i l e 12 W. P. Overbeck - 27 -23 P3D % x : r a Czpies P33 2e:ol.d C ~ p l *iB+ ' / - - & OF THIS DQCUMENT I S UNuMITEI) E. 1. ciu /'(I,\ 7' d

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18, 2012 18, 2012 Media Contact: Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho Operations, 208-526-5709, millerdc@id.doe.gov Rick Dale, Idaho Treatment Group, 208-557-6552, rick.dale@amwtp.inl.gov Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes IDAHO FALLS, ID- Operations to retrieve the estimated 6,900 cubic meters of stored transuranic waste remaining at the Idaho site began this week at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. Waste retrieval resumes at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. The resumption of work comes after a nearly two-year stoppage of retrieval operations �A significant investment has been made in terms of time and dollars that will allow employees to safely retrieve the final radioactive waste that has been stored aboveground at the Idaho site for more than four

242

Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste transportation regulations and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify the regulations and requirements for transporting greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and to identify planning activities that need to be accomplished in preparation for transporting GTCC LLW. The regulations and requirements for transporting hazardous materials, of which GTCC LLW is included, are complex and include several Federal agencies, state and local governments, and Indian tribes. This report is divided into five sections and three appendices. Section 1 introduces the report. Section 2 identifies and discusses the transportation regulations and requirements. The regulations and requirements are divided into Federal, state, local government, and Indian tribes subsections. This report does not identify the regulations or requirements of specific state, local government, and Indian tribes, since the storage, treatment, and disposal facility locations and transportation routes have not been specifically identified. Section 3 identifies the planning needed to ensure that all transportation activities are in compliance with the regulations and requirements. It is divided into (a) transportation packaging; (b) transportation operations; (c) system safety and risk analysis, (d) route selection; (e) emergency preparedness and response; and (f) safeguards and security. This section does not provide actual planning since the details of the Department of Energy (DOE) GTCC LLW Program have not been finalized, e.g., waste characterization and quantity, storage, treatment and disposal facility locations, and acceptance criteria. Sections 4 and 5 provide conclusions and referenced documents, respectively.

Tyacke, M.; Schmitt, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1982-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of technical progress reports designed to report radioactive waste management programs at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Accomplishments in the following programs are reported: waste stabilization; Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; low-level waste management; remedial action; and supporting studies.

Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive 5: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste Summary This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS. The EIS evaluates potential impacts from the construction and operation of

247

Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Assessment (PA) maintenance plan requires an annual review to determine if current operations and conditions at the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) remain consistent with PA and composite analysis (CA) assumptions and models. This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 2005 annual review findings for the Area 3 RWMS PA only. The PA Maintenance Plan states that no annual review or summary reporting will be carried out in years that a PA or CA revision is undertaken (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2002). Updated PA results for the Area 5 RWMS were published in an addendum to the Area 5 RWMS PA report in September 2005. A federal review of the draft addendum report took place in early FY 2006 (October November 2005). The review team found the addendum acceptable without conditions. The review team's recommendation will be presented to the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group in early 2006. The addendum was revised in January 2006 and incorporated comments from the review team (BN, 2006). Table 1 summarizes the updated Area 5 RWMS PA results presented in the addendum.

Vefa Yucel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Savannah River Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the man  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's 49 underground waste tanks, including the removal of waste materials. Once water is removed from the waste tanks, two materials remain: salt and sludge waste. Removing salt waste, which fills approximately 90 percent of the tank space in the SRS tank farms, is a major step toward closing the Site's waste tanks that currently contain approximately 38 million gallons of waste. Due to the limited amount of tank space available in new-style tanks, some salt waste must be dispositioned in the interim to ensure sufficient tank space for continued sludge washing and to support the initial start-up and salt processing operations at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF).

250

EIS-0217: Savannah River Site Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17: Savannah River Site Waste Management 17: Savannah River Site Waste Management EIS-0217: Savannah River Site Waste Management Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts and costs of storing, treating, and/or disposing of liquid high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, hazardous, mixed (radioactive and hazardous), and transuranic wastes at SRS. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 28, 2001 EIS-0217: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina May 19, 1997 EIS-0217: Supplemental Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management May 19, 1997 EIS-0217: Supplemental Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office,

251

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes April 18, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho...

252

Measurement of radioactive contaminated wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Los Alamos, a comprehensive program is underway for the development of sensitive, practical, nondestructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics in bulk solid wastes. The program encompasses a broad range of techniques, including sophisticated active and passive gamma-ray spectroscopy, passive neutron detection systems, pulsed portable neutron generator interrogation systems, and electron accelerator-based techniques. The techniques can be used with either low-level or high-level beta-gamma wastes in either low-density or high-density matrices. The techniques are quite sensitive (< 10 nCi/g detection) and, in many cases, isotopic specific. Waste packages range in size from small cardboard boxes to large metal or wooden crates. Considerable effort is being expended on waste matrix identification to improve assay accuracy.

Caldwell, J.T.; Close, D.A.; Crane, T.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Managing Nuclear Waste: Options Considered  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Starting in the 1950s, U.S. scientists began to research ways to manage highly radioactive materials accumulating at power plants and other sites nationwide. Long-term surface storage of these materials poses significant potential health, safety, and environmental risks. Scientists studied a broad range of options for managing spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The options included leaving it where it is, disposing of it in various ways, and making it safer through advanced technologies. International scientific consensus holds that these materials should eventually be disposed of deep underground in what is called a geologic repository. In a recent special report, the National Academy of Sciences summarized the various studies and emphasized that geologic disposal is ultimately necessary.

DOE

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

McNatt, F.G. Sr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

257

2007 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an annual review of conditions affecting the operation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). The Area 5 RWMS PA documentation consists of the original PA (Shott et al., 1998), referred to as the 1998 Area 5 RWMS PA and supporting addenda (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2001b; 2006a). The Area 5 RWMS CA was issued as a single document (BN, 2001a) and has a single addendum (BN, 2001c). The Area 3 PA and CA were issued in a single document (Shott et al., 2000). The Maintenance Plan for the PAs and CAs (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2006) and the Disposal Authorization Statements (DASs) for the Area 3 and 5 RWMSs (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2000; 2002) require preparation of an annual summary and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the PAs and CAs. The annual summary report is submitted to DOE Headquarters. Following the annual report format in the DOE PA/CA Maintenance Guide (DOE, 1999), this report presents the annual summary for the PAs in Section 2.0 and the CAs in Section 3.0. The annual summary for the PAs includes the following: Section 2.1 summarizes changes in waste disposal operations; Section 2.1.5 provides an evaluation of the new estimates of the closure inventories derived from the actual disposals through fiscal year (FY) 2007; Section 2.2 summarizes the results of the monitoring conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's (NNSA/NSO's) Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (BN, 2005), and the research and development (R&D) activities; Section 2.4 is a summary of changes in facility design, operation, or expected future conditions; monitoring and R&D activities; and the maintenance program; and Section 2.5 discusses the recommended changes in disposal facility design and operations, monitoring and R&D activities, and the maintenance program. Similarly, the annual summary for the CAs (presented in Section 3.0) includes the following: Section 3.1 presents the assessment of the adequacy of the CAs, with a summary of the relevant factors reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.2 presents an assessment of the relevant site activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that would impact the sources of residual radioactive material considered in the CAs; Section 3.3 summarizes the monitoring and R&D results that were reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.4 presents a summary of changes in relevant site programs (including monitoring, R&D, and the maintenance program) that occurred since the CAs were prepared; and Section 3.5 summarizes the recommended changes to these programs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization), Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina.

259

Radiation protection, radioactive waste management and site monitoring at the nuclear scientific experimental and educational centre IRT-Sofia at INRNE-BAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......monitoring system (RMS) for...with an integrated semiconductor...database. The control of the workplace...monitoring system providing...soils, plants, underground...selected plants-bio-indicators...detector systems are placed...from several control points...radioactive waste treatments and interim......

Al. Mladenov; D. Stankov; Tz. Nonova; K. Krezhov

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, Aporil-June 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, process and equipment development, TRU waste, and low-level waste are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities.

None

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A team effort: Reducing the volume of low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the team effort at Entergy Operation`s River Bend Station in Louisiana to reduce the volume of low-level radioactive waste. Topic areas covered include the following: Assessment - waste composition analysis using EPRI guidelines; grassroots effort; release facility - managing the waste; emerging technologies; spreading the success. 4 fig.

Zimmermann, K.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Waste gas combustion in a Hanford radioactive waste tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been observed that a high-level radioactive waste tank generates quantities of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen that are potentially well within flammability limits. These gases are produced from chemical and nuclear decay reactions in a slurry of radioactive waste materials. Significant amounts of combustible and reactant gases accumulate in the waste over a 110- to 120-d period. The slurry becomes Taylor unstable owing to the buoyancy of the gases trapped in a matrix of sodium nitrate and nitrite salts. As the contents of the tank roll over, the generated waste gases rupture through the waste material surface, allowing the gases to be transported and mixed with air in the cover-gas space in the dome of the tank. An ignition source is postulated in the dome space where the waste gases combust in the presence of air resulting in pressure and temperature loadings on the double-walled waste tank. This analysis is conducted with hydrogen mixing studies HMS, a three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid dynamics code coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The waste tank has a ventilation system designed to maintain a slight negative gage pressure during normal operation. We modeled the ventilation system with the transient reactor analysis code (TRAC), and we coupled these two best-estimate accident analysis computer codes to model the ventilation system response to pressures and temperatures generated by the hydrogen and ammonia combustion.

Travis, J.R.; Fujita, R.K.; Spore, J.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste.

Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radioactive Liquid Waste Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory OAS-L-13-15 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT MANAGER LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is a Government- owned, contractor operated Laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex. Los Alamos' primary responsibility is to

270

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity radioactive waste Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

waste Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activity radioactive waste...

272

System for handling and storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

Anderson, John K. (San Diego, CA); Lindemann, Paul E. (Escondido, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

1969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE 969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE bY C . Ashley A p r i l 1970 Radiological Sciences Division Savannah River Laboratory E. 1. du Pont de Nemours & Co. Aiken, South Carolina 29801 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best avaiiable original document. . . . CONTENTS Page I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Releases t o t h e Atmosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 S e p a r a t i o n s Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 TNX and Building 773-A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Reactor Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Releases t o E f f l u e n t Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 S e p a r a t i o n s Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 DArea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 R e a c t o r A r e a s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

274

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

276

Disposal of Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste EVS prepared a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLRW). The EVS Division prepared a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLRW) for the DOE Office of Environmental Management. DOE is now finalizing this EIS and is including a preferred alternative. DOE intends that the final EIS will provide information to support the selection of disposal method(s) and site(s) for GTCC LLRW and GTCC-like waste. In general, GTCC LLRW is not acceptable for near-surface disposal. Typically, the waste form and disposal methods must be different from and more stringent than those specified for Class C LLRW. For GTCC LLRW, the

277

Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

West, B.; Waltz, R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

17 - Immobilisation of Radioactive Waste in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclide immobilisation mechanisms are examined for vitreous wasteforms. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are described in detail, including the ability of cations to enter into the glass network structure. The role of various cations is considered, including boron, intermediates, and modifiers and elements difficult to immobilise. Selection rules for designing nuclear wasteform silicate glasses are outlined. Glass composite materials to immobilise glass-immiscible waste components are discussed. Both one- and two-stage vitrification technologies are described. An overview is given of the development of vitrification technology, including current operational data on radioactive waste vitrification facilities. Calcination processes are considered in detail, including typical properties of waste calcination products. Recent developments in vitrification are given, including descriptions of cold crucible induction-heated melters and in situ vitrification. Limitations caused by radionuclide volatility are examined. Acceptance criteria are given for vitreous wasteforms.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal treatment of historical radioactive solid and liquid waste into the CILVA incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the very beginning of the nuclear activities in Belgium, the incineration of radioactive waste was chosen as a suitable technique for achieving an optimal volume reduction of the produced waste quantities. Based on the 35 years experience gained by the operation of the old incinerator, a new industrial incineration plant started nuclear operation in May 1995, as a part of the Belgian Centralized Treatment/Conditioning Facility named CILVA. Up to the end of 2006, the CILVA incinerator has burnt 1660 tonne of solid waste and 419 tonne of liquid waste. This paper describes the type and allowable radioactivity of the waste, the incineration process, heat recovery and the air pollution control devices. Special attention is given to the treatment of several hundreds of tonne historical waste from former reprocessing activities such as alpha suspected solid waste, aqueous and organic liquid waste and spent ion exchange resins. The capacity, volume reduction, chemical and radiological emissions are also evaluated. BELGOPROCESS, a company set up in 1984 at Dessel (Belgium) where a number of nuclear facilities were already installed is specialized in the processing of radioactive waste. It is a subsidiary of ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Nuclear Waste Management Agency. According to its mission statement, the activities of BELGOPROCESS focus on three areas: treatment, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste; decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities and cleaning of contaminated buildings and land; operating of storage sites for conditioned radioactive waste. (authors)

Deckers, Jan; Mols, Ludo [Belgoprocess NV, Operations Department, Gravenstraat 73, B-2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield R. 5. Haszeldine* and C. Mc of the great environmentalproblems of our age is the safe disposal of radioactive waste for geological time periods. Britain is currently investigating a potential site for underground burial of waste, near

Haszeldine, Stuart

283

Summary of Natural Resources that Potentially Influence Human Intrusion at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, Raytheon Services Nevada completed a review of natural resource literature and other sources to identify potentially exploitable resources and potential future land uses near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, that could lead to future inadvertent human intrusion and subsequent release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. National Security Technologies, LLC, revised the original limited-distribution document to conform to current editorial standards and U.S. Department of Energy requirements for public release. The researchers examined the potential for future development of sand, gravel, mineral, petroleum, water resources, and rural land uses, such as agriculture, grazing, and hunting. The study was part of the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes. Sand and gravel are not considered exploitable site resources because the materials are common throughout the area and the quality at the Area 5 RWMS is not ideal for typical commercial uses. Site information also indicates a very low mineral potential for the area. None of the 23 mining districts in southern Nye County report occurrences of economic mineral deposits in unconsolidated alluvium. The potential for oil and natural gas is low for southern Nye County. No occurrences of coal, tar sand, or oil shale on the NTS are reported in available literature. Several potential future uses of water were considered. Agricultural irrigation is impractical due to poor soils and existing water supply regulations. Use of water for geothermal energy development is unlikely because temperatures are too low for typical commercial applications using current technology. Human consumption of water has the most potential for cause of intrusion. The economics of future water needs may create a demand for the development of deep carbonate aquifers in the region. However, the Area 5 RWMS is not an optimal location for extraction of groundwater from the deep carbonate aquifer. Grazing and hunting are unlikely to be potential causes for inadvertent human intrusion into waste areas because of vegetation characteristics and lack of significant game animal populations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental 46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to convert buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site from their former uses to interim waste storage facilities in order to increase storage capacity for low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 9, 1996 EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

285

Monitoring of a RCRA Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1953, solid radioactive waste materials have been disposed of in a centrally located facility known as the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. These burial grounds comprise three distinct disposal sites which include the original set of burial trenches for solid low level radioactive wastes (643-G), the currently operating Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (643-7G), and the Mixed Waste Management Facility (643-28G) located within 643-7G. The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) has been used to dispose of various low level radioactive waste materials just as the other portions of the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Some of the waste materials in the MWMF have been classified as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because the MWMF contains mixed wastes, a closure plan for the facility was developed and submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to comply with RCRA requirements. This paper discusses the various aspects of the groundwater monitoring program developed to satisfy regulatory requirements for post-closure care and provides some initial results on groundwater quality.

Gordon, D.E.; Stevens, C.B.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Monitoring of a RCRA Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1953, solid radioactive waste materials have been disposed of in a centrally located facility known as the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. These burial grounds comprise three distinct disposal sites which include the original set of burial trenches for solid low level radioactive wastes (643-G), the currently operating Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (643-7G), and the Mixed Waste Management Facility (643-28G) located within 643-7G. The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) has been used to dispose of various low level radioactive waste materials just as the other portions of the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Some of the waste materials in the MWMF have been classified as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because the MWMF contains mixed wastes, a closure plan for the facility was developed and submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to comply with RCRA requirements. This paper discusses the various aspects of the groundwater monitoring program developed to satisfy regulatory requirements for post-closure care and provides some initial results on groundwater quality.

Gordon, D.E.; Stevens, C.B.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Framework Approach to Evaluate Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Public Engagement Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management - 13430  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex interplay of politics, economics and culture undermines attempts to define universal best practices for public engagement in the management of nuclear materials. In the international context, communicators must rely on careful adaptation and creative execution to make standard communication techniques succeed in their local communities. Nuclear professionals need an approach to assess and adapt culturally specific public engagement strategies to meet the demands of their particular political, economic and social structures. Using participant interviews and public sources, the Potomac Communications Group reviewed country-specific examples of nuclear-related communication efforts to provide insight into a proposed approach. The review considered a spectrum of cultural dimensions related to diversity, authority, conformity, proximity and time. Comparisons help to identify cross-cultural influences of various public engagement tactics and to inform a framework for communicators. While not prescriptive in its application, the framework offers a way for communicators to assess the salience of outreach tactics in specific situations. The approach can guide communicators to evaluate and tailor engagement strategies to achieve localized public outreach goals. (authors)

Hermann, Laura [Potomac Communications Group, 1133 20th St NW Washington DC 20035 (United States)] [Potomac Communications Group, 1133 20th St NW Washington DC 20035 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

Mohamed, Yasser T. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT_19507_1 DRAFT_19507_1 High-Level Waste Management Bryan Bower, DOE Director - WVDP DOE High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Savannah River Site April 1, 2008 West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project DRAFT_19507_2 West Valley High-Level Waste To solidify the radioactive material from approximately 600,000 gallons of high-level radioactive waste into a durable, high-quality glass, both a pretreatment system to remove salts and sulfates from the waste and a vitrification system/process were designed. To solidify the radioactive material from approximately 600,000 gallons of high-level radioactive waste into a durable, high-quality glass, both a pretreatment system to remove salts and sulfates from the waste and a vitrification system/process were designed.

291

South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

292

UOP, A Honewell Company CSTs Clean Radioactive Waste in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UOP, A Honewell Company CSTs Clean Radioactive Waste in Fukushima and Worldwide Radiation waste cleanup was in the public eye this year following the huge earthquake and tsunami in...

293

Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Radioactive Material Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Material Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM) 12/5/2013 (form Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM) 12/5/2013 (form date) SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001 (RWM date) SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001 (RWM number) Page 1 of 2 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DECLARATION FORM For RP use

Wechsler, Risa H.

295

What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

DOE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Fund Activities Management Team Waste Fund Activities Management Team Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team The Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team has responsibility to: Manage the investments and expenditures of the Nuclear Waste Fund; Support correspondence regarding Nuclear Waste Policy Act issues raised by congressional, Inspector General, Government Accounting Office and Freedom of Information Act inquiries; and, Manage the annual fee adequacy assessment process. Applicable Documents Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 2009 Letter to Congress OCRWM Financial Statements for Annual Report for Years Ended

297

Impact of the deployment schedule of fast breeding reactors in the frame of French act for nuclear materials and radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of the French Act of June 28, 2006 on 'a sustainable management of nuclear materials and radioactive waste' EDF R and D assesses various research scenarios of transition between the actual French fleet and a Generation IV fleet with a closed fuel cycle where plutonium is multi-recycled. The basic scenarios simulate a deployment of 60 GWe of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) in two steps: one third from 2040 to 2050 and the rest from 2080 to 2100 (scenarios 2040). These research scenarios assume that SFR technology will be ready for industrial deployment in 2040. One of the many sensitivity analyses that EDF, as a nuclear power plant operator, must evaluate is the impact of a delay of SFR technology in terms of uranium consumptions, plutonium needs and fuel cycle utilities gauging. The sensitivity scenarios use the same assumptions as scenarios 2040 but they simulate a different transition phase: SFRs are deployed in one step between 2080 and 2110 (scenarios 2080). As the French Act states to conduct research on minor actinides (MA) management, we studied different options for 2040 and 2080 scenarios: no MA transmutation, americium transmutation in heterogeneous mode based on americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB) in SFRs and all MA transmutation in heterogeneous mode based on MA Bearing Blankets (MABB). Moreover, we studied multiple parameters that could impact the deployment of these reactors (SFR load factor, increase of the use of MOX in Light Water Reactors, increase of the cooling time in spent nuclear fuel storage...). Each scenario has been computed with the EDF R and D fuel cycle simulation code TIRELIRE-STRATEGIE and optimized to meet various fuel cycle constraints such as using the reprocessing facility with long period of constant capacity, keeping the temporary stored mass of plutonium and MA under imposed limits, recycling older assemblies first... These research scenarios show that the transition from the current PWR fleet to an equivalent fleet of Generation IV SFR can follow different courses. The design of SFR-V2B that we used in our studies needs a high inventory of plutonium resulting in tension on this resource. Several options can be used in order to loosen this tension: our results lead to favour the use of axial breeding blanket in SFR. Load factor of upcoming reactors has to be regarded with attention as it has a high impact on plutonium resource for a given production of electricity. The deployment of SFRs beginning in 2080 instead of 2040 following the scenarios we described creates higher tensions on reprocessing capacity, separated plutonium storage and spent fuel storage. In the frame of the French Act, we studied minor actinides transmutation. The flux of MA in all fuel cycle plants is really high, which will lead to decay heat, a and neutron emission related problems. In terms of reduction of MA inventories, the deployment of MA transmutation cycle must not delay the installation of SFRs. The plutonium production in MABB and AmBB does not allow reducing the use of axial breeding blankets. The impact of MA or Am transmutation over the high level waste disposal is more important if the SFRs are deployed later. Transmutation option (americium or all MA) does not have a significant impact on the number of canister produced nor on its long-term thermal properties. (authors)

Le Mer, J.; Garzenne, C.; Lemasson, D. [Electricite de France R and D, 1, Avenue du General De Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing more than 2 million cubic meters of radioactive wastes from past, present, and future DOE activities. The WM PEIS will assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in improving the efficiency and reliability of management of its current and anticipated volumes of radioactive and hazardous wastes and will help DOE continue to comply with applicable laws and regulations and protect workers, public health and safety, and the environment. The WM PEIS

299

Department of Energy - Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 en U.S. Department of Energy to Host 1 en U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal http://energy.gov/articles/us-department-energy-host-press-call-radioactive-waste-shipment-and-disposal radioactive-waste-shipment-and-disposal" class="title-link">U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal

300

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Storage of High-Level Radioactive Waste (08/26/99)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

661 661 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 165 / Thursday, August 26, 1999 / Notices Installation State Function(s) Total au- thorizations Public an- nounce- ment date Solicitation issued or scheduled date SELFRIDGE ......................... MI FUELS MANAGEMENT ..................................................... 8 01-Jun-98 27-Apr-99. SELFRIDGE ......................... MI TRANSIENT AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ......................... 8 04-Jun-98 28-Apr-99. SEYMOUR JOHNSON ......... NC TRANSIENT AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE ......................... 8 12-Nov-97 02-Jul-99. SHAW ................................... SC COMMUNICATION FUNCTIONS ....................................... 3 18-May-99 09-May-00. SHAW ................................... SC LIBRARY .............................................................................

302

Integration of remediation strategy with waste management capabilities and regulatory drivers for radioactive waste storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the plans and strategies for remediation of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system tanks that have been removed from service at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the EPA-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One requirement of the FFA is that LLLW tanks that are removed from service must be evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. The Environmental Restoration Program intends to meet this requirement by using a {open_quotes}streamlined{close_quote} approach for selected tanks. This approach will combine the CERCLA Site Investigation. Remedial Action, Feasibility Study, and Proposed Plan requirements into a single Interim Proposed Plan document. This streamlined approach is expected to reduce the time required to complete the regulatory process while attaining acceptable risk reduction in a cost-effective way.

Baxter, J.T. [H& R Technical Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hepworth, H.K. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Hooyman, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

304

Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference February 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga speaks during the plenary session of the Waste Management Conference in Phoenix today. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga speaks during the plenary session of the Waste Management Conference in Phoenix today. WM Symposia Board Chairman James Gallagher, left to right, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Member William Ostendorff, Natural Resources Canada Uranium & Radioactive Waste Division Director Dave McCauley, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and WM Symposia Board Member Fred Sheil gather for a photo at the Waste Management Conference. WM Symposia Board Chairman James Gallagher, left to right, U.S. Nuclear

305

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Christine...

306

Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors.

Kocher, D.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EIS-0337: West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement is to provide information on the environmental impacts of the Department of Energys proposed action to ship radioactive wastes that are either currently in storage, or that will be generated from operations over the next 10 years, to offsite disposal locations, and to continue its ongoing onsite waste management activities.

308

Development of low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity in the United States - progress or stalemate?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been fifteen years since responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was shifted to the states by the United States Congress through the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA). In December 1985, Congress revisited the issue and enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). No new disposal sites have opened yet, however, and it is now evident that disposal facility development is more complex, time-consuming, and controversial than originally anticipated. For a nation with a large nuclear power industry, the lack of availability of LLW disposal capacity coupled with a similar lack of high-level radioactive waste disposal capacity could adversely affect the future viability of the nuclear energy option. The U.S. nuclear power industry, with 109 operating reactors, generates about half of the LLW shipped to commercial disposal sites and faces dwindling access to waste disposal sites and escalating waste management costs. The other producers of LLW - industries, government (except the defense related research and production waste), academic institutions, and medical institutions that account for the remaining half of the commercial LLW - face the same storage and cost uncertainties. This paper will summarize the current status of U.S. low-level radioactive waste generation and the status of new disposal facility development efforts by the states. The paper will also examine the factors that have contributed to delays, the most frequently suggested alternatives, and the likelihood of change.

Devgun, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Larson, G.S. [Midwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Assessment of LANL solid low-level waste management documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section's capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans and procedures and identify particular areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter III sets forth the requirements and guidelines for preparation and implementation of criteria, plans and procedures to be utilized in the management of solid low-level waste. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Suggested outlines for these documents are presented as Appendix A.

Klein, R.B.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Danna, J.G. (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Davis, K.D.; Rutz, A.C. (Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Assessment of LANL solid low-level waste management documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section`s capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans and procedures and identify particular areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter III sets forth the requirements and guidelines for preparation and implementation of criteria, plans and procedures to be utilized in the management of solid low-level waste. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Suggested outlines for these documents are presented as Appendix A.

Klein, R.B.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Danna, J.G. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Davis, K.D.; Rutz, A.C. [Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

US Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Protection Programs for Waste Management and Site Cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the regulatory authorities of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (ORIA) as they pertain to radioactive waste management and disposal, and cleanup of radioactively contaminated sites. It also describes several ORIA initiatives and examples of two of EPA's radioactive waste standards. (authors)

Clark, R.L. [Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Fifth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Fourth Report published in October 2011, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on...

313

Emerging technologies in hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The meeting was divided into two parts: Waste water management technologies and Soils, residues, and recycle techniques. Technologies included: photocatalytic oxidation; water treatment with hydrogen peroxide; ultraviolet destruction of pollutants; biodegradation; adsorption; affinity dialysis; and proton transfer. Other papers described evaluation of land treatment techniques; mobility of toxic metals in landfills; sorptive behavior in soils; artificial reef construction; and treatment and disposal options for radioactive metals (technetium 99, strontium, and plutonium). Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Tedder, D.W.; Pohland, F.G. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Application of microwave solidification technology to radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA has declared vitrification to be the Best Available Demonstrated Technology (BDAT) for High Level Radioactive Waste (40 CFR 268.42). Vitrification has been chosen as the method of choice for treating a number of radioactive residues and wastes in the DOE complex. Vitrification offers advantages of waste volume reduction, the ability to handle changing waste forms, and a stable, nonleachable final waste form. Microwave heating is a superior method for vitrification of radioactive wastes. Advantages of microwave heating include: (1) direct waste heating, eliminates need for electrodes, refractories and other consumables; (2) ``in-can`` processing allows for treatment of the material in its final container, (3) a mechanically simple system where the microwaves are generated away from the treatment area and transmitted to the treatment applicator by a wave guide, thus minimizing worker exposure to radiation; (4) easier equipment maintenance; and (5) a high degree of public acceptance.

Harris, M.; Sprenger, G.; Roushey, B.; Fenner, G.; Nieweg, R.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

315

Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste More Documents & Publications National Defense...

316

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

317

Radioactivity, Radiation, and the Chemistry of Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactivity, Radiation, and the Chemistry of Nuclear Waste ... A chemistry course for nonmajors, which centers on the chemistry of nuclear waste, has as a prerequisite at least two semesters of general chemistry. ... The final section of the course is devoted to the treatment of nuclear waste by vitrification and applications based on nuclear or radiation chemistry. ...

Nick Zevos

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Department has approximately 88 million gallons of liquid waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval, treatment and disposal of this waste exceeds $50 billion to be spent over several decades.

319

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Information-Sharing Protocol for the Transportation of Radioactive Waste to Yucca Mountain  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Draft for Review Only Preliminary Draft for Review Only Information-Sharing for Transportation of Radioactive Waste to Yucca Mountain Office of Logistics Management Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management U. S. Department of Energy Preliminary Draft July 2007 1 Preliminary Draft for Review Only TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION...........................................................................3 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................... 3 1.2 Document Origin and Structure...................................................................... 4 1.3 Information Sharing with Department of Homeland Security..................... 4 2.0 DISCUSSION OF TERMS ..................................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuels and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes were compiled through December 31, 1983, based on the most reliable information available from government sources and the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Future waste and spent fuel to be generated over the next 37 years and characteristics of these materials are also presented, consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) or projection of US commercial nuclear power growth and expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities. Materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, airborne waste, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated, based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions. 48 figures, 107 tables.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, 391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts for the following three key areas: (1) retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal of Hanford's waste and other DOE sites' low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for

324

Annual Report - FY 2001, Radioactive Waste Shipments To and From the Nevada Test Site, February 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada'' (DOE/EIS 0243). NNSA/NV committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at Area 3 and Area 5. This document satisfies requirements with regard to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to or from the NTS during fiscal year (FY 2001).

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Operations Office

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) recently deployed a new version of the Transportation Tracking and Communication System (TRANSCOM) that is compatible with mobile devices, including smartphones. The recent enhancement, TRANSCOM version 3.0, improves the user interface

326

The High-Level Radioactive Waste Act (Manitoba, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manitoba bars the storage of high-level radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel, not intended for research purposes, that was produced at a nuclear facility or in a nuclear reactor outside the...

327

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Christine Gelles*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Edward Regnier, U.S. Department of Energy; Andrew Wallo, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The Atomic Energy Act gives the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), the authority to regulate the management of radioactive waste generated by US DOE. This session will discuss DOE Order 435.1, which is protective of workers, public, and environment through specific requirements for the generation, treatment, storage, and disposal of US DOE radioactive waste. The Order is divided into four chapters: General Requirements, High-Level Waste, Transuranic Waste and Low-Level Waste. The requirements are consistent with existing promulgated Federal requirements but are specific to waste generated and disposed at US DOE facilities. A technical standard with requirements for documentation supporting the Disposal Authorization for a facility is also being prepared as well as a guide to accompany the Order. US DOE is in the process of updating the Order to maintain consistency with current practices and to increase efficiency in waste management. The draft Order will be available for public comment prior to being finalized.

328

Summary - Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge, TN  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge, TN Oak Ridge, TN EM Project: EM Waste Management Facility ETR Report Date: February 2008 ETR-11 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) is a land disposal facility for wastes generated by environmental restoration activities being conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation. Low-level radioactive wastes, hazardous wastes (Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act), and wastes defined by the Toxic Substances Control Act are approved for disposal in the EMWMF. All of the cells are lined with a

329

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)...

330

Waste Management Project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project, Liquid Effluents Project, and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible.

Jacobsen, P.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

PUBLIC AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE OF BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE VS DILUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 21, 2009, the Energy Facilities Contractors Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) provided a recommendation to the Department of Energy's Environmental Management program (DOE-EM) concerning supplemental guidance on blending methodologies to use to classify waste forms to determine if the waste form meets the definition of Transuranic (TRU) Waste or can be classified as Low-Level Waste (LLW). The guidance provides specific examples and methods to allow DOE and its Contractors to properly classify waste forms while reducing the generation of TRU wastes. TRU wastes are much more expensive to characterize at the generator's facilities, ship, and then dispose at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) than Low-Level Radioactive Waste's disposal. Also the reduction of handling and packaging of LLW is inherently less hazardous to the nuclear workforce. Therefore, it is important to perform the characterization properly, but in a manner that minimizes the generation of TRU wastes if at all possible. In fact, the generation of additional volumes of radioactive wastes under the ARRA programs, this recommendation should improve the cost effective implementation of DOE requirements while properly protecting human health and the environment. This paper will describe how the message of appropriate, less expensive, less hazardous blending of radioactive waste is the 'right' thing to do in many cases, but can be confused with inappropriate 'dilution' that is frowned upon by regulators and stakeholders in the public. A proposal will be made in this paper on how to communicate this very complex and confusing technical issue to regulatory bodies and interested stakeholders to gain understanding and approval of the concept. The results of application of the proposed communication method and attempt to change the regulatory requirements in this area will be discussed including efforts by DOE and the NRC on this very complex subject.

Goldston, W.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal This report provides findings from a set of social science studies undertaken by the Center for Risk and Crisis Management (CRCM) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which focus on public attitudes and preferences concerning the siting of nuclear repositories and interim storage facilities. Overall these studies are intended to be responsive to the recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) that US Department of Energy (DOE) learn as much as possible from prior experience. As stated by the BRC (BRC 2012: 118): "To ensure

333

Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER EG&G IDAHO, INC. SUBCONTRACT NO. EGG-C93-170221, W(A)-93-005, CH-0757 Under this subcontract, Waste Management Environmental Services, Inc. (WMES) will demonstrate key technical features of its proposed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Pit-9 remediation program. Pit-9 is an area in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL containing radioactive and hazardous materials in the form of toxic metals and organic materials, including plutonium and americium. Specifically, the subject subcontract is directed toward a Proof-of-Process (POP) demonstration program intended to provide EG&G Idaho, Inc. (EG&G) with additional information that it will use in the

335

Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) A transuranic (TRU) waste shipment makes its way to the...

336

Savannah River Site Interim Waste Management Program Plan FY 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report of how Waste Management`s operations are conducted, what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year. In addition, this document projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year in order to adequately plan for safe handling, storage, and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site and for developing technology for improved management of wastes. In this document, work descriptions and milestone schedules are current as of December 1991.

Chavis, D.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Characterisation of radioactive waste products associated with plant decommissioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the results integrated over selected...deposited on the system and equipment...operating plant data and...residual waste activities...coolant pH controls. Shut-down...Surface treatments (e.g...Component-system decontamination...varies from plant to plant...radioactive waste due to activation...internals and control rod drive......

J. Sejvar; A. H. Fero; C. Gil; R. J. Hagler; J. L. Santiago; A. Holgado; R. Swenson

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

339

1995 state-by-state assessment of low-level radioactive wastes received at commercial disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year the National Low-Level Waste Management Program publishes a state-by-state assessment report. This report provides both national and state-specific disposal data on low-level radioactive waste commercially disposed in US. Data in this report are categorized according to disposal site, generator category, waste class, volumes, and radionuclide activity. Included are tables showing the distribution of waste by state for 1995 and a comparison of waste volumes and radioactivity by state for 1991 through 1995; also included is a list of all commercial nuclear power reactors in US as of Dec. 31, 1994. This report distinguishes low-level radioactive waste shipped directly for disposal by generators and waste handled by an intermediary.

Fuchs, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Synergistic Inhibitors for Dilute High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were conducted to determine the effectiveness of various combinations of anodic inhibitors in the prevention of pitting in carbon steel exposed to dilute radioactive waste. Chromate, molybdate, and phosphate were investigated as replacements for nitrite, whose effective concentrations are incompatible with the waste vitrification process. The polarization scans were performed in non-radioactive waste simulants. Their results showed that acceptable combinations of phosphate with chromate and phosphate with molybdate effectively prevented pitting corrosion. Chromate with molybdate could not replace nitrite.

Wiersma, B.J.; Zapp, P.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Why are 11 states attempting to develop new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities? Why is only on disposal facility accepting waste nationally? What is the future of waste disposal? These questions are representative of those being asked throughout the country. This paper attempts to answer these questions in terms of where we are, how we got there, and where we might be going.

Smith, P.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Association of Indiana Solid Wastes Districts Inc. The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting,

346

WIMS - Waste Information Management System  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Welcome To WIMS Welcome To WIMS Waste Information Management System WIMS new web address: http://www.emwims.org WIMS is developed to provide DOE Headquarters and site waste managers with the tools necessary to easily visualize, understand, and manage the vast volumes, categories, and problems of forecasted waste streams. WIMS meets this need by providing a user-friendly online system to gather, organize, and present waste forecast data from DOE sites. This system provides a method for identification of waste forecast volumes, material classes, disposition pathways, and potential choke points and barriers to final disposition. Disclaimer: Disposition facility information presented is for planning purposes only and does not represent DOE's decisions or commitments. Any selection of disposition facility will be made after technical, economic, and policy considerations.

347

Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solid Waste Management Rules (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules establish procedures and standards to protect public health and the environment by ensuring the safe, proper, and sustainable management of solid waste in Vermont. The rules apply to...

349

2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

Shott, Gregory [NSTec] [NSTec

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method for aqueous radioactive waste treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Plutonium, strontium, and cesium found in aqueous waste solutions resulting from nuclear fuel processing are removed by contacting the waste solutions with synthetic zeolite incorporating up to about 5 wt % titanium as sodium titanate in an ion exchange system. More than 99.9% of the plutonium, strontium, and cesium are removed from the waste solutions.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Burger, Leland L. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

352

Savannah River Site Interim Waste Management Program Plan FY 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report of how Waste Management's operations are conducted, what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year. In addition, this document projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year in order to adequately plan for safe handling, storage, and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site and for developing technology for improved management of wastes. In this document, work descriptions and milestone schedules are current as of December 1991.

Chavis, D.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling of transport and reaction in an engineered barrier for radioactive waste confinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of transport and reaction in an engineered barrier for radioactive waste confinement G bentonite; Radioactive waste; Modelling; KIRMAT code; Chemical transformations; Mass transport 0169;1. Introduction A particular radioactive waste disposal design proposes to store waste in deep geological layers

Montes-Hernandez, German

354

Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The basics in transportation of low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin gives a basic understanding about issues and safety standards that are built into the transportation system for radioactive material and waste in the US. An excellent safety record has been established for the transport of commercial low-level radioactive waste, or for that matter, all radioactive materials. This excellent safety record is primarily because of people adhering to strict regulations governing the transportation of radioactive materials. This bulletin discusses the regulatory framework as well as the regulations that set the standards for packaging, hazard communications (communicating the potential hazard to workers and the public), training, inspections, routing, and emergency response. The excellent safety record is discussed in the last section of the bulletin.

Allred, W.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Director Catherine Templeton and U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) unveil a marker to commemorate the closing of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left,

357

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Director Catherine Templeton and U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) unveil a marker to commemorate the closing of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left,

358

Sandia National Laboratories: radioactive waste solution cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Fukushima and Worldwide On February 14, 2013, in Energy, Materials Science, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Research & Capabilities Radiation waste cleanup was in the public eye...

359

Waste Information Management System with 2012-13 Waste Streams - 13095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Information Management System (WIMS) 2012-13 was updated to support the Department of Energy (DOE) accelerated cleanup program. The schedule compression required close coordination and a comprehensive review and prioritization of the barriers that impeded treatment and disposition of the waste streams at each site. Many issues related to waste treatment and disposal were potential critical path issues under the accelerated schedule. In order to facilitate accelerated cleanup initiatives, waste managers at DOE field sites and at DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., needed timely waste forecast and transportation information regarding the volumes and types of radioactive waste that would be generated by DOE sites over the next 40 years. Each local DOE site historically collected, organized, and displayed waste forecast information in separate and unique systems. In order for interested parties to understand and view the complete DOE complex-wide picture, the radioactive waste and shipment information of each DOE site needed to be entered into a common application. The WIMS application was therefore created to serve as a common application to improve stakeholder comprehension and improve DOE radioactive waste treatment and disposal planning and scheduling. WIMS allows identification of total forecasted waste volumes, material classes, disposition sites, choke points, technological or regulatory barriers to treatment and disposal, along with forecasted waste transportation information by rail, truck and inter-modal shipments. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida, developed and deployed the web-based forecast and transportation system and is responsible for updating the radioactive waste forecast and transportation data on a regular basis to ensure the long-term viability and value of this system. (authors)

Upadhyay, H.; Quintero, W.; Lagos, L.; Shoffner, P.; Roelant, D. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

SPRU Removes High-Risk Radioactive Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NISKAYUNA, N.Y. EMs Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) Disposition Project completed a significant waste-treatment campaign in February that involved the solidification of approximately 9,700 gallons of contaminated sludge and 14 shipments of the waste off-site for permanent disposal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Radioactive waste Cumbria 6, 7 Sept 2012 1 Geological disposal of radioactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Edinburgh Professor of Geology Nuclear waste ­ exists and has to be solved Nuclear power ­ is likely_and_Copeland.html #12;Nuclear power s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Radioactive waste Cumbria 6, 7 Sept 2012 2 First civil nuclear waste Cumbria 6, 7 Sept 2012 15 Thus, the nuclear industry has calculated that the escape of radioactive

362

Elimination of liquid discharge to the environment from the TA-50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternatives were evaluated for management of treated radioactive liquid waste from the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The alternatives included continued discharge into Mortandad Canyon, diversion to the sanitary wastewater treatment facility and discharge of its effluent to Sandia Canyon or Canada del Buey, and zero liquid discharge. Implementation of a zero liquid discharge system is recommended in addition to two phases of upgrades currently under way. Three additional phases of upgrades to the present radioactive liquid waste system are proposed to accomplish zero liquid discharge. The first phase involves minimization of liquid waste generation, along with improved characterization and monitoring of the remaining liquid waste. The second phase removes dissolved salts from the reverse osmosis concentrate stream to yield a higher effluent quality. In the final phase, the high-quality effluent is reused for industrial purposes within the Laboratory or evaporated. Completion of these three phases will result in zero discharge of treated radioactive liquid wastewater from the RLWTF.

Moss, D.; Williams, N.; Hall, D.; Hargis, K.; Saladen, M.; Sanders, M.; Voit, S.; Worland, P.; Yarbro, S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Migration barrier covers for radioactive and mixed waste landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Migration barrier cover technology will likely serve as the remediation alternative of choice for most of DOE's radioactive and mixed waste landfills simply because human and ecological risks can be effectively managed without the use of more expensive alternatives. However, very little testing and evaluation has been done, either before or after installation, to monitor how effective they are in isolating waste or to develop data that can be used to evaluate model predictions of long term performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory has investigated the performance of a variety of landfill capping alternatives since 1981 using large field lysimeters to monitor the fate of precipitation falling on the cap surface. The objective of these studies is to provide the risk manager with a variety of field tested capping designs, of various complexities and costs, so that design alternatives can be matched to the need for hydrologic control at the site. Four different landfill cap designs, representing different complexities and costs, were constructed at Hill Air Force Base (AFB) in October and November, 1989. The designs were constructed in large lysimeters and instrumented to provide estimates of all components of water balance including precipitation, runoff (and soil erosion), infiltration, leachate production, evapotranspiration, and capillary/hydraulic barrier flow. The designs consisted of a typical soil cover to serve as a baseline, a modified EPA RCRA cover, and two versions of a Los Alamos design that contained erosion control measures, an improved vegetation cover to enhance evapotranspiration, and a capillary barrier to divert downward flow of soil water. A comprehensive summary of the Hill AFB demonstration will be available in October 1993, when the project is scheduled to terminate.

Hakonson, T.E.; Manies, K.L.; Warren, R.W.; Bostick, K.V.; Trujillo, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kent, J.S. (Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology); Lane, L.J. (Department of Agriculture, Tucson, AZ (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Migration barrier covers for radioactive and mixed waste landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Migration barrier cover technology will likely serve as the remediation alternative of choice for most of DOE`s radioactive and mixed waste landfills simply because human and ecological risks can be effectively managed without the use of more expensive alternatives. However, very little testing and evaluation has been done, either before or after installation, to monitor how effective they are in isolating waste or to develop data that can be used to evaluate model predictions of long term performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory has investigated the performance of a variety of landfill capping alternatives since 1981 using large field lysimeters to monitor the fate of precipitation falling on the cap surface. The objective of these studies is to provide the risk manager with a variety of field tested capping designs, of various complexities and costs, so that design alternatives can be matched to the need for hydrologic control at the site. Four different landfill cap designs, representing different complexities and costs, were constructed at Hill Air Force Base (AFB) in October and November, 1989. The designs were constructed in large lysimeters and instrumented to provide estimates of all components of water balance including precipitation, runoff (and soil erosion), infiltration, leachate production, evapotranspiration, and capillary/hydraulic barrier flow. The designs consisted of a typical soil cover to serve as a baseline, a modified EPA RCRA cover, and two versions of a Los Alamos design that contained erosion control measures, an improved vegetation cover to enhance evapotranspiration, and a capillary barrier to divert downward flow of soil water. A comprehensive summary of the Hill AFB demonstration will be available in October 1993, when the project is scheduled to terminate.

Hakonson, T.E.; Manies, K.L.; Warren, R.W.; Bostick, K.V.; Trujillo, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kent, J.S. [Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology; Lane, L.J. [Department of Agriculture, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

367

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

368

Sandia National Laboratories: Defense Waste Management Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs provides scientific analyses and programmatic advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in support of defense waste management challenges. Defense waste encompasses...

369

Bibliography of reports by US Geological Survey personnel pertaining to underground nuclear testing and radioactive waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site, and radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP Site, New Mexico, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography presents reports released to the public between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 1979, by personnel of the US Geological Survey. Reports include information on underground nuclear testing and waste management projects at the NTS (Nevada Test Site) and radioactive waste projects at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site, New Mexico. Reports on Project Dribble, Tatum Dome, Mississippi, previously prepared as administrative reports and released to the public as 474-series reports during 1979 are also included in this bibliography.

Glanzman, V.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EIS-0081: Long-Term Management of Liquid High-Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Western New York Nuclear Service Center, West Valley, New York  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action prepared this statement to analyze the environmental and socioeconomic impacts resulting from the Departments proposed action to construct and operate facilities necessary to solidify the liquid high level wastes currently stored in underground tanks at Wes t Valley, New York.

371

Low-level radioactive waste technology: a selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography of 447 references contains scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information relevant to low-level radioactive waste technology. The bibliography focuses on environmental transport, disposal site, and waste treatment studies. The publication covers both domestic and foreign literature for the period 1952 to 1979. Major chapters selected are Chemical and Physical Aspects; Container Design and Performance; Disposal Site; Environmental Transport; General Studies and Reviews; Geology, Hydrology and Site Resources; Regulatory and Economic Aspects; Transportation Technology; Waste Production; and Waste Treatment. Specialized data fields have been incorporated into the data file to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the Measured Radionuclides field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the Measured Parameters field. In addition, each document referenced in this bibliography has been assigned a relevance number to facilitate sorting the documents according to their pertinence to low-level radioactive waste technology. The documents are rated 1, 2, 3, or 4, with 1 indicating direct applicability to low-level radioactive waste technology and 4 indicating that a considerable amount of interpretation is required for the information presented to be applied. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. Indexes are provide for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) subject category, (4) title, (5) geographic location, (6) measured parameters, (7) measured radionuclides, and (8) publication description.

Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Hyder, L.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method for solidification of radioactive and other hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solidification of liquid radioactive waste, and other hazardous wastes, is accomplished by the method of the invention by incorporating the waste into a porous glass crystalline molded block. The porous block is first loaded with the liquid waste and then dehydrated and exposed to thermal treatment at 50-1,000.degree. C. The porous glass crystalline molded block consists of glass crystalline hollow microspheres separated from fly ash (cenospheres), resulting from incineration of fossil plant coals. In a preferred embodiment, the porous glass crystalline blocks are formed from perforated cenospheres of grain size -400+50, wherein the selected cenospheres are consolidated into the porous molded block with a binder, such as liquid silicate glass. The porous blocks are then subjected to repeated cycles of saturating with liquid waste, and drying, and after the last cycle the blocks are subjected to calcination to transform the dried salts to more stable oxides. Radioactive liquid waste can be further stabilized in the porous blocks by coating the internal surface of the block with metal oxides prior to adding the liquid waste, and by coating the outside of the block with a low-melting glass or a ceramic after the waste is loaded into the block.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Voskresenskaya, Elena N. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Kostin, Eduard M. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Pavlov, Vyacheslav F. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal November...

374

Locations of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Locations of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Locations of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Map of the United States of America showing the...

375

Considerations Related To Human Intrusion In The Context Of Disposal Of Radioactive Waste-The IAEA HIDRA Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal approaches for management of radioactive waste are commonly termed delay and decay, concentrate and contain and dilute and disperse. Containing the waste and isolating it from the human environment, by burying it, is considered to increase safety and is generally accepted as the preferred approach for managing radioactive waste. However, this approach results in concentrated sources of radioactive waste contained in one location, which can pose hazards should the facility be disrupted by human action in the future. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) agree that some form of inadvertent human intrusion (HI) needs to be considered to address the potential consequences in the case of loss of institutional control and loss of memory of the disposal facility. Requirements are reflected in national regulations governing radioactive waste disposal. However, in practice, these requirements are often different from country to country, which is then reflected in the actual implementation of HI as part of a safety case. The IAEA project on HI in the context of Disposal of RadioActive waste (HIDRA) has been started to identify potential areas for improved consistency in consideration of HI. The expected outcome is to provide recommendations on how to address human actions in the safety case in the future, and how the safety case may be used to demonstrate robustness and optimize siting, design and waste acceptance criteria within the context of a safety case.

Seitz, Roger; Kumano, Yumiko; Bailey, Lucy; Markley, Chris; Andersson, Eva; Beuth, Thomas

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

376

Underground facility area requirements for a radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, managed by the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. Preliminary waste descriptions and preliminary areal power density calculations have been completed, and the Topopah Spring Member has been recommended as the emplacement unit. Using these data, an effort has begun to determine the area needed for the underground facility. This report describes work performed to determine the area needed to emplace waste equivalent to 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) initially loaded in commercial power reactors. The area needed for support functions is also described. The total area of the underground facility depends on the types of waste received, the amount of each type of waste received, the areal power density assumed, and the emplacement configuration chosen (horizontal or vertical emplacement). The areas range from about 1240 acres to about 1520 acres. For vertical emplacement of the reference inventory of spent fuel, 1520 acres are required. A significant finding of this report is the importance of low-heat-producing wastes (defense high-level waste, West Valley high-level waste, cladding hulls, transuranic waste, and spent fuel hardware) when calculating the area required for the underground facility. If other wastes are included and the spent fuel capacity is reduced consistent with a total capacity of 70,000 MTU, the area required will be smaller.

Mansure, A.J.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation liability and radiological risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for States, compact regions, and other interested parties to address two subjects related to transporting low-level radioactive waste to disposal facilities. One is the potential liabilities associated with low-level radioactive waste transportation from the perspective of States as hosts to low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The other is the radiological risks of low-level radioactive waste transportation for drivers, the public, and disposal facility workers.

Quinn, G.J.; Brown, O.F. II; Garcia, R.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cesium removal from Savannah River Site radioactive waste using crystalline silicotitanate (IONSIV(R) IE-911)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study measured the ability of crystalline silicotitanate to remove cesium from Savannah River Site radioactive waste.

Walker, D.D.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Method of storing radioactive wastes using modified tobermorite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatable with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

Komarneni, Sridhar (State College, PA); Roy, Della M. (State College, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Migration of Radioactive Wastes: Radionuclide Mobilization by Complexing Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Hanford, West Valley, and Maxey Flats facilities, respectively (29-31...Chalk River, West Valley, and Maxey Flats (31, 32). The use of EDTA and...transport at many radio-active waste disposal sites in this coun-try, and migration...

JEFFREY L. MEANS; DAVID A. CRERAR; JAMES O. DUGUID

1978-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION IN FRACTURED ROCK FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES F. Cadini1 , J. De Sanctis1 , I. Bertoli1 , E. Zio1,2 1 Dipartimento di Energia is a fundamental task in any performance assessment aimed at verifying the protection offered by radioactive waste for chemical or low-level radioactive wastes, or the Performance Assessment (PA) of geological repositories

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Modelling of long-term diffusionreaction in a bentonite barrier for radioactive waste confinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling of long-term diffusion­reaction in a bentonite barrier for radioactive waste confinement in geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste. This material is expected to fill up by swelling transformations; Solute diffusion 1. Introduction The radioactive waste confinement in deep geolo- gical laye

Montes-Hernandez, German

385

Investigations to site a radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigations to site a radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4 Radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4 s the UK radioactive waste legacy comprises difficult material which is complex, of mixed origin

386

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

387

Applications Where Snap is BPM for Radioactive Waste Assay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston in the United Kingdom (UK), has used a variety of assay techniques to measure the radioactive content of a diverse range of waste packages from decommissioning, operational and legacy sources. The regulator, the Environment Agency in the UK, places conditions and limits on AWE through an authorisation within the Radioactive Substances Act (RSA93). The conditions and limits require Best Practical Means (BPM) measurements to be used to demonstrate compliance with the authorisation. Hence, the assay technique employed needs to achieve a balance between risk of exposure, environmental considerations, technological considerations, health and safety considerations and cost effectiveness, without being grossly disproportionate in terms of money, time or trouble. Recently published work has concluded that the Spectral Non-destructive Assay Platform (SNAP) assay system is BPM for Depleted Uranium (DU) waste assay at AWE (1) and low level plutonium in soft drummed waste, HEPA filters and soils (2-4). The purpose of this paper is to highlight other applications where SNAP represents BPM for radioactive waste assay. This has been done by intercomparison studies of SNAP with other assay techniques, such as Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) and Passive Neutron Coincidence Counter (PNCC). It has been concluded that, for a large range of waste packages encountered at AWE, SNAP is BPM. (author)

Miller, T.J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Disposal of radioactive waste from nuclear research facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swiss radioactive wastes originate from nuclear power plants (NPP) and from medicine (e.g. radiation sources), industry (e.g. fire detectors) and research (e.g. CERN, PSI). Their conditioning, characterisation and documentation has to meet the demands given by the Swiss regulatory authorities including all information needed for a safe disposal in future repositories. For NPP wastes, arisings as well as the processes responsible for the buildup of short and long lived radionuclides are well known, and the conditioning procedures are established. The radiological inventories are determined on a routinely basis using a combined system of measurements and calculational programs. For waste from research, the situation is more complicated. The wide spectrum of different installations combined with a poorly known history of primary and secondary radiation results in heterogeneous waste sorts with radiological inventories quite different from NPP waste and difficult to measure long lived radionuclides. In order to c...

Maxeiner, H; Kolbe, E

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Building 251 Radioactive Waste Characterization by Process Knowledge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 251 is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Elements Facility. Operations that involved heavy elements with uncontained radioisotopes including transuranic elements took place inside of glove boxes and fume hoods. These operations included process and solution chemistry, dissolutions, titrations, centrifuging, etc., and isotope separation. Operations with radioactive material which presently take place outside of glove boxes include storage, assaying, packing and unpacking and inventory verification. Wastes generated inside glove boxes will generally be considered TRU or Greater Than Class C (GTCC). Wastes generated in the RMA, outside glove boxes, is presumed to be low level waste. This process knowledge quantification method may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around B251. The method is suitable only for quantification of waste which measures below the MDA of the Blue Alpha meter (i.e. only material which measures as Non-Detect with the blue alpha is to be characterized by this method).

Dominick, J L

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

Fox, K.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Historical perspective, economic analysis, and regulatory analysis of the impacts of waste partitioning-transmutation on the disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partitioning-transmutation, sometimes called actinide burning, is an alternative approach to high-level radioactive waste management. It consists of removing long-lived radionuclides from wastes and destroying those radionuclides, thus reducing the long-term hazards of radioactive waste. It was studied in detail in the 1970's. New developments in technology and other factors are resulting in a reexamination of this waste management option. This report consists of three papers which summarize the historical work, update the analysis of the costs of waste disposal, and describe current regulatory requirements which might be impacted by P-T. The papers provide a starting point for future research on P-T. 152 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Croff, A.G.; Kocher, D.C.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities.

Porter, C.L.; Widmayer, D.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.

W.M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Basic Research for Evaluating Nuclear Waste Form Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Don J. Bradley

395

International waste management fact book  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries around the world are faced with nuclear and environmental management problems similar to those being addressed by the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this Fact Book is to provide the latest information on US and international organizations, programs, activities and key personnel to promote mutual cooperation to solve these problems. Areas addressed include all aspects of closing the commercial and nuclear fuel cycle and managing the wastes and sites from defense-related, nuclear materials production programs.

Amaya, J.P.; LaMarche, M.N.; Upton, J.F.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

2014 Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2014 Waste Management Conference 2014 Waste Management Conference April 9, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis What does this project do? Goal 2. Preserve, protect, and share records and...

397

Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Recommendations for future low-level and mixed waste management practices at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes recommendations concerning the management of low-level radioactive wastes and mixtures at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Performance assessments, characterization, site disposal design, shipment, and storage are discussed.

Jennrich, E.A.; Klein, R.B.; Murphy, E.S.; Shuman, R. (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Hickman, W.W.; Rutz, A.C.; Uhl, D.L. (Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1989-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Waste Management Information System (WMIS) User Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the user of the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) instructions on how to use the WMIS software. WMIS allows users to initiate, track, and close waste packages. The modular design supports integration and utilization of data throuh the various stages of waste management. The phases of the waste management work process include generation, designation, packaging, container management, procurement, storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal.

R. E. Broz

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Enclosure 3 DOE Response to EPA Question Regarding "High-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to date, which is from the definitions in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act: The term "high-level radioactive of waste streams as from the applicable definition of HLW in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. 5/11/20051 #12 defining High Level Waste: For the purpose of this statement of policy, "high-level liquid radioactive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive waste management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume serves as an introduction to the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. This report includes discussions of radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha-emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than five years). Each report includes information regarding radiological and chemical characteristics of specific radionuclides. Information is also included discussing waste streams and waste forms that may contain each radionuclide, and radionuclide behavior in the environment and in the human body. Not all radionuclides commonly found at low-level radioactive waste sites are included in this report. The discussion in this volume explains the rationale of the radionuclide selection process.

Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Overview of resuspension model: application to low level waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resuspension is one of the potential pathways to man for radioactive or chemical contaminants that are in the biosphere. In waste management, spills or other surface contamination can serve as a source for resuspension during the operational phase. After the low-level waste disposal area is closed, radioactive materials can be brought to the surface by animals or insects or, in the long term, the surface can be removed by erosion. Any of these methods expose the material to resuspension in the atmosphere. Intrusion into the waste mass can produce resuspension of potential hazard to the intruder. Removal of items from the waste mass by scavengers or archeologists can result in potential resuspension exposure to others handling or working with the object. The ways in which resuspension can occur are wind resuspension, mechanical resuspension and local resuspension. While methods of predicting exposure are not accurate, they include the use of the resuspension factor, the resuspension rate and mass loading of the air.

Healy, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Final report of the Department of Energy pilot internship program on radioactive waste at Vanderbilt University (September 1, 1993-08/31, 1994)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes Vanderbilt's ten year program in radioactive waste management. The report describes the interns selected for the program, the interns' course of study, and their assignments.

Frank Parker

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Determination of Iodine-129 in Low Level Radioactive Wastes - 13334  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the radioactivity determination of {sup 129}I in the radioactive wastes, alkali fusion and anion-exchange resin separation methods, which are sample pretreatment methods, have been investigated in this study. To separate and quantify the {sup 129}I radionuclide in an evaporator bottom and spent resin, the radionuclide was chemically leached from the wastes and adsorbed on an anion exchange resin at pH 4, 7, 9. In the case of dry active waste and another solid type, the alkali fusion method was applied. KNO{sub 3} was added as a KOH and oxidizer to the wastes. It was then fused at 450 deg. C for 1 hour. The radioactivity of the separated iodine was measured with a low energy gamma spectrometer after the sample pretreatment. Finally, it was confirmed that the recovery rate of the iodine for the alkali fusion method was 83.63.8%, and 86.41.6% for the anionic exchange separation method. (authors)

Choi, K.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Park, Y.J.; Song, K.S. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)] [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Waste management project fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan WBS 1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MYWP technical baseline describes the work to be accomplished by the Project and the technical standards which govern that work. The Waste Management Project manages and integrates (non-TWRS) waste management activities at the site. Activities include management of Hanford wastes as well as waste transferred to Hanford from other DOE, Department of Defense, or other facilities. This work includes handling, treatment, storage, and disposition of radioactive, nonradioactive, hazardous, and mixed solid and liquid wastes. Major Waste Management Projects are the Solid Waste Project (SW), Liquid Effluents Project (LEP), and Analytical Services. Existing facilities (e.g., grout vaults and canyons) shall be evaluated for reuse for these purposes to the maximum extent possible. The paper tabulates the major facilities that interface with this Project, identifying the major facilities that generate waste, materials, or infrastructure for this Project and the major facilities that will receive waste and materials from this Project.

Slaybaugh, R.R.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Classification and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses the laws and regulations in the United States addressing classification of radioactive wastes and the requirements for disposal of different waste classes. This review emphasizes the relationship between waste classification and the requirements for permanent disposal.

Kocher, D.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A robotic inspector for low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at several facilities. Weekly visual inspections are required. A mobile robot inspection system, ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed to survey and inspect the stored drums. The robot will travel through the three- foot wide aisles of drums stacked four high and perform a visual inspection, normally performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. This mobile robot system will improve the quality of inspection, generate required reports, and relieve human operators from low-level radioactive exposure.

Byrd, J.S.; Pettus, R.O. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Device Assembly Facility (DAF) Glovebox Radioactive Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provides programmatic support to the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility in the form of target assembly. The target assembly activities are performed in a glovebox at DAF and include Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Currently, only activities with transuranic SNM are anticipated. Preliminary discussions with facility personnel indicate that primarily two distributions of SNM will be used: Weapons Grade Plutonium (WG-Pu), and Pu-238 enhanced WG-Pu. Nominal radionuclide distributions for the two material types are included in attachment 1. Wastes generated inside glove boxes is expected to be Transuranic (TRU) Waste which will eventually be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Wastes generated in the Radioactive Material Area (RMA), outside of the glove box is presumed to be low level waste (LLW) which is destined for disposal at the NTS. The process knowledge quantification methods identified herein may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around the DAF and possibly JASPER as long as the fundamental waste stream boundaries are adhered to as outlined below. The method is suitable for quantification of waste which can be directly surveyed with the Blue Alpha meter or swiped. An additional quantification methodology which requires the use of a high resolution gamma spectroscopy unit is also included and relies on the predetermined radionuclide distribution and utilizes scaling to measured nuclides for quantification.

Dominick, J L

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Assessment of radioactive wastes from a DCLL fusion reactor: Disposal in El Cabril facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Under the Spanish Breeding Blanket Technology Programme TECNO_FUS a conceptual design of a DCLL (Dual-Coolant LithiumLead) blanket-based reactor is being revised. The dually cooled breeding zone is composed of He/LiPb and SiC as material of the liquid metal flow channel inserts. Structural materials are ferritic-martensitic steel (Eurofer) for the blanket and austenitic steel (SS316LN) for the vacuum vessel (VV) and the cryostat. In this work, radioactive wastes are assessed in order to determine if they can be disposed as low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) in the Spanish near surface disposal facility of El Cabril. Also, unconditional clearance and recycling waste management options are studied. The neutron transport calculations have been performed with MCNPX code, while the ACAB code is used for calculations of the inventory of activation products and for activation analysis, in terms of waste management ratings for the options considered. Results show that the total amount of the cryostat can be disposed in El Cabril joined to the outer layer of both VV and channel inserts, whereas only concrete-made biological shield can be managed through clearance and none of the steels can be recycled. Those results are compared with those corresponding to French regulation, showing similar conclusions.

Raquel Garca; Juan Pablo Cataln; Javier Sanz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

Jantzen, C.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Microbial effects on radioactive wastes at SLB sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to determine the significance of microbial degradation of organic wastes on radionuclide migration on shallow land burial for humid and arid sites, establish which mechanisms predominate and ascertain the conditions under which these mechanisms operate. Factors contolling gaseous eminations from low-level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide and possibly hydrogen from the site stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or /sup 14/C into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste materials, primary emphasis of the study involved on examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Although the methane and carbon dioxide production rate indicates the degradation rate of the organic substances in the waste, it does not predict the methane evolution rate from the trench site. Methane fluxes from the soil surface are equivalent to the net synthesis minus the quantity oxidized by the microbial community as the gas passes through the soil profile. Gas studies were performed at three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (West Valley, New York; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky) during the period 1976 to 1978. The results of these studies are presented. 3 tables.

Colombo, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Regulation of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been actively developing needed regulations over the last two years for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Technical criteria are about to be published in the form of a proposed regulation. The waste packages, underground facility, and geologic setting form the major elements of any geologic repository and the basis of a multibarrier system. Performance objectives and supporting technical criteria have been developed for each of these repository elements to provide benchmarks for scientists and engineers working in each of these major areas. 9 refs.

White, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radioactive Wastes: Some Urgent Unfinished Business  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...however. An NRC study of management alterna-tives for the now-defunct Nuclear Fuel Services reprocessing operation at West Valley, New York, found that to develop an operational process for vitrifying (con-verting to glass) the 600,000 gallons...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1977-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Spring Meeting - May 15, 2012 Hilton Knoxville 501 West Church Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37902-2591 Agenda (Draft #1 - 4/18/12) ______________________________________________________________________________ Tuesday, May 15 - 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM / (need meeting room name) 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast - served in meeting room 9:00 a.m. Task Force Business Meeting - John Giarrusso, MEMA and Rich Pinney, NJDEP Co-chairs presiding  Welcome: Introductions; Agenda Review; Announcements  2012 funding  Co-Chair Election  Rules of Procedure  Membership: members & alternates appointment status  Legislative Liaisons  Staff Regional Meeting Attendance

418

THE USE OF POLYMERS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), one of the largest U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, has operated since the early 1950s. The early mission of the site was to produce critical nuclear materials for national defense. Many facilities have been constructed at the SRS over the years to process, stabilize and/or store radioactive waste and related materials. The primary materials of construction used in such facilities are inorganic (metals, concrete), but polymeric materials are inevitably used in various applications. The effects of aging, radiation, chemicals, heat and other environmental variables must therefore be understood to maximize service life of polymeric components. In particular, the potential for dose rate effects and synergistic effects on polymeric materials in multivariable environments can complicate compatibility reviews and life predictions. The selection and performance of polymeric materials in radioactive waste processing systems at the SRS are discussed.

Skidmore, E.; Fondeur, F.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH), that implements the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) document, and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement with Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), Sections 6.5 and 7.8. WHM is responsible for the treatment, storage, and disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated at the Hanford Site as well as those wastes received from other US Department of Energy (DOE) and non-DOE sites. WMH operations include the Low-Level Burial Grounds, Central Waste Complex (a mixed-waste storage complex), a nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility, the Transuranic Storage Facility, T Plant, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facility, 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, the 242-A Evaporator, 300 Area Treatment Effluent Disposal Facility, the 340 Facility (a radioactive liquid waste handling facility), 222-S Laboratory, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility, and the Hanford TRU Waste Program.

VOLKMAN, D.D.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Microsoft PowerPoint - Marcinowski - Waste Management (FINAL...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Update on WIPP, Tank Waste and Other Waste Disposition Frank Marcinowski Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Office of Environmental Management EM SSAB Chairs Fall...

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421

Identification of technical problems encountered in the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of problems encountered in the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive wastes has been made in support of the technical aspects of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being administered by the Low-Level Waste Management Program Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The operating histories of burial sites at six major DOE and five commercial facilities in the US have been examined and several major problems identified. The problems experienced st the sites have been grouped into general categories dealing with site development, waste characterization, operation, and performance evaluation. Based on this grouping of the problem, a number of major technical issues have been identified which should be incorporated into program plans for further research and development. For each technical issue a discussion is presented relating the issue to a particular problem, identifying some recent or current related research, and suggesting further work necessary for resolving the issue. Major technical issues which have been identified include the need for improved water management, further understanding of the effect of chemical and physical parameters on radionuclide migration, more comprehensive waste records, improved programs for performance monitoring and evaluation, development of better predictive capabilities, evaluation of space utilization, and improved management control.

Jacobs, D.G.; Epler, J.S.; Rose, R.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WMG QAP is an integral part of a management system designed to ensure that WMG activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified in a manner that assures a quality product. A quality product is one that meets all waste acceptance criteria, conforms to all permit and regulatory requirements, and is accepted at the offsite treatment, storage, and disposal facility. In addition to internal processes, this QA Plan identifies WMG processes providing oversight and assurance to line management that waste is managed according to all federal, state, and local requirements for waste generator areas. A variety of quality assurance activities are integral to managing waste. These QA functions have been identified in the relevant procedures and in subsequent sections of this plan. The WMG QAP defines the requirements of the WMG quality assurance program. These requirements are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, Contractor Requirements Document, the LBNL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), and other applicable environmental compliance documents. The QAP and all associated WMG policies and procedures are periodically reviewed and revised, as necessary, to implement corrective actions, and to reflect changes that have occurred in regulations, requirements, or practices as a result of feedback on work performed or lessons learned from other organizations. The provisions of this QAP and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by the WMG; WMG personnel, contractors, and vendors; and personnel from other associated LBNL organizations, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WMG-approved QA programs.

Waste Management Group

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Survey of agents and techniques applicable to the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the various solidification agents and techniques that are currently available or potentially applicable for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes is presented. An overview of the types and quantities of low-level wastes produced is presented. Descriptions of waste form matrix materials, the wastes types for which they have been or may be applied and available information concerning relevant waste form properties and characteristics follow. Also included are descriptions of the processing techniques themselves with an emphasis on those operating parameters which impact upon waste form properties. The solidification agents considered in this survey include: hydraulic cements, thermoplastic materials, thermosetting polymers, glasses, synthetic minerals and composite materials. This survey is part of a program supported by the United States Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP). This work provides input into LLWMP efforts to develop and compile information relevant to the treatment and processing of low-level wastes and their disposal by shallow land burial.

Fuhrmann, M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these ta