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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

DOEE A-1059 Environmental Assessment Radioactive Source Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the country. These neutron sources would be temporarily stored in floor holes at the CMR Hot Cell Facility. Recovery reduces the neutron emissions from the source material and...

2

Dynamic radioactive particle source  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

PORTABLE SOURCE OF RADIOACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable source for radiogiaphy or radiotherapy is described. It consists of a Tl/sup 170/ or Co/sup 60/ source mounted in a rotatable tungsten alloy plug. The plug rotates within a brass body to positions of safety or exposure. Provision is made for reloading and carrying the device safely. (T.R.H.)

Goertz, R.C.; Ferguson, K.R.; Rylander, E.W.; Safranski, L.M.

1959-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

UK Radioactive Waste: Classification, Sources and Management ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paper contents outlook: Introduction; Radioactive waste classification; Sources of waste (Nuclear power plant operation/decommissioning, Reprocessing and...

5

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

6

Tracking of Moving Radioactive Sources  

Devices that detect the sources of unsecured nuclear materials are currently limited in their capabilities, ... City halls, public streets, hospitals ...

7

The IAEA and Control of Radioactive SourcesThe  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the control of radioactive sources.

Dodd, B.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Blind source recovery: a framework in the state space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blind Source Recovery (BSR) denotes recovery of original sources/signals from environments that may include convolution, temporal variation, and even nonlinearity. It also infers the recovery of sources even in the absence of precise environment identifiability. ...

Khurram Waheed; Fathi M. Salem

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source Heat Pumps Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source Heat Pumps A detailled description of the...

10

Particle beam generator using a radioactive source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

Underwood, D.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Particle beam generator using a radioactive source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

Underwood, D.G.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

10 years and 20,000 sources: the offsite source recovery project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources. This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Sealed source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity, as evidenced by its initial organization under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program. After the terrorist attacks of 2001, however, the interagency community began to recognize the threat posed by excess and unwanted radiological material, particularly those that could not be disposed at the end of their useful life. After being transferred to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) when it became waste, but also any other materials that might be a 'national security consideration.' This paper discusses OSRP's history, recovery operations, expansion to accept high-activity beta-gamma-emitting sealed sources and devices and foreign-possessed sources, and more recent efforts such as cooperative projects with the Council on Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and involvement in GTRI's Search and Secure project. Current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

Whitworth, Julia R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities, OAS-M-06-09 Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities, OAS-M-06-09 The mission of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Off-site Recovery Project (OSRP) is to recover unwanted radioactive sealed sources (sources) held in the piblic sector. thereby reducing the threat of the sources being used in radiological dispersal de\iices or a "dirty bomb." Plutonium-239 (Pu-239), one of the rildioactive sealed sources recovered by OSRP, requires additional safeguards because ~t is a special nuclear material. These sources were manufactured in the United States (Li S.) and loaned or leased to colleges and universilies, commercial

14

Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 Radioactive materials are a critical and beneficial component of global

15

Offsite Source Recovery Program (OSRP) Workshop Module: Tianjin, China, July 16-July 17, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Recovering and disposal of radioactive sources that are no longer in service in their intended capacity is an area of high concern Globally. A joint effort to recover and dispose of such sources was formed between the US Department of Energy and the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), in preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. LANL involvement in this agreement continues today under the DOE-Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program. LANL will be presenting overview information on their Offsite Source Recovery (OSRP) and Source Disposal programs, in a workshop for the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) at Tianjin, China, on July 16 and 17, 2012.

Houlton, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Sealed Sources in EgyptIMPRSS  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the Integrated Management Program for Radioactive Realed Sources (IMPRSS) in Egypt.

Hasan, A.; El-Adham, K.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

The New Orphaned Radioactive Sources Program in the United States International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The New Orphaned Radioactive Sources Program in the United States International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials. September 14-18, 1998 Neil Naraine Exposure of the public to uncontrolled radioactive sources has become an significant concern to the United

18

Radioactivity in the environment: Sources, distribution and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Radioactivity in the Environment provides the background and techniques necessary for understanding and monitoring today's radiological environment. It presents an overview of the entire field, including both natural and manmade sources of radiation, radiation distribution, and methods of environmental dose assessment, surveillance and measurement.

Kathren, R.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Integrated Management Program Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radioactive materials in ''public'' locations are typically contained in small, stainless steel capsules known as sealed radiation sources (RS). These capsules seal in the radioactive materials, but not the radiation, because it is the radiation that is needed for a wide variety of applications at hospitals, medical clinics, manufacturing plants, universities, construction sites, and other facilities in the public sector. Radiation sources are readily available, and worldwide there are hundreds of thousands of RS. The IMPRSS Project is a cooperative development between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA), Egyptian Ministry of Health (MOH), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), New Mexico Tech University (NMT), and Agriculture Cooperative Development International (ACDI/VOCA). SNL will coordinate the work scope between the participant organizations.

Hasan, A.; Cochran, J. R.; El-Adham, K.; El-Sorougy, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Laser ion source development at Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the efforts made to develop a resonant-ionization laser ion source based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers for nuclear physics and astrophysics research at Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Three Ti:sapphire lasers have been upgraded with individual pump lasers to eliminate laser power losses due to synchronization delays. Ionization schemes for 14 elements have been obtained. Off-line studies show that the overall efficiency of the laser ion source can be as high as 40%. TaC surface coatings have been investigated for minimizing surface and bulk trapping of the atoms of interest.

Liu, Y.; Havener, C. C.; Beene, J. R. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Howe, J. Y.; Kiggans, J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Flowsheets and source terms for radioactive waste projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flowsheets and source terms used to generate radioactive waste projections in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program are given. Volumes of each waste type generated per unit product throughput have been determined for the following facilities: uranium mining, UF/sub 6/ conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, boiling-water reactors (BWRs), pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and fuel reprocessing. Source terms for DOE/defense wastes have been developed. Expected wastes from typical decommissioning operations for each facility type have been determined. All wastes are also characterized by isotopic composition at time of generation and by general chemical composition. 70 references, 21 figures, 53 tables.

Forsberg, C.W. (comp.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

1979-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

EA-1059: Radioactive Source Recovery Program, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to establish a program to accept and recover surplus americium-241 mixed with beryllium metal (Be) and plutonium-238 mixed with Be sealed...

27

Experiments with radioactive samples at the Advanced Photon Source.  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a national synchrotron-radiation light source research facility. The 7 GeV electron Storage Ring is currently delivering intense high brilliance x-ray beams to a total of 34 beamlines with over 120 experiment stations to members of the international scientific community to carry out forefront basic and applied research in several scientific disciplines. Researchers come to the APS either as members of Collaborative Access Teams (CATs) or as Independent Investigators (IIs). Collaborative Access Teams comprise large number of investigators from universities, industry, and research laboratories with common research objectives. These teams are responsible for the design, construction, finding, and operation of beamlines. They are the owners of their experimental enclosures (''hutches'') designed and built to meet their specific research needs. Fig. 1 gives a plan view of the location of the Collaborative Access Teams by Sector and Discipline. In the past two years, over 2000 individual experiments were conducted at the APS facility. Of these, about 60 experiments involved the use of radioactive samples, which is less than 3% of the total. However, there is an increase in demand for experiment stations to accommodate the use of radioactive samples in different physical forms embedded in various matrices with activity levels ranging from trace amounts of naturally occurring radionuclides to MBq (mCi) quantities including transuranics. This paper discusses in some detail the steps in the safety review process for experiments involving radioactive samples and how ALARA philosophy is invoked at each step and implemented.

Veluri, V. R.; Justus, A.; Glagola, B.; Rauchas, A.; Vacca, J.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors.

Kocher, D.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employs crossed electric and magnetic fields to separate the electrons from ions as they are extracted from a negative ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full kinetic energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90.degree. to each other, the electrons are separated from the plasma and remain at approximately the electrical potential of the generator in which they were generated. The electrons migrate from the ion beam path in a precessing motion out of the ion accelerating field region into an electron recovery region provided by a specially designed electron collector electrode. The electron collector electrode is uniformly spaced from a surface of the ion generator which is transverse to the direction of migration of the electrons and the two surfaces are contoured in a matching relationship which departs from a planar configuration to provide an electric field component in the recovery region which is parallel to the magnetic field thereby forcing the electrons to be directed into and collected by the electron collector electrode. The collector electrode is maintained at a potential slightly positive with respect to the ion generator so that the electrons are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply voltage energy.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stirling, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on AddThis.com...

31

Identification of low-level point radioactive sources using a sensor network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of a low-level point radioactive source amidst background radiation is achieved by a network of radiation sensors using a two-step approach. Based on measurements from three or more sensors, a geometric difference triangulation method ... Keywords: Point radioactive source, detection and localization, sequential probability ratio test

Jren-Chit Chin; Nageswara S. V. Rao; David K. Y. Yau; Mallikarjun Shankar; Yong Yang; Jennifer C. Hou; Srinivasagopalan Srivathsan; Sitharama Iyengar

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Demonstration and development of control mechanism for radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect

Saudi Arabia have no nuclear industry. Nevertheless, many radioactive sources, for different purposes, have been used in the country. There is upswing in the number of companies that recruit nuclear technology in their daily work. The National Center for Radiation Protection (NCRP) takes the full commitment and responsibility for monitoring and regulating the movement of radioactive sources in the country. NCRP issues the licenses for import, export, and use of radioactive sources. It, also, protects the country from any trespassing radiation through a sizable net of early warning and radiation monitoring stations along the borders of Saudi Arabia. This paper talks about the procedures of licensing, importing, exporting of radioactive sources. It, also, sheds light on types of implementing radioactive sources in different practices encompass medicine, industry, research. The NCRP has established an electronic web site to ease the communication with all users in the country. This site is yet in the experimental stage.

Al-Kheliewi, A. S. [National Center for Radiation Protection King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radioactive Neutron Sources Emission Rates (44010C and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Safe handling of neutron sources and the industrial safety aspects are taught through an apprentice-type relationship with each new handler. ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Recovery Act Helps GE in-source Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Helps GE in-source Manufacturing Recovery Act Helps GE in-source Manufacturing Recovery Act Helps GE in-source Manufacturing September 30, 2010 - 2:21pm Addthis The Geospring Hybrid Water Heater will be produced at GE's Appliance Park in Louisville. | Photo courtesy of GE The Geospring Hybrid Water Heater will be produced at GE's Appliance Park in Louisville. | Photo courtesy of GE Lindsay Gsell GE has a long history in Louisville, Ky. The company's appliance and lighting facility in Louisville has been manufacturing appliances for more than 50 years. Like many facilities, it has seen its share of ups-and-downs. Now, after a tough couple of years, the "Appliance Park" facility is making a "manufacturing" comeback -- with the help of the Recovery Act. The plant retooling project, partially funded through a 48C Advanced Energy

35

Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to the treatment of mixed wastes at Oak Ridge and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the atomic energy legislation, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A major part of our ORNL program involves the development of separation technologies that are necessary for the complete treatment of mixed wastes. The residues from the MSO treatment of the mixed wastes must be processed further to separate the radioactive components, to concentrate and recycle residues, or to convert the residues into forms acceptable for final disposal. This paper is a review of the MSO requirements for separation technologies, the information now available, and the concepts for our development studies.

Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

TRACKING OF MOVING RADIOACTIVE SOURCES (IN-05-128, IN-09-003 and IN-09-007)  

Devices for radioactive source detection exist but their capabilities and their precision is limited. There are currently no systems which integrate signals from multiple sensors or which provide directional information or discrete source location ...

37

Radioactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mixed-alpha-emitting sources may be calibrated using the 2 ? proportional counter and the percentage per radionuclide is determined using a ...

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Blind Source Separation, ISI Cancellation and Carrier Phase Recovery in SDMA Systems for Mobile Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current rates of demand for radio cellular services will soon reach the saturation point of the actual cellular infrastructures. Thus, spectral bandwidth-saving multiple access schemes are necessary to expand the actual networks capacity. ... Keywords: SDMA wireless communications, blind source separation, carrier phase recovery, intersymbol interference cancellation

Joo Xavier; Victor Barroso

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proposed Design for a Coupled Ground-Source Heat Pump/Energy Recovery Ventilator System to Reduce Building Energy Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis focuses on reducing the energy demand of a residential building by using a coupled ground-source heat pump/energy recovery ventilation (more)

McDaniel, Matthew Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Simulated Performance of Algorithms for the Localization of Radioactive Sources from a Position Sensitive Radiation Detecting System (COCAE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation studies are presented regarding the performance of algorithms that localize point-like radioactive sources detected by a position sensitive portable radiation instrument (COCAE). The source direction is estimated by using the List Mode Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-ML-EM) imaging algorithm. Furthermore, the source-to-detector distance is evaluated by three different algorithms based on the photo-peak count information of each detecting layer, the quality of the reconstructed source image, and the triangulation method. These algorithms have been tested on a large number of simulated photons over a wide energy range (from 200 keV to 2 MeV) emitted by point-like radioactive sources located at different orientations and source-to-detector distances.

Karafasoulis, K. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Patriarxou Grigoriou and Neapoleos, 15310, Athens (Greece); Hellenic Army Academy, 16673 Vari (Greece); Zachariadou, K. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Patriarxou Grigoriou and Neapoleos, 15310, Athens (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Piraeus, Thivon 250, 12244, Egaleo (Greece); Seferlis, S.; Kaissas, I.; Potiriadis, C. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Patriarxou Grigoriou and Neapoleos, 15310, Athens (Greece); Lambropoulos, C. [Technological Educational Institute of Chalkida, Psachna Evias, 34400 Greece (Greece); Loukas, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos 15310, Athens (Greece)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soviet Union operates a vast and growing radioactive waste management system. Detailed information on this system is rare and a general overall picture only emerges after a review of a great deal of literature. Poor waste management practices and slow implementation of environmental restoration activities have caused a great deal of national concern. The release of information on the cause and extent of an accident involving high-level waste at the Kyshtym production reactor site in 1957, as well as other contamination at the site, serve to highlight past Soviet waste management practices. As a result, the area of waste management is now receiving greater emphasis, and more public disclosures. Little is known about Soviet waste management practices related to uranium mining, conversion, and fuel fabrication processes. However, releases of radioactive material to the environment from uranium mining and milling operations, such as from mill tailings piles, are causing public concern. Official Soviet policy calls for a closed fuel cycle, with reprocessing of power reactor fuel that has been cooled for five years. For power reactors, only VVER-440 reactor fuel has been reprocessed in any significant amount, and a decision on the disposition of RBMK reactor fuel has been postponed indefinitely. Soviet reprocessing efforts are falling behind schedule; thus longer storage times for spent fuel will be required, primarily at multiple reactor stations. Information on reprocessing in the Soviet Union has been severely limited until 1989, when two reprocessing sites were acknowledged by the Soviets. A 400-metric ton (MT) per year reprocessing facility, located at Kyshtym, has been operational since 1949 for reprocessing production reactor fuel. This facility is reported to have been reprocessing VVER-440 and naval reactor fuel since 1978, with about 2000 MT of VVER-440 fuel being reprocessed by July 1989. A second facility, located near Krasnoyarsk and having a 1500 MT per year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass volume of 100-150 liters/MT of fuel reprocessed); 3) set it aside in air-cooled storage

Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990  

SciTech Connect

The Soviet Union operates a vast and growing radioactive waste management system. Detailed information on this system is rare and a general overall picture only emerges after a review of a great deal of literature. Poor waste management practices and slow implementation of environmental restoration activities have caused a great deal of national concern. The release of information on the cause and extent of an accident involving high-level waste at the Kyshtym production reactor site in 1957, as well as other contamination at the site, serve to highlight past Soviet waste management practices. As a result, the area of waste management is now receiving greater emphasis, and more public disclosures. Little is known about Soviet waste management practices related to uranium mining, conversion, and fuel fabrication processes. However, releases of radioactive material to the environment from uranium mining and milling operations, such as from mill tailings piles, are causing public concern. Official Soviet policy calls for a closed fuel cycle, with reprocessing of power reactor fuel that has been cooled for five years. For power reactors, only VVER-440 reactor fuel has been reprocessed in any significant amount, and a decision on the disposition of RBMK reactor fuel has been postponed indefinitely. Soviet reprocessing efforts are falling behind schedule; thus longer storage times for spent fuel will be required, primarily at multiple reactor stations. Information on reprocessing in the Soviet Union has been severely limited until 1989, when two reprocessing sites were acknowledged by the Soviets. A 400-metric ton (MT) per year reprocessing facility, located at Kyshtym, has been operational since 1949 for reprocessing production reactor fuel. This facility is reported to have been reprocessing VVER-440 and naval reactor fuel since 1978, with about 2000 MT of VVER-440 fuel being reprocessed by July 1989. A second facility, located near Krasnoyarsk and having a 1500 MT per year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass volume of 100-150 liters/MT of fuel reprocessed); 3) set it aside in air-cooled storage

Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Transport of radioactive droplet moisture from a source in a nuclear power plant spray pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to a change in the microclimate in the region surrounding a nuclear power plant resulting from the emission of vapor form a cooling tower, evaporation of water from the water surface of a cooling pond or a spray pond, in the latter case direct radioactive contamination of the underlying surface around the nuclear power plant can also occur due to discharge of process water (radioactive) into the pond and its transport in the air over a certain distance in the form of droplet moisture. A typical example may be the situation at the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in 1986 when accidental discharge of process water into the cooling pond occurred. Below we present a solution for the problem of transport of droplet moisture taking into account its evaporation, which may be used to estimate the scale of radioactive contamination of the locality.

Elokhin, A.P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Streamtube Fate and Transport Modeling of the Source Term for the Old Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

The modeling described in this report is an extension of previous fate and transport modeling for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study. The purpose of this and the previous modeling is to provide quantitative input to the screening of remedial alternatives for the CMS/FS for this site.

Brewer, K.

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Source holder collimator for encapsulating radioactive material and collimating the emanations from the material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a transportable device capable of detecting normal levels of a trace element, such as lead in a doughnutshaped blood sample by x-ray fluorescence with a minimum of sample preparation in a relatively short analyzing time. In one embodiment, the blood is molded into a doughnut-shaped sample around an annular array of low-energy radioactive material that is at the center of the doughnut-shaped sample but encapsulated in a collimator, the latter shielding a detector that is close to the sample and facing the same so that the detector receives secondary emissions from the sample while the collimator collimates ths primary emissions from the radioactive material to direct these emissions toward the sample around 360 deg and away from the detector. (Official Gazette)

Laurer, G.R.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN WORKSHOP ON THE SUSTAINABILITY OF RADIOACTIVE SOURCE PHYSICAL PROTECTION UPGRADES HOSTED IN GUATEMALA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. The GTRI program has worked successfully to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources, and is now working to ensure sustainability. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of radiological materials. GTRI is now seeking to develop and enhance sustainability by coordinating its resources with those of the partner country, other donor countries, and international organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Greenberg, Raymond; Watson, Erica E.; Morris, Frederic A.; de Leal, Patty

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

First Large Scale Production of Low Radioactivity Argon From Underground Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the first large-scale production of low radioactivity argon from underground gas wells. Low radioactivity argon is of general interest, in particular for the construction of large scale WIMP dark matter searches and detectors of reactor neutrinos for non-proliferation efforts. Atmospheric argon has an activity of about 1 Bq/kg from the decays of 39Ar; the concentration of 39Ar in the underground argon we are collecting is at least a factor of 100 lower than this value. The argon is collected from a stream of gas from a CO2 well in southwestern Colorado with a Vacuum Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant. The gas from the well contains argon at a concentration of 400-600 ppm, and the VPSA plant produces an output stream with an argon concentration at the level of 30,000-50,000 ppm (3-5%) in a single pass. This gas is sent for further processing to Fermilab where it is purified by cryogenic distillation. The argon production rate is presently 0.5 kg/day.

Back, Henning O; Condon, Christopher; de Haas, Ernst; Ford, Richard; Galbiati, Cristiano; Goretti, Augusto; Hohman, Tristan; Inanni, Andrea; Loer, Ben; Montanari, David; Nelson, Allan; Pocar, Andrea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

THE APPLICATION OF RADIOACTIVE RADIATION SOURCES IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY. PART IV. FURTHER EXAMPLES OF APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

A review on the status of radioisotope applications in the textile industry is presented. The use of energy-rich radiation for the initiation of block- and graft polymerization of macromolecules used in the manufacture of synthetic fibers is discussed. For determining the colorfastness of fabrics, their behavior toward fatty acids can be measured by using soaps or detergents labeled with I/sup 131/. In manufacturing viscose fibers, the complete removal of S can be determined by using S/sup 35/-labeled xanthogenate. The viscosity can be measured by determining the sink velocity of a radioactively labeled small Pb ball. In spinning, numerous applications are possible by using suitably labeled radioactive fibers in the spinning process. In weaving, radioisotopes allow the control of the physical and mechanical qualities of the fabrics. In laundry and dry-cleaning research, radioisotopes are used for determining the soil removal from different fabrics by various cleaning agents. Pn/sup 210/ is used in textile plants for removing static electricity accumulating in textile machinery during operation. (OID)

Heger, A.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

INSPECTION OF THE ACCOUNTABILITY AND CONTROL OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF THE ACCOUNTABILITY AND CONTROL OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES AT SELECTED DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SITES, IG-0544 Sealed radioactive sources consist of radioactive material either...

55

Single-inductor, multiple-output buck converter with parallel source transient recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To address the need for multiple regulated voltage supplies in electronic devices, this thesis presents a modeling and design study of a single-inductor, multiple-output (SIMO) DC-DC buck converter with parallel source ...

King, Charles Jackson, III

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Radioactivity in consumer products  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Urban, Radovan [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Wolkow, Robert A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada)

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

RADIOACTIVE BATTERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

1959-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

Wanetick, S.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ???¢????????Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.???¢??????? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP system

James A Menart, Professor

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Problems with packaged sources in foreign countries  

SciTech Connect

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP), which is administered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), removes excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential threat to national security, public health, and safety. In total, GTRI/OSRP has been able to recover more than 25,000 excess and unwanted sealed sources from over 825 sites. In addition to transuranic sources, the GTRI/OSRP mission now includes recovery of beta/gamma emitting sources, which are of concern to both the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper provides a synopsis of cooperative efforts in foreign countries to remove excess and unwanted sealed sources by discussing three topical areas: (1) The Regional Partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency; (2) Challenges in repatriating sealed sources; and (3) Options for repatriating sealed sources.

Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzke, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tompkin, J. Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fusion fuel cycle solid radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Eight conceptual deuterium-tritium fueled fusion power plant designs have been analyzed to identify waste sources, materials and quantities. All plant designs include the entire D-T fuel cycle within each plant. Wastes identified include radiation-damaged structural, moderating, and fertile materials; getter materials for removing corrosion products and other impurities from coolants; absorbents for removing tritium from ventilation air; getter materials for tritium recovery from fertile materials; vacuum pump oil and mercury sludge; failed equipment; decontamination wastes; and laundry waste. Radioactivity in these materials results primarily from neutron activation and from tritium contamination. For the designs analyzed annual radwaste volume was estimated to be 150 to 600 m/sup 3//GWe. This may be compared to 500 to 1300 m/sup 3//GWe estimated for the LMFBR fuel cycle. Major waste sources are replaced reactor structures and decontamination waste.

Gore, B.F.; Kaser, J.D.; Kabele, T.J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

66

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

67

Microsoft Word - SealedSources - Cover.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities OAS-M-06-09 September 2006 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 12, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR MANAGER, LOS ALAMOS SITE OFFICE I &JJ;;C&$ . ( ' L / ? I ' < , ! FROM: . Collard ~ s s i s t a h t Inspector General for Performance Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATlON: Audit Report on "Follow- up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities" The mission of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Off-site Recovery Project (OSRP) is to recover unwanted radioactive sealed sources (sources)

68

Switchable radioactive neutron source device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14; Alternate Water Sources (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the air handler condensate recovery program at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division.

Not Available

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radioactivity of the Cooling Water  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

Wigner, E. P.

1943-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Science Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities Uranium containing compounds and other...

74

Recovery Act | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act Recovery Act Dataset Summary Description This dataset, updated quarterly by Recovery.org, contains a breakdown of state-by-state recovery act funds awarded and received, as well as the number of jobs created and saved. The shows two periods, February 17, 2009 to December 31, 2010, and January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2011. The jobs created and saved are displayed just for January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2011. The document was downloaded from Recovery.org. It is a simple document displaying 50 states, as well as American territories. Source Recovery.org Date Released June 08th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords award funding jobs Recovery Act Recovery.org Data text/csv icon recipientfundingawardedbystate.csv (csv, 5.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

75

Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery News Flashes Recovery News Flashes Recovery News Flashes RSS January 29, 2013 "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP With the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, Savannah River Site (SRS) continues to safely treat and dispose of radioactive waste created while producing materials for nuclear weapons throughout the Cold War. The DOE site in Aiken, S.C., is safely, steadily, and cost-effectively making progress to analyze, measure, and then carefully cleanup or dispose of legacy transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at SRS after the lengthy nuclear arms race. November 2, 2012 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and

76

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

77

Management of disused plutonium sealed sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources since 1999, including more than 2,400 Plutonium (Pu)-238 sealed sources and 653 Pu-239-bearing sources that represent more than 10% of the total sources recovered by GTRI/OSRP to date. These sources have been recovered from hundreds of sites within the United States (US) and around the world. OSRP grew out of early efforts at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program, a loan-lease program that serviced 31 countries, as well as domestic users. In the conduct of these recovery operations, GTRI/OSRP has been required to solve problems related to knowledge-of-inventory, packaging and transportation of fissile and heat-source materials, transfer of ownership, storage of special nuclear material (SNM) both at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and commercially, and disposal. Unique issues associated with repatriation from foreign countries, including end user agreements required by some European countries and denials of shipment, will also be discussed.

Whitworth, Julia Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two years ago I summarized 20 years of experience on Industrial Heat Recovery for the Energy-source Technology Conference and Exhibition held in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the end of that paper I concluded with brief advice on 'How to specify heat recovery equipment.' The two years which have elapsed since then have convinced me that proper specification assures the most reliable equipment at the lowest price. The most economical specification describes the operating and site data but leaves the design details for the supplier. A true specialist will be able to provide you with the latest technology at the best possible price. This paper explores the impact of specifications on heat recovery equipment and its associated cost.

Csathy, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Recovery Act Buy American Requirements for Information Needed from Financial Assistance Applicants/Recipients for Waiver Requests Based on Unreasonable Cost or Nonavailability Applicants for and recipients of financial assistance funded by the Recovery Act must comply with the requirement that all of the iron, steel, and manufactured goods used for a project for the construction, alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work be produced in the United States, unless the head of the agency makes a waiver, or determination of inapplicability of the Buy American Recovery Act provisions, based on one of the authorized exceptions. The authorized exceptions are unreasonable cost, nonavailability, and in furtherance of the public interest. This

80

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally applicable to other sources of steam. The interaction of the recovery system with the plant's steam/power system has been included. Typical operating economics have been prepared. It was found that the profitability of most recovery schemes is generally dependent on the techniques used, the existing steam/power system, and the relative costs of steam and power. However, there will always be site-specific factors to consider. It is shown that direct heat exchange and thermocompression will always yield an energy profit when interacting with PRVs in the powerhouse. A set of typical comparisons between the three recovery techniques, interacting with various powerhouse and plant steam system configurations, is presented. A brief outline of the analysis techniques needed to prepare the comparison is also shown. Only operating costs are examined; capital costs are so size - and site-specific as to be impossible to generalize. The operating cost savings may be used to give an indication of investment potential.

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Recovery Act Recovery Act The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 -- commonly called the "stimulus" -- was designed to spur economic growth while creating new jobs and saving existing ones. Through the Recovery Act, the Energy Department invested more than $31 billion to support a wide range of clean energy projects across the nation -- from investing in the smart grid and developing alternative fuel vehicles to helping homeowners and businesses reduce their energy costs with energy efficiency upgrades and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The Department's programs helped create new power sources, conserve resources and aligned the nation to lead the global energy economy. Featured Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack Fuel cell forklifts like the one shown here are used by leading companies across the U.S. as part of their daily business operations. | Energy Department file photo.

82

Radioactive waste systems and radioactive effluents  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste systems for handling gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes generated at light and pressurized water reactors are described. (TFD)

Row, T.H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the gas/oil industry radioactive sources are routinelyreplacement of radioactive sources for oil-well logging withto build a neutron source suit- able for oil-well logging

Persaud, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

RCRA designation of discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources  

SciTech Connect

Many sealed sources containing americium and beryllium are used throughout construction, industry, and research, and will eventually require disposal. For planning purposes it is necessary to determine whether these sources, when disposed, constitute a mixed waste, i.e., a waste containing hazardous constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive constituents regulated under the Atomic Energy Act. Waste designation criteria contained in 40 CFR 261 are evaluated in detail in this report. It is determined that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources do not contain any wastes listed in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, nor do the discarded sources exhibit any hazardous characteristics. Therefore, it is concluded that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources are not a mixed waste under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Hazardous waste regulatory programs delegated to States, however, may have regulations that differ from those of the Federal government.

Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Recovery Newsletters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

newsletters Office of Environmental newsletters Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en 2011 ARRA Newsletters http://energy.gov/em/downloads/2011-arra-newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters

86

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

87

EM American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Program Recovery Act Program www.em.doe.gov 1 Thomas Johnson, Jr. Recovery Act Program Director PRESENTED TO: Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) December 5, 2011 EM's Mission "Complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons www.em.doe.gov 2 nuclear weapons development, production, and Government- sponsored nuclear energy research." EM's Recovery Act Program $6 Billion at 17 sites (12 states) Accelerated existing scope › Soil and groundwater remediation › Radioactive solid waste disposition › Facility decontamination & decommissioning www.em.doe.gov 3 Selected projects were "shovel-ready" › Fully-defined cost, scope, and schedule › Established regulatory framework › Proven technology

88

Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit  

SciTech Connect

In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

90

Simplified scheme or radioactive plume calculations  

SciTech Connect

A simplified mathematical scheme to estimate external whole-body $gamma$ radiation exposure rates from gaseous radioactive plumes was developed for the Rio Blanco Gas Field Nuclear Stimulation Experiment. The method enables one to calculate swiftly, in the field, downwind exposure rates knowing the meteorological conditions and $gamma$ radiation exposure rates measured by detectors positioned near the plume source. The method is straightforward and easy to use under field conditions without the help of mini-computers. It is applicable to a wide range of radioactive plume situations. It should be noted that the Rio Blanco experiment was detonated on May 17, 1973, and no seep or release of radioactive material occurred. (auth)

Gibson, T.A.; Montan, D.N.

1976-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

92

ARM - Recovery Act Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActRecovery Act Instruments ActRecovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Recovery Act Instruments These pages provide a breakdown of the new instruments planned for installation among the permanent and mobile ARM sites. In addition, several instruments will be purchased for use throughout the facility and deployed as needed. These are considered "facility spares" and are included in the table below. View All | Hide All ARM Aerial Facility Instrument Title Instrument Mentor Measurement Group Measurements

93

Thin californium-containing radioactive source wires  

SciTech Connect

A cermet wire includes at least 1% californium-252 and is characterized by a diameter of no more than 0.0225 inch.

Gross, Ian G (Clinton, TN); Pierce, Larry A (Kingston, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Recovery Act Open House  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Open House North Wind Environmental was one of three local small businesses that received Recovery Funding for projects at DOE's Idaho Site. Members of the community...

95

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Finite Volume...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems Geothermal Technologies...

96

Energy Recovery During Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery During Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power Plant Low-Quality Heat Sources Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is...

97

Waste Heat Recovery and Furnace Technology - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Each source of waste heat is listed together with the assessment for potential cogeneration or direct recovery. The overall impact on energy...

98

MFC study - krypton and xenon recovery  

SciTech Connect

As commercial fuels reprocessing develops, large quantities of radioactive and stable fission rare gases will become available. These gases pose both a problem and an opportunity. When efficient methods of control and recovery are developed, the cost of these materials will be greatly reduced. With increased availability and reduced costs, commercial and government applications would be accelerated. Thus the fission gases which present potential environmental problems, would become useful by-products.

Shaw, H.P.

1967-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

NITRIC ACID RECOVERY FROM WASTE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

Wilson, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agencys Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14: Alternate Water Sources, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the air handler condensate recovery program at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal An International Approach to Monitoring, Interception & Managing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of uncontrolled radioactive source incidents. Aside from radiation exposure to workers and the public development of a database where countries can report scrap radiation incidents. Training: InternationalRadioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal An International Approach to Monitoring, Interception

102

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 12, 2010 August 12, 2010 Department of Energy Paves Way for Additional Clean Energy Projects and Jobs Through Manufacturing Solicitation Recovery Act Funds to Support New Renewable Energy Manufacturing Projects August 2, 2010 Department of Energy Announces $188 Million for Small Business Technology Commercialization Includes $73 million in Recovery Act Investments to Help Small Businesses Bring Clean Energy Ideas to the Marketplace July 22, 2010 Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products $106 Million Recovery Act Investment will Reduce CO2 Emissions and Mitigate Climate Change July 21, 2010 DOE Hosts Workshop on Transition to Electric Vehicles Washington, DC - On Thursday, July 22, 2010, the Department of Energy will

103

Field Performance of Heat Recovery Chillers and Heat Recovery Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery chillers and heat recovery heat pumps operate at high efficiency and excellent economy by simultaneously providing both heating and cooling. Although this technology has been in use for more than thirty years and all major chiller manufacturers offer heat recovery models, applications are not yet widespread. One of the barriers to using this technology is the lack of measured performance information on the devices. This project was undertaken to identify and summarize existing sources of pe...

1994-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

105

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) excavation crew working on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project landfill. The truck was unearthed inside a sealed building where digging is taking place at Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B), the Lab's first hazardous and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

106

ORNL radioactive waste operations  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards.

Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Partial Recovery of Quantum Entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppose Alice and Bob try to transform an entangled state shared between them into another one by local operations and classical communications. Then in general a certain amount of entanglement contained in the initial state will decrease in the process of transformation. However, an interesting phenomenon called partial entanglement recovery shows that it is possible to recover some amount of entanglement by adding another entangled state and transforming the two entangled states collectively. In this paper we are mainly concerned with the feasibility of partial entanglement recovery. The basic problem we address is whether a given state is useful in recovering entanglement lost in a specified transformation. In the case where the source and target states of the original transformation satisfy the strict majorization relation, a necessary and sufficient condition for partial entanglement recovery is obtained. For the general case we give two sufficient conditions. We also give an efficient algorithm for the feasibility of partial entanglement recovery in polynomial time. As applications, we establish some interesting connections between partial entanglement recovery and the generation of maximally entangled states, quantum catalysis, mutual catalysis, and multiple-copy entanglement transformation.

Runyao Duan; Yuan Feng; Mingsheng Ying

2004-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... This resource offers a a very broad explanation of how the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material...

110

SCAVENGING OF RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of decontaminatinig an atmosphere from suspended radioactive particles by introducing silicon tetrafluoride whereby the particles precipitate and are removed, is described. (AEC)

Rosinski, J.; Werle, D.K.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Cargo at US Borders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the U.S. and other countries, large numbers of vehicles pass through border crossings each day. The illicit movement of radioactive sources is a concern that has resulted in the installation of radiation detection and identification instruments at border crossing points. This activity is judged to be necessary because of the possibility of an act of terrorism involving a radioactive source that may include any number of dangerous radionuclides. The problem of detecting, identifying, and interdicting illicit radioactive sources is complicated by the fact that many materials present in cargo are somewhat radioactive. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material or technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material that may trigger radiation portal monitor alarms. Man-made radioactive sources, especially medical isotopes, are also frequently observed and produce alarms. Such nuisance alarms can be an operational limiting factor for screening of cargo at border crossings. Information about the nature of the radioactive materials in cargo that can interfere with the detection of radionuclides of concern is necessary. This paper provides such information for North American cargo, but the information may also be of use to border control officials in other countries. (PIET-43741-TM-361)

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Evans, John C.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

Honig, E.M.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

Honig, E.M.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE Recovery Act Awardees | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act Awardees Recovery Act Awardees Dataset Summary Description The data contained within the .xls is the latest list of DOE recovery act awardees. The list is to be updated weekly by the DOE. Source DOE Date Released December 10th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Awardees DOE Recovery Act Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon DOE Recovery Act Awardees - Dec 10 2010 (xls, 949.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Weekly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.energy.gov/webpolicies.htm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

116

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.) [ed.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year. March 8, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

118

LANL sponsors Recovery Act Job Fair  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Job Fair Recovery Act Job Fair LANL sponsors Recovery Act Job Fair The fair was aimed at filling current and future positions with subcontractors working on environmental cleanup under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. October 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

119

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of waste heat energy is one element of a complete energy conservation plan. In addition to contributing to the goal of saving energy, utilization of waste heat is also an important source of cost savings. This presentation details the steps necessary to develop a good waste heat recovery plan. The necessity of performing a complete waste heat audit is detailed, together with guidelines to selecting waste heat recovery projects. The economic analysis of potential projects, and the art of selling these projects to management are discussed. Also included are brief descriptions of the various types of heat exchangers commonly used in industry today.

Darby, D. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Battleground Energy Recovery Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ? Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

Daniel Bullock

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

123

Radiation effects on MOS devices: dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequence and sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on some investigations of dosimetry, annealing, irradiation sequences, and radioactive sources, involved in the determination of radiation effects on MOS devices. Results show that agreement in the experimental and theoretical surface to average doses support the use of thermo-luminescent dosimeters (manganese activated calcium fluoride) in specifying the surface dose delivered to thin gate insulators of MOS devices. Annealing measurements indicate the existence of at least two energy levels, or activation energies, for recovery of soft oxide MOS devices after irradiation by electrons, protons, and gammas. Damage sensitivities of MOS devices were found to be independent of combinations and sequences of radiation type or energies. Comparison of various gamma sources indicated a small dependence of damage sensitivity on the Cobalt facility, but a more significant dependence in the case of the Cesium source. These results were attributed to differences in the spectral content of the several sources.

Stassinopoulos, E.; Brucker, G.; Gunten, O.; Jordan, T.; Knudson, A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Radioactivity in Nature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fig. 3-8. The ratio of uranium to lead present on Earth today gives us an estimate of its age (4.5 billion years). Given Earths age, any much shorter lived radioactive nuclei...

125

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

Fields, Stanley R. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

RECOVERY.GOV U.S. Depar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 29, 2013 January 29, 2013 AIKEN, S.C. - With the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, Savannah River Site (SRS) continues to safely treat and dispose of radioactive waste created while producing materials for nuclear weapons throughout the Cold War. The DOE site in Aiken, S.C., is safely, steadily, and cost-effectively making progress to analyze, measure, and then carefully cleanup or dispose of legacy transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at SRS. Much of this funding supported massive efforts to certify, repackage, and prepare legacy TRU waste for shipment from SRS to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), DOE's deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated TRU radioactive waste near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Central Characterization Program, which characterizes the

128

Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Technology Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imported sources and includes conventional and unconventional extraction * Marcellus Shale has an EUR (estimated ultimate recovery) of 489 Tcf (Engelder, 2009) Source: EIA,...

129

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cyanidation Recovery Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material ... Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs).

131

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Radiation Awareness TrainingRadiation Awareness Training Radioactive Material &Radioactive Material &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Regulatory Agencies · Radioactive Materials ­ Broad Scope License ­ Issued by GA Department of Natural Resources · X-Ray Machines ­ Units registered with the GA Department of Human Resources ­ They regulate x) · Sealed sources ­ Nickel-63 (Gas chromatograph) ­ Cesium-137 (Liquid Scintillation Counter) ­ Neutron

Löffler, Frank E.

134

Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo American Samoa Recovery Act State Memo Arizona Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo Colorado Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Delaware Recovery Act State Memo District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo Florida Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Guam Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Idaho Recovery Act State Memo Illinois Recovery Act State Memo Indiana Recovery Act State Memo Iowa Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Maine Recovery Act State Memo

135

Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act-funded demolition completed Recovery Act-funded demolition completed Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition The building was the largest of the 24 demolished at LANL's historic Technical Area 21. January 19, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430

136

Laboratory awards final Recovery Act demolition contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act demolition contracts Recovery Act demolition contracts Laboratory awards final Recovery Act demolition contracts The two winning bidders will each demolish a portion of the remaining unused buildings at the Lab's historic Technical Area 21. April 20, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

137

DETECTOR FOR RADIOACTIVE HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

A device of the Geiger-Mueller type is designed for detecting radioactive hydrogen in the presence of other radioactive substances. The device comprises an envelope with thin (1 to 5 mil thick) Ni or Pd windows at the ends, an anode and a cathode spaced apart in the envelope, and a counting gas within the envelope. In operation, the suspect atmosphere is blown against one of the windows, whereby only the hydrogen diffuses into the envelope for counting. Means is provided for heating the windows to the desired temperatures. (D.L.C.)

Christianson, C.; Gilman, M.; Maggio, R.C.

1963-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agencys Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14: Alternate Water Sources, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

drought in the southeastern United States caused drought in the southeastern United States caused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address the need for water conservation and develop a water management plan for their Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD). The water management plan aimed to reduce SESD's potable water usage (more than 2.4 million gallons in fiscal year 2008) through an air handler condensate recovery project. The EPA SESD encompasses 12 acres in Athens, Georgia. A single laboratory building was constructed in 1996 consisting of 66,200 square feet configured for a mix use of laboratory and office activities. In May 2008, SESD completed an air handler condensate recovery system. The system routes condensate from rooftop air handler units to the facility's cooling tower,

140

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients November 19, 2009 1 Outline of Presentation * OMB Reporting Requirements * Jobs Guidance * FR.gov 2 Section 1512 of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Outlines Recipient Reporting Requirements "Recipient reports required by Section 1512 of the Recovery Act will answer important questions, such as: ▪ Who is receiving Recovery Act dollars and in what amounts? ▪ What projects or activities are being funded with Recovery Act dollars? ▪ What is the completion status of such projects or activities and what impact have they had on job creation and retention?" "When published on www.Recovery.gov, these reports will provide the public with an unprecedented level of transparency into how Federal dollars are being spent and will help drive accountability for the timely,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

142

Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy. About Anaerobic Digestion Biogas recovery systems are sometimes known as anaerobic digesters, because they use a process called anaerobic digestion. (Conventional lagoons oper- ate on the same biological principle.) During anaerobic digestion, bacteria break down

Mukhtar, Saqib

143

TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.  

SciTech Connect

For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

HOLDEN,N.E.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

RADIOACTIVITY (NATURAL) Synonyms Definition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

rays to the natural dose of radioactivity is strongly depen- dent on altitude and ... a noble gas, and its migration in groundwater and soil gas is of ..... trometers available on the market. ... example, using an oil immersion objective (NA 1.4) with.

145

Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1988 (WSRC-RP-89-737) is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSU-1-YR-25). The series reflects the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. Data contained in this report are used for a variety of purposes, including the calculation of offsite dose estimates and aiding special environmental studies. This document is an effluent/source term report. The report is divided into four summary sections. Summary A details volumes of air and water released from emission sources since plant startup. Summary B lists annual radioactive release data from these emission sources, grouped by nuclide and area. Summary C provides yearly totals of radioactive releases by radionuclide, under the headings Atmospheric,'' Liquid to streams,'' or Liquid to Seepage Basins'' accordingly. Monthly radioactive releases from each emission source from 1986 to 1988 are found in Summary D. Where appropriate, headings in the summary tables have been changed to clarify and simplify emission data (see Appendix B). Additionally, any new discharge points, such as the liquid discharge from the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), are included in this report. A listing of 1988 source term and onsite discharge designations is provided in Appendix C. 36 refs.

Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Enhanced oil recovery water requirements  

SciTech Connect

Water requirements for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are evaluated using publicly available information, data from actual field applications, and information provided by knowledgeable EOR technologists in 14 major oil companies. Water quantity and quality requirements are estimated for individual EOR processes (steam drive; in situ combustion; and CO/sub 2/, micellar-polymer, polymer, and caustic flooding) in those states and specific geographic locations where these processes will play major roles in future petroleum production by the year 2000. The estimated quantity requirements represent the total water needed from all sources. A reduction in these quantities can be achieved by reinjecting all of the produced water potentially available for recycle in the oil recovery method. For injection water quality requirements, it is noted that not all of the water used for EOR needs to be fresh. The use of treated produced water can reduce significantly the quantities of fresh water that would be sought from other sources. Although no major EOR project to date has been abandoned because of water supply problems, competing regional uses for water, drought situations, and scarcity of high quality surface water and ground water could be impediments to certain projects in the near future.

Royce, B.; Kaplan, E.; Garrell, M.; Geffen, T.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises Source term information is required for to reconstruct a device used in a dispersed radiological dispersal device. Simulating a radioactive environment to train and exercise sampling and sample characterization methods with suitable sample materials is a continued challenge. The Idaho National Laboratory has developed and permitted a Radioactive Response Training Range (RRTR), an 800 acre test range that is approved for open air dispersal of activated KBr, for training first responders in the entry and exit from radioactively contaminated areas, and testing protocols for environmental sampling and field characterization. Members from the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement, and the Department of Energy participated in the first contamination exercise that was conducted at the RRTR in the July 2011. The range was contaminated using a short lived radioactive Br-82 isotope (activated KBr). Soil samples contaminated with KBr (dispersed as a solution) and glass particles containing activated potassium bromide that emulated dispersed radioactive materials (such as ceramic-based sealed source materials) were collected to assess environmental sampling and characterization techniques. This presentation summarizes the performance of a radioactive materials surrogate for use as a training aide for nuclear forensics.

Martha Finck; Bevin Brush; Dick Jansen; David Chamberlain; Don Dry; George Brooks; Margaret Goldberg

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

RADIOACTIVITY STORED UP BY ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

A fast radiometric method of measuring radioactivity uptake by marine organisms is described. (R.V.J.)

Akamsin, A.D.; Parchevskii, V.P.; Polikarpov, G.G.

1960-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Enhanced recovery update  

SciTech Connect

Three key projects featuring enhanced operations in California are described. In the Kern River oil field, steaming at a pilot project is testing the hot plate heavy oil recovery method. In Buena Vista oil field, steam will be injected in a test project to determine the commercial feasibility of using steam for the enhanced recovery of light crude oil. Also, in the McKittrick oil field, 2 processes are being considered for a commercial heavy oil mining venture. Steam continues to be the most important element in the recovery of hard-to-produce oil. Other steam-using projects are highlighted.

Rintoul, B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method for calcining radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA); McElroy, Jack L. (Richland, WA); Mendel, John E. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here is one compliance agreement for EMs American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program on accelerated milestones for the Recovery Act program.

152

Recovery News Flashes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news-flashes Office of Environmental news-flashes Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP http://energy.gov/em/downloads/tru-success-srs-recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear" class="title-link">"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP

153

Finding Aids: Radioactive Fallout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Argonne National Laboratory Bancroft Library, University of California Boeing Aircraft Company Brookhaven National Laboratory Coordination and Information Center (CIC) Eastman Kodak EG&G, Energy Measurements Holmes and Narver Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Manuscript Division, Library of Congress National Academy of Sciences Archives Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories Scripps Institution of Oceanography Archives Smithsonian Institution Archives U.S. Air Force Brooks Air Force Base Kirtland Air Force Base USAF Historical Research Center U.S. Army Chemical Corps (Aberdeen Proving Ground)

154

Pennsylvania Source Term Tracking System  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania Source Term Tracking System tabulates surveys received from radioactive waste generators in the Commonwealth of radioactive waste is collected each quarter from generators using the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Quarterly Report Form (hereafter called the survey) and then entered into the tracking system data base. This personal computer-based tracking system can generate 12 types of tracking reports. The first four sections of this reference manual supply complete instructions for installing and setting up the tracking system on a PC. Section 5 presents instructions for entering quarterly survey data, and Section 6 discusses generating reports. The appendix includes samples of each report.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Magnesium fluoride recovery method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

Gay, Richard L. (Canoga Park, CA); McKenzie, Donald E. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

1961-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environmental geochemistry of radioactive contamination.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report attempts to describe the geochemical foundations of the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. The information is obtained and applied in three interacting spheres of inquiry and analysis: (1) experimental studies and theoretical calculations, (2) field studies of contaminated and natural analog sites and (3) model predictions of radionuclide behavior in remediation and waste disposal. Analyses of the risks from radioactive contamination require estimation of the rates of release and dispersion of the radionuclides through potential exposure pathways. These processes are controlled by solubility, speciation, sorption, and colloidal transport, which are strong functions of the compositions of the groundwater and geomedia as well as the atomic structure of the radionuclides. The chemistry of the fission products is relatively simple compared to the actinides. Because of their relatively short half-lives, fission products account for a large fraction of the radioactivity in nuclear waste for the first several hundred years but do not represent a long-term hazard in the environment. The chemistry of the longer-lived actinides is complex; however, some trends in their behavior can be described. Actinide elements of a given oxidation state have either similar or systematically varying chemical properties due to similarities in ionic size, coordination number, valence, and electron structure. In dilute aqueous systems at neutral to basic pH, the dominant actinide species are hydroxy- and carbonato-complexes, and the solubility-limiting solid phases are commonly oxides, hydroxides or carbonates. In general, actinide sorption will decrease in the presence of ligands that complex with the radionuclide; sorption of the (IV) species of actinides (Np, Pu, U) is generally greater than of the (V) species. The geochemistry of key radionuclides in three different environments is described in this report. These include: (1) low ionic strength reducing waters from crystalline rocks at nuclear waste research sites in Sweden; (2) oxic water from the J-13 well at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a proposed repository for high level nuclear waste (HLW) in tuffaceous rocks; and (3) reference brines associated with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The transport behaviors of radionuclides associated with the Chernobyl reactor accident and the Oklo Natural Reactor are described. These examples span wide temporal and spatial scales and include the rapid geochemical and physical processes important to nuclear reactor accidents or industrial discharges as well as the slower processes important to the geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Application of geochemical information to remediating or assessing the risk posed by radioactive contamination is the final subject of this report. After radioactive source terms have been removed, large volumes of soil and water with low but potentially hazardous levels of contamination may remain. For poorly-sorbing radionuclides, capture of contaminated water and removal of radionuclides may be possible using permeable reactive barriers and bioremediation. For strongly sorbing radionuclides, contaminant plumes will move very slowly. Through a combination of monitoring, regulations and modeling, it may be possible to have confidence that they will not be a hazard to current or future populations. Abstraction of the hydrogeochemical properties of real systems into simple models is required for probabilistic risk assessment. Simplifications in solubility and sorption models used in performance assessment calculations for the WIPP and the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain are briefly described.

Bryan, Charles R.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

164

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 7, 2010 September 7, 2010 MetroTek installed a 620kW solar panel system at Buckman's Inc. in Pottstown, PA. The Recovery Act-funded project is expected to save the pool chemical business $5 million over the next 25 years. | Photo Courtesy of MetroTek Electrical Services Pennsylvania Pool Chemical Business Soaks Up Rays Most people catching rays poolside don't realize this, but it takes a lot of energy to make swimming pool chemicals. So much so that Buckman's Inc., a small business in Pottstown, PA, decided to tap into a fitting energy source to help offset high energy costs from its pool chemical manufacturing facility: the sun. September 2, 2010 Ice storage coolers lie next to the central plant for the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City, OK. | Photo courtesy of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum |

165

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Status of enhanced oil recovery technology  

SciTech Connect

The various enhanced oil recovery processes are discussed and classified into the following categories: (1) polymer waterflooding; (2) steam processes; (3) miscible gas (CO/sub 2/) processes; (4) surfactant flooding; and (5) in-situ combustion. Polymer flooding alone is of limited applicability and production from polymer projects is unlikely to become highly significant. Steam processes are now economic for favorable prospects, and recovery levels range from 5 to 35%. Miscible gas processes are particularly applicable to those reservoirs with favorable geology located near sources of CO/sub 2/, and production could become significant in the next five years, but not sooner due to the time necessary to develop CO/sub 2/ sources and construct distribution systems. Recovery levels for the miscible gas processes are in the 5 to 15% range. Most surfactant processes are still in the research stage, and will not yield significant production for at least ten years. Ten to fifteen % of the original oil-in-place can be recovered through these processes. In Situ combustion processes are currently economic in some cases, but the ultimate potential is presently very limited unless significant technical breakthroughs are made in the future. It is estimated that the ultimate potential for present enhanced oil recovery processes in the conterminous United States is up to 20 billion barrels of petroleum.

Mattax, C.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 21  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work now two-thirds of the way complete at Hanford's tank farms, the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is engaged in essential projects that will reduce the risk posed to the environment by more than 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 un- derground tanks. The waste is left over from decades of Cold War plutonium production. ORP and its prime contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), have spent $209 million of $326 mil- lion from the Recovery Act to upgrade tank farm infrastruc- ture, extend the life of critical operating nuclear facilities and prepare the waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) now under construction at Hanford. "The upgrades to tank farm infrastructure allow us to more ef-

169

Recovery Act Progress at Idaho National Lab | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress at Idaho National Lab Progress at Idaho National Lab Recovery Act Progress at Idaho National Lab August 19, 2010 - 5:09pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a hot bed of activity with various Recovery Act projects funded through the Office of Environmental Management. For example, North Wind Services will be constructing several new structures at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex -- facilities that will provide important protection from the elements and minimize the spread of contamination during buried waste excavation, retrieval and packaging operations. Pictures of Recovery Act Projects at Idaho National Lab Down the road at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, TerranearPMC is working

170

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

171

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recycling and Secondary Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Applying Ausmelt Technology to Recover Cu, Ni, and Co from Slags" .... " Enhancing Cobalt Recovery from Primary and Secondary Resources" .... " Modifying Alumina Red Mud to Support a Revegetation Cover" (Research .... " Recycling Used Automotive Oil Filters" (Research Summary), K.D. Peaslee, February 1994, pp.

173

Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled, Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSPU-YR-25-1). The reports reflect the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. This document is an effluent/source term report; items falling under other categories, such as environmental spills or solid waste transport to the burial ground, are not included. Any classified or secret data have either been excluded, as in the case of 1960--1970 atmospheric releases of {sup 85}Kr from the Separations Areas, or combined to avoid classification, such as atmospheric tritium releases from the Separations Area.

Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Radioactive isotopes on the Moon  

SciTech Connect

A limited review of experiments and studies of radioactivity and isotope ratios in lunar materials is given. Observations made on the first few millimeters of the surface where the effects of solar flare particles are important, some measurements on individual rocks, and some studies of radioactivities produced deep in the lunar soil by galactic cosmic rays, are among the experiments discussed. (GHT)

Davis, R. Jr.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

176

New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development September 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 22 projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. Funded with more than $575 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these R&D projects complement the industrial demonstration projects already being funded through the Recovery Act. Together, these projects represent an unprecedented investment in the development of clean coal technologies. This program supports the President's goal of overcoming the barriers to

177

Uranium at Y-12: Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Recovery Uranium at Y-12: Recovery Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:44pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Recovery involves reclaiming uranium from numerous sources and configurations and handling uranium in almost any form, including oxides and liquids (see A Rich Resource Requires Recovery). Y-12 has the equipment and expertise to recover uranium that is present in filters, wipes, mop water and elsewhere. For many salvage materials, the uranium is extracted and then manipulated into a uranyl nitrate solution, purified and chemically converted through several stages. Then it is reduced to a mass of uranium metal. This mass, called a button, is used in casting operations. The chemical operators who recover and purify uranium understand and monitor complex chemical reactions, flow rates, temperatures

178

Secretary Chu Announces Progress on BPA Recovery Act Project | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress on BPA Recovery Act Project Progress on BPA Recovery Act Project Secretary Chu Announces Progress on BPA Recovery Act Project August 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Richland, Wash. - With the goal of bringing new jobs and green power to the West, Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the start of the McNary-John Day transmission project in Washington and Oregon, which will be funded by $343 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The project is expected to deliver almost 600 megawatts of clean, renewable wind energy to homes and business across the West. "These Recovery Act funds are putting people to work today to build the infrastructure that will be vital to our economy in the future," said U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "By integrating renewable energy sources onto

179

New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development September 7, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 22 projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. Funded with more than $575 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these R&D projects complement the industrial demonstration projects already being funded through the Recovery Act. Together, these projects represent an unprecedented investment in the development of clean coal technologies. This program supports the President's goal to overcome the barriers to

180

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Recovery Act Recovery Act Center Map PERFORMANCE The Department estimates the $6 billion Recovery Act investment will allow us to complete work now that would cost approximately $13 billion in future years, saving $7 billion. As Recovery Act work is completed through the cleanup of contaminated sites, facilities, and material disposition, these areas will becoming available for potential reuse by other entities. Recovery Act funding is helping the Department reach our cleanup goals faster. Through the end of December 2012, EM achieved a total footprint reduction of 74%, or 690 of 931 square miles. EM achieved its goal of 40% footprint reduction in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule. Recovery Act payments exceeded $5.9 billion in December 2012. Recovery Act

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low Radioactivity in CANDLES  

SciTech Connect

CANDLES is the project to search for double beta decay of 48Ca by using CaF2 crystals. Double beta decay of 48Ca has the highest Q value among all nuclei whose double beta decay is energetically allowed. This feature makes the study almost background free and becomes important once the study is limited by the backgrounds. We studied double beta decays of 48Ca by using ELEGANTS VI detector system which features CaF2(Eu) crystals. We gave the best limit on the lifetime of neutrino-less double beta decay of 48Ca although further development is vital to reach the neutrino mass of current interest for which CANDLES is designed. In this article we present how CANDLES can achieve low radioactivity, which is the key for the future double beta decay experiment.

Kishimoto, T.; Ogawa, I.; Hazama, R.; Yoshida, S.; Umehara, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Sakai, H.; Yokoyama, D.; Mukaida, K.; Ichihara, K.; Tatewaki, Y.; Kishimoto, K.; Hirano, Y.; Yanagisawa, A.; Ajimura, S. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

COLORADO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COLORADO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT COLORADO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and...

183

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Los Alamos National Laboratory receives Recovery Act funds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act funds Recovery Act funds Los Alamos National Laboratory receives Recovery Act funds Recovery Act funds will go toward environmental compliance and cleaning up Cold War-era buildings slated for demolition. July 21, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office

185

LANL awards Recovery Act contract worth up to $100 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Awards Recovery Act contract LANL Awards Recovery Act contract LANL awards Recovery Act contract worth up to $100 million TerranearPMC, LLC will haul demolition debris and soils from LANL's Recovery Act cleanup projects for disposal in licensed facilities. March 10, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

186

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Symposium on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Second Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 5 to 8, 1981. Forty-four technical papers were presented which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery. Field tests, laboratory investigations, and mathematical analyses of tertiary recovery methods such as microemulsion flooding, carbon dioxide injection, in-situ combustion, steam injection, and gas injection are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Caustic Recovery Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

366, REVISON 0 366, REVISON 0 Key Words: Waste Treatment Plant Sodium Recovery Electrochemical Retention: Permanent Review of Ceramatec's Caustic Recovery Technology W. R. Wilmarth D. T. Hobbs W. A. Averill E. B. Fox R. A. Peterson UNCLASSIFIED DOES NOT CONTAIN UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION ADC & Reviewing Official:_______________________________________ (E. Stevens, Manager, Solid Waste and Special Programs) Date:______________________________________ JULY 20, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U. S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-96SR18500 Page 1 of 28 WSRC-STI-2007-00366, REVISON 0 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under

189

Fermilab | Recovery Act | Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Videos Videos Watch videos documenting progress on Fermilab projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. NOvA - Community Voices - September 2009 Residents of northern Minnesota and construction workers building the NOvA detector facility discuss the benefits the high-energy physics research project has brought their communities. Congressman Bill Foster at Fermilab Congressman Bill Foster speaks to Fermilab Technical Division employees and members of the media at a press conference on Wednesday, August 5 to announce an additional $60.2 million in Recovery Act funds for the lab. NOvA first blast On July 20, construction crews began blasting into the rock at the future site of the NOvA detector facility in northern Minnesota. NOvA groundbreaking ceremony

190

Fermilab | Recovery Act | Features  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Features - Archive Features - Archive photo Industrial Building 3 addition Fermilab Today-November 5, 2010 IB3 addition nears completion The future site of Fermilab’s new materials laboratory space has evolved from a steel outline to a fully enclosed building over the past five months. Read full column photo Fermilab Today-October 22, 2010 Recovery Act gives LBNE team chance to grow Thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the collaboration for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment, LBNE, has expanded its project team. Read full column photo cooling units Fermilab Today-October 15, 2010 Local company completes FCC roof construction A local construction company recently completed work on the roof of the Feynman Computing Center, an important step in an ongoing project funded by

191

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until recently, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, changing world events have raised questions concerning the need to recover and recycle this material. In April 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the management and disposition of radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste) and 3,800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine waste are in inventory at the ICPP. Legal drivers and agreements exist obligating the INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for safe and environmentally sound treatment and interim storage of radioactive liquid and calcine waste. Candidate treatment processes and waste forms are being evaluated using the Technology Evaluation and Analysis Methodology (TEAM) Model. This process allows decision makers to (1) identify optimum radioactive waste treatment and disposal form alternatives; (2) assess tradeoffs between various optimization criteria; (3) identify uncertainties in performance parameters; and (4) focus development efforts on options that best satisfy stakeholder concerns. The Systems Analysis technology evaluation presented in this document supports the DOE in selecting the most effective radioactive liquid and calcine waste management plan to implement in compliance with established regulations, court orders, and agreements.

Murphy, J.A.; Pincock, L.F.; Christiansen, I.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distributed Generation Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental drivers are promoting the adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. Technology advances have produced new and improved distributed generation (DG) units that can be coupled with heat recovery hardware to create CHP systems. Performance characteristics vary considerably among DG options, and it is important to understand how these characteristics influence the selection of CHP systems that will meet both electric and thermal site loads.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

195

Recovery Boiler Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary computations of the cold flow in a simplified geometry of a recovery boiler are presented. The computations have been carried out using a new code containing multigrid methods and segmentation techniques. This approach is shown to provide good resolution of the complex flow near the air ports and greatly improve the convergence characteristics of the numerical procedure. The improved resolution enhances the predictive capabilities of the computations, and allows the assessment of the relative performance of different air delivery systems.

Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional and combined-cycle plants, boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the main availability problem for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. The three volumes of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice (1012757) present an in-depth description of the various HRSG and degradation mechanisms, providing plant owners and operators with the t...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Chemically enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yet when conducted according to present state of the art, chemical flooding (i.e., micellar/polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, surfactant flooding) can mobilize more residual crude oil than any other method of enhanced oil recovery. It also is one of the most expensive methods of enhanced oil recovery. This contribution will describe some of the technology that comprises the state of the art technology that must be adhered to if a chemical flood is to be successful. Although some of the efforts to reduce cost and other points are discussed, the principle focus is on technical considerations in designing a good chemical flooding system. The term chemical flooding is restricted here to methods of enhanced oil recovery that employs a surfactant, either injected into the oil reservoir or generated in situ, primarily to reduce oil-water interfacial tension. Hence, polymer-water floods for mobility or profile control, steam foams, and carbon dioxide foams are excluded. Some polymer considerations are mentioned because they apply to providing mobility control for chemical flooding systems.

Nelson, R.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

Stuart E. Strand

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Radioactivity in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2008 ... This video introduces terms and concepts associated with radioactivity and shows how to identify radioactive substances that might enter a...

200

FAQ 4-What is radioactivity and radiation?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and radiation? What is radioactivity and radiation? Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

i TP?TT<$wft Environmental Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in the North Atlantic region including the Faroe Islands FALLOUT; GREENLAND; MAN; MILK; PLANTS; PLUTONIUM 239; PLU- TONIUM 240; RADIOACTIVITY; SEAWATER; SEAWEEDS

202

Environmental Radioactivity in the North Atlantic Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactivity, Monaco Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in the North Atlantic region including ISLANDS; FOOD CHAINS; GLOBAL FALLOUT GREENLAND; LEAD 210; MAN; MILK; MOLLUSCS; POLONIUM 210; PLANTS

203

Recovery Act: Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Water Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) distributed a portion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to advance technologies for chemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) captured from industrial sources. The focus of the research projects is permanent sequestration of CO 2 through mineralization or development

204

"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP With the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, Savannah River Site (SRS) continues to safely treat and dispose of radioactive waste created while producing materials for nuclear weapons throughout the Cold War. The DOE site in Aiken, S.C., is safely, steadily, and cost-effectively making progress to analyze, measure, and then carefully cleanup or dispose of legacy transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at SRS after the lengthy nuclear arms race. "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than

205

"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP With the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, Savannah River Site (SRS) continues to safely treat and dispose of radioactive waste created while producing materials for nuclear weapons throughout the Cold War. The DOE site in Aiken, S.C., is safely, steadily, and cost-effectively making progress to analyze, measure, and then carefully cleanup or dispose of legacy transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at SRS after the lengthy nuclear arms race. "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than

206

Priorities for technology development and policy to reduce the risk from radioactive materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Standing Committee on International Security of Radioactive and Nuclear Materials in the Nonproliferation and Arms Control Division conducted its fourth annual workshop in February 2010 on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials. This workshop examined new technologies in real-time tracking of radioactive materials, new risks and policy issues in transportation security, the best practices and challenges found in addressing illicit radioactive materials trafficking, industry leadership in reducing proliferation risk, and verification of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, Article VI. Technology gaps, policy gaps, and prioritization for addressing the identified gaps were discussed. Participants included academia, policy makers, radioactive materials users, physical security and safeguards specialists, and vendors of radioactive sources and transportation services. This paper summarizes the results of this workshop with the recommendations and calls to action for the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) membership community.

Duggan, Ruth Ann

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

1959-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation...

209

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radioactive decay data tables  

SciTech Connect

The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

Kocher, D.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Monitoring radioactive xenon gas in room air using activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

A method for monitoring room air for radioactive xenon gas is described. It uses activated charcoal vials, a vacuum source and a well-type scintillation counter. The method may be adapted for detection and identification of any radioactive gas excluding those with ultra-short half-lives. Sampling room air during xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) ventilation lung studies was performed using this technique. The results show that low concentrations of {sup 133}Xe in room air can be reliably detected and that staff exposure to {sup 133}Xe at this institution was within ICRP recommendations.

Langford, J.; Thompson, G. (Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth (Australia) Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Laundry heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

A laundry heat recovery system includes a heat exchanger associated with each dryer in the system, the heat exchanger being positioned within the exhaust system of the dryer. A controller responsive to the water temperature of the heat exchangers and the water storage for the washer selectively circulates the water through a closed loop system whereby the water within the exchangers is preheated by the associated dryers. By venting the exhaust air through the heat exchanger, the air is dehumidified to permit recirculation of the heated air into the dryer.

Alio, P.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

214

The ALEXIS mission recovery  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the recovery of the ALEXIS small satellite mission. ALEXIS is a 113-kg satellite that carries an ultrasoft x-ray telescope array and a high-speed VHF receiver/digitizer (BLACKBEARD), supported by a miniature spacecraft bus. It was launched by a Pegasus booster on 1993 April 25, but a solar paddle was damaged during powered flight. Initial attempts to contact ALEXIS were unsuccessful. The satellite finally responded in June, and was soon brought under control. Because the magnetometer had failed, the rescue required the development of new attitude control-techniques. The telemetry system has performed nominally. They discuss the procedures used to recover the ALEXIS mission.

Bloch, J.; Armstrong, T.; Dingler, B.; Enemark, D.; Holden, D.; Little, C.; Munson, C.; Priedhorsky, B.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Smith, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Warner, R.; Dill, B.; Huffman, G.; McLoughlin, F.; Mills, R.; Miller, R. [AeroAstro, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Management of Spent and Disused Radiation Sources - The Zambian Experience  

SciTech Connect

Zambia like all other countries in the world is faced with environmental problems brought about by a variety of human activities. In Zambia the major environmental issues as identified by Nation Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) of 1994 are water pollution, poor sanitation, land degradation, air pollution, poor waste management, misuse of chemicals, wildlife depletion and deforestation. Zambian has been using a lot of radioactive materials in its various industries. The country has taken several projects with help of external partners. These partners however left these projects in the hands of the Zambians without developing their capacities to manage these radioactive sources. The Government recognized the need to manage these sources and passed legislation governing the management of radioactive materials. The first act of Parliament on Radiation Protection work was passed in 1975 to legislate the use of ionizing radiation. However, because of financial constraints the Country is facing, these regulations have remained unimplemented. Fortunately the international Community has been working in partnership with the Zambian Government in the Management of Radioactive Material. Therefore this paper will present the following aspects of radioactive waste management in Zambia: review Existing Legislation in Zambia regarding management of spent/radioactive sources; capacity building in the field of management of radioactive waste; management of spent and disused radiation sources; existing disposal systems in Zambia regarding spent/orphaned sources; existing stocks of radioactive sources in the Zambian industries.

Chabala, F.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

217

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Crude Distillation Unit Heat Recovery Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baytown's Pipe Still 3 is a 95,000 barrel per day crude distillation unit. A comprehensive heat recovery and energy utilization study was done on Pipe Still 3 after a preliminary cursory study had indicated that an overall look at the total picture could produce much better results than a series of improvements done piecemeal. The study did meet its objective by identifying the maximum heat recovery that is technically and economically feasible. It showed a potential for dramatic improvement - a 39 percent reduction in fuel, plus a 43 percent increase in the quantity of process steam generated, equivalent to a 48 percent reduction in net energy consumed. Techniques employed included a Source/Sink Profile (which is described later); a combining of oil heating, steam generation, and air preheat to best advantage; and a computer program to design the required heat exchanger trains.

John, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Storage depot for radioactive material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Storage depot for radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, M.J.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet...

223

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses. For Immediate ... Berne. Radioanalytical emergency response exercise. Journal ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

Recovery Act State Memos Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 For total Recovery Act jobs numbers in Ohio go to www.recovery.gov DOE Recovery Act projects in Ohio: 83 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OHIO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Ohio are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from the smart grid and energy efficiency to advanced battery manufacturing, biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and cleanup of the state's Cold War legacy nuclear sites Through these investments, Ohio's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Ohio to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. EXAMPLES OF OHIO FORMULA GRANTS Program

225

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Economy » Recovery Act Energy Economy » Recovery Act Recovery Act December 18, 2013 BPA Wins Platts Global Energy Award for Grid Optimization Platts awarded the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) a Global Energy Award for grid optimization on December 12 in New York City for its development of a synchrophasor network. BPA is part of the Recovery Act-funded Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Program. December 13, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through November 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through November 30, 2013. December 12, 2013 Energy Department Announces $150 Million in Tax Credits to Invest in U.S. Clean Energy Manufacturing Domestic Manufacturing Projects to Support Renewable Energy Generation as

226

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) In 1965 the Solid Waste Disposal Act [Public Law (Pub. L.) 89-72] was enacted to improve solid waste disposal methods. It was amended in 1970 by the Resource Recovery Act (Pub. L. 91-512), which provided the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with funding for resource recovery programs. However, that Act had little impact on the management and ultimate disposal of hazardous waste. In 1976 Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Pub. L. 94-580). RCRA established a system for managing non-hazardous and hazardous solid wastes in an environmentally sound manner. Specifically, it provides for the management of hazardous wastes from the point of origin to the point of final disposal (i.e., "cradle to grave"). RCRA also promotes resource recovery and waste minimization.

227

INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of EnergyIdaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most promising alternatives were compared by applying weighting factors to each based on how well the alternative met the established criteria. From this information, an overall ranking of the various alternatives was obtained and a path forward recommended.

Tripp, Julia Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Miller, Rose Anna; Lauerhass, Lance

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy ? Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most promising alternatives were compared by applying weighting factors to each based on how well the alternative met the established criteria. From this information, an overall ranking of the various alternatives was obtained and a path forward recommended.

C. B. Millet; J. L. Tripp; K. E. Archibald; L. Lauerhauss; M. D. Argyle; R. L. Demmer

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Recovery Act State Memos Louisiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Louisiana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

230

Recovery Act State Memos Alabama  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Alabama For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

231

Recovery Act State Memos Oklahoma  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Oklahoma For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

232

Recovery Act State Memos Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Massachusetts For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

233

Recovery Act State Memos Mississippi  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Mississippi For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

234

Recovery Act State Memos Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Wyoming For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 4

235

Recovery Act State Memos Connecticut  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Connecticut For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

236

Recovery Act State Memos Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Oregon For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 4 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

237

Recovery Act State Memos Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah Utah For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

238

Recovery Act State Memos Nebraska  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nebraska For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

239

Recovery Act State Memos Alaska  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Alaska For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

240

Recovery Act State Memos Arkansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Arkansas For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Recovery Act State Memos Indiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indiana Indiana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

242

Recovery Act State Memos Guam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guam Guam For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 4

243

Recovery Act State Memos Iowa  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Iowa For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

244

Recovery Act State Memos Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Georgia For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

245

Recovery Act State Memos Minnesota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Minnesota For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

246

Recovery Act State Memos Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Idaho For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

247

Recovery Act State Memos Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Illinois For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 7

248

Recovery Act State Memos Pennsylvania  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Pennsylvania For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................ 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ......................................................................................... 7

249

Recovery Act State Memos Wisconsin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Wisconsin For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 6

250

Recovery Act State Memos Montana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Montana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

251

Recovery Act State Memos Arizona  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona Arizona For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

252

Recovery Act State Memos Kansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas Kansas For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

253

Recovery Act State Memos California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY .............................................................................................. 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................ 12

254

Recovery Act State Memos Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Washington For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 6

255

Recovery Act State Memos Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Nevada For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ................................................................................................ 1 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

256

Recovery Act State Memos Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Virginia For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

257

Recovery Act State Memos Maine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maine Maine For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

258

Recovery Act State Memos Missouri  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Missouri For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

259

Recovery Act State Memos Maryland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maryland Maryland For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ....................................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ..................................................................................................... 4

260

Recovery Act State Memos Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado Colorado For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Recovery Act State Memos Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Texas For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 7

262

Recovery Act State Memos Vermont  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Vermont For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................ 4

263

Recovery Act State Memos Michigan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Michigan For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

264

Recovery Act State Memos Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Tennessee For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

265

Recovery Act State Memos Hawaii  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hawaii Hawaii For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

266

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Commercialization New green jobs a benefit of effort to end dependence on foreign oil April 29, 2009 Secretary Chu Announces 93 Million from Recovery Act to...

267

Economic Recovery Loan Program (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Recovery Loan Program provides subordinate financing to help businesses remain viable and improve productivity. Eligibility criteria are based on ability to repay, and the loan is...

268

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

269

Recovery Act State Memos Delaware  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

weatherization efforts in the state, creating jobs, reducing carbon emissions, and saving money for Delaware's low-income families. Over the course of the Recovery Act,...

270

Tracking of moving radioactive sources - Energy Innovation Portal  

A system for detecting unsecured nuclear materials. Whereas current portal monitors rely in part on physical prominence to deter materials from entering the country ...

271

Method for making radioactive metal articles having small dimensions  

SciTech Connect

A method for making a radioactive article such as wire, includes the steps of providing a metal article having a first shape, such a cylinder, that is either radioactive itself or can be converted to a second, radioactive isotope by irradiation; melting the metal article one or more times; optionally adding an alloying metal to the molten metal in order to enhance ductility or other properties; placing the metal article having the first shape (e.g., cylindrical) into a cavity in the interior of an extrusion body (e.g., a cylinder having a cylindrical cavity therein); extruding the extrusion body and the article having the first shape located in the cavity therein, resulting in an elongated extrusion body and an article having a second shape; removing the elongated extrusion body, for example by chemical means, leaving the elongated inner article substantially intact; optionally repeating the extrusion procedure one or more times; and then drawing the elongated article to still further elongate it, into wire, foil, or another desired shape. If the starting metal is enriched in a radioactive isotope or a precursor thereof, the end product can provide a more intense radiation source than conventionally manufactured radioactive wire, foil, or the like.

Ohriner, Evan K. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fermilab | Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOvA NOvA In April 2010, workers set up two cranes at the construction site for the NOvA detector facility in Ash River, Minnesota. In 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, provided DOE's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with $114.2 million. Fermilab invested the funds in critical scientific infrastructure to strengthen the nation's global scientific leadership as well as to provide immediate economic relief to local communities. This Web site provided citizens with clear and accurate information about how Fermilab used the new funding and its immediate benefits for our neighbors and our nation. Features photo Industrial Building 3 addition Fermilab Today-November 5, 2010 IB3 addition nears completion

273

Enhanced oil recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Speech recovery device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

Frankle, Christen M.

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

Flash Steam Recovery Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the goals of Vulcan's cost reduction effort is to reduce energy consumption in production facilities through energy optimization. As part of this program, the chloromethanes production unit, which produces a wide variety of chlorinated organic compounds, was targeted for improvement. This unit uses a portion of the high-pressure steam available from the plant's cogeneration facility. Continuous expansions within the unit had exceeded the optimum design capacity of the unit's steam/condensate recovery system, resulting in condensate flash steam losses to the atmosphere. Using computer simulation models and pinch analysis techniques, the Operational Excellence Group (Six Sigma) was able to identify a project to recover the flash steam losses as a supplemental low-pressure steam supply. The project was designed and implemented at no capital cost using existing instrumentation and controls. On an annualized basis steam usage per ton of product fell by about three percent. Absolute savings were about 15,800 million Btu.

Bronhold, C. J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Speech recovery device  

SciTech Connect

There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

Frankle, Christen M.

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies $44 Million for State Public Utility Commissions State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to ensure they have the capacity to quickly and effectively review proposed electricity projects. The funds will help the individual state PUCs accelerate reviews of the large number of electric utility requests that are expected under the Recovery Act. State PUCs will be reviewing electric utility investments in projects such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, carbon capture and storage, transmission

279

Heat Recovery From Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More opportunity exists today for the successful implementation of resource recovery projects than at any other period. However, that doesn't mean that energy/resource recovery exists for everyone. You must have a favorable match of all the critical areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc.

Underwood, O. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Sturcken, E.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ARM - ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActARM Recovery Act Project FAQs ActARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Why is ARM buying new instruments and equipment? The ARM Climate Research Facility (ARM) is receiving $60 million dollars in Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to build the next generation facility for climate change research. Using input from past ARM user workshops and ARM working group discussion, ARM has planned for the purchase and deployment of an expansive array of new

282

Recovery Act milestone: Excavation begins at Manhattan Project landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act milestone Recovery Act milestone Recovery Act milestone: Excavation begins at Manhattan Project landfill The six-acre site contains a series of trenches used from 1944 to 1948 to dispose of hazardous and non-hazardous trash from Manhattan Project labs and buildings. July 1, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

283

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Recovery Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Planning for Emergencies > Recovery Recovery NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier

284

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2010 26, 2010 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act -- Video from Cathy Zoi Vice President Biden announced that 200,000 homes have been Weatherized under the Recovery Act. Hear what Cathy Zoi, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has to say on Weatherization. August 26, 2010 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act August 25, 2010 The Recovery Act: Cutting Costs and Upping Capacity Secretary Chu joined Vice President Joe Biden at the White House to help unveil a new report on how investments made through the Recovery Act have been impacting innovation. While the report analyzed several major sectors, its most striking findings centered on energy. August 25, 2010 Eco Technologies, Inc., hired eleven workers to install these solar panels at the Hillsborough County judicial center. | Photo courtesy of Hillsborough County

285

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2009 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $755 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Tennessee New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $1.615 Billion in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in South Carolina New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $138 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Ohio New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $148 million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New York New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for

286

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act Act Recovery Act Total Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients by Month, through November 30, 2013 Total Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients by Month, through November 30, 2013 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Overview PROJECTS TOTAL OBLIGATIONS AWARD RECIPIENTS Smart Grid Investment Grant $3,482,831,000 99 Smart Grid Regional and Energy Storage Demonstration Projects $684,829,000 42 Workforce Development Program $100,000,000 52 Interconnection Transmission Planning $80,000,000 6 State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies $48,619,000 49 Enhancing State Energy Assurance $43,500,000 50 Enhancing Local Government Energy Assurance $8,024,000 43 Interoperability Standards and Framework $12,000,000 1 Program Direction1 $27,812,000 --

287

Infill drilling enhances waterflood recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of west Texas carbonate reservoir and waterflood data were studied to evaluate the impact of infill drilling on waterflood recovery. Results show that infill drilling enhanced the current and projected waterflood recovery from most of the reservoirs. The estimated ultimate and incremental infill-drilling waterflood recovery was correlated with well spacing and other reservoir and process parameters. Results of the correlation indicate that reducing well spacing from 40 to 20 acres (16 to 8 ha) per well would increase the oil recovery by 8 to 9% of the original oil in place (OOIP). Because of the limited data base and regressional nature of the correlation models, the infill-drilling recovery estimate must be used with caution.

Wu, C.H.; Jardon, M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Laughlin, B.A. (Union Pacific Research Co. (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Single-Objective Recovery Phase Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA has identified the four phases of disaster related planning as mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery. The recovery phase is characterized by activity to return life to normal or improved levels. ... Keywords: Disaster Recovery, Disaster Recovery Strategy, Optimization, Recovery, Response, Transportation Model

Sandy Mehlhorn; Michael Racer; Stephanie Ivey; Martin Lipinski

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method for magnesium sulfate recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for obtaining magnesium sulfate substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is then contacted with a concentrated sulfuric acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a solid product. The particulate solid product and a minor amount of the liquid is then treated to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium sulfate substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than 1,000 pCi/gm. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the initial acid treatment and a final solid residue has a radioactivity level of less than about 50 pCi/gm.

Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

290

Uranium Recovery Surface Activities (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality enforces and makes the rules and regulations for handling and recovering radioactive materials associated with in situ mining in Texas....

291

Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to! We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these radionuclides. We will then review some of the industrial sectors affected by TENORM, followed by a brief discussion on regulatory aspects of the issue.

Egidi, P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs at Savannah River Site Jobs at Savannah River Site Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site Addthis Description The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires. Speakers Skila Harris, Doug Clark, Bill Picciano, Kelli Culpepper, Nancy Cole, Duration 5:08 Topic Recovery Act Waste Management Nuclear Security & Safety Credit Energy Department Video SKILA HARRIS: We understand the health risks associated with radioactivity much better today than we did 50 years ago. And at the sites where this country was developing its weapons, we were not responsible in how we handled those materials. The recovery act has allowed us to accelerate the clean-up, hire a lot more people so we can

295

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental Radioactivity in the Faroes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN THE FAROES IN 1979 A. Aarkroo and J. Lippert Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in the Faroes Descriptors [0] DIET, ENVIRONMENT, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, FAROE ISLANDS, FISHES, FOOD, FOOD CHAINS, GLOBAL FALLOUT 62°N #12;- 7 - 1. INTRODUCTION 1*1*. The fallout programme for the Faroes, which was initiated

299

Recovery tasks: an automated approach to failure recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach for developing robust software applications that breaks dependences on the failed parts of an application's execution to allow the rest of the application to continue executing. When a failure occurs, the recovery algorithm ...

Brian Demsky; Jin Zhou; William Montaz

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Petroleum recovery materials and process  

SciTech Connect

A petroleum recovery process uses micellar solutions made from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). During the process, microemulsions utilizing LPG in the external phase are injected through at least one injection well into the oil-bearing formations. The microemulsions are driven toward at least one recovery well and crude petroleum is recovered through the recovery well. The LPG in the micellar system may be propane or butane. Corrosion inhibitors can be used in sour fields, and bactericides can be used where necessary. The microemulsions used contain up to about 10-20% water and about 8% surfactant. (4 claims)

Gogarty, W.B.; Olson, R.W.

1967-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

B. B. Back

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

Recovery Act Funding Opportunity Announcement: Enhanced Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Recovery Act Funding Opportunity Announcement: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Recovery Act Funding Opportunity...

303

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 January Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important...

304

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

305

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(or enhanced) recovery. During primary recovery, the natural pressure of the reservoir or gravity drive oil into the wellbore, combined with artificial lift techniques (such as...

306

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Thanks in part to innovations supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory over the past 30 years,...

307

Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery George G. JudgeSome Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery George G.G. Judge. ed. 2013. An Information Theoretic Approach to

Judge, George G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy Recovery Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California . References "Energy Recovery Inc" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnergyRecoveryInc&oldid344878" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations...

309

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

310

4. Nuclei and Radioactivity Paradoxes and Puzzles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactivity, it may not be legally sold in the United States. 4. Of those killed by the Hiroshima atomic bomb anecdotes and say, "Of course." Radioactivity Radioactivity is the explosion of the nucleus of the atom nucleus of one atom is about million times greater than in a chemical explosion of a single atom

Browder, Tom

311

Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the single vent port. Leak testing prior to transport may be either using helium mass spectrometry or the pressure-rise concept.

Brown, Darrell Dwaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noss, Philip W [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC will play a significant role in continued enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology development and field demonstration. A scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) enhanced oil recovery

313

Recovery Act State Memos Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 1, 2010 October 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 6 TRANSPORTATION ................................................................................................. 8 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE ........................................................................ 9

314

Recovery Act State Memos Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1, 2010 June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 8 TRANSPORTATION ............................................................................................... 10 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE ...................................................................... 10

315

UML Fever: Diagnosis and Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acknowledgment is only the first step toward recovery from this potentially devastating affliction. The Institute of Infectious Diseases has recently published research confirming that the many and varied strains of UML Fever continue to spread ...

Alex E. Bell

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Outlook for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the potential for enhanced oil recovery, the evolutionary nature of the recovery processes being applied in oilfields today, key parameters that describe the technology state-of-the-art for each of the major oil recovery processes, and the nature and key outputs from the current Department of Energy research program on enhanced oil recovery. From this overview, it will be seen that the DOE program is focused on the analysis of ongoing tests and on long-range, basic research to support a more thorough understanding of process performance. Data from the program will be made available through reports, symposia, and on-line computer access; the outputs are designed to allow an independent producer to evaluate his own project as an effort to transfer rapidly the technology now being developed.

Johnson, H.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mineral Nutrient Recovery from Pyrolysis Co-Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is the thermo-chemical degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment to product liquid, gaseous, and solid co-products. The liquid co-product, known as bio-oil, can be used as a transportation fuel. The gaseous co-product, known as synthesis gas, can be used to power the pyrolysis reactor or other machinery. The solid co-product, known as bio-char, has been studied as an amendment to enhance soil physical and chemical properties and nutrient status. Although previous publications have described the beneficial effects of pyrolysis bio-char on soil physical and chemical properties, relatively little has been published on the recovery of mineral nutrients from pyrolysis co-products. This work quantified the recovery of feedstock nutrients (P, K, Ca, and Mg) and micronutrients (Na, Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) from pyrolysis co-products from various feedstocks using three distinct pyrolysis reactor designs. The reactors comprised a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor and two fluidized-bed reactors located in College Station, TX and Wyndmoor, PA. Nutrient recoveries, on a feedstock basis, were calculated for a comparison of reactor efficiencies. In addition to nutrient recoveries, physical and chemical properties of input biomass and of bio-char generated by each reactor were characterized through ultimate and proximate analyses. For the fixed-bed reactor, results revealed variation among feedstocks for the recoveries of feedstock sources of macronutrients and Na, Fe, and Cu in pyrolysis co-products. Variation among species was also detected for the recoveries of feedstock sources of P, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe in pyrolysis co-products for samples pyrolyzed using the Wyndmoor reactor. For the College Station reactor, recoveries of feedstock sources of P, K, Ca, and Mg in pyrolysis co-products did not vary among species, but Zn did vary. Ultimate and proximate analyses of biomass and bio-chars generated by the three reactors revealed variation among species. Additionally, the results showed that the recovery of feedstock nutrients varied by reactor design. Statistical analysis revealed high correlations and linear relationships between the recovery of nutrients and reactor mass and energy efficiency and feedstock fiber properties.

Wise, Jatara Rob

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act to Recovery Act to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Technical Assistance Projects Project Stories Recovery Act The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included funding for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to facilitate the Federal

319

EMSL: Capabilities: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMSL Procurements under Recovery Act EMSL Procurements under Recovery Act Additional Information Investing in Innovation: EMSL and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act and Systems Biology at EMSL Recovery Act Instruments coming to EMSL In the News EMSL ARRA Capability Features News: Recovery Act and PNNL Recovery Act in the Tri-City Herald Related Links Recovery.gov DOE and the Recovery Act Message from Energy Secretary Chu Recovery Act at PNNL EMSL evolves with the needs of its scientific users, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has helped to accelerate this evolution. Thirty-one instruments were acquired and installed at EMSL. These instruments are listed below, and each listing is accompanied by a brief overview. Each of these new and leading-edge instruments was chosen by design to

320

Enhanced oil-recovery operatiohs in Kansas 1979  

SciTech Connect

Data for 1552 enhanced oil-recovery (EDR) projects are listed in this report and a map shows their distribution. The majority of the EOR projects fall into the categories of pressure maintenance, dump floods, and controlled waterfloods, which are secondary recovery projects. There are several active tertiary projects and a few inactive projects. Active EOR projects are listed alphebetically by county and field. Data on thickness and depth of oil-producing zones or injection horizons, sources of water, and cumulative figures on oil produced and water injected are included. (DMC)

Paul, S.E.; Bahnmaier, E.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Developing a Regional Recovery Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radioactive Material Transportation Requirements for the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Transportation Program (NTP) whose goal is to ensure the availability of safe, efficient, and timely transportation of DOE materials. The Integration and Planning Group of the NTP, assisted by Global Technologies Incorporated (GTI), was tasked to identify requirements associated with the transport of DOE Environmental Management (EM) radiological waste/material. A systems engineering approach was used to identify source documents, extract requirements, perform a functional analysis, and set up a transportation requirements management database in RDD-100. Functions and requirements for transporting the following DOE radioactive waste/material are contained in the database: high level radioactive waste (HLW), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), nuclear materials (NM), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and transuranic waste (TRU waste). The requirements will be used in the development of standard transportation protocols for DOE shipping. The protocols will then be combined into a DOE Transportation Program Management Guide, which will be used to standardize DOE transportation processes.

John, Mark Earl; Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Bolander, Thane Weston

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Recovery Act update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of Obligations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of Obligations Recovery Act update from Sr. Advisor Matt Rogers -- End of Obligations Addthis Description Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation, shares his thoughts as the Recovery Act reaches a critical milestone -- the end of the 2010 fiscal year and the last day to obligation contract and grant funding under the Recovery Act. Speakers Matt Rogers Duration 2:26 Topic Energy Sources Recovery Act Funding Opportunities Loans Grants Credit Energy Department Video MATTHEW ROGERS: This week, we are obligating the last of our funds under the recovery act for contract and grant work, $32.7 billion of funds, $32.7 billion obligated and on the street. What this means is that we have now

324

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, C.E.; Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, Clay E. (Knoxville, TN); Vass, Arpad A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering Fellowship Program. Grants.gov Synopsis. ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Recovery Act on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program WAP - Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grants WAP - Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program State Energy Program Energy Efficiency & Conservation Block Grant Program

329

EOR boosts Twofreds oil production. [Enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Higher crude oil prices have spurred enhanced oil recovery action in Twofreds field in west Texas. Houston Natural Gas Corporation's (HNG) Fossil Fuels Corporation has a fieldwide waterflood and miscible CO/sub 2/ enhanced recovery program under way. HNG is alternating water injection with injection of CO/sub 2/ and inert gases to boost oil yield from ca. 4392 productive acres. Cumulative production since tertiary recovery began is 1.4 million bbl. HNG is injecting an average of 8 to 10 MMCFD of CO/sub 2/. CO/sub 2/ source is Oasis Pipeline Company's Mi Vida treating plant near Pecos, Texas. The CO/sub 2/ is extracted from gas produced by wells that tap the deep Ordovician Ellenburger in the area.

Not Available

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ion energy recovery experiment based on magnetic electro suppression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-principle experiment on direct recovery of residual hydrogen ions based on a magnetic electron suppression scheme is described. Ions extracted from a source plasma a few kilovolts above the ground potential (approx. 20 A) are accelerated to 40 keV by a negative potential maintained on a neutralizer gas cell. As the residual ions exit the gas cell, they are deflected from the neutral beam by a magnetic field that also suppresses gas cell electrons and then recovered on a ground-potential surface. Under optimum conditions, a recovery efficiency (the ratio of the net recovered current to the available full-energy ion current) of 80% +- 20% has been obtained. Magnetic suppression of the beam plasma electrons was rather easily achieved; however, handling the fractional-energy ions originating from molecular species (H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/) proved to be extremely important to recovery efficiency.

Kim, J.; Stirling, W.L.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

EMSL: Capabilities: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act Logo EMSL researchers are benefitting from a recent $60 million investment in innovation through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. These Recovery Act funds were employed to further develop and deploy transformational capabilities that deliver scientific discoveries in support of DOE's mission. Today, they are helping EMSL accomplish the following: Establish leadership in in situ chemical imaging and procure ultrahigh-resolution microscopy tools Additional Information Investing in Innovation: EMSL and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act and Systems Biology at EMSL Recovery Act Instruments coming to EMSL In the News EMSL ARRA Capability Features News: Recovery Act and PNNL Recovery Act in the Tri-City Herald

332

Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Funding Recovery Act Funding Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on AddThis.com... Recovery Act Funding Opportunities President Barack Obama announced on March 19 that the DOE is offering up to $2.4 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to support next-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and their advanced

333

Sources - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help annotate Contents Next: References Up: RamanujanModular Equations, Previous: Ramanujan's sum. Sources. [Annotate] [Shownotes]. References [7]...

334

Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use  

SciTech Connect

The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad (Iraq Ministry of Science and Technology)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Microsoft Word - Recovery Act Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspector General Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Decommissioning and Demolition Activities at Office of Science Sites OAS-RA-L-10-05 August 2010 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: August 12, 2010 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-10-05 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A10RA005) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Decommissioning and Demolition Activities at Office of Science Sites" TO: Deputy Director for Field Operations, SC-3 Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In February 2009, the President signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) into law. The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management (EM) allocated $140 million of Recovery Act funds to

337

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69.2 Million in 69.2 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Maine Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $94.7 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Kansas Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $121.3 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Iowa Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for

338

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 18, 2010 June 18, 2010 Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the company's $3.5 million investment. | Photo Courtesy of Energetx | VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts Tiara Yachts makes fiber composite structures for boats. Now the Holland, Mich.-based company is transforming part of its factory and using its 30 years of expertise in composites to establish a new company - Energetx Composites - that will produce commercial-sized wind turbine blades. June 18, 2010 Five More States Reach Major Recovery Act Weatherization Milestone Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Utah Have Weatherized Over 9,000 Homes with Recovery Act Funding

339

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2009 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $89.8 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Mississippi Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $122.3 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Louisiana Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $123.4 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Kentucky Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency

340

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nearly $80.7 Million in Weatherization Nearly $80.7 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Oregon Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $107.6 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Oklahoma Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $362.8 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Ohio Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 AcuTemp received a $900,000 48C manufacturing tax credit under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to increase production of the company's ThermoCor vacuum insulation panels for more efficient ENERGY STAR appliances. | Photo courtesy of AcuTemp | AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient AcuTemp, a small U.S. company that manufactures vacuum insulation panels that are needed to maintain precise temperatures for cold-storage products, is expanding and creating jobs in Dayton, OH thanks in part to the Recovery Act. August 6, 2010 A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme take production from tens of thousands of gallons a year of its algae "drop-in" oil to an annual production capacity of over half a million gallons. | Photo courtesy of Solazyme, Inc. |

342

Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. Previous laboratory and simulation research has indicated that such heat transfer between the infiltrating air and walls may be substantial. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics was used to simulate sensible heat transfer in typical envelope constructions. The results show that the traditional method may over-predict the infiltration energy load by up to 95 percent at low leakage rates. A simplified physical model has been developed and used to predict the infiltration heat recovery based on the Peclet number of the flow and the fraction of the building envelope active in infiltration heat recovery.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen and WOWClean provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. WOWGen - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat WOWClean - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300F to 1,200F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Radioactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and allows the nucleus to achieve a more stable, lower energy configuration. Spontaneous fission of a large-mass nucleus into smaller-mass products is also a form of...

346

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 CX-005991: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prairie Village, Kansas Ground Source Heat Pump Relocation CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Prairie Village, Kansas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 25, 2011 CX-005988: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Technology Acceleration Center - Solar Thermal Energy Storage Test Facility CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.15, B3.6 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Denver, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 25, 2011 CX-005961: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act ? Clean Energy Coalition Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/25/2011 Location(s): Taylor, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

347

Low Temperature Heat Recovery for Boiler Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low temperature corrosion proof heat exchangers designed to reduce boiler flue gas temperatures to 150F or lower are now being commercially operated on gas, oil and coal fired boilers. These heat exchangers, when applied to boiler flue gas, are commonly called condensing economizers. It has traditionally been common practice in the boiler industry to not reduce flue gas temperatures below the 300F to 400F range. This barrier has now been broken by the development and application of corrosion proof heat exchanger technology. This opens up a vast reservior of untapped recoverable energy that can be recovered and reused as an energy source. The successful recovery of this heat and the optimum use of it are the fundemental goals of the technology presented in this paper. This Recovered Low Level Heat Is Normally Used To Heat Cold Make-up Water Or Combustion Air.

Shook, J. R.; Luttenberger, D. B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microbiology for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy has sponsored several projects to investigate the feasibility of using microorganisms to enhance oil recovery. Microbes from the Wilmington oilfield, California, were found to be stimulated in growth by polyacrylamide mobility-control polymers and the microbes also can reduce the viscosity of the polyacrylamide solutions. Microbes have been discovered that produce surface active molecules, and several mixed cultures have been developed that make low viscosity, non-wetting, emulsions of heavy oils (/sup 0/API oil deposits, in China for enhanced recovery of light oils and successful field tests have been conducted in Romania and Arkansas.

Donaldson, E.C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Initial Results of ISCO for a Large TCE DNAPL Source Area  

SciTech Connect

This paper will describe the results of an in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) remedial action currently in progress to address subsurface contamination by trichloroethene (TCE) dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). The U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the cleanup of environmental media at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in southern Ohio. The X-701B Solid Waste Management Unit is an unlined surface impoundment at PORTS which was operated from 1954 to 1988. A TCE plume in groundwater emanates from the unit and is approximately 2,200 feet in length. Metals, radioactive inorganics, and other organic chemicals are also present at lower concentrations in the groundwater. An ongoing 1.6-acre TCE DNAPL source area for the plume is believed to exist up-gradient in the vicinity of the X-701B pond. The extent of the source area is inferred from actual recovery of DNAPL in production wells and from detection of TCE concentrations between 100 and 1,000 mg/L in monitoring wells. Previous remedial activities at X-701B have included a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure and a technology demonstration that recirculated permanganate solutions between two horizontal wells. Results of sampling after these remedial activities showed that the permanganate effectively destroyed TCE in portions of the aquifer where adequate contact was achieved, but that uniform distribution by the recirculation system was problematic. As a result, the TCE concentration in the groundwater eventually rebounded after the treatment. To overcome distribution issues and to more aggressively remediate the source, a new remediation approach is being implemented for the unit. The new approach involves the injection of Modified Fenton's Reagent directly into the source area using temporary direct push injection points. This new approach provides the ability to overcome limitations imposed by heterogeneities in the subsurface by injecting relatively small quantities of reagent into a large number of temporary injection points across the source area. These injections are then repeated, as necessary, on a grid pattern until performance goals are achieved. The remediation is being implemented in four phases under a work plan approved by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. Phase I, the pilot test, was conducted over a small portion of the source area. Phase II currently involves full-scale treatment of the source area. In Phase III, the source area will be monitored for TCE rebound. Phase IV will involve limited treatment for the down-gradient portion of the plume. (authors)

Thompson, S.L.; Cross, P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Massachusetts State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Massachusetts. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Massachusetts. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Massachusetts.

Not Available

1981-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Vermont State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Vermont State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Vermont. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Vermont. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Vermont.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

South Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in South Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in South Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as definied by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in South Carolina.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Puerto Rico State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Puerto Rico. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Puerto Rico. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Puerto Rico.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

South Dakota State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The South Dakota State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in South Dakota. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in South Dakota. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in South Dakota.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Process for reducing radioactive contamination in phosphogypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of two crystallization stages for reducing radioactive contamination of phosphogypsum is disclosed. In the process anhydrite crystals are obtained through dehydration of the radiation containing phosphogypsum in strong sulfuric acid; a portion of the anhydrite crystals containing the radioactive contamination is converted to substantially radiation free gypsum by crystallizing out on a large solids concentration of radiation free gypsum seed crystals; and coarse radiation free gypsum crystals are separated from small anhydrite crystal relics containing substantially all of the radioactive contamination.

Gaynor, J.C.; Palmer, J.W.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

359

ARRA870A Recovery Act - Recip Details for Next Quarter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARRA870A Recovery Act - Recipient Reporting Details" ARRA870A Recovery Act - Recipient Reporting Details" "Data is as of July, 19, 2011" "Awardee Name","Award/ Contract Number","Award Type","Award Amount","Total Costs","Total Payments","Project Value","Project Desc","DUNS Number","CFDA Code","NAICS Code","Award Date","Contracting Office Code","Awarding Agency Code","Funding Agency Code","Program Source (TAS) Code","CCR Renewal Date" "1001 SOUTH 15TH STREET ASSOCIATES, LLC","EE0002776","Grant",1682920,7277.96,7277.96,2004230,"Ground Source Heat Pumps",831221945,81.087,,"application/vnd.ms-excel",,8900,8900,"89-0331","application/vnd.ms-excel"

360

Enhanced oil recovery data base and simplified process models  

SciTech Connect

In 1980, the U.S. Department of Energy Bartlesville Energy Technology Center initiated a program to estimate the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential in the continental U.S. The prime objectives for this program are to estimate the technically recoverable oil through utilization of current EOR technologies, to estimate the economically recoverable oil for those technologies, and to estimate the risks associated with the various EOR recovery techniques. These estimates provide the basis for studies to measure the effects of improving technologies, improved economic scenarios, reduction of risks on future levels of EOR production, and aid in determining research needs. The interaction between the databases and models is discussed. Because this database contains comprehensive information on active EOR projects nationwide, it is used as a calibration source for the models. The reservoir database, used as the data source for estimates of technically and economically recoverable oil, contains basic information on reservoirs located throughout the U.S.

Wesson, T.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fast crash recovery in RAMCloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RAMCloud is a DRAM-based storage system that provides inexpensive durability and availability by recovering quickly after crashes, rather than storing replicas in DRAM. RAMCloud scatters backup data across hundreds or thousands of disks, and it harnesses ... Keywords: crash recovery, main memory databases, scalability, storage systems

Diego Ongaro; Stephen M. Rumble; Ryan Stutsman; John Ousterhout; Mendel Rosenblum

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Biosurfactant and enhanced oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pure culture of Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 (ATCC No. 39307) and a process for using said culture and the surfactant lichenysin produced thereby for the enhancement of oil recovery from subterranean formations. Lichenysin is an effective surfactant over a wide range of temperatures, pH's, salt and calcium concentrations.

McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste Management in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... A glossary of terms and public discussion papers on current and past projects are included. Citation: "Radioactive Waste Management in...

364

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radioactive material are determined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Postal...

365

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination ofindividuals who have entered a hot zone during transportation incidents involving radioactive.

366

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

367

Riso-R-489LK Environmental Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in Greenland in 1982 are reported. Strontium-90 (and Cesium Descriptors [0] DEER, DIET, ENVIRONMENT, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, FISHES, POOD CHAINS, GLOBAL FALLOUT, GRAPHS

368

'^^ Ris-R-449 Environmental Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Sweden Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in Greenland in 1980 are reported. Strontium-90. INIS Descriptors [O] DEER, DIET, ENVIRONMENT, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PISHES, POOD CHAINS, GLOBAL FALLOUT

369

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

370

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

371

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Alaska are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and electric grid improvements to geothermal power. Through these investments, Alaska's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Alaska to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ALASKA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

372

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Georgia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Georgia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Georgia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

373

ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arizona reflect a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to transportation, carbon capture and storage, and geothermal energy. Through these investments, Arizona's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arizona to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

374

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Arkansas are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to advanced battery manufacturing and renewable energy. Through these investments, Arkansas's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Arkansas to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

375

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Georgia are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to environmental cleanup and alternative fuels and vehicles. Through these investments, Georgia's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Georgia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications

376

Contaminant Dating and Natural Recovery with Radioisotopes in Sediment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many reasons to conduct dated sediment core investigations. These include the site-specific analysis of sediment accumulation rates, natural and modern contaminant background concentrations, storm water effects, sediment stability, natural recovery, source identification, and recontamination potential. Environmental investigators use a limited number of radioisotopes for sediment dating, including 1) beryllium-7 for sediment deposition during the last year, 2) lead-210 and cesium-137 for sedime...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater. The groundwater was contaminated by radioactive waste and chemicals generated during decades of producing plutonium for the Cold War at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The Department of Energy (DOE) had set a goal for its contractor, CH2M HILL

379

Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1989. An Environmental Protection Department summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled, Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSPU-YR-25-1). The reports reflect the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. This document is an effluent/source term report; items falling under other categories, such as environmental spills or solid waste transport to the burial ground, are not included. Any classified or secret data have either been excluded, as in the case of 1960--1970 atmospheric releases of {sup 85}Kr from the Separations Areas, or combined to avoid classification, such as atmospheric tritium releases from the Separations Area.

Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act » Recovery Act Reports Recovery Act » Recovery Act Reports Recovery Act Reports The following is a list of the oversight results by the Office of Inspector General regarding The Department's programs, grants, and projects funded under the Recovery Act. November 25, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-RA-14-02 The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - District of Columbia September 27, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-31 The Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program September 19, 2013 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-30 Alamo Area Council of Governments - Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 September 9, 2013 Audit Report: IG-0893 Follow-up Audit of the Department of Energy's Financial Assistance for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENRECO has prepared this paper on HVAC energy recovery to provide the engineer with an overview of the design engineering as well as the economic analysis considerations necessary to evaluate the potential benefits of energy recovery.

Kinnier, R. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

COUNTER DISASTER AND RECOVERY PLAN -UNIVERSITY RECORDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................10 3.1 Disaster Response and Recovery Team...........................................10 3.2 Emergency Disaster Response.......................................................................23 6.1 AssessingCOUNTER DISASTER AND RECOVERY PLAN - UNIVERSITY RECORDS Records Management & Archives Murdoch

383

Web Services for Recovery.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

established and widely supported Web technologies such asof Information Report 2009-035 Web Services for Recovery.govof Recovery.gov as a user-friendly Web site and hence most

Wilde, Erik; Kansa, Eric C; Yee, Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Vermont Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Recovery Act State Memo Vermont Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and...

385

Colorado Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado Recovery Act State Memo Colorado Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and...

386

Recovery Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework Recovery Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework Congressional Testimony Recovery Act Recovery Act...

387

Implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

$20 million for geologic carbon sequestration training and research . Recovery Act Tax Provisions on Clean Energy Production Tax Credit

388

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery andequal opportunity employer. Distributed Generation with Heatenergy resources (DER), distributed generation (DG), and

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Recovery Act NIST Construction Grant Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery Act NIST Construction Grant Program. ... Fraud Prevention Training for Recipients; Fraud Indicators Pamphlet; Red Flags of Collusion ...

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System (VES-SFE-106)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System located in the adjacent to the Sludge Tank Control House (CPP-648), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, was developed to meet the interim status closure requirements for a tank system. The system to be closed includes a tank and associated ancillary equipment that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System will be "cleaned closed" in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of acheiving those standards for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System.

S. K. Evans

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Diverter assembly for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diverter assembly for diverting a pneumatically conveyed holder for a radioactive material between a central conveying tube and one of a plurality of radially offset conveying tubes includes an airtight container. A diverter tube having an offset end is suitably mounted in the container for rotation. A rotary seal seals one end of the diverter tube during and after rotation of the diverter tube while a spring biased seal seals the other end of the diverter tube which moves between various offset conveying tubes. An indexing device rotatably indexes the diverter tube and this indexing device is driven by a suitable drive. The indexing mechanism is preferably a geneva-type mechanism to provide a locking of the diverter tube in place. 3 figs.

Andrews, K.M.; Starenchak, R.W.

1988-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M.sub.2 O.3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. 6SiO.sub.2.2MX, where M=alkali metal; X=I.sup.- or IO.sub.3.sup.-) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800.degree. to 1100.degree. C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite.

Babad, Harry (Richland, WA); Strachan, Denis M. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co?mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving radioactive samples will be reviewed by the APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC). The review will be on a graded basis. Hence, the experimenters are strongly advised to send in the experiment proposal in detail at least 2 months before the expected scheduled date of the experiment. Previously approved containment, isotopes and weights can be submitted as late as 2 weeks in advance. If your ESAF was submitted less than seven (7) days in advance of its scheduled start date you may be delayed to allow time for a safety review. The following guidelines are to be followed for all experiments with

395

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

396

Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs © Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

398

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 22, 2011 June 22, 2011 Recovery Act SGDP View a map which combines the above two maps View the full list of selected projects June 22, 2011 Recovery Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework May 18, 2009 Locke, Chu Announce Significant Steps in Smart Grid Development WASHINGTON - U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced significant progress that will help expedite development of a nationwide "smart" electric power grid. June 22, 2011 Strategic Plan A modern, reliable, secure, affordable and environmentally sensitive national energy infrastructure is fundamental to our quality of life and energy future. Yet since 1982, growth in peak demand for electricity has exceeded the growth and development of our electric grid. This demand

399

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 12, 2011 April 12, 2011 Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for $1.187 Billion Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project Recovery Act-Supported Project Estimated to Create Over 350 Jobs and Avoid over 430,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide Annually March 3, 2011 Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for a Loan Guarantee to Support Maine Wind Project Recovery Act-Funded Project Expected to Create Approximately 200 Jobs and Avoid over 70,000 Tons of Carbon Pollution Annually February 17, 2011 Department of Energy Offers Support for an Oregon Solar Manufacturing Project Project Estimated to Create Over 700 Jobs and Greater Efficiencies in the Production of Photovoltaic Panels February 15, 2011 Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee for New Transmission Project

400

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 24, 2013 September 24, 2013 Carbon fiber material produced at SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers in Moses Lake, Wash. (Photo courtesy of SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers) Electric Car Featuring High-Tech Material Made in the USA Makes Its Debut One of the world's first electric vehicles built using ultra lightweight carbon fiber material manufactured in the U.S. was recently unveiled. September 20, 2013 Electrical transmission lines cross a snow-covered field in Dallas Dam, Oregon. | Energy Department photo. Top 9 Things You Didn't Know About America's Power Grid Ever wonder how electricity gets to your home? Test your knowledge with these top power grid facts. September 16, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through August 31, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2010 19, 2010 North Community Police Substation upgraded its solar energy system with the help of Recovery Act funds. The city's electric bill will be about $5,000 cheaper. | Courtesy of the City of Henderson Police Station Triples Solar Power - and Savings The Henderson, Nevada, police department is going above and beyond the call of duty by tripling the size of its solar panel system on its LEED-certified station, saving the city thousands of dollars in energy costs. July 15, 2010 VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant President Obama visits Compact Power in Holland, Michigan -- one of nine new battery plants under construction as a result of the $2.4 billion in Recovery Act advanced battery and electric vehicle awards the President announced last August.

402

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 25, 2010 February 25, 2010 Bluegrass State Getting Greener To help reduce Kentucky's energy appetite, the state set a goal of 25-percent energy reduction by 2025 and is using Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the energy-efficiency of its buildings. February 19, 2010 Homes Weatherized by State for Calendar Year 2009 February 19, 2010 Secretary Chu's Remarks on the Anniversary of the Recovery Act February 19, 2010 January 26, 2010 Electric Cars Coming to Former Delaware GM Plant If a company's cars are luxurious enough for the Crown Prince of Denmark, then just imagine how the vehicles - which have a 50-mile, emission-free range on a single electric charge - might be received by folks in the U.S. January 15, 2010 Secretary Chu Announces More than $37 Million for Next Generation Lighting

403

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 22, 2010 April 22, 2010 Weatherization Subgrantees Reach More N.Y. Homes Why weatherization is booming in the South Bronx. April 21, 2010 Vice President Biden Kicks Off Five Days of Earth Day Activities with Announcement of Major New Energy Efficiency Effort 25 Communities Selected for Recovery Act "Retrofit Ramp-Up" Awards April 15, 2010 Arkansas Preparing for Wind Power Arkansas energy leaders are working to get the best data for potential wind energy decisions. April 1, 2010 Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act "It's a win for everyone: the environment, the cities, buildings, for us," says Gianna O'Keefe, marketing manager for Ruud Lighting, which is producing LED lights that emit more light, have a longer life and provide anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in energy savings.

404

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46.3 Million in 46.3 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Alaska Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $127.3 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Alabama Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 11, 2009 Statement of Steven Chu Secretary of Energy Before the Committee on the Budget March 11, 2009 March 5, 2009 Secretary Steven Chu Editorial in USA Today Washington, D.C. - This morning's edition of USA Today includes the following editorial from Energy Secretary Steven Chu highlighting President

405

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

185.5 Million in 185.5 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Missouri Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families March 12, 2009 Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $35.1 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Wyoming Washington, DC -- Vice President Joe Biden and Energy Secretary Chu today announced Wyoming will receive $35,180,261 in weatherization and energy efficiency funding - including $10,239,261 for the Weatherization Assistance Program and $24,941,000 for the State Energy Program. This is part of a nationwide investment announced today of nearly $8 billion under the President's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - an investment that

406

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2, 2009 December 2, 2009 Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall Recovery Act money to weatherize homes has resulted in much lower energy bills for Alabama families, including Mary, whose bill is about $300 cheaper now. December 2, 2009 Training Center Gets People Work, Teaches New Skills Corporation for Ohio Appalachian Development, a nonprofit organization comprised of 17 community action agencies involved in weatherization, has been awarded Recovery Act funds to help train weatherization providers and create jobs across Ohio. December 2, 2009 Former Auto Worker Gauges Efficiency of American Homes Holland, Michigan resident retools skills learned testing car parts to land new job assessing home energy efficiency as a weatherization inspector. October 15, 2009

407

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 11, 2013 July 11, 2013 Analysis of Customer Enrollment Patterns in TIme-Based Rate Programs: Initial Results from the SGIG Consumer Behavior Studies (July 2013) The Smart Grid Investment Grant program's consumer behavior study effort presents an opportunity to advance the electric power industry's understanding of consumer behaviors in terms of customer acceptance and retention, and energy and peak demand impacts. July 10, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013. July 7, 2013 Voices of Experience: Insights on Smart Grid Customer Engagement (July 2013) The success of the Smart Grid will depend in part on consumers taking a more proactive role in managing their energy use. This document is the

408

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 7, 2011 February 7, 2011 Mechanics train with plasma arc cutting equipment at the Paducah Site | Courtesy of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant 240 Jobs Later: The Recovery Act's Impact at the Paducah Site Workers at the Department of Energy's Paducah Site are doing great things with the training they've received as part of the Recovery Act. January 25, 2011 Watercolor print of the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) with new facilities. How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, this Wisconsin nature center will be at the forefront in demonstrating the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to thousands of visitors every year. January 24, 2011 Vids 4 Grids: Surge Arresters and Switchgears A new video series is increasing general public knowledge of the cutting

409

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 17, 2010 March 17, 2010 Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Terry Sandstrom never thought he would run his house entirely on renewable energy, but when faced with a $100,000 price tag to get connected to the grid, he had to look at alternative options. March 17, 2010 DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding

410

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 14, 2009 September 14, 2009 Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization Programs in Six States and Territories Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs, create jobs and weatherize nearly 17,000 homes in American Samoa, Northern Arapahoe Tribe, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, Tennessee and the U.S. Virgin Islands September 14, 2009 DOE Delivers More than $354 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 22 States Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $354 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is being awarded to 22 states to support energy efficiency and conservation activities. Under the Department of Energy's Efficiency and Conservation

411

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With today's high fuel prices, energy conservation projects to utilize low level waste heat have become more attractive. Exxon Chemical Company Central Engineering has been developing guidelines and assessing the potential for application of low level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various possibilities and some guidelines on when they should be considered will be presented.

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Report on Competitive Sourcing Results Fiscal Year 2006 May 2007 Executive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ...................................................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................................................. 4 I. The big picture ......................................................................................... 4 II. How public-private competition was used in FY 2006 .................................... 6 A. Anticipated benefits from competition in FY 2006

413

In-Situ Characterization of Underwater Radioactive Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental requirement underpinning safe clean-up technologies for legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF) ponds, pools and wet silos is the ability to characterize the radioactive waste form prior to retrieval. The corrosion products resulting from the long term underwater storage of spent nuclear fuel, reactor components and reprocessing debris present a major hazard to facility decontamination and decommissioning in terms of their radioactive content and physical / chemical reactivity. The ability to perform in-situ underwater non-destructive characterization of sludge and debris in a safe and cost-effective manner offers significant benefits over traditional destructive sampling methods. Several techniques are available for underwater measurements including (i) Gross gamma counting, (ii) Low-, Medium- and High- Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy, (iii) Passive neutron counting and (iv) Active Neutron Interrogation. The optimum technique depends on (i) the radioactive inventory (ii) mechanical access restrictions for deployment of the detection equipment, interrogation sources etc. (iii) the integrity of plant records and (iv) the extent to which Acceptable Knowledge which may be used for 'fingerprinting' the radioactive contents to a marker nuclide. Prior deployments of underwater SNF characterization equipment around the world have been reviewed with respect to recent developments in gamma and neutron detection technologies, digital electronics advancements, data transfer techniques, remote operation capabilities and improved field ruggedization. Modeling and experimental work has been performed to determine the capabilities, performance envelope and operational limitations of the future generation of non-destructive underwater sludge characterization techniques. Recommendations are given on the optimal design of systems and procedures to provide an acceptable level of confidence in the characterization of residual sludge content of legacy wet storage facilities such that retrieval and repackaging of SNF sludges may proceed safely and efficiently with support of the regulators and the public. (author)

Simpson, A.P.; Clapham, M.J.; Swinson, B. [Pajarito Scientific Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The impact of reduced injected radioactivity on image quality of molecular breast imaging tomosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study's objective is to compare image quality in 3-D molecular breast imaging tomosynthesis (MBIT) with that in planar molecular breast imaging (MBI) over a range of breast radioactivity concentrations. Using gelatin and point source phantoms lesion ... Keywords: molecular breast imaging, radiation dose, tomosynthesis

Olivia Sullivan; Zongyi Gong; Kelly Klanian; Tushita Patel; Mark B. Williams

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013 April 25, 2013 Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now Available A report on the Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid is now available. This study analyzes the economy-wide impacts of the Recovery Act funding for smart grid project deployment in the United States, administered by Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Key findings include: April 25, 2013 Smart Grid: Powering Our Way to a Greener Future Learning how to be smarter and more efficient about reducing our energy consumption is on the minds of everyone this week. The smart grid, with its improved efficiency and performance, is helping consumers conserve energy and save money every day. April 9, 2013 The Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project is a 36-megawatt energy storage and power management system, which completed testing and became fully operational in December. It shows how energy storage can moderate the intermittent nature of wind by storing excess energy when the wind is blowing and making it available later to the electric grid to meet customer demand.

416

Heat recovery in building envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross activity and the concentration of radium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60/sup 0/C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background radioactivity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from fractured siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters, and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

Leonard, R.B.; Janzer, W.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Integrated data base report--1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radioactive mineral occurences of Colorado and bibliography. [2500 citations in bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This two-part report provides an essentially complete listing of radioactive occurrences in Colorado, with a comprehensive bibliography and bibliographic cross-indexes. Part 1 lists approximately 3000 known radioactive occurrences with their locations and brief accounts of the geology, mineralogy, radioactivity, host rock, production data, and source of data for each. The occurrences are classified by host rock and plotted on U.S. Geological Survey 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ topographic quadrangle maps with a special 1 : 100,000-scale base map for the Uravan mineral belt. Part 2 contains the bibliography of approximately 2500 citations on radioactive mineral occurrences in the state, with cross-indexes by county, host rock, and the special categories of ''Front Range,'' ''Colorado Plateau,'' and ''thorium.'' The term ''occurrence'' as used in this report is defined as any site where the concentration of uranium or thorium is at least 0.01% or where the range of radioactivity is greater than twice the background radioactivity. All citations and occurrence data are stored on computer diskettes for easy retrieval, correction, and updating.

Nelson-Moore, J.L.; Collins, D.B.; Hornbaker, A.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2009 financial assistance 4, 2009 financial assistance Special provisions relating to work funded under American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Mar 2009) [Prescription: This clause must be included in all grants, cooperative agreements and TIAs (new or amended) when funds appropriated under the Recovery Act are obligated to the agreement.] Preamble The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Pub. L. 111-5, (Recovery Act) was enacted to preserve and create jobs and promote economic recovery, assist those most impacted by the recession, provide investments needed to increase economic efficiency by spurring technological advances in science and health, invest in transportation, environmental protection, and other infrastructure that will provide long-

422

Recovery Act State Memos American Samoa  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American American Samoa For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ................................................................................................ 1 For total Recovery Act jobs numbers in American Samoa go to www.recovery.gov

423

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

424

Recovery Act State Memos Virgin Islands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virgin Virgin Islands For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 For total Recovery Act jobs numbers in the U.S. Virgin Islands go to www.recovery.gov

425

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in California are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to solar and wind, geothermal and biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, California's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning California to play an important role in the new energy economy

426

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crittendon County, Arkansas Office(s): Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 25, 2011 CX-005478: Categorical Exclusion...

427

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users...

428

EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1146: Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site,...

429

CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT This Fiscal Year...

430

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

431

Information-Sharing Protocol for the Transportation of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Draft for Review Only Information-Sharing for Transportation of Radioactive Waste to Yucca Mountain Office of Logistics Management Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste...

432

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state) Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state) Eligibility...

433

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States)...

434

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Eligibility...

435

Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste...

436

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste...

437

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

438

EM Recovery Act Performance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Recovery Act » EM Recovery Act Performance Mission » Recovery Act » EM Recovery Act Performance EM Recovery Act Performance Footprint Reduction The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 690 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 241 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve

439

IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Iowa has substantial natural resources, including wind power and is the largest ethanol producer in the United States. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Iowa are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to the Ames Laboratory. Through these investments, Iowa's businesses, universities, national labs, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Iowa to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT More Documents & Publications Iowa Recovery Act State Memo

440

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between wells. Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between wells. Crude oil development and production in U.S. oil reservoirs can include up to three distinct phases: primary, secondary, and tertiary (or enhanced) recovery. During primary recovery, the natural pressure of the reservoir or gravity drive oil into the wellbore, combined with artificial lift techniques (such as pumps) which bring the oil to the surface. But only about 10 percent of a reservoir's original oil in place is typically produced during primary recovery. Secondary recovery techniques extend a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

442

Property:Geothermal/FundingSource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FundingSource FundingSource Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/FundingSource Property Type String Description Funding Source Pages using the property "Geothermal/FundingSource" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 +

443

Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

The determination of technetium-99 in low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed for the separation and purification of {sup 99}Tc in nuclear power plant radioactive waste samples. The classical iron hydroxide and carbonate precipitations are followed by solid phase extraction. The pure {sup 99}Tc is quantified using liquid scintillation spectrometry. Technetium-99m is used as an internal radiotracer to determine the radiochemical recovery for the process. The quality of analytical results obtained was within the 15% precision and accuracy criteria established for this technique at the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory (YAEL).

Banavali, A.D.; Raimondi, J.M.; Moreno, E.M.; McCurdy, D.E. [Yankee Automic Electric Company, Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Sourcing Competitive Sourcing The Department of Energy's (DOE) Competitive Sourcing program is a management initiative aimed at improving DOE's performance and reducing the Department's operational costs. The program is governed by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A- 76, Performance of Commercial Activities, dated May 29, 2003. The commercial activities selected for review and competition include functions performed by government employees that are readily available in the private sector, and where the potential for efficiencies, regardless of the winning provider, are highly likely. The candidate functions are chosen from the Department's annual Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory and subjected to a feasibility review to determine if a prudent business case can be made to enter

446

Neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

447

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

Leland, W.T.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Geochemistry of the Dakota Formation of Northwestern New Mexico: Relevance to Radioactive Waste Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Backfill as an Engineered Barrier for Radioactive Waste Management / Radioactive Waste Management

Douglas G. Brookins

451

Recovery Act: Smart Grid Investment Grants | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investment Grants Investment Grants Recovery Act: Smart Grid Investment Grants Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards Recipients by State Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards Recipients by State GRID MODERNIZATION President Obama has announced the largest single grid modernization investment in U.S. history, funding a broad range of technologies to spur the nation's transition to a smarter, stronger, more efficient and reliable electric system. This will promote energy-saving choices for consumers, increase energy efficiency, and foster the growth of renewable energy sources like wind and solar power. The $3.4 billion in investments are part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and will be matched by industry funding for a total public-private investment worth over $8

452

Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A guide to environmental laws and regulations which have special significance for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is presented. The Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, federal regulations, and state regulations are discussed. This handbook has been designed as a planning tool and a convenient reference source. The 16 states included comprise the major oil-producing states in various regions of the state. The major topics covered are: general guidelines for complying with environmental laws and regulations; air pollution control; water pollution control; protecting drinking water: underground injection control; hazardous waste management; and federal laws affecting siting or operation of EOR facilities. (DMC)

Wilson, T.D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Using Neutrons to Study Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research ... to the unique infrastructure and specialized staff of the Nuclear Laboratory. Shielded cells enable neutron diffraction studies on highly radioactive...

454

ORISE: Radiation and Radioactive Contamination FAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

take potassium iodide, also known as KI? A: KI is a medication that blocks the thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive iodine. It works by providing all the iodine the gland...

455

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Environmental Radioactivity in Greenland in 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in Greenland in 1981 are reported. Strontium-90 (and Cesium-137 in most. INIS Descriptors [0] DEER, DIET, ENVIRONMENT, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, FISHES, POOD CHAINS, GLOBAL FALLOUT

457

Method for storing radioactive combustible waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Civilian Radioactive Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B5.1 Date: 04052011 Location(s): Hot Springs, Arkansas Office(s): Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 25, 2011 CX-005570:...

459

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radioactive source recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification.

Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 10, 2011 March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion EM has made more than $4 billion in Recovery Act payments, or 32 percent of the DOE's $12.4 billion in Recovery Act payments. DOE received $35.2 billion from the Recovery Act, and EM's portion of that was $6 billion, or 17 percent. March 7, 2011 Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory

463

Recovery Act Milestones | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestones Milestones Recovery Act Milestones Addthis Description Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation. Speakers Matt Rogers Duration 3:07 Topic Energy Efficiency Batteries Recovery Act Energy Policy Credit Energy Department Video MATTHEW ROGERS: So I'm Matt Rogers. I'm the senior adviser to the secretary for Recovery Act implementation. And Saturday, September the 5th, was the 200th day of the Recovery Act. And it should be no surprise that we are accountable every hundred days; so it was a good chance to reflect on what we've accomplished and where we're headed over the next

464

Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery News Flashes Recovery News Flashes Recovery News Flashes RSS September 1, 2011 Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing the former commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing building for demolition. August 29, 2011 Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers successfully transferred 130 containers of remote-handled transuranic waste – each weighing up to 15 tons – to a facility for repackaging and shipment to a permanent disposal location.

465

Use expander cycles for LPG recovery  

SciTech Connect

Expander-type cycles are competitive with other gas recovery processes even when applied to relatively rich gas feeds for a high recovery of only propane plus. These cycles are the most economical to use when (1) ''free pressure drop'' is available between feed and residue gas pressure; (2) product requires demethanization only; (3) feed is very lean and propane plus heavier components are required; (4) a small, unattended, prefabricated unit for LPG recovery is needed; (5) an offshore LPG facility is required to be built on a platform where space and weight allowance is at a premium; (6) a facility is initially built for propane recovery, but is planned for future conversion to ethane recovery; and (7) relatively low-pressure gas feeds (which are usually quite rich) must be processed for a high recovery of ethane. A flow chart for an oil absorption plant is presented.

Valdes, A.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Overview of Recovery Act FAR Clauses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act FAR Clauses Recovery Act FAR Clauses The Table below provides a brief overview of the FAR clauses in FAC 2005-32. These clauses and H.999 Special provisions relating to work funded under American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 must be incorporated into all contracts and orders that will have Recovery Act funds. ARRA Requirement Clause Number Prescription 52.225-21 Include in Recovery Act funded contracts for construction projects under $7,443,000 - replaces 52.225-9 52.225-22 Include if using 52.225-21 - replaces 52.225-10 52.225-23 Include Recovery Act funded contracts for construction projects of $7,443,000 or more - replaces 52.225-11 Section 1605 Buy American 52.225-24 Include if using 52.225-23 - replaces 52.225-12 Section 1552 Whistleblower

467

RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONDITIONING, IMMOBILISATION, AND ENCAPSULATION PROCESSES AND TECHNOLOGIES: OVERVIEW AND ADVANCES (CHAPTER 7)  

SciTech Connect

The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCMs), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate wastes are also discussed. The various processing technologies are cross-referenced to the various types of wasteforms since often a particular type of wasteform can be made by a variety of different processing technologies.

Jantzen, C.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

468

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

469

SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

. . . . . . -- SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S t a r t u p t h r o u g h 1 9 5 9 September 1 9 6 0 _- R E C O R D - W O R K S T E C H N I C A L D E P A R T M E N T 1 J. E. C o l e , W i l n i 1 4 W. P. 3ebbii 3 H. Worthington, Wilm 16 C. $?. P~.t-Lei-s~:; - 5 J. D. E l l e t t - 17 E. C. Morris 6 F. H. Endorf 19 3 . L. &tier 7 K. W. F r e n c h 20 bi. C . 3 e i n i g 8 J. K. Lower 2 1 2. 3 . 3 G : - x r 9 K. W. M i l l e t t 22 R . FJ . V 2 x 7 : W ~ ~ C k 1 c - 2 J. B. Tinker, W i h L-, i . c . E?-ens 4 W F i l e P. 3 . K t B U ? & J. A. Monier, Jr. 13. : . A. KcClesrer. 1 0 M. 2 . Wahl . - 23 C. Ashley C. W. J. Wende 24 T I S F i l e 11 J. W. Morris - 2s T'pC File D. E. Waters 26 P3D F i l e , 736-C R. B. Fenninger 33 V l ~ a l Records F i l e 12 W. P. Overbeck - 27 -23 P3D % x : r a Czpies P33 2e:ol.d C ~ p l *iB+ ' / - - & OF THIS DQCUMENT I S UNuMITEI) E. 1. ciu /'(I,\ 7' d

470

Anomaly metrics to differentiate threat sources from benign sources in primary vehicle screening.  

SciTech Connect

Discrimination of benign sources from threat sources at Port of Entries (POE) is of a great importance in efficient screening of cargo and vehicles using Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM). Currently RPM's ability to distinguish these radiological sources is seriously hampered by the energy resolution of the deployed RPMs. As naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are ubiquitous in commerce, false alarms are problematic as they require additional resources in secondary inspection in addition to impacts on commerce. To increase the sensitivity of such detection systems without increasing false alarm rates, alarm metrics need to incorporate the ability to distinguish benign and threat sources. Principal component analysis (PCA) and clustering technique were implemented in the present study. Such techniques were investigated for their potential to lower false alarm rates and/or increase sensitivity to weaker threat sources without loss of specificity. Results of the investigation demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity in discriminating benign sources from threat sources.

Cohen, Israel Dov; Mengesha, Wondwosen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Recovery Act State Memos Washington, DC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington, DC Washington, DC For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5