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1

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Approach of gas and radiation to equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Einstein described equilibrium between two?level gas molecules and radiation in terms of a Brownian motion model involving frictional and agitational effects arising from photon absorptions and emissions. This paper extends his treatment to the case of disequilibrium when molecules and radiation are in cavities with either black or perfectly reflecting walls. The precise role of the black walls in promoting equilibrium is explicated in terms of Einstein’s formula for the frictional effect and the nature of changes in radiation patterns caused by Doppler shifts of photon frequencies. It is then shown that equilibrium between the two?level gas molecules and radiation cannot be achieved for a container with perfectly reflecting walls. The blockage of equilibrium occurs because a change in the slope of the Planck spectrum at the resonant frequency causes a change in the frictional force.

Frank Munley

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Compare All CBECS Activities: Natural Gas Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Use Natural Gas Use Compare Activities by ... Natural Gas Use Total Natural Gas Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 2.0 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in 1999. Natural gas use was not dominated by any single activity, with seven activities each accounting for between 9 and 13 percent of all commercial natural gas use. Figure showing total natural gas consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Natural Gas Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most natural gas per building. Figure showing natural gas consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

6

String Gas Shells, their Dual Radiation and Hedgehog Signature Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for spherically symmetric, stationary solutions with a string gas shell as a source. The requirement of a uniform newtonian potential, or constancy of the 00 component of the metric, implies the existence of a "dual" radiation, which we argue can be interpreted as representing the virtual quantum fluctuations that stabilize the shell. A string hedgehog can be introduced also into the solution. For zero or small hedgehog strength the string gas shell is of a regular nature, while the dual radiation is of a spacelike nature. For higher hedgehog strengths however the radiation "materializes" and becomes timelike while the string gas shell becomes space like. The significance of these solutions for the quantum theory is discussed.

E. I. Guendelman

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Active galaxies and radiative heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prevented large-scale cooling flows and assisted in the expulsion of metal rich gas. We...and is of the order of 1.5 10-11 Lb solar masses per year, where Lb is the galaxy blue luminosity in solar units (Ciotti et al. 1991). Thus...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ionizing Radiation Activates the Nrf2 Antioxidant Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Scientific). Results Ionizing radiation does not activate ARE-reporter...determine if exposure to varying doses of ionizing radiation would activate the Nrf2-ARE pathway. The radiation dose range was extended below that used...

J. Tyson McDonald; Kwanghee Kim; Andrew J. Norris; Erina Vlashi; Tiffany M. Phillips; Chann Lagadec; Lorenza Della Donna; Josephine Ratikan; Heather Szelag; Lynn Hlatky; and William H. McBride

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

Henderson, Gideon

10

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation… (more)

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Activity Stream - Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dataset Activity Stream Activity Stream Jay Huggins updated the dataset Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 6 days ago Jay Huggins added the...

13

Study on technology of electromagnetic radiation of sensitive index to forecast the coal and gas hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hazard forecast of coal and gas outburst was an important step of comprehensive outburst-prevention measures. Aiming at the manifestation of disaster threatens such as the gas outburst to mine safety, this paper explained the forecasting principles of electromagnetic radiation to coal and gas outburst, by the electromagnetic radiation theory of coal rock damage; it studied the characteristics and rules of electromagnetic radiation during the deformation and fracture process of loaded coal rocks, and confirmed forecast sensitive indexes of electromagnetic radiation as well as its critical values by signals of electromagnetic radiation. By applying EMR monitoring technology in the field, outburst prediction and forecast tests to the characteristics of electromagnetic radiation during the driving process was taken, and figured out the hazard prediction values by using forecast methods of static and dynamic trend.

Yuliang Wu; Wen Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Multisection gas counters for spectral studies of weak pulse x-radiation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two multisection gas counters for recording pulse x-radiation. The first design is a set of eight tandem cylindrical gas counters and the second design is a sixsection gas scintillation counter. These detectors measure the free path length of radiation in the gas filling them, form the measurement data using the maximum-liklihood method, and a computer satisfactorily reconstructs the x-ray spectra, when the total number of absorbed photons Np about 10/sup 2/ for one pulse with a duration of less than or equal to 1 usec.

Bogomolov, G.D.; Kravchenko, N.A.; Peskov, V.D.; Podolyak, E.R.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Selective Dissociation of Sulfur Hexafluoride by Intense CO2 Laser Radiation in Pulsed Gas Dynamic Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotopically selective IR multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of SF6 in a pulsed gas dynamic flow was studied. The dependence of the yield of the product SF4 on the frequency of CO2 laser radiation exciting SF6 molecu...

G. N. Makarov; A. N. Petin

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

17

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Human Activities: Toward Verification of Emissions Control Compliance Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: April 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Local to international control of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will require systematic estimation of emissions and independent verification. California, the only state in the US with legislated controls on GHG emissions, is conducting research to enable emissions verification of the mandated emissions reductions (AB-32). The California Energy Commission supports the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project at LBNL. In collaboration with NOAA, CALGEM measures mixing ratios of all significant GHGs at two tall-towers and on aircraft in

18

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...natural catalytic activity in marine shales. Gas is generated at ambient temperatures...differences are in degree. Mowry shale generates gas compositions that are quite different...probably a major source of natural gas. Mowry shale generates gas at thermodynamic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation thus preventing fire fighters from approaching and extinguishing the fire. One...

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

A comparison of approximate models for radiation in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Approximate equations for radiative heat transfer equations coupled to an equation for the temperature are stated and a comparative numerical study of the different approximations is given. The approximation methods considered here range from moment methods to simplified PN-approximations. Numerical experiments and comparisons in different space dimensions and for various physical situations are presented.

M. Frank; M. Seaid; A. Klar; R. Pinnau; G. Thommes; J. Janicka

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS IN GALAXIES: MOLECULAR GAS AND NUCLEAR ACTIVITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS IN GALAXIES: MOLECULAR GAS AND NUCLEAR ACTIVITY DUILIA DE MELLO and TOMMY;ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS IN GALAXIES 69 a. log(MH2 /LB) versus Morphology b. Kolmogorov-Smirnov Statistic Figure 2 in dense envir- onments and in the field and to study whether there is any correlation between nuclear

Maia, Marcio Antonio Geimba

22

On the Radio-activity of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Physical Science Series, an account is given of some experiments with a highly radio-active gas obtained from crude petroleum. In this investigation it was found that air drawn through ... emanation from radium. The present writer has extended this investigation to an examination of the natural ...

J. C. MCLENNAN

1904-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Applications of Noble Gas Radiation Detectors to Counter?terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation detectors are essential tools in the detection analysis and disposition of potential terrorist devices containing hazardous radioactive and/or fissionable materials. For applications where stand?off distance and source shielding are limiting factors large detectors have advantages over small ones. The ability to distinguish between Special Nuclear Materials and false?positive signals from natural or man?made benign sources is also important. Ionization chambers containing compressed noble gases notably xenon and helium?3 can be scaled up to very large sizes improving the solid angle for acceptance of radiation from a distant source. Gamma spectrometers using Xe have a factor of three better energy resolution than NaI scintillators allowing better discrimination between radioisotopes. Xenon detectors can be constructed so as to have extremely low leakage currents enabling them to operate for long periods of time on batteries or solar cells. They are not sensitive to fluctuations in ambient temperature and are therefore suitable for deployment in outdoor locations. Position?sensitive 3He chambers have been built as large as 3000 cm2 and with spatial resolution of less than 1 mm. Combined with coded apertures made of cadmium they can be used to create images of thermal neutron sources. The natural background of spallation neutrons from cosmic rays generates a very low count rate so this instrument could be quite effective at identifying a man?made source such as a spontaneous fission source (Pu) in contact with a moderator (high explosive).

Peter E. Vanier; Leon Forman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Slow neutron detection without 3He: far ultraviolet noble-gas-excimer radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slow neutron detection without 3He: far ultraviolet noble-gas-excimer radiation induced by neutron (NIST) 3 Nuclear Engineering Program, UMD 4 Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and UMD Slow neutron detection without 3He Eighth Ultracold Neutron Workshop Saint Petersburg ­ Moscow, June 2011 #12;Summary We have

Titov, Anatoly

25

Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar radiation (*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W solar furnace of Solar Energy Laboratory in Odeillo (France). Revue Phys. Appl. 15 (1980) 423-426 MARS423 Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar exposed to the solar radiation. These quantities may be expressed in any set consistent units. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

The landfill gas activity of the IEA bioenergy agreement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable source of useful energy. Its world wide annual energy potential is in the range of a few hundred TWh. Today it is only marginally exploited. LFG is also an important contributor to the atmospheres CH4-content, it can be estimated to contribute about 25% of the methane coming from anthropogenic sources. In comparison to many other sources of methane emissions such as peat bogs, rice paddies, termites and sheep, landfills can be considered to be point sources, i.e. they are stationary and of limited extension. For this reason landfill gas (LFG) utilisation is one of the most cost effective ways to combat the greenhouse effect. The aim of the IEA activity on LFG is to promote information exchange and co-operation between national programmes in order to promote the proliferation of landfill gas utilisation. During the period 1992–1994 the LFG activity has had six participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK and USA. In the past three-year period, the activity has been mainly directed towards establishing networks and obtaining an over-view of data related to LFG in the member countries. Numerous contacts have been established and perhaps of most importance for the future of the activity are the links towards organisations involved in the development of landfill technology, such as ISWA and SWANA. The gathering and evaluation of data within the LFG area from the member countries has resulted in a number of documents that are to be published within the near future. These documents cover information on LFG utilisation, landfill research, landfill gas potentials, landfill emission assessment and also non-technical barriers to LFG utilisation.

A Lagerkvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations  

SciTech Connect

Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Lee, Jeseung [ORNL; Wang, Xiqing [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effect of UV activation on acid and catalytic properties of zeolite-containing catalysts in conversion of gas-condensate straight-run gasolines to high-octane gasolines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of activation by UV radiation with different wavelengths on the acid and catalytic properties of the N-TsKE-G zeolite catalyst in conversion of straight-run gasolines from the gas condensate of the Myl’...

V. I. Erofeev; A. S. Medvedev; L. M. Koval’…

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hard synchroton radiation and gas desorption processes at a copper absorber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments with high energy synchrotron radiation machines such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) under construction at Grenoble present the particular problem of the absorption of radiation at localities in the region of bending magnets where the power density can attain levels of around 400 W/mm2 at a critical energy of about 20 keV. In the present article we describe an investigation of the gas desorption and of photocurrent generation in a test facility at the Wiggler beam line at LURE Orsay which was designed to simulate and explore the conditions of operation at the local absorber sites in the ESRF. The experiment allowed in particular for varying angles of incidence of the radiation on an absorber and for surveys of photocurrents both from the absorber and over the surface of the vacuum enclosure. The observations of gas desorption are shown to follow most closely a model of photon induced desorption in which a significant role is assigned to fluorescenceradiation from the absorber.

B. A. Trickett; D. Schmied; E. M. Williams

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

International oil and gas exploration and development activities  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

32

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

A review of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation in oil and gas well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The prospect of employing Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) for well drilling in oil and gas industry was examined. In this work, the experimental works carried out on various oil well drilling operations was discussed. The results show that, LASER or LASER-aided oil and gas well drilling has many potential advantages over conventional rotary drilling, including high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, bit costs, enhanced well control, as well as perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The investigation also reveals that modern infrared \\{LASERs\\} have a higher rate of rock cuttings removal than that of conventional rotary drilling and flame-jet spallation. It also reveals that LASER can destroy rock without damaging formation permeability but rather, it enhances or improves permeability and that permeability and porosity increases in all rock types. The paper has therefore provided more knowledge on the potential value to drilling operations and techniques using LASER.

M OLALEYE B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission  

SciTech Connect

Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte [University of Texas at Austin, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 210 East 24. Street W. R. Woolrich Laboratories 1 University Station, C0600 Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 229 Hammond, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

The modeling and calculation of sound radiation from facilities with gas flowed pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer modeling of industrial facilities like chemical plants refineries or other production areas is the first and most important step in the calculation of sound exposure in the environment. The pipework with gas flows is often contributing relevant to the sound radiation of the complete facility. This radiation can be determined applying the methods described in technical papers like VDI 3733 and ISO 15664. On the basis of these descriptions a software tool was developed that allows to create pipework in 3D models with line sources and to calculate the sound propagation with methods like ISO 9613-2. The line sources are linked with the technical parameters like pipe cross section flow rate pressure density and temperature of the gas and material parameters of the pipe wall. The sound power emission from the pipe to the environment and the internal flow of sound power—linked to the next section of piping—is calculated on the basis of these parameters. The same technique is used to calculate the sound emission of cooling towers electric and fuel driven motors gears pumps and other devices. This powerful technique allows creating sustainable models that can be adapted to different operation conditions with minimum time and effort.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The modeling and calculation of sound radiation from facilities with gas flowed pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer modeling of industrial facilities like chemical plants refineries or other production areas is the first and most important step in the calculation of sound exposure in the environment. The pipework with gas flows is often contributing relevant to the sound radiation of the complete facility. This radiation can be determined applying the methods described in technical papers like VDI3733 and ISO15664. On the basis of these descriptions a software tool was developed that allows to create pipework in 3D models with line sources and to calculate the sound propagation with methods like ISO9613-2. The line sources are linked with the technical parameters like pipe cross section flow rate pressure density and temperature of the gas and material parameters of the pipe wall. The sound power emission from the pipe to the environment and the internal flow of sound power - linked to the next section of piping - is calculated on the basis of these parameters. The same technique is used to calculate the sound emission of cooling towers electric and fuel driven motors gears pumps and other devices. This powerful technique allows creating sustainable models that can be adapted to different operation conditions with minimum time and effort.

Fabian Probst

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena , Sigurd little attention. this paper addresses optimal operation of a simple natural gas liquefaction process at all times. Keywords: Self-optimizing control, liquefied natural gas, LNG, PRICO, disturbances, optimal

Skogestad, Sigurd

38

Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by extremely low-dose ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray irradiation at very low doses, between 2 and 5 cGy, stimulated activity of a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in normal human diploid cells. Higher doses of irradiation at more than 1 Gy induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and accumulated p53 protein. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased with doses down to 50 cGy, however, doses of between 2 and 5 cGy phosphorylated ERK1/2 as efficiently as higher doses of X-rays, while the p53 protein level was no longer changed by doses below 50 cGy. Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent phosphorylation of p53 protein at Ser15 and histone H2AX at Ser139 was only observed at higher doses of more than 10 cGy of X-rays. We found that the MEK1 inhibitor, PD98059, and the specific epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG1478, decreased phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 proteins induced by 2 cGy or 6 Gy of X-rays. These results indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activates ERK1/2 kinases via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and MAP kinase–ERK kinase, which mediates various effects of cells receiving very low doses of ionizing radiation.

Keiji Suzuki; Seiji Kodama; Masami Watanabe

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Natural Gas_v2 (9764 - Activated, Traditional).xps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas usage for this service address between September 2008 and April 2010. Billing Period Enter End Date for each billing period MMDDYY Amount used was: AActual...

40

Active microuidic mixer and gas bubble lter driven by thermal bubble micropump$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active micro¯uidic mixer and gas bubble ®lter driven by thermal bubble micropump$ Jr-Hung Tsaia Abstract A micro¯uidic mixer with a gas bubble ®lter activated by a thermal bubble actuated nozzle/min. The optimal mixing result is found when the actuating frequency of thermal bubble reaches 200 Hz. Normalized

Lin, Liwei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings Friedhelm, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8582, Japan Edited by Timothy Patterson, Carleton) Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential

Wehrli, Bernhard

42

DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

disconnection allows termination of correction elements to be conducted in a lower dose rate area and in less time. This innovation will greatly reduce radiation exposures to...

43

Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation  

SciTech Connect

The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A., E-mail: anouar.soufiani@ecp.fr [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire EM2C, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); École Centrale Paris, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France)] [France; Xin, S. [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)] [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Le Quéré, P. [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)] [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong [Department of Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Effect of Gas Absorption on the Scattered Radiation in the Solar Almucantar: Results of Numerical Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Absorption on the Gas Absorption on the Scattered Radiation in the Solar Almucantar: Results of Numerical Simulation T. Yu. Chesnokova, K. M. Firsov, I. M. Nasrtdinov, S. M. Sakerin, V. V. Veretennikov, and T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The methods for reconstruction of the aerosol optical characteristics (e.g., aerosol size distribution, and single-scattering albedo) from diffuse and direct radiation measured in the solar almucantar has been widely used during the last decade. The photometers with filters in the "atmospheric transparency windows" in the wavelength range 0.4 to 1 m were applied for measurements. Usually it was assumed that one could neglect the molecular absorption of the measured diffuse radiation. Further development

46

Extremely Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Causes Activation of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway and Enhances Proliferation of Normal Human Diploid Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stimulative effect of low-dose irradiation. These results indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activates...indicate that a limited range of low-dose ionizing radiation differentially activates...

Keiji Suzuki; Seiji Kodama; and Masami Watanabe

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

48

Experimental study of active magnetic bearing on a 150M3 turbo oxygen gas expander  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the investigation, experiment and design analyses on the application of active magnetic bearings for a 150M3 turbo oxygen gas expander having 1.16 kg weight and 30...

Wang Xiping Ph. D; Zhang Zhiming; Yu Liang…

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Particle acceleration and radiation by direct electric fields in flaring complex solar active regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to connect the energy re- lease process with the acceleration of electrons in solar flares, using a CA modelParticle acceleration and radiation by direct electric fields in flaring complex solar active-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex, FRANCE Abstract The acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles

Anastasiadis, Anastasios

50

Linking future aerosol radiative forcing to shifts in source activities Dorothy Koch,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because of economic growth, or the desire to mitigate climate effects or improve air quality, affect all or 'black carbon' (BC) that also absorb incoming solar radiation, exert a positive radiative forcing depend upon fuels burned and technologies used in various energy- related activities. Actions that occur

51

Critical Analysis of Active Shielding Methods for Space Radiation Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are reviewed and critiqued. Advantages and disadvantages of the proposed methods will be presented harmful space radiations. Designs affording protection from either solar energetic particle event protons for deep space missions are sporadic solar energetic particle events (SPEs) and the ever-present Galactic

Shepherd, Simon

52

Radiation asymmetries during disruptions on DIII-D caused by massive gas injection  

SciTech Connect

One of the major challenges that the ITER tokamak will have to face during its operations are disruptions. During the last few years, it has been proven that the global consequences of a disruption can be mitigated by the injection of large quantities of impurities. But one aspect that has been difficult to study was the possibility of local effects inside the torus during such injection that could damage a portion of the device despite the global heat losses and generated currents remaining below design parameter. 3D MHD simulations show that there is a potential for large toroidal asymmetries of the radiated power during impurity injection due to the interaction between the particle injection plume and a large n?=?1 mode. Another aspect of 3D effects is the potential occurrence of Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), which could induce large poloidal heat load asymmetries. This potential deleterious effect of 3D phenomena has been studied on the DIII-D tokamak, thanks to the implementation of a multi-location massive gas injection (MGI) system as well as new diagnostic capabilities. This study showed the existence of a correlation between the location of the n?=?1 mode and the local heat load on the plasma facing components but shows also that this effect is much smaller than anticipated (peaking factor of ?1.1 vs 3-4 according to the simulations). There seems to be no observable heat load on the first wall of DIII-D at the location of the impurity injection port as well as no significant radiation asymmetries whether one or 2 valves are fired. This study enabled the first attempt of mitigation of a VDE using impurity injection at different poloidal locations. The results showed a more favorable heat deposition when the VDE is mitigated early (right at the onset) by impurity injection. No significant improvement of the heat load mitigation efficiency has been observed for late particle injection whether the injection is done “in the way” of the VDE (upward VDE mitigated by injection from the upper part of the vessel vs the lower part) or not.

Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; Jernigan, T. C.; Foust, C. R.; Combs, S.; Meitner, S. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Hollmann, E. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Moyer, R. A. [University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Humphreys, D. A.; Wesley, J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States); Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Radiation asymmetries during disruptions on DIII-D caused by massive gas injectiona)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the major challenges that the ITER tokamak will have to face during its operations are disruptions. During the last few years it has been proven that the global consequences of a disruption can be mitigated by the injection of large quantities of impurities. But one aspect that has been difficult to study was the possibility of local effects inside the torus during such injection that could damage a portion of the device despite the global heat losses and generated currents remaining below design parameter. 3D MHD simulations show that there is a potential for large toroidal asymmetries of the radiated power during impurity injection due to the interaction between the particle injection plume and a large n?=?1 mode. Another aspect of 3D effects is the potential occurrence of Vertical Displacement Events (VDE) which could induce large poloidal heat load asymmetries. This potential deleterious effect of 3D phenomena has been studied on the DIII-D tokamak thanks to the implementation of a multi-location massive gas injection (MGI) system as well as new diagnostic capabilities. This study showed the existence of a correlation between the location of the n?=?1 mode and the local heat load on the plasma facing components but shows also that this effect is much smaller than anticipated (peaking factor of ?1.1 vs 3-4 according to the simulations). There seems to be no observable heat load on the first wall of DIII-D at the location of the impurity injection port as well as no significant radiation asymmetries whether one or 2 valves are fired. This study enabled the first attempt of mitigation of a VDE using impurity injection at different poloidal locations. The results showed a more favorable heat deposition when the VDE is mitigated early (right at the onset) by impurity injection. No significant improvement of the heat load mitigation efficiency has been observed for late particle injection whether the injection is done “in the way” of the VDE (upward VDE mitigated by injection from the upper part of the vessel vs the lower part) or not.

L. R. Baylor; T. C. Jernigan; J. C. Wesley; V. A. Izzo; N. W. Eidietis; C. J. Lasnier; R. A. Moyer; P. B. Parks; C. R. Foust; S. Combs; S. J. Meitner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago....

55

Asymptotic Preserving Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Grey Radiative Transfer Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due equations, where the radiation transport equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation(2013), 138-156] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two

Xu, Kun

56

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

near Crescent Junction, Utah. The scope also includes active remediation of ground water at the mill site (Moab site). The Uranium Reduction Company constructed the Moab...

57

Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point mutation in codon 146 and induces a different spectrum of ras mutations than does gamma radiation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

research-article Research Article Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point...School of Medicine, New York 10016. Neutron radiation is known to produce tumors in...RF/J mice by a single acute dose of neutron irradiation. Activated ras genes were...

S R Sloan; E W Newcomb; A Pellicer

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Research Activities Using Indus-1 Synchrotron Radiation Source  

SciTech Connect

Indus-1 is an efficient SR source in the soft x-ray / vacuum ultra violet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. For Indus-1, the higher order energy contamination in soft x-ray region, heat load and radiation safety problems are also significantly low. At present, soft x-ray-VUV reflectivity, angle integrated and angle resolved photo electron spectroscopy (ARPES), photo physics and high resolution vacuum ultra violet spectroscopy, beamlines are operational. The paper presents some of the recent studies carried out using In-dus-1.

Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K. [ISU Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology(RRCAT), Indore 452013 (India)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of about 19 million barrels of U.S. crude oil and 46 billion cubic feet of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That's about one-third more than the amount of oil and gas production knocked offline during last year's hurricane season. Government weather forecasts predict 13 to 20 named storms will form between June and the end of November, with 7 to 11 of those turning into hurricanes. Production outages in previous hurricane seasons were as high as 107 million barrels of crude oil

62

Solute-Solvent Interactions From Gas Chromatographic Activity Coefficients and the Solvation Parameter Model for Nitrogen-Containing Stationary Phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......analyte injected into a gas chromatographic...Interactions From Gas Chromatographic Activity...Parameter Model for Nitrogen-Containing Stationary...mol), R is the gas con- stant (taken...pressure of saturated water vapor at ambient...the Ost- wald solubility coefficient (or......

José M. Santiuste

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities  

SciTech Connect

This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Multipole radiation in a collisonless gas coupled to electromagnetism or scalar gravitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell and Vlasov-Nordstr\\"om systems which describe large particle ensembles interacting by either electromagnetic fields or a relativistic scalar gravity model. For both systems we derive a radiation formula analogous to the Einstein quadrupole formula in general relativity.

Sebastian Bauer; Markus Kunze; Gerhard Rein; Alan D. Rendall

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effects of radiative emission and absorption on the propagation and extinction of premixed gas flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;2 losses are eliminated by employing large combustion vessels at microgravity, heat loss via gaseous when CO2, a strong absorber, is present in the unburned gas. Two heat loss mechanisms that lead to flammability limits even with reabsorption were identified. One is that for dry hydrocarbon-air mixtures

67

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5460us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5460us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5460US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34515,-19376 34880,5419 35246,-12622 35611,6367

68

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5460us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5460us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5460US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34349,10392 34380,8240 34408,-5388

69

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34349,10956 34380,12444

70

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5450us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5450us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5450US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" 34349,21349 34380,20684

71

,"U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5440us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5440us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5440US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Salt Underground Storage Activity-Injects (MMcf)" 34515,142243 34880,194185 35246,258468

72

Radiation gas evolution in loosely crosslinked copolymers of acrylic acid and hexaallylsucrose  

SciTech Connect

The change in the thickening power and quantitative composition of ..gamma..-radiolysis products of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in loosely crosslinked copolymers of acrylic acid and hexaallylsucrose (CAAAS) was studied as a function of the content of the crosslinking agent, hexaallylsucrose (HAS), in the starting monomeric mixture, and irradiation conditions (vacuum, atmospheric environment). With increase in the per-weight content of HAS from 1.2 to 2.5%, the thickening power of nonirradiated CAAAS increases. By the action of ..gamma..-radiation the thickening power of PAA and CAAAS decreases, and carbon oxides, methane and ethane are detected in their radiolysis products. With increases in the HAS content, the yields of carbon oxides and ethane increase. This was interpreted as the result of a radiation chemical destruction of lattice junction points of CAAAS.

Afanas'ev, A.M.; Demishev, V.N.; Novozhilov, V.A.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

if it is a gas leak, do not activate building alarms, use mobile phones, hand held radios, electronic equipment or light flammable material!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas leak gas leak if it is a gas leak, do not activate building alarms, use mobile phones, hand held radios, electronic equipment or light flammable material! 1. If you discover a Gas Leak, shout and check that the nearest gas isolator switch is off. 4. Evacuate the building immediately, avoiding

Hickman, Mark

74

Effect of gas radiation and property variation on the performance of thermal regenerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with experiments by Larkin et al [18]. The interaction of conduction, convection 12 and radiation in a fully developed laminar flow was investi- gated by Viskanta [19] by solving a non linear integro- differential energy equation. In order to simplify...: Where (3 2) ae = &eA ( I &e I ) +~ Fe' 0 j 18 an = Dn+( I+nl) +I Fn' Oj p 4x4y 4t Here T' refers to the known value of temperature at a time t, while all other values are at unknown values at time t+4t. The mass flow rates F? F, F? and F...

Gadiraju, Srinivasa Varma

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

A study of the response of a gas ionization chamber to different sources of ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ranged from a few keV to 20 MeV and peaked at 5 MeV. The neutrons were produced by the (n, n) reaction o(5. 16MeV)+ Be ~ C+n( 5MeV). A 2-in thick lead brick was placed in front of the chamber to absorb the soft 7-rays emitted from the source along... with the neutrons. The source was kept 9in away from the chamber during all runs. Data were taken for both gas mixtures with the cathode pad facing the source and also with the chamber turned around. In addition to these measurements, four more runs were made...

Zamble?-Die?guez, Filiberto Edmundo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Initiation of ignition of a combustible gas mixture in a closed volume by the radiation of a high-power pulsed CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect

The results of experiments on initiating the ignition of a CH{sub 4} - O{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} triple gas mixture in a closed volume by the radiation of a high-power CO{sub 2} laser are presented. It is shown that spatially nonuniform (in the direction of the laser beam) gas heating by the laser radiation leads to formation of a fast combustion wave, propagating along the chamber axis and giving rise to 'instantaneous' ignition. At the threshold value 16.5 J of the laser radiation energy the fast combustion wave is transformed into a detonation wave, which causes an explosion and destruction of the reaction chamber.

Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Kossyi, I A; Popov, N A; Tarasova, N M; Firsov, K N

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tracking uncertainties in the causal chain from human activities to climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are designated forthe causal chain from human activities, to GHG emissions, tothe increasing GHG abundances, to the radiative forcing of

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.  

SciTech Connect

An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol (4 Activities)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it is important for students to know where it comes from. This module uses a series of four activities to show how energy and mass are converted from one form to another. It focuses on the conversion of light energy into chemical energy via photosynthesis, then goes on to show how the chemical energy in plant sugars can be fermented to produce ethanol. Finally, the reasons for using ethanol as a fuel are discussed.

80

A hybrid passive/active system for control of the noise radiated by a small generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work was the design and implementation of a hybrid passive/active system to control the noise radiated by a small generator. The fundamental frequency of the periodic radiated noise depends on the electrical load plugged into the generator. Passive control is afforded by a rectangular enclosure with dimensions 1000×710×530?mm3. The wall panels of the enclosure (steel 1.5 mm thick) are lined with a 30?mm layer of sound absorbing material. Special attention is paid to technical aspects such as air refreshing and temperature inside the enclosure. The measured insertion loss is higher than 20 dB above 500 Hz. Low?frequency noise escapes the enclosure via intake and exhaust openings. Active control is applied to the exhaust noise. The reference signal is supplied by an accelerometer over the air filter case of the generator. A high?temperature loudspeaker is used as control source. The error signal is picked up by a cheap electric microphone. Since noise along the exhaust is too loud the microphone sensitivity had to be reduced by taping its diaphragm. A commercial system is used to implement active noise control. [Work supported by CICYT Project AMB97?1175?C03?01.

Maria Cuesta; Pedro Cobo

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hanford Low-Activity Waste Processing: Demonstration of the Off-Gas Recycle Flowsheet - 13443  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification of Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW) is nominally the thermal conversion and incorporation of sodium salts and radionuclides into borosilicate glass. One key radionuclide present in LAW is technetium-99. Technetium-99 is a low energy, long-lived beta emitting radionuclide present in the waste feed in concentrations on the order of 1-10 ppm. The long half-life combined with a high solubility in groundwater results in technetium-99 having considerable impact on performance modeling (as potential release to the environment) of both the waste glass and associated secondary waste products. The current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flowsheet calls for the recycle of vitrification process off-gas condensates to maximize the portion of technetium ultimately immobilized in the waste glass. This is required as technetium acts as a semi-volatile specie, i.e. considerable loss of the radionuclide to the process off-gas stream can occur during the vitrification process. To test the process flowsheet assumptions, a prototypic off-gas system with recycle capability was added to a laboratory melter (on the order of 1/200 scale) and testing performed. Key test goals included determination of the process mass balance for technetium, a non-radioactive surrogate (rhenium), and other soluble species (sulfate, halides, etc.) which are concentrated by recycling off-gas condensates. The studies performed are the initial demonstrations of process recycle for this type of liquid-fed melter system. This paper describes the process recycle system, the waste feeds processed, and experimental results. Comparisons between data gathered using process recycle and previous single pass melter testing as well as mathematical modeling simulations are also provided. (authors)

Ramsey, William G.; Esparza, Brian P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99532 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA 99532 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Relativistic study of vuv radiation properties from Kr-Xe gas mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to obtain a microscopic understanding of the origin of vuv emission from inert heavy-atom gas mixtures we present results from relativistic calculations of the krypton-xenon spectrum in the 68 000 cm-1 region. Calculations carried out on the interatomic interaction in the ground and in the low-lying spin-orbit excited states [0-(3P2), 0+(3P1), 1(3P1), 1(3P2), 2(3P1)] of the krypton-xenon dimer are presented. The calculations were executed in a two-step procedure in which the CCSD(T) model for the ground state and the CCSD response theory model for the excited states were used to obtain spin-free potential curves in the first step. A perturbational treatment of the spin-orbit interaction within the atomic mean-field approximation was applied in the next step. Large-core quasirelativistic effective core potentials with richly augmented valence basis sets and midbond functions were used. All calculations were corrected for basis set superposition errors by applying the counterpoise method. For all involved states, spin-orbit perturbed potential energy curves were computed and equilibrium geometries, potential well depths, and local extrema were determined. Vibrational analysis and Franck-Condon factors for the ground and 0+(3P1),1(3P1) states were also calculated. The geometry dependence of the electronic dipole transition matrix elements between all involved excited states and the ground state was investigated. Excitation energies and potentials were obtained that are in excellent agreement with results based on fitting to experimental data. Out of some earlier disparate experimental assignments of the character of the excited states of the KrXe complex, the present results adhere most closely to the ones presented by Pibel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 10 242 (1994)]. Analyzed together with the experimental data, the theoretical results provide a clear picture of the organization of exciplex states and of the origin of strong vuv emission from these states that follows from binary collisions of the heavy inert Kr and Xe atoms.

Branislav Jansík; Bernd Schimmelpfennig; Hans Ågren

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Anisotropic radiation from accretion disc-coronae in active galactic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the unification scheme of active galactic nuclei (AGN), Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s are intrinsically same, but they are viewed at different angles. However, the Fe K\\alpha emission line luminosity of Seyfert 1s was found in average to be about twice of that of Seyfert 2s at given X-ray continuum luminosity in the previous work (Ricci et al. 2014). We construct an accretion disc-corona model, in which a fraction of energy dissipated in the disc is extracted to heat the corona above the disc. The radiation transfer equation containing Compton scattering processes is an integro-differential equation, which is solved numerically for the corona with a parallel plane geometry. We find that the specific intensity of X-ray radiation from the corona changes little with the viewing angle \\theta when \\theta is small (nearly face-on), and it is sensitive to \\theta if the viewing angle is large (\\theta> 40 degrees). The radiation from the cold disc, mostly in infrared/optical/UV bands, is almost proportional to cos\\thet...

Xu, Ya-Di

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Surface free-carrier screening effect on the output of a ZnO nanowire nanogenerator and its potential as a self-powered active gas sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential as a self-powered active gas sensor This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please on the output of a ZnO nanowire nanogenerator and its potential as a self-powered active gas sensor Xinyu Xue1 as a power source, but also as a response signal to the gas, demonstrating a possible approach as a self-powered

Wang, Zhong L.

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - active gas handling Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

geopolitics of gas working paper series THE BELARUS CONNECTION: EXPORTING RUSSIAN GAS TO GERMANY... AND POLAND david victor and nadejda makarova victor 12;The Belarus Connection:...

86

The use of activated charcoal for the removal of oxygen from gas ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

May 1, 1970 ... being analyzed by gas-solid chromatography. ... chosen for gas separations will not separate ... two or three stations had been processed to.

1999-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Activity concentrations of 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K radionuclides in refinery products and the additional radiation dose originated from oil residues in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radioactive materials (TENORM). Oil and gas production, coal mining and combustion, drinking or waste water treatments...Sources from the point of view of radiation protection, taking economic and social factors into account, the common goal is to keep......

A. Parmaksiz; Y. Agus; F. Bulgurlu; E. Bulur; Ç. Yildiz; T. Öncü

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities  

SciTech Connect

In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

Bent, Jimmy

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in a marine shale for generating natural gas Frank D. Mango 1 * Daniel M...be the source of equilibrium in natural gas habitats and in marine shales...palaeoactivity|low-temperature gas|natural gas| 1. Introduction It is broadly...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Negative refraction with tunable absorption in an active dense gas of atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of negative index materials (NIM) presently are severely limited by absorption. Next to improvements of metamaterial designs, it has been suggested that dense gases of atoms could form a NIM with negligible losses. In such gases, the low absorption is facilitated by quantum interference. Here, we show that additional gain mechanisms can be used to tune and effectively remove absorption in a dense gas NIM. In our setup, the atoms are coherently prepared by control laser fields, and further driven by a weak incoherent pump field to induce gain. We employ nonlinear optical Bloch equations to analyze the optical response. Metastable Neon is identified as a suitable experimental candidate at infrared frequencies to implement a lossless active negative index material.

P. P. Orth; R. Hennig; C. H. Keitel; J. Evers

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the

Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

93

Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (?14–15 years) compared to the other two sites (?6–11 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7 g m?2 d?1, respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R = 0.827, P < 0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

Yao Su; Xuan Zhang; Fang-Fang Xia; Qi-Qi Zhang; Jiao-Yan Kong; Jing Wang; Ruo He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Molecular gas and nuclear activity in early-type galaxies: any link with radio-loudness?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. We want to study the amount of molecular gas in a sample of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) which host low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We look for possible differences between the radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) AGN. Methods. We observed the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) spectral lines with the IRAM 30m and NRO 45m telescopes for eight galaxies. They belong to a large sample of 37 local ETGs which host both RQ and RL AGN. We gather data from the literature for the entire sample. Results. We report the new detection of CO(1-0) emission in four galaxies (UGC0968, UGC5617, UGC6946, and UGC8355) and CO(2-1) emission in two of them (UGC0968 and UGC5617). The CO(2-1)/CO(1-0) ratio in these sources is $\\sim0.7\\pm0.2$. Considering both the new observations and the literature, the detection rate of CO in our sample is 55 $\\pm$ 9%, with no statistically significant difference between the hosts of RL and RQ AGNs. For all the detected galaxies we converted the CO luminosities into the molecular masses, $M...

Baldi, Ranieri D; Capetti, Alessandro; Giovannini, Gabriele; Casasola, Viviana; Perez-Torres, Miguel A; Kuno, Nario

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model  

SciTech Connect

The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

Fitzgerald, J.E.; Robinson, R.L.; Gasem, K.A.M. [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of dense vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition method was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques.

Takashima, A.

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - active-edge planar radiation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANTENNA FOR RADIO Summary: Lightweight Robust Linear Wire Antenna Planar Patch Antenna Linear Acceptable Radiation Pattern... 255 17 270 17 285 18 300 20 315...

98

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5560us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5560us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:35 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5560US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34349,747322 34380,509144

100

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5550us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5550us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5550US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" 34349,770932

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5550us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5550us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5550US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Withdraw (MMcf)" 34515,2385284 34880,2774498

102

,"U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5560us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5560us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5560US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Activity-Net (MMcf)" 34515,-268751 34880,402800 35246,18357

103

CO2 gas exchange and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in leaves of Zea mays L.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Important gas exchange characteristics of C4 plants depend on ... , the enzyme catalysing the primary fixation of CO2 during C4 photosynthesis. In this study, the relationship between intracellular resistance for...

Michael Pfeffer; Martin Peisker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Conversion of relativistic pair energy into radiation in the jets of active galactic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally accepted that relativistic jet outflows power the nonthermal emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN). The composition of these jets -- leptonic versus hadronic -- is still under debate. We investigate the microphysical details of the conversion process of the kinetic energy in collimated relativistic pair outflows into radiation through interactions with the ambient interstellar medium. Viewed from the coordinate system comoving with the pair outflow, the interstellar protons and electrons represent a proton-electron beam propagating with relativistic speed in the pair plasma. We demonstrate that the beam excites both electrostatic and low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic Alfven-type waves via a two-stream instability in the pair background plasma, and we calculate the time evolution of the distribution functions of the beam particles and the generated plasma wave turbulence power spectra. For standard AGN jet outflow and environment parameters we show that the initial beam distributions of interstellar protons and electrons quickly relax to plateau-distributions in parallel momentum, transferring thereby one-half of the initial energy density of the beam particles to electric field fluctuations of the generated electrostatic turbulence. On considerably longer time scales, the plateaued interstellar electrons and protons will isotropise by their self-generated transverse turbulence and thus be picked-up in the outflow pair plasma. These longer time scales are also characteristic for the development of transverse hydromagnetic turbulence from the plateaued electrons and protons. This hydromagnetic turbulence upstream and downstream is crucial for diffusive shock acceleration to operate at external or internal shocks associated with pair outflows.

R. Schlickeiser; R. Vainio; M. Boettcher; I. Lerche; M. Pohl; C. Schuster

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity gamma radiation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

no. (will be inserted by hand later) Summary: as a function of time. Key words: Gamma ray : bursts -- Shock waves -- ISM : jets and outflous -- Radiation... .10.1; 02.18.5...

106

Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Active Charged Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-PMWC) Orbital Technologies Corporation Technical Abstract Model calculations and risk assessment estimates Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement Technologies Technical Abstract The innovative High Efficiency the resultant plastic tiles. This system requires access to power, data, and cooling interfaces. The system

107

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Magmatic Gas Composition Reveals the Source Depth of Slug-Driven Strombolian Explosive Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrothermal meteoric steam during shallow...closed- to open-system conditions...entrainment of meteoric steam from the shallow hydrothermal system. (ii) The gas slugs...prevented quantitative assessment of the slug source...is a powerful tool in such studies...

Mike Burton; Patrick Allard; Filippo Muré; Alessandro La Spina

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

109

Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989  

SciTech Connect

This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus  

SciTech Connect

Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

Segebade, Christian [Idaho Accelerator Centre (IAC), Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States); Goerner, Wolf [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, unter den Eichen 86, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The dynamics of the early universe and the initial conditions for inflation in a model with radiation and a Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the early universe is done through the quantization of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model with positive curvature. The material content consists of two fluids: radiation and Chaplygin gas. The quantization of these models is made by following the Wheeler and DeWitt's prescriptions. Using the Schutz formalism, the time notion is recovered and the Wheeler-DeWitt equation transforms into a time dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which rules the dynamics of the early universe, under the action of an effective potential $V_{ef}$. Using a finite differences method and the Crank-Nicholson scheme, in a code implemented in the program OCTAVE, we solve the corresponding time dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and obtain the time evolution of a initial wave packet. This wave packet satisfies appropriate boundary conditions. The calculation of the tunneling probabilities shows that the universe may emerge from the Planck era to an inflationary phase. It also shows that, the tunneling probability is a function of the mean energy of the initial wave packet and of two parameters related to the Chaplygin gas. We also show a comparison between these results and those obtained by the WKB approximation.

G. A. Monerat; G. Oliveira-Neto; E. V. Corrêa Silva; L. G. Ferreira Filho; P. Romildo Jr.; J. C. Fabris; R. Fracalossi; F. G. Alvarenga; S. V. B. Gonçalves

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Using hyperspectral vegetation indices to estimate the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by corn canopies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). 1. Introduction The fraction of incoming solar radiation (400-700 nm spectral range) absorbed the exchange of energy, mass, and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere, and thus a key state several advantages ­ they are non-destructive, uniform, can be performed rapidly, and no complicated

Myneni, Ranga B.

113

Gas inflows towards the nucleus of the active galaxy NGC7213  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present two-dimensional stellar and gaseous kinematics of the inner 0.8x1.1kpc^2 of the LINER/Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC7213, from optical spectra obtained with the GMOS integral field spectrograph on the Gemini South telescope at a spatial resolution of 60pc. The stellar kinematics shows an average velocity dispersion of 177km/s, circular rotation with a projected velocity amplitude of 50km/s and a kinematic major axis at a position angle of -4degrees (west of north). From the average velocity dispersion we estimate a black hole mass of M_BH=8_{-6}^{+16}x10^7 M_sun. The gas kinematics is dominated by non-circular motions, mainly along two spiral arms extending from the nucleus out to 4arcsec (280pc) to the NW and SE, that are cospatial with a nuclear dusty spiral seen in a structure map of the nuclear region of the galaxy. The projected gas velocities along the spiral arms show blueshifts in the far side and redshifts in the near side, with values of up to 200km/s. This kinematics can be interpreted as gas infl...

Schnorr-Müller, Allan; Nagar, Neil M; Ferrari, Fabricio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate to the insoluble technetium dioxide. The reducing agents were tried with and without sorbents.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

115

Continuous process preparation of activated silica with low carbon dioxide content gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for storage to prevent gel formation. This sol hns loss tendency to gel and. csn be sai'ely stored and used st approxirately twice the safe storage concentrat1on of the ILsylis sol, Hay (8) bas published. the results of a great deal of de- velopment work... of equipment operation which gave an activated product should. be accurate enough to cause activation in different, but similar equipment. Operating conditions found. 8o /0 /0 Figure ~ /oo /00o /moog C e/ Time, //oorq Gel Time oF Activated Sols Based...

Burdett, Joseph Walton

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Off-Gas Cleaning in an FRG Reprocessing Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Development of Nuclear Gas Cleaning and Filtering Techniques / Radiation Biology and Environment

Jürgen Furrer; Walter Weinländer

117

Capture of CO2 from flue gas by vacuum pressure swing adsorption using activated carbon beads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) for CO2 capture has attracted much research effort with the...2...adsorbent materials. In this work, a new adsorbent, that is, pitch-based activated carbon bead (AC bead), ...

Chunzhi Shen; Jianguo Yu; Ping Li; Carlos A. Grande; Alirio E. Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Investigating of electrons bunching in a Penning trap and accelerating process for CO2 gas mixture active medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the presence of an active medium incorporated in a Penning trap, the moving electrons can become bunched, as they get enough energy, they escape the trap forming an optical injector. These bunched electrons can enter next PASER section filled with the same active medium to be accelerated. In this paper, electron dynamics in the presence of gas mixture active medium incorporated in a penning trap is analyzed by developing an idealized 1D model. We further evaluate the energy exchange occurring as the train of electrons traversing the next PASER section. The results show that the oscillating electrons can be bunched at the resonant frequency of the active medium. The influence of the trapped time and the population inversion are analyzed, which shows that the longer the electrons are trapped, the more energy from the medium the accelerated electrons get, and with the increase of the population inversion, the decelerated electrons virtually unchanged but the accelerated electrons more than double their peak e...

Tian, Xiu-fang; Jia, Qika

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling of UF{sub 6} enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities  

SciTech Connect

The physical modeling of uranium isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF{sub 6} gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays). Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the 'on site' inspectors' measurements.

Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements Via Fermi, 2749-TP181,20127 Ispra (Italy)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pt/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator as self-powered active gas sensor with linear ethanol sensing at room temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A self-powered gas sensor that can actively detect ethanol at room temperature has been realized from a Pt/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator. Pt nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the whole surface of ZnO nanowires. The piezoelectric output of Pt/ZnO nanoarrays can act not only as a power source, but also as a response signal to ethanol at room temperature. Upon exposure to dry air and 1500 ppm ethanol at room temperature, the piezoelectric output of the device under the same compressive strain is 0.672 and 0.419 V, respectively. Moreover, a linear dependence of the sensitivity on the ethanol concentration is observed. Such a linear ethanol sensing at room temperature can be attributed to the atmosphere-dependent variety of the screen effect on the piezoelectric output of ZnO nanowires, the catalytic properties of Pt nanoparticles, and the Schottky barriers at Pt/ZnO interfaces. The present results can stimulate research in the direction of designing new material systems for self-powered room-temperature gas sensing.

Yayu Zhao; Xuan Lai; Ping Deng; Yuxin Nie; Yan Zhang; Lili Xing; Xinyu Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. (Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a multi-species lattice gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargoes being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) to characterize the motion of the interacting cargoes, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation/deposition processes introduce qualitatively new features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or {\\it shocks}. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various {\\it in-vivo} situations.

Sudipto Muhuri; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

124

CSM RADIATION USER INFORMATION (Please type or print legibly) Last Name First Name Initial CWID SSN * Gender  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Solid Liquid Gas mA: kV or kVp Training (Authorized User or Radiation Producing Equipment Supervisor * Gender M F Birth Date Department Building/Room Office Phone Lab Phone Email Authorized User User Category Radiation Producing Machine Radionuclides: Accelerator X-ray Other (specify) Maximum activity: mCi Form

125

Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion adsorption chemicals, solid-liquid separation methods, and achievable decontamination factors. Results of the radionuclide removal testing indicate that the radionuclides, including Tc-99, can be removed with inorganic sorbents and precipitating agents. Evaporation test results indicate that the simulant can be evaporated to fairly high concentration prior to formation of appreciable solids, but corrosion has not yet been examined.

McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less effective at alkaline pH. Conversely, removal of the cesium was more effective at alka

Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Combination of Measles Virus Virotherapy and Radiation Therapy Has Synergistic Activity in the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...obtained with the radiation-sensitive line U251 and the radiation-resistant primary...using the CalcuSyn software program based on...Greiner SM, et al. Safety of repeat intracerebral...virotherapy and radiation therapy has synergistic...

Chunsheng Liu; Jann N. Sarkaria; Cory A. Petell; Georgia Paraskevakou; Paula J. Zollman; Mark Schroeder; Brett Carlson; Paul A. Decker; Wenting Wu; C. David James; Stephen J. Russell; and Evanthia Galanis

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

129

arXiv:cond-mat/0301569v325Aug2003 Radiation-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in a 2D Electron Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at = c due to heating at the cyclotron resonance. Interest in this phenomenon was heightened when, using on the ratio of radiation frequency to cyclotron frequency. We perform a diagrammatic calculation and find, µ, to the cyclotron frequency, c, these radiation-induced oscillations are controlled by the ratio

130

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Oil and stock market activity when prices go up and down: the case of the oil and gas industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the asymmetric effects of daily oil price changes on equity returns, market betas, oil betas, return variances, and trading volumes for the US oil and gas industry. The responses of stock returns assoc...

Sunil K. Mohanty; Aigbe Akhigbe…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- ANC Gas Hills Site - 040  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ANC Gas Hills Site (040) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The ANC Gas Hills site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Gas Hills, Wyoming. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U.S. Government. After the owner completes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination, the Department of Energy¿s

133

Natural gas monthly, July 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Report No. A 335 Nuclear Instruments and Methods...Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation...from various elements-vacuum chambers, cryogenic...European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN...Carlo Method Particle Accelerators instrumentation Protons......

A. Butterworth; A. Ferrari; E. Tsoulou; V. Vlachoudis; T. Wijnands

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

those for selective catalytic reduction (SCR)), scrubbing liquors, flue gas or coal additives, combustion modifications, barrier discharges, and ultraviolet radiation....

137

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

138

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Natural gas monthly, June 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Natural gas monthly, August 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural gas monthly: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Natural gas monthly, November 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Natural gas monthly, October 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Natural gas monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Natural gas monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

148

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

149

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

150

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

151

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

152

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

153

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lamp filaments, the electrodes of an electric arc, and molten metals of high melting point. The emission of an incandescent object is due to its temperature and depends little upon the chemical nature of the radiator. The Stefan- 13 Boltzmann law... is automatically fed by the welding machine into the weld puddle. Metal is transferred through the arc plasma to the base material being welded. The wire is of the same metallic composition as the base metal, and generally the same diameter is used for most...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Influence of gamma radiation on the activities of some carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the cotyledons and the leaves of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L. ) bean seedlings  

SciTech Connect

Studies indicated that 21-day old cotyledons from gamma irradiated seeds of fenugreek beans were heavier and had more starch and sugar than their non-irradiated controls. To test whether these effects occurred in the leaves and to seek a possible biochemical explanation for these results, the activities of five enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were studied. Three groups of fenugreek bean seeds were irradiated (100-300 Gy) and then allowed to grow for 21 days. On harvest, wet and dry weights of both cotyledons and leaves were determined. Starch and sugar contents in cotyledons and leaves were measured. The five enzymes ..cap alpha..-amylase, ..beta..-amylase, starch phosphorylase, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase were extracted from cotyledons and leaves, respectively. The protein contents and activities of the enzyme extracts were determined. The results suggest an increase in carbohydrate metabolism in cotyldeons and a decrease in leaves due to the radiation treatment of the seeds before germination. Thus, increased amounts of starch and sugars are observed in the cotyledons, and decreased amounts in the leaves. Radiation damage to the translocatory system of the plant may retard the movement of sugars from the cotyledons to the other parts of the plant. This may cause accumulation of sugars and starch in the cotyledons, leading to an increase in their size and weight.

Ahanotu, P.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

EIA - Natural Gas Exploration & Reserves Data and Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natural gas, and lease condensate (annual). Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Rotary rigs in operation, footage drilled, and active well service rig counts (monthly,...

156

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Low radiative efficiency accretion at work in active galactic nuclei: the nuclear spectral energy distribution of NGC4565  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC4565. Despite its classification as a Seyfert2, the nuclear source is substantially unabsorbed. The absorption we find from Chandra data (N_H=2.5 X 10^21 cm^-2) is consistent with that produced by material in the galactic disk of the host galaxy. HST images show a nuclear unresolved source in all of the available observations, from the near-IR H band to the optical U band. The SED is completely different from that of Seyfert galaxies and QSO, as it appears basically ``flat'' in the IR-optical region, with a small drop-off in the U-band. The location of the object in diagnostic planes for low luminosity AGNs excludes a jet origin for the optical nucleus, and its extremely low Eddington ratio L_o/L_Edd indicates that the radiation we observe is most likely produced in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). This would make NGC4565 the first AGN in which an ADAF-like process is identified in the optical. We find that the relatively high [OIII] flux observed from the ground cannot be all produced in the nucleus. Therefore, an extended NLR must exist in this object. This may be interpreted in the framework of two different scenarios: i) the radiation from ADAFs is sufficient to give rise to high ionization emission-line regions through photoionization, or ii) the nuclear source has recently ``turned-off'', switching from a high-efficiency accretion regime to the present low-efficiency state.

M. Chiaberge; R. Gilli; F. D. Macchetto; W. B. Sparks

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

On the conversion of blast wave energy into radiation in active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested that relativistic blast waves may power the jets of AGN and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). We address the important issue how the kinetic energy of collimated blast waves is converted into radiation. It is shown that swept-up ambient matter is quickly isotropised in the blast wave frame by a relativistic two-stream instability, which provides relativistic particles in the jet without invoking any acceleration process. The fate of the blast wave and the spectral evolution of the emission of the energetic particles is therefore solely determined by the initial conditions. We compare our model with existing multiwavelength data of AGN and find remarkable agreement.

Martin Pohl; Reinhard Schlickeiser

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural gas monthly, March 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas analysis and geographic information systems.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Natural gas monthly, August 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature article is on US Natural Gas Imports and Exports 1994.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural gas monthly, June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

Natural gas monthly, October 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Unabated Adenovirus Replication following Activation of the cGAS/STING-Dependent Antiviral Response in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coxsackie B viruses and adenoviruses 2 and 5. Science 275 :1320-1323. doi: 10.1126/science.275.5304.1320 . 13. Gaggar, A , DM...activates the type I interferon pathway. Science 339 :786-791. doi: 10.1126/science...

Eric Lam; Erik Falck-Pedersen

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

167

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. [Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

169

Backscatter absorption gas imaging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

McRae, Jr., Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

Martin, Kevin L. (Washburn, IL); Elliott, Dwight E. (Chillicothe, IL)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Gas Geothermometry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Geothermometry Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group:...

173

Neutrino and Cosmic-Ray Emission and Cumulative Background from Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study high-energy neutrino and cosmic-ray (CR) emission from the cores of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). In LLAGN, the thermalization of particles is expected to be incomplete in radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs), allowing the existence of non-thermal particles. In this work, assuming stochastic particle acceleration due to turbulence in RIAFs, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate spectra of escaping neutrinos and CRs. The RIAF in LLAGN can emit CR protons with $\\gtrsim10$ PeV energies and TeV-PeV neutrinos generated via $pp$ and/or $p\\gamma$ reactions. We find that, if $\\sim1$% of the accretion luminosity is carried away by non-thermal ions, the diffuse neutrino intensity from the cores of LLAGN may be as high as $E_\

Shigeo S. Kimura; Kohta Murase; Kenji Toma

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

174

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A highly active and stable Co4N/?-Al2O3 catalyst for CO and CO2 methanation to produce synthetic natural gas (SNG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Co4N/?-Al2O3 and Co/?-Al2O3 catalysts with different metal loadings were prepared by NH3 and H2-temperature programmed reaction method for the co-methanation of carbon oxides (CO and CO2). The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption, XRD, XPS, TEM-SAED, H2, CO, and CO2-TPD techniques. Results showed that the Co4N catalysts had higher activity than Co metal-supported catalysts due to their enhanced adsorption capacity, uniform metal dispersion, and superior metal-support interaction. Among the catalysts studied, 20Co4N/?-Al2O3 catalyst with 20 wt% metal loading showed the best performance. This catalyst achieved higher activity for CH4 formation between 200 and 300 °C and maintained high product selectivity (?98%). A 250 h stability test for 20Co4N/?-Al2O3 was also conducted at 350 °C and increased gas hourly space velocity (GHSV; 10,000 h?1). The spent catalyst was further characterized using XRD, TEM, and TGA analysis. Results revealed that the catalyst was highly resistant to metal sintering and carbon deposition, whereas high CO and CO2 conversion and CH4 selectivity were maintained even at a higher GHSV.

Rauf Razzaq; Chunshan Li; Muhammad Usman; Kenzi Suzuki; Suojiang Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources.

178

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

179

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

180

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES IN THE CHUKCHI AND BEAUFORT SEAS IN 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS..............................................................................................................84 i #12;BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS" permits under section 101(a)(5) of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, as amended, for certain oil and gas

182

Forbush decrease effects on radiation dose received on-board aeroplanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......information provided by the US FAA to promote radiation safety for air carrier crew members. Radiat...Cosmic Radiation Humans Monte Carlo Method Radiation Dosage Radiation Monitoring methods Software Solar Activity...

P. Lantos

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Third millenium ideal gas and condensed phase thermochemical database for combustion (with update from active thermochemical tables).  

SciTech Connect

The thermochemical database of species involved in combustion processes is and has been available for free use for over 25 years. It was first published in print in 1984, approximately 8 years after it was first assembled, and contained 215 species at the time. This is the 7th printed edition and most likely will be the last one in print in the present format, which involves substantial manual labor. The database currently contains more than 1300 species, specifically organic molecules and radicals, but also inorganic species connected to combustion and air pollution. Since 1991 this database is freely available on the internet, at the Technion-IIT ftp server, and it is continuously expanded and corrected. The database is mirrored daily at an official mirror site, and at random at about a dozen unofficial mirror and 'finger' sites. The present edition contains numerous corrections and many recalculations of data of provisory type by the G3//B3LYP method, a high-accuracy composite ab initio calculation. About 300 species are newly calculated and are not yet published elsewhere. In anticipation of the full coupling, which is under development, the database started incorporating the available (as yet unpublished) values from Active Thermochemical Tables. The electronic version now also contains an XML file of the main database to allow transfer to other formats and ease finding specific information of interest. The database is used by scientists, educators, engineers and students at all levels, dealing primarily with combustion and air pollution, jet engines, rocket propulsion, fireworks, but also by researchers involved in upper atmosphere kinetics, astrophysics, abrasion metallurgy, etc. This introductory article contains explanations of the database and the means to use it, its sources, ways of calculation, and assessments of the accuracy of data.

Burcat, A.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Technion - Israel Inst. of Tech.

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

RADIATION MECHANISM AND JET COMPOSITION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND GeV-TeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P{sub jet}) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L{sub jet}) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L{sub s,jet}) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies ({epsilon}) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L{sub bol,jet}) for FSRQs and with the L{sub jet} for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P{sub jet}-L{sub s,jet} relation of FSRQs. They have lower {epsilon} and L{sub bol,jet} values than FSRQs, and a tentative L{sub bol,jet}-{epsilon} relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters ({sigma}) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with {epsilon} for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with {epsilon} for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

Zhang Jin; Lu Ye; Zhang Shuangnan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liang Enwei; Sun Xiaona [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang Bing, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gas filled panel insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

Griffith, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Gas filled panel insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - association biannual radiation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mathematics 40 Radiation Safety Training for Ancillary Personnel Summary: is the ALARA Principle? URI radiation safety activities strive to keep all radiation doses...

188

Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

191

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

192

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

193

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

196

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

197

Natural gas monthly, October 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

Radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems, and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g.\\ at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H \\textsc{ii} region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick "adiabatic" regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved,for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state, and we derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability conditi...

Jacquet, Emmanuel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

General. The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Georgia's Oil and Gas and Deep Drilling Act regulates oil and gas drilling activities to provide protection of underground freshwater supplies and certain "environmentally sensitive" areas. The...

202

Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling...

203

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Soil Gas Sampling...

204

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At...

205

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

206

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

207

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

208

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

209

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

210

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

211

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

212

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

213

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

214

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

215

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

216

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

217

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

218

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

219

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The drop in the cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused by a change in the mode of gas accretion and by active galactic nucleus feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused...Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrabetae...cosmic star formation rate is observed to drop sharply...of the gas that did not pass through a virial shock...simulations to show that the rate at which the gas accretes......

Freeke van de Voort; Joop Schaye; C. M. Booth; Claudio Dalla Vecchia

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

On parton distributions in a photon gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In some cases it may be useful to know parton distributions in a photon gas. This may be relevant, e.g., for the analysis of interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The latter can be considered as a gas of photons with an almost perfect blackbody spectrum. An approach to finding such parton distributions is described. The survival probability of ultra-high energy neutrinos traveling through this radiation is calculated.

I. Alikhanov

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Enhancement of Antitumor Activity of Ionizing Radiation by Combined Treatment with the Selective Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor ZD1839 (Iressa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Table 1 Effect of ionizing radiation or of ZD1839 treatment on the...were calculated by performing dose-response experiments. Cancer cells were exposed to different doses of ionizing radiation (range, 10-250 cGy) or to different...

Cataldo Bianco; Giampaolo Tortora; Roberto Bianco; Roberta Caputo; Bianca Maria Veneziani; Rosa Caputo; Vincenzo Damiano; Teresa Troiani; Gabriella Fontanini; David Raben; Stefano Pepe; A. Raffaele Bianco; and Fortunato Ciardiello

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Abstract 4422: Activation of beta-catenin/TCF-4 signaling leading to intestinal tumorigenesis in APCMin/+ mice is radiation quality dependent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice is radiation quality dependent Kamal Datta...Purpose: Radiation quality depends on loss of energy in tissues per unit...iron (56-Fe) ion (energy: 1 GeV/nucleon...Gy determined using a quality factor 1.25 and 1...

Kamal Datta; Shubankar Suman; Daniela Trani; and Albert J. Fornace

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

229

Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

Klunder; ,Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

230

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

231

A Novel Paradigm in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission [1, 2]. Moreover, water vapor is also a naturally occurring greenhouse gas and accounts for the largest percent- age of the greenhouse effect, between 36% and 66% in terms of radiation absorbance. Water). Yet the radiative importance of water vapor is less than that of CO2, CH4, and N2O, because

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

232

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

233

American Instrument Companies and the Early Development of Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......continued to be active in gas chromatography and in the...by also building low-cost gas chromatographs. Hamilton...the standard tools of a gas chromatographic laboratory...ultimate in high-precision production: it utilizes the bore......

L.S. Ettre

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Secondary emission gas chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL hot recycle solids oil shale retorting process has been studied as a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as areductant. Combusted Green River oil shale heated at 10{degrees}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppm/4000 ppm) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec exhibited NO removal between 250 and 500{degrees}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was found to be {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. These results are not based on optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized (combusted) oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10{degree}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500{degree}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degree}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO{sub x} remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH[sub 3] as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10[degree]C/min in an Ar/O[sub 2]/NO/NH[sub 3] mixture ([approximately]93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of [approximately]0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500[degree]C, with maximum removal of 70% at [approximately]400[degree]C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was [approximately]64%. When CO[sub 2] was added to the gas mixture at [approximately]8%, the NO removal dropped to [approximately]50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to [approximately]1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO[sub x] remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Influences of offshore activity. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Panama Canal/Outer Continental Shelf, of the House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on offshore oil and gas activity and its socio-economic and environmental influences, October 12, 1983  

SciTech Connect

A field hearing in Humble, Texas heard testimony on the socio-economic and environmental effects of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico. These activities influence the commercial and recreational climate of the area as well as municipal services. The 20 witnesses included representatives of the petroleum, shipping, fishing, and other industries, environmental groups, and both organizations and agencies concerned with coastal management. Additional material and communications supplied for the record follows the testimony.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Simple Cosmological Model with Relativistic Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct simple and useful approximation for the relativistic gas of massive particles. The equation of state is given by an elementary function and admits analytic solution of the Friedmann equation, including more complex cases when the relativistic gas of massive particles is considered together with radiation or with dominating cosmological constant. The model of relativistic gas may be interesting for the description of primordial Universe, especially as a candidate for the role of a Dark Matter.

Guilherme de Berredo-Peixoto; Ilya L. Shapiro; Flavia Sobreira

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

242

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

244

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

245

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

246

Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

247

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

250

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

251

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

252

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

253

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

254

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

255

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

256

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

257

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

258

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

259

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

260

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

262

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

263

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

264

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

266

Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation The Natural Gas Act of 1938, as amended, requires anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) from or to a foreign country must first obtain an authorization from the Department of Energy. The Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply, Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities is the one-stop-shopping place to obtain these authorizations in the Department. The import/export authorizations are necessary for anyone who wants to import or export natural gas, including LNG. There are basically two types of authorizations, blanket and long-term authorizations. The blanket authorization enables you to import or export on a short-term or spot market basis for a period of up to two years. The

267

Photoprotection mechanisms against ultraviolet radiation in ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cells were cultivated under two different light treatments, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and PAR + UVR, and at two NaNO3 concentrations, mid ...

268

Compressed natural gas measurement issues  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition`s Measurement and Metering Task Group (MMTG) was established on July 1st, 1992 to develop suggested revisions to National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) Handbook 44-1992 (Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Technical Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices) and NIST Handbook 130-1991 (Uniform Laws & Regulations). Specifically, the suggested revisions will address the sale and measurement of compressed natural gas when sold as a motor vehicle fuel. This paper briefly discusses the activities of the MMTG and its interaction with NIST. The paper also discusses the Institute of Gas Technology`s (IGT) support of the MMTG in the area of natural gas composition, their impact on metering technology applicable to high pressure fueling stations as well as conversion factors for the establishment of ``gallon gasoline equivalent`` of natural gas. The final portion of this paper discusses IGT`s meter research activities and its meter test facility.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Freeman, P.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

74Exploring Nuclear Decay and Radiation Dose The devastating earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

74Exploring Nuclear Decay and Radiation Dose The devastating earthquake that struck northern Japan vent radioactive gas and dust clouds into the environment. Although the initial radiation levels were extremely high, the natural decay of the radioactive compounds will cause the radiation levels at any given

272

Efficiency of Gas-to-Liquids Technology with Different Synthesis Gas Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design and optimization of a gas-to-liquids technology (GTL) is considered, mostly from the view of an optimal choice of a synthesis gas (syngas) production method. ... If the tail gas is not enough, an additional portion of the natural gas is burned. ... The temperature of the flue gases passing from the radiation chamber of the tubular furnace to the convection chamber is taken as equal to 1150 °C, which allows proper calculation of required amount of gas supplied to the burner. ...

Ilya S. Ermolaev; Vadim S. Ermolaev; Vladimir Z. Mordkovich

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

EPA Natural Gas STAR Program Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Established in 1993, the Natural Gas STAR program is a partnership between the U.S. EPA and the oil and natural gas industry designed to cost-effectively reduce methane emissions from voluntary activities undertaken at oil and natural gas operations both

unknown authors

274

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

275

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

276

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

279

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

280

Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) Exploration Activity...

282

Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado...

283

Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity...

284

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

285

Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

286

10th Radiation Physics and Protection Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Energy Authority National Network of Radiation Physics Atomic Energy Authority National Network of Radiation Physics 10 th Radiation Physics and Protection Conference Special Topic Elements of Regulating Nuclear and Radiation Activities Egyptian Law 26 -30 November 2010 To be held at EAEA Headquarter Nasr City Cairo - Egypt (www.rphysp.com) INVITATION The conference organizing committee invites scientists from the Atomic Energy , Research Centers , Universities Institutes , and all those involved in radiation Physics and its Applications in Egypt , Arab countries and abroad to participate in scientific activities of the conference . The official working language of the conference in English Conference Honorary Chairman Conference Scientific Secretary

287

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

288

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

289

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

290

Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active Desiccant Hybrid Rooftop Systems Combined with a Natural Gas Driven Cogeneration Package, 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report summary of a research/demonstration project involving a custom 230 kW cogeneration package with four integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) systems

291

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Historical Natural Gas Annual Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Historical Natural Gas Annual The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-2000 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-2000. To read reports in PDF format download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

292

Passive gas separator and accumulator device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

294

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

295

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

296

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

297

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

298

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

299

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

300

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

302

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

303

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

305

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

307

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

308

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

Complete radiative terms for the electron/electronic energy equation  

SciTech Connect

A derivation of the radiative terms in the electron/electronic energy equation is presented, properly accounting for the effects of absorption and emission of radiation on the individual energy modes of the gas. This electron/electronic energy equation with the complete radiative terms has successfully been used to model the radiation-dominated precursor ahead of the bow shock of a hypersonic vehicle entering the Earth`s atmosphere. 8 refs.

Stanley, S.A.; Carlson, L.A. [Univ of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_(Lewicki_%26_Oldenburg)&oldid=508144" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

313

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1999 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1999. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1999. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1999. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

315

Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The global model that I used was GATOR-GCMM, which treated gas, aerosol, radiative, meteorological and transport processes (see Supplementary ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

317

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

318

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

319

Passive gas separator and accumulator device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

Choe, Hwang (Saratoga, CA); Fallas, Thomas T. (Berkeley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

In Situ Studies of the Active Sites for the Water Gas Shift Reaction over Cu-CeO2 Catalysts: Complex Interaction Between Metallic Copper and Oxygen Vacancies of Ceria  

SciTech Connect

New information about the active sites for the water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Cu-CeO{sub 2} systems was obtained using in-situ, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TR-XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS, Cu K and Ce L3 edges), and infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Cu-CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by a novel reversed microemulsion method (doped Ce1-xCuxO2 sample) and an impregnation method (impregnated CuO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} sample) were studied. The results from all of the samples indicate that both metallic copper and oxygen vacancies in ceria were involved in the generation of active sites for the WGS reaction. Evidence was found for a synergistic Cu-O vacancy interaction. This interaction enhances the chemical activity of Cu, and the presence of Cu facilitates the formation of O vacancies in ceria under reaction conditions. Water dissociation occurred on the O vacancy sites or the Cu-O vacancy interface. No significant amounts of formate were formed on the catalysts during the WGS reaction. The presence of strongly bound carbonates is an important factor for the deactivation of the catalysts at high temperatures. This work identifies for the first time the active sites for the WGS reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts and illustrates the importance of in situ structural studies for heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Gas Sensing Optical Gas Sensing Opportunity Research is active on optical sensors integrated with advanced sensing materials for high temperature embedded gas sensing applications. Patent applications have been filed for two inventions in this area and several other methods are currently under development. These technologies are available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Organizations or individuals with capabilities in optical sensor packaging for harsh environment and high temperature applications are encouraged to contact NETL to explore potential collaborative opportunities. Overview Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov

323

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

324

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Alaska (including Lower Cook Inlt) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, September 1980  

SciTech Connect

The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Gulf of Alaska subregion of the Alaska leasing region began in 1967, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. Two lease sales have been held in the subregion. Lease Sale 39, for the Northern Gulf of Alaska, was held on April 13, 1976, and resulted in the leasing of 76 tracts. Lease Sale CI, for Lower Cook Inlet, was held on October 27, 1977, and resulted in the leasing of 87 tracts. Exploratory drilling on the tracts leased in Sale 39 began in September 1976, and exploratory drilling on tracts leased in Sale CI began in July 1978. Commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in any of the wells drilled in either sale area. Seventy-four of the leases issued in the Northern Gulf of Alaska have been relinquished. As of June 1980, exploratory drilling in both areas had ceased, and none was planned for the near future. The next lease sale in the Gulf of Alaska, Sale 55, is scheduled for October 1980. Lease Sale 60 (Lower Cook Inlet and Shelikof Strait) is scheduled for September 1981, and Lease Sale 61 (OCS off Kodiak Island) is scheduled for April 1983. Sale 60 will be coordinated with a State lease sale in adjacent State-owned waters. The most recent estimates (June 1980) by the US Geological Survey of risked, economically recoverable resources for the 2 tracts currently under lease in the Northern Gulf of Alaska are negligible. For the 87 tracts currently under lease in Lower Cook Inlet, the USGS has produced risked, economically recoverable resource estimates of 35 million barrels of oil and 26 billion cubic feet of gas. These resource estimates for the leased tracts in both areas are short of commercially producible amounts. Onshore impacts from OCS exploration have been minimal. Two communities - Yakutat and Seward - served as support bases for the Northern Gulf of Alaska.

Jackson, J.B.; Dorrier, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A- General Provisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

329

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

330

Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This Act establishes The Department of Environmental Quality as the designated official agency of the State of Oklahoma for all regulatory activities for the use of atomic energy and sources of radiation, except for the use of sources of radiation by diagnostic x-ray facilities. It also states rules for permits and fees related to the establishment of standards for safe levels of protection against radiation; the maintenance and submission of records; the determination, prevention and control of radiation hazards; the reporting of radiation accidents; the handling,

331

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

333

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

334

Filament seasoning and its effect on the chemistry prevailing in hot filament activated gas mixtures used in diamond chemical vapour deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TS, UK b Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK c Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow, Russia Available online 18 June 2007 diamond [1­3]. Attrac- tions of HF ­ compared with microwave or DC arc jet ­ activation include low cost

Bristol, University of

335

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS  

SciTech Connect

Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

Clark, E.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

339

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007 contract increased in price by $0.29 per MMBtu on the week to $6.352. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,840 Bcf as of Friday, July 27. This level of working gas in underground storage exceeds the maximum level of the previous 5 years. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.75 per barrel on the week to $76.49 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now more than double the price of natural gas at $13.19 per MMBtu.

340

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

SciTech Connect

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System  

SciTech Connect

The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed. Similarly, if a fire were to break out anywhere in the D-ZERO Hall, fire sensors would stop the output of all flammable gas manifolds within the gas shed, by unpowering electrically controlled solenoid valves that are normally closed in the event of a power failure. Fire sensor contacts have not yet been installed.

Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Laboratory experiments aimed at evaluating gas flux sampling methods The value of using the noble gas suite in transport studies is made obvious by the eight-fold enrichment in 4Her132Xe observed in the 80% CO sample (Table 2 1), relative to abundancies in air. Our results at least show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state values. On-site measurements other than CO2 flux could

343

Radiation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Landfill Gas Generation and Transport In Bioreactor Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activation gas and water flow each other in Bioreactor Landfill. Based on the porous media seepage and ... of water and waste components decomposition for describing landfill gas flow have been developed, and...

Qi-Lin Feng; Lei Liu; Qiang Xue; Ying Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Towards an optimum design of a P-MOS radiation detector for use in high-energy medical photon beams and neutron facilities: analysis of activation materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......phantom surrounded by water-filled containers extending...depth of maximum dose in water for a 10 cm 10 cm square...all irradiations. The atmospheric pressure and internal...acetone and distilled water. They were then transferred...neutrons from a D-T generator. Table 1. Activation......

Robert A. Price

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Abstract 4204: Chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure of mouse skin activates GATA and PAX families of transcription factors, which regulate expression of cell survival genes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...9/10, PAX-4, LH-2/lim-1, NF-4FA, NCAM BP, WTI, E12, EBP40/45, CEA, MUSF) were activated compared to...CTCF, MyoD, KBF-A, PPAR, HOXD9/10, Myb, RSRFC4, PYR, WTI, MZF, SAA, COUP-TF, CCAC, EGR, E2F-1, NF-E1/YY-1...

Mohammad S. Jamal; Bilal B. Hafeez; Ajit K. Verma

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Lack of Radiation-induced Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Prevents Enhanced Reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus and Is Linked to Non-Cancer Proneness in Xeroderma Pigmentosum Patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...requires ODC activity, but does not lead to entry of S-phase...espe cially because EM, which does not differ between XPER@ and...effect in the skin, although it does not cause cancer in other organs...K. Weisburger(eds.), Handbook ofCarcinogen Testing. pp...

Carrol Terleth; Theo van Laar; Ron Schouten; Harry van Steeg; Hennie Hodemaekers; Thera Wormhoudt; Paulien D. M. Cornelissen-Steijger; Peter J. Abrahams; and Alex J. van der Eb

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gas-phase activation of silane, disilane and germane by actinide ions; and collision induced dissociation of metal oxide ions in TOF-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas-phase reactions of selected actinide metal ions, An+, with silane, disilane and germane under minimally hyperthermal conditions were studied using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOF-MS). Both U+ and Np+ reacted with silane while Pu+ was comparatively inert. The primary reactions with silane yielded the silylenes, AnSiH2+; secondary reactions gave AnSi2H4+ and AnSi2H2+ (An=U, Np). With disilane, single- and double-dehydrogenation by An+ produced AnSi2H4+ and AnSi2H2+ for An=U and Np, while Pu+ and Am+ were inert. Oxo-ligation rendered plutonium reactive towards silane: UO+, NpO+ and PuO+ each dehydrogenated disilane to give AnOSi2H4+. With germane, selected lanthanide ions, M+?Ln+, were studied along with M+?An+. Germylenes, MGeH2+, were formed for M=Th, U, Np, Pu, Ce and Tb, while Am+ and Tm+ were inert. Secondary products were MGe2+ (M=Th, U, Np, Ce and Tb), ThGe3+ and ThGe4+. The results are assessed in the context of the electronic structures and energetics of the actinide (and lanthanide) ions. For comparison and to confirm consistency with previous studies, a few reactions of CH4 and C2H6 with actinide ions were examined. The nature of anomalous peaks at ion flight times corresponding to “tetrahydride” ions, “AnH4,” upon introduction of both reactive and inert gases into the reaction region was examined in detail. It was concluded that these aberrant peaks were due to high-energy collision induced dissociation of actinide oxide ions, AnO+, in the first field-free region of the RTOF-MS. The identification of this dissociation phenomenon nullifies a previous report of actinide hydride ions produced by reactions of An+ with ethylene oxide.

John K. Gibson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Comparison of codes assessing galactic cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the galactic cosmic radiation. Results are provided...fully satisfactory for radiation protection purposes...Protection and Nuclear Safety, F-92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses...Computer Simulation Cosmic Radiation Europe Humans Occupational...instrumentation methods Software Solar Activity...

J. F. Bottollier-Depois; P. Beck; B. Bennett; L. Bennett; R. Bütikofer; I. Clairand; L. Desorgher; C. Dyer; E. Felsberger; E. Flückiger; A. Hands; P. Kindl; M. Latocha; B. Lewis; G. Leuthold; T. Maczka; V. Mares; M. J. McCall; K. O'Brien; S. Rollet; W. Rühm; F. Wissmann

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Folded-path optical analysis gas cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

radiation detection  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for the system's sustainability through operations and maintenance training, and "train-the-trainer" activities.

NNSA's SLD program works to strengthen the capabilities...

354

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

355

Active Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry hydrogen can be activated in an electric discharge if the pressure and voltage are carefully regulated. Active hydrogen reduces metallic sulphides whose heat of formation is 22 000 cal. or less. The active gas is decomposed by 3 cm of well packed glass wool. A quantitative method is given for the determination of active hydrogen. Less of the active gas is formed in a tube coated with stearic acid or phosphoric acid than when no coating is employed. The decay reaction was found to follow the expression for a unimolecular reaction. The rate of decay appears to be independent of the wall surface. The period of half?life at room temperature and 40 mm pressure is 0.2 sec. approximately. The energy of formation of active hydrogen is approximately 18 000 cal. The energy of activation for the decay of the active constituent is approximately 17 800 cal. The properties of active hydrogen are considered in relation to the properties predicted for H3.

A. C. Grubb; A. B. Van Cleave

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-Ceria Systems for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction: In Situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeO{sub x} nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

Barrio, L.; Estrella, M; Zhou, G; Wen, W; Hanson, J; Hungria, A; Hornes, A; Fernandez-Garcia, M; Martinez-Arias, A; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-ceria Systems for the Water Gas Shift Reaction: In-situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeOx nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Barrio, L.; Estrella, M.; Zhou, G.; Wen, W.; Hanson, J.C.; Hungría, A.B.; Hornés, A.; Fernández-García, M.; Arturo Martínez-Arias, A.

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural gas monthly, September 1991. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production distribution consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and slightly lower prices for crude oil led to an easing of natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 3. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 3-10), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1.0 percent, to $6.50. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains. The NYMEX contract for June delivery increased 29.4 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.900 yesterday (May 10). Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,989 Bcf as of Friday, May 5, which is 56.0 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.11 per barrel on the week to $72.15 per barrel, or $12.44 per MMBtu.

362

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) 25, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 17-24), as moderate weather prevailed across much of the Lower 48 States. Although tropical storms entering the Gulf of Mexico production region-evidenced by a system currently moving through the Caribbean-could still disrupt supplies, the passing of at least the most active part of the hurricane season may help explain the price declines. On the week the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.01 per MMBtu to $6.10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant decreases. The futures contract for November delivery declined about 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.972. Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture ahead of the winter heating season. As of Friday, October 19, working gas in storage was 3,443 Bcf, which is 7.2 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.11 per barrel, ending trading yesterday at $88.30, or $15.22 per MMBtu.

363

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenação de Astronomia e Astrofísica, Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino, 77, São Cristóvão 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Física Teórica, Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Maracanã 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Medical applications of synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

366

CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-35, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate occupational radiation protection programs against DOE policy, standards, and regulatory requirements. The approach includes evaluation of essential programmatic elements of radiation protection programs with additional emphasis on implementation of the core functions of integrated safety management. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012

367

Radiation transport coupled particle-in-cell simulation of low-pressure inductive discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-120, South Korea J. P. Verboncoeur Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley of mercury causes disposal and environmental problems, rare gas mixture or rare gas­ halogen mixtures is warranted. The radiation trapping effect plays an important role in dis- charges using resonance radiation

Lee, Hae June

368

The HERMES Dual-Radiator Ring Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The instrument uses two radiators, C 4 F 10 , a heavy uorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected

369

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

'PGTI[+PHQTOCVKQP#FOKPKUVTCVKQP0CVWTCN)CU/QPVJN[/CTEJ 'PGTI[+PHQTOCVKQP#FOKPKUVTCVKQP0CVWTCN)CU/QPVJN[/CTEJ EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series William Trapmann and Phil Shambaugh Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status. They are assessed directly for trends, as well as in combination with other measures to assess the productivity and profitability of upstream industry operations. They are a major reference point for policymakers at both the Federal and State level. Users in the private sector include financial

370

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

J. Dimock

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

A compact pyrodetector for measuring the radiation energy of pulsed plasma light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A compact noise-resistant pyroelectric calorimeter has been developed in which radiation is spectrally selected by quartz and inert-gas filters. The calorimeter is ...

Bedrin, A G; Vorypaev, G G; Golubev, E M; Zhilin, A N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, P.H.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Natural gas dehydration by desiccant materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water vapor in a natural gas stream can result in line plugging due to hydrate formation, reduction of line capacity due to collection of free water in the line, and increased risk of damage to the pipeline due to the corrosive effects of water. Therefore, water vapor must be removed from natural gas to prevent hydrate formation and corrosion from condensed water. Gas dehydration is the process of removing water vapor from a gas stream to lower the temperature at which water will condense from the stream; this temperature is called the “dew point” of the gas. Molecular sieves are considered as one of the most important materials that are used as desiccant materials in industrial natural gas dehydration. This work shows a study of natural gas dehydration using 3A molecular sieve as a type of solid desiccant materials, the scope of this work was to build up a pilot scale unit for a natural gas dehydration as simulation of actual existing plant for Egyptian Western Desert Gas Company (WDGC). The effect of different operating conditions (water vapor concentration and gas flow rate) on dehydration of natural gas was studied. The experimental setup consists of cylinder filled with 3A molecular sieve to form a fixed bed, then pass through this bed natural gas with different water vapor concentration, The experimental setup is fitted with facilities to control bed pressure, flow rate, measure water vapor concentration and bed temperature, a gas heater was used to activate molecular sieve bed. Increasing water vapor concentration in inlet feed gas leads to a marked decrease in dehydration efficiency. As expected, a higher inlet flow rate of natural gas decrease dehydration efficiency. Increasing feed pressure leads to higher dehydration efficiency.

Hassan A.A. Farag; Mustafa Mohamed Ezzat; Hoda Amer; Adel William Nashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

378

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

380

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

382

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

383

85Kr management trade-offs: a perspective to total radiation dose commitment  

SciTech Connect

Radiological consequences arising from the trade-offs for /sup 85/Kr waste management from possible nuclear fuel resource recovery activities have been investigated. The reference management technique is to release all the waste gas to the atmosphere where it is diluted and dispersed. A potential alternative is to collect, concentrate, package and submit the gas to long-term storage. This study compares the radiation dose commitment to the public and to the occupationally exposed work force from these alternatives. The results indicate that it makes little difference to the magnitude of the world population dose whether /sup 85/Kr is captured and stored or chronically released to the environment. Further, comparisons of radiation exposures (for the purpose of estimating health effects) at very low dose rates to very large populations with exposures to a small number of occupationally exposed workers who each receive much higher dose rates may be misleading. Finally, cost studies (EPA 1976 and DOE 1979a) show that inordinate amounts of money will be required to lower this already extremely small 80-year cumulative world population dose of 0.05 mrem/person (<0.001% of natural background radiation for the same time period).

Mellinger, P.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Greenborg, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

385

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

386

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

387

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

388

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

389

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Pacific hurricane activity. EIA Releases Overview of the Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2006: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a special report on...

390

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

391

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique...

392

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration...

393

Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application to Crystal University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook N.Y. 11794 ABSTRACT Radiative heat transfer plays simulating radiative heat transfer in the crystal and in the region above the melt containing gas under

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

394

Project: (version of January 28, 2009) Sparse tensor product methods for radiative transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulating a dense gas at very high temperatures, energy transport by means of radiation has to be taken into account. However, as even the non-scattering stationary monochromatic radiative transfer equation s · x. Applying an adaptive sparse discretiza- tion to the radiative transfer equation [1] allows to significantly

Hiptmair, Ralf

395

APEX-CHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects: IV. Mechanical and radiative feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the embedded stage of star formation, bipolar molecular outflows and UV radiation from the protostar are important feedback processes. Our aim is to quantify the feedback, mechanical and radiative, for a large sample of low-mass sources. The outflow activity is compared to radiative feedback in the form of UV heating by the accreting protostar to search for correlations and evolutionary trends. Large-scale maps of 26 young stellar objects, which are part of the Herschel WISH key program are obtained using the CHAMP+ instrument on the APEX (12CO and 13CO 6-5), and the HARP-B instrument on the JCMT (12CO and 13CO 3-2). Maps are used to determine outflow parameters and envelope models are used to quantify the amount of UV-heated gas and its temperature from 13CO 6-5 observations. All sources in our sample show outflow activity and the outflow force, F_CO, is larger for Class 0 sources than for Class I sources, even if their luminosities are comparable. The outflowing gas typically extends to much greater ...

Y?ld?z, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Karska, Agata; Belloche, Arnaud; Endo, Akira; Frieswijk, Wilfred; Güsten, Rolf; van Kempen, Tim A; Leurini, Silvia; Nagy, Zsofia; Pérez-Beaupuits, Juan-Pablo; Risacher, Christophe; van der Marel, Nienke; van Weeren, Reinout J; Wyrowski, Friedrich

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forum Forum Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) supports development and deployment of commercially competitive natural gas engines, vehicles, and infrastructure. Learn about NGVTF's purpose, activities, meetings, stakeholders, steering committee, and webinars. Purpose Led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission, NGVTF unites a diverse group of stakeholders to: Share information and resources Identify natural gas engine, vehicle, and infrastructure technology targets Facilitate government-industry research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) to achieve targets Communicate high-priority needs of natural gas vehicle end users to natural gas equipment and vehicle manufacturers

397

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-2000 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-2000. Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.5 MB Front Matter . Historical Natural Gas Annual Cover Page, Preface, Common Abbreviations Used, and Table of Contents PDF . . Tables . 1 Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1998 PDF

398

Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Resources on Greenhouse Gas October 7, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis Many helpful resources about greenhouse gases (GHG) are available. Also see Contacts. GHG Reporting and Accounting Tools Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report: Lists resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist agencies with completing comprehensive GHG inventory reporting requirements under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514. General Services Administration (GSA) Carbon Footprint and Green Procurement Tool: Voluntary tool developed by GSA to assist agencies in managing GHGs as required by E.O. 13514. Also see Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools.

399

Effect of Ni/Al atomic ratio of mesoporous Ni–Al2O3 aerogel catalysts on their catalytic activity for hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoporous Ni–Al2O3 (XNiAE) aerogel catalysts with different Ni/Al atomic ratio (X) were prepared by a single-step sol-gel method and a subsequent CO2 supercritical drying method. The effect of Ni/Al atomic ratio of mesoporous \\{XNiAE\\} aerogel catalysts on their physicochemical properties and catalytic activity for steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) was investigated. Textural properties and chemical properties of \\{XNiAE\\} catalysts were strongly influenced by Ni/Al atomic ratio. Nickel species were highly dispersed on the surface of \\{XNiAE\\} catalysts through the formation of surface nickel aluminate phase. In the steam reforming of LNG, both LNG conversion and hydrogen yield showed volcano-shaped curves with respect to Ni/Al atomic ratio. Average nickel diameter of \\{XNiAl\\} catalysts was well correlated with LNG conversion and hydrogen yield over the catalysts. Among the catalysts tested, 0.35NiAE (Ni/Al = 0.35) catalyst with the smallest average nickel diameter showed the best catalytic performance. The highest surface area, the largest pore volume, the largest average pore size, and the highest reducibility of 0.35NiAE catalyst were also partly responsible for its superior catalytic performance.

Jeong Gil Seo; Min Hye Youn; Yongju Bang; In Kyu Song

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

DETERMINATION OF GUIDANCE VALUES FOR CLOSED LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF GUIDANCE VALUES FOR CLOSED LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS O. BOUR*, S. BERGER**, C Gambetta, 74 000 Annecy SUMMARY: In order to promote active landfill gas collection and treatment or natural attenuation, it is necessary to identify trigger values concerning landfill gas emissions

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

403

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

Sigg, R.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

406

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

408

Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

Proga, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hydrodynamic solutions for a sonoluminescing gas bubble  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytic solutions for a sonoluminescing gas bubble have been obtained which provide density pressure and temperature distributions for the gas inside a bubble oscillating under the ultrasonic field. The solutions have revealed that sonoluminescence should occur just prior to the bubble collapse and its duration is less than 300 ps and that increase and subsequent decrease in the bubble wall acceleration induces the quenching of gas followed by the substantial temperature rise up to 100?000 K which can be regarded as a thermal spike. The gas temperature inside the bubble near collapse is determined primarily by the amount of radiation heat loss. Shock formation during the bubble collapse is questionable because gas density as well as pressure at the bubble center are much greater than those at the bubble wall during this stage. It also turns out that the number of electrons ionized the ion species and the kinetic energy of electrons affect the spectrum of light emission crucially. The spectralradiance calculated is in good agreement with the observed data qualitatively which suggests that the origin of sonoluminescences is bremsstrahlung rather than thermal blackbody radiation. [Work supported by Korea Science and Engineering Foundation.

Ho?Young Kwak; Jung?Hee Na

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Natural gas imports and exports, fourth quarter report 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Natural gas imports and exports, third quarter report 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Natural gas imports and exports, first quarter report 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent reporting quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 22) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 22) Since Wednesday, September 7, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing at least partially to the aftermath of storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) however, prices at the Henry Hub decreased 25 cents, or about 2 percent, to $10.80 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $11.166 per MMBtu, decreasing by only 3.5 cents or about 0.3 percent since last Wednesday (September 7). Natural gas in storage was 2,758 Bcf as of September 9, which is 3.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 82 cents per barrel, or 1.3 percent, since last Wednesday, trading yesterday at $65.20 per barrel or $11.24 per MMBtu.

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 19) 12, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 19) Natural gas spot prices have moved up by 10 to 25 cents at most trading locations since Wednesday, September 4. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.20 per MMBtu to $3.32 as Tropical Storm Fay temporarily threatened Gulf area production activity and late-season high temperatures triggered cooling demand in key market areas. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.057 per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $3.250 yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,855 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by nearly 12.3 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.49 per barrel to $29.77, or $5.13 per MMBtu.

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 21) Since Wednesday, July 6, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing at least partially to the effects of storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 10 cents, or about 1.3 percent, to $7.78 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 13), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.900 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 21 cents or about 3 percent since last Wednesday (July 6). Natural gas in storage was 2,280 Bcf as of July 8, which is 11.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.24 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday, after reaching an all time high of $61.24 per barrel on July 6. Crude oil traded yesterday at $60 per barrel or $10.34 per MMBtu.

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) 13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 6-13), as tropical storms threatened to disrupt supplies and pipeline explosions in Mexico stirred concerns of supply security. Hurricane Humberto is still active near the Texas-Louisiana border at the time of this writing, and Tropical Depression 8 in the South Atlantic is apparently moving toward Puerto Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies have not yet announced significant shut-in production or damage from the weather. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased 32 cents per MMBtu to $6.13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for October delivery rose 63.3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.438. Working gas in storage as of Friday, September 7, was 3,069 Bcf, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recorded yet another record high, increasing $4.11 per barrel on the week to $79.85, or $13.77 per MMBtu.

417

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

418

Understanding the Nuclear Gas Dispersion in Early-Type Galaxies in the Context of Black Hole Demographics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We analyze and model HST /STIS observations of a sample of 27 galaxies; 16 Fanaroff & Riley Type I radio galaxies and 11 (more) normal early-type galaxies. We focus here on what can be learned from the nuclear velocity dispersion (line width) of the gas as a complement to the many studies dealing with gas rotation velocities. We find that the dispersion in a STIS aperture of ~0.1''-0.2'' generally exceeds the large-scale stellar velocity dispersion of the galaxy. This is qualitatively consistent with the presence of central BHs, but raises the question whether the excess gas dispersion is of gravitational or non-gravitational origin and whether the implied BH masses are consistent with our current understanding of BH demography(as predicted by the M-sigma relation between BH mass and stellar velocity dispersion). To address this we construct dynamical models for the gas, both thin disk models and models with more general axis ratios and velocity anisotropies. For the normal galaxies the nuclear gas dispersions are adequately reproduced assuming disks around BHs with masses that follow the M-sigma relation. In contrast, the gas dispersions observed for the radio galaxies generally exceed those predicted by any of the models. We attribute this to the presence of non-gravitational motions in the gas that are similar to or larger than the gravitational motions. The non- gravitational motions are presumably driven by the active galactic nucleus (AGN), but we do not find a relation between the radiative output of the AGN and the non-gravitational dispersion. It is not possible to uniquely determine the BH mass for each galaxy from its nuclear gas dispersion. However, for the sample as a whole the observed dispersions do not provide evidence for significant deviations from the M-sigma relation.

Gijs Verdoes Kleijn; Roeland van der Marel; Jacob Noel-Storr

2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity...

420

Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area...

422

Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

423

Gold, Copper, and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Senanayake, S; Barrio, L; Liu, P; Fdez. Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gold, Copper and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Park, J.B.; Graciani, J.; Evans, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Senanayake, S.D.; Barrio, L.; Liu, P.; Sanz, J.F.; Hrbek, J.

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

Natural Gas Annual, 1999 (HISTORICAL)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 The Natural Gas Annual, 1999 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1999. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1995 to 1999. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1999 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1999, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1995-1999 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1999 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

426

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jul-14 Aug-14 Sep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 Dec-14 View History Rotary Rigs in Operation 1,876 1,904 1,930 1,924 1,925 1,882 1973-2014 By Site Onshore 1,819 1,842 1,866 1,867 1,872 1,824...

427

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 Sep-14 Oct-14 Nov-14 View History Rotary Rigs in Operation 1,861 1,876 1,904 1,930 1,924 1,925 1973-2014 By Site Onshore 1,804 1,819 1,842 1,866 1,867 1,872...

428

Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, authorizes DOE to protect the health and safety of the public against radiation. It is the Department's objective to operate its facilities and conduct activities so that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment are maintained as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA), within limits established in DOE O 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.

429

Molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the central region of nearby 3CR radio galaxies (z$gas content is below 10$^9$ \\msun. Their individual CO emission exhibit, for 5 cases, a double-horned line profile that is characteristic of an inclined rotating disk with a central depression at the rising part of its rotation curve. The inferred disk or ring distributions of the molecular gas is consistent with the observed presence of dust disks or rings detected optically in the cores of the galaxies. We reason that if their gas originates from the mergers of two gas-rich disk galaxies, as has been invoked to explain the molecular gas in other radio galaxies, then these galaxies must have merged a long time ago (few Gyr or more) but their remnant elliptical galaxies only recently (last 10$^7$ years or less) become active radio galaxies. Instead, we argue the the cannibalism of gas-rich galaxies provide a simpler explanation for the origin of molecular gas in the elliptical hosts of radio galaxies (Lim et al. 2000). Given the transient nature of their observed disturbances, these galaxies probably become active in radio soon after the accretion event when sufficient molecular gas agglomerates in their nuclei.

S. Leon; J. Lim; F. Combes; D. Van-Trung

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Christopher W. Klein (1 January 2007) Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_(Klein,_2007)&oldid=689399"

432

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

433

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

434

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

435

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

436

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

437

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

438

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

439

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

440

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

442

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

443

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

444

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

445

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

446

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

447

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

448

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

449

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

450

Numerical Simulations of Radiatively-Driven Dusty Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation pressure on dust grains may be an important mechanism in driving winds in a wide variety of astrophysical systems. However, the efficiency of the coupling between the radiation field and the dusty gas is poorly understood in environments characterized by high optical depths like those in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and massive dense star clusters. We present a series of idealized numerical experiments, performed with the radiation-hydrodynamic code \\textsc{orion}, in which we study the dynamics of such winds and quantify their properties. We find that, after wind acceleration begins, radiation Rayleigh-Taylor instability forces the gas into a configuration that reduces the rate of momentum transfer from the radiation field to the gas by a factor ~ 10 - 100 compared to an estimate based on the optical depth at the base of the atmosphere; instead, the rate of momentum transfer from a driving radiation field of luminosity L to the gas is roughly L/c multiplied by half the optical depth at...

Krumholz, Mark R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Radiation Therapy with Tositumomab (B1) Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody Initiates Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase–Dependent Cell Death that Overcomes Resistance to Apoptosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software (MediaCybernetics...Microsoft Excel or SPSS 13 software (SPSS, Inc.). Results...U0126 on tositumomab and radiation-induced additive cell...et al. Efficacy and safety of tositumomab and iodine-131...2005;23:712-9. Radiation therapy with tositumomab...

Andrey Ivanov; Sergei Krysov; Mark S. Cragg; and Tim Illidge

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation  

SciTech Connect

A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

456

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky) Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky) Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department For Natural Resources Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any oil shale operation, these regulations govern natural gas operations throughout the state. The following information is found in KAR title 404 chapter 30: Oil shale operations or related activity require a valid permit covering

458

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

459

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

460

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

462

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

463

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

464

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

469

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

470

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

472

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

473

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Digg

475

Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

476

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

478

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

479

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiatively active gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Post-accident gas generation from radiolysis of organic materials  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology for estimating the gas generation rates resulting from radiolysis of organic materials in paints and electrical cable insulation inside a nuclear reactor containment building under design basis accident conditions. The methodology was based on absorption of the radiation energies from the post-accident fission products and the assumed gas yields of the irradiated materials. A sample calculation was made using conservative assumptions, plant-specific data of a nuclear power plant, and a radiation source term which took into account the time-dependent release and physico-chemical behavior of the fission products.

Wing, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Effects of a Supermassive Black Hole Binary on a Nuclear Gas Disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study influence of a galactic central supermassive black hole (SMBH) binary on gas dynamics and star formation activity in a nuclear gas disk by making three-dimensional Tree+SPH simulations. Due to orbital motions of SMBHs, there are various resonances between gas motion and the SMBH binary motion. We have shown that these resonances create some characteristic structures of gas in the nuclear gas disk, for examples, gas elongated or filament structures, formation of gaseous spiral arms, and small gas disks around SMBHs. In these gaseous dense regions, active star formations are induced. As the result, many star burst regions are formed in the nuclear region.

Hidenori Matsui; Asao Habe; Takayuki R. Saitoh

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

483

The United States has significant natural gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States has significant natural gas United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection. The goal of these activities has been to not only help overcome

484

A COMPARISON OF RADIATION USE EFFICIENCY BETWEEN TWO SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN FORESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), intercepted photosynthetically active solar radiation (IPAR), and radiation use efficiency ( =PP/IPAR) betweenA COMPARISON OF RADIATION USE EFFICIENCY BETWEEN TWO SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN FORESTS by LUKE A. PANGLE influence the photosynthetic radiation use efficiency (PhRUE) of forest canopies. The mixed deciduous forest

Teskey, Robert O.

485

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

486

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

487

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

488

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

489

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

491

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

492

ANL Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities of the DOD Activities of the DOD Project Office focus today on the Navy's Free Electron Laser Program Argonne Accelerator Institute Meeting June 16, 2009 2 Several Beam Activities and Interests Ongoing  Terahertz sources and applications  Navy Free Electron Laser (Focus area today)  Free Electron Laser Applications  Electromagnetic Interference Technology Review Committees  Novel Fiber Optic Materials with Army Research Lab  Optical Diagnostics for next-generation light sources  Neutron detection schemes  NATO Sensors and Electronics Panel, international field tests of directed energy source applications  Controls  Radiation Oncology 3 Background, Naval Directed Energy History The U.S Navy has been investigating utility of lasers since the 1960's and the

493

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

494

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From