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1

Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application to Crystal University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook N.Y. 11794 ABSTRACT Radiative heat transfer plays simulating radiative heat transfer in the crystal and in the region above the melt containing gas under

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

2

A dynamic multi-scale model for transient radiative transfer calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) or the diffusion equation (DE). The RTE is a kinetic transport equation-scale model which couples the transient radiative transfer equation (RTE) and the diffusion equation (DE: transient radiative transfer, multi-scale model, finite volume method, diffusion equation, domain

Boyer, Edmond

3

HELIOS-K: An Ultrafast, Open-source Opacity Calculator for Radiative Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an ultrafast opacity calculator for application to exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name HELIOS-K. It takes a line list as an input, computes the shape of each spectral line (e.g., a Voigt profile) and provides an option for grouping an enormous number of lines into a manageable number of bins. We implement a combination of Algorithm 916 and Gauss-Hermite quadrature to compute the Voigt profile, write the code in CUDA and optimise the computation for graphics processing units (GPUs). We use the k-distribution method to reduce $\\sim 10^5$ to $10^8$ lines to $\\sim 10$ to $10^4$ wavenumber bins, which may then be used for radiative transfer, atmospheric retrieval and general circulation models. We demonstrate that the resampling of the k-distribution function, within each bin, is an insignificant source of error across a broad range of wavenumbers and column masses. By contrast, the choice of line-wing cutoff for the Voigt profile is a significant source of error and affects the value of the compute...

Grimm, Simon L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

A 3D radiative transfer framework: II. line transfer problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higher resolution telescopes as well as 3D numerical simulations will require the development of detailed 3D radiative transfer calculations. Building upon our previous work we extend our method to include both continuum and line transfer. We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in 3D static atmospheres. The scattering problem for line transfer is solved via means of an operator splitting (OS) technique. The formal solution is based on a long-characteristics method. The approximate $\\Lambda$ operator is constructed considering nearest neighbors {\\em exactly}. The code is parallelized over both wavelength and solid angle using the MPI library. We present the results of several test cases with different values of the thermalization parameter and two choices for the temperature structure. The results are directly compared to 1D spherical tests. With our current grid setup the interior resolution is much lower in 3D than in 1D, nevertheless the 3D results agree very well with the well-tested 1D calculations. We show that with relatively simple parallelization that the code scales to very large number of processors which is mandatory for practical applications. Advances in modern computers will make realistic 3D radiative transfer calculations possible in the near future. Our current code scales to very large numbers of processors, but requires larger memory per processor at high spatial resolution.

E. Baron; Peter H. Hauschildt

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.4 Transport equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 The equation for radiative transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad van

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

8

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, "A fast forward solver of radiative transfer equation," Transport Theory and Statistical Physics 38Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation Part 1: l1 approach for bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation with the emphasis on improving

Soatto, Stefano

10

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Multi-model Preconditioning for Radiative Transfer Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, multigrid, radiative transfer, neutron transport, linear Boltzmann equation 2000 MSC: 65N22, 85A25, 65N30 1 and radiation dominated regions must be combined. Since the character of the equation is very different in those of the monochromatic radiative transfer problem leads to a diffusion equation, approximating the radiative transfer

13

Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Microwave radiative transfer in the mixed-phase regions of tropical rainfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on an RTM. To accomplish this, we examined data taken by the Convair-580 aircraft during the KWAJEX (Kwajalein Experiment). In order to calculate radiative transfer, the AMMR (Airborne Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer) data were combined with radiosonde...

Jin, Kyoung-Wook

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation Part 2: total variation with both l1 and total- variation norm for bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation, Radiative Transfer (Dover Publications, 1960). 14. K. M. Case and P. F. PF Zweifel, Linear Transport Theory

Soatto, Stefano

16

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 72 (2002) 691713  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Equation of radiative transfer; Transport theory; Photon propagation; Scattering media; Discrete.elsevier.com/locate/jqsrt Optical tomography using the time-independent equation of radiative transfer -- Part 1: forward model optical tomographic imaging algorithm that is based on the equation of radiative transfer. Using

Hielscher, Andreas

17

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS A. Kersch1 W. Moroko2 A. Schuster1 1Siemens of Quasi-Monte Carlo to this problem. 1.1 Radiative Heat Transfer Reactors In the manufacturing of the problems which can be solved by such a simulation is high accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer

18

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASIMONTE CARLO METHODS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI­MONTE CARLO METHODS \\Lambda A. Kersch 1 W. Morokoff 2 A accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer from the heater to the wafer. Figure 1 shows the draft Carlo simulation is often used to solve radiative transfer problems where complex physical phenomena

19

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 98 (2006) 220237  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discontinuities associated with the propagation of a radiation front in transient radiation transport. r 2005 q heat flux s geometric path length S source term in the radiative transfer equation t time tc timeJournal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 98 (2006) 220­237 Modified method

Pilon, Laurent

20

Calculating reactor transfer functions by Pade approximation via Lanczos algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating reactor transfer functions by PadeÃ? approximation via Lanczos algorithm Zhifeng Kuang a function of a reactor, i.e. the neutron noise induced by a localised perturbation is calculated in one, *,1 , Imre PaÃ? zsit a , Axel Ruhe b a Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University of Technology

Pázsit, Imre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 91 (2005) 2746  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in the field of transport phenomena simulation, and more specifically in the field of radiative (application of the reciprocity principle to the integral form of the radiative transfer equation), and to netJournal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 91 (2005) 27­46 A boundary-based net

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

22

Radiative Transfer in Interacting Media J.Kenneth Shultis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear energy. Today, radiative transport plays an important role in many other areas besides nuclear, and many others. 1.1 Radiative Transfer Regimes The transport of radiant energy through a medium falls shielding analyses, the radiative transfer equation is linear, and a wealth of numerical techniques exist

Shultis, J. Kenneth

23

A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

Davis, Shane W. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 73 (2002) 159168  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dependence of radiative transport due to the large but ÿnite speed of radiation propagation must be incorporated usion approximation is often used to describe the transient radiation transport [5]. However, recent the fully transient radiative transfer equation. Kumar et al. [8] and Kumar and Mitra [9] were among

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

25

NUMERICAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASYMPTOTIC, DIFFUSION DOMINATED MASS-TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN PACKED BED REACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculations for the Asymptotic, Diffusion Dominated Mass-Transfer Coefficient in Packed Bed Reactors

Fedkiw, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Two-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative transfer equation has been derived with full mathematical rigor [13,14]. In the case the wave nature of the process and is not just about energy transport. Hence the governing equation cannotTwo-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution Albert C. Fannjiang* Department

Fannjiang, Albert

27

Investigation of the Accuracy of Calculation Methods for Conduction Transfer Functions of Building Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USA lxq9031@yahoo.com.cn Abstract: Conduction transfer functions (CTFs) are widely used to calculate conduction heat transfer in building cooling load and energy calculations. They can conveniently fit into any load and energy calculation...

Chen, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, Q.; Spitler, J.; Fisher, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 94 (2005) 357371  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rights reserved. Keywords: Time dependent radiation transport; M1 approximation; Multigroup models; Mean that solve the radiative transfer equation at a low cost. Among these models, we find diffusion, flux this equation, see [3] and [4]. The first three angular moments of the radiative intensity are defined as Eðn

Coudière, Yves

29

COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Four Numerical Approaches for Solving the Radiative Transfer Equation in Magnetized White-Dwarf Atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare four different methods to calculate radiative transfer through a magnetized stellar atmosphere, and apply them to the case of magnetic white dwarfs. All methods are numerically stable enough to allow determination of the magnetic field structure, but distinctions between faster, simplifying, methods, and elaborate, but more CPU-time consuming, methods, can be made.

Stefan Jordan; Holger Schmidt

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

Enhanced radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates in the framework of the scattering theory. We predict an enhancement of the heat transfer as we increase the depth of the corrugations while keeping the distance of closest approach fixed. We interpret this effect in terms of the evolution of plasmonic and guided modes as a function of the grating's geometry.

R. Guérout; J. Lussange; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -P. Hugonin; D. A. R. Dalvit; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Discrete Ordinate Method for Solving Inhomogeneous Vector Radiative Transfer Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paper.. This type of equation appears when modeling radiative transport in plane parallel media. WeDiscrete Ordinate Method for Solving Inhomogeneous Vector Radiative Transfer Equation We describe here a solution method for equations of the type given by: µ I(,µ) +I(,µ)- () 2 1 -1 Z(,µ,µ )I(,µ )dµ

Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

33

Di usion Approximation of Radiative Transfer Equations in a Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

direction. 1 #12; 1 Introduction Radiative transport equations were #12;rst used to describe the propagationDi#11;usion Approximation of Radiative Transfer Equations in a Channel Guillaume Bal Department by a di#11;usion equation. However, the thickness of the crust is of the order of the transport mean free

Bal, Guillaume

34

Heat transfer including radiation and slag particles evolution in MHD channel-I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of convective and radiative heat transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic channel are provided. Calculations performed for a base load-size channel indicate that heat transfer by gas radiation almost equals that by convection for smooth walls, and amounts to 70% as much as the convective heat transfer for rough walls. Carbon dioxide, water vapor, and potassium atoms are the principal participating gases. The evolution of slag particles by homogeneous nucleation and condensation is also investigated. The particle-size spectrum so computed is later utilized to analyze the radiation enhancement by slag particles in the MHD diffuser. The impact of the slag particle spectrum on the selection of a workable and design of an efficient seed collection system is discussed.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Numerical methods for multidimensional radiative transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation plays a key role in various scientific applications, such as combustion physics, thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. The equa- tion describing the transport of photons or neutrons through a medium

36

Debris Disk Radiative Transfer Simulation Tool (DDS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A WWW interface for the simulation of spectral energy distributions of optically thin dust configurations with an embedded radiative source is presented. The density distribution, radiative source, and dust parameters can be selected either from an internal database or defined by the user. This tool is optimized for studying circumstellar debris disks where large grains are expected to determine the far-infrared through millimeter dust reemission spectral energy distribution. The tool is available at http://aida28.mpia-hd.mpg.de/~swolf/dds

S. Wolf; L. A. Hillenbrand

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Virtual detector of synchrotron radiation (VDSR) - A C++ parallel code for particle tracking and radiation calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation (VDSR) is a parallel C++ code developed to calculate the incoherent radiation from a single charged particle or a beam moving in given external electro-magnetic fields. In this proceedings the code structure and features are introduced. An example of radiation generation from the betatron motion of a beam in the focusing fields of the wake in a laser-plasma accelerator is presented.

Rykovanov, S. G.; Chen, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

39

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 104 (2007) 384399  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thickness, the single scattering albedo of the materials, and the incident pulse width have been developed inversion schemes accounting for anisotropic scattering. r 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords is the so-called radiative transfer equation (RTE). It expresses an energy balance in a unit solid angle d

Pilon, Laurent

40

Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

Dana E. Veron

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had two primary goals: 1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and 2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed below.

Veron, Dana E

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Three-dimensional calculation of field emission from carbon nanotubes using a transfer-matrix methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional calculation of field emission from carbon nanotubes using a transfer- matrix simulations of field emission from carbon nanotubes, using a transfer-matrix methodology. By repeating field, as shown by recent ab-initio calculations [10]. To study field emission from carbon nanotubes, we

Mayer, Alexandre

43

Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez; Wang-Kong Tse; Diego A. R. Dalvit

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Three-dimensional optical tomography with the equation of radiative transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a transport-backtransport method applied to the two-dimensional time-dependent equation of radiative transferThree-dimensional optical tomography with the equation of radiative transfer Gassan S. Abdoulaev reconstruction scheme that is based on the time-independent equation of radiative transfer (ERT) and allows

Hielscher, Andreas

45

Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems. Signature Date 3 #12;Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG

Salvaggio, Carl

46

Radiative heat transfer in a hydrous mantle transition zone Sylvia-Monique Thomas a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transfer in a hydrous mantle transition zone Sylvia-Monique Thomas a,n , Craig R contribute significantly to heat transfer in the mantle and demonstrate the importance of radiative heat, radiative heat transfer was considered relatively unimportant in the mantle. Earlier experimental work

Jacobsen, Steven D.

47

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source P. Boulet - mail Pascal.Boulet@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr Keywords : heat transfer, radiative transfer, vaporization, convection, water spray Abstract Heat transfer inside a participating medium, made of droplets flowing in gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Heat transfer performance of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heat transfer and absorption characteristics of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation are theoretically investigated. Since the heat loss ratio of the infrared radiation has maximum at moderate energy flux, the heat absorption efficiency will first increase and then decrease with the incident energy flux. The local absorption efficiency will increase with the flow velocity, while the wall temperature drops quickly. Because of the unilateral concentrated solar radiation and different incident angle, the heat transfer is uneven along the circumference. Near the perpendicularly incident region, the wall temperature and absorption efficiency slowly approaches to the maximum, while the absorption efficiency sharply drops near the parallelly incident region. The calculation results show that the heat transfer parameters calculated from the average incident energy flux have a good agreement with the average values of the circumference under different boundary conditions. For the whole pipe with coating of Pyromark, the absorption efficiency of the main region is above 85%, and only the absorption efficiency near the parallelly incident region is below 80%. In general, the absorption efficiency of the whole pipe increases with flow velocity rising and pipe length decreasing, and it approaches to the maximum at optimal concentrated solar flux. (author)

Jianfeng, Lu; Jing, Ding [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jianping, Yang [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of the Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite-observed radiance is a nonlinear functional of surface properties and atmospheric temperature and absorbing gas profiles as described by the radiative transfer equation (RTE). In the era of hyperspectral sounders with thousands of high-resolution channels, the computation of the radiative transfer model becomes more time-consuming. The radiative transfer model performance in operational numerical weather prediction systems still limits the number of channels we can use in hyperspectral sounders to only a few hundreds. To take the full advantage of such high-resolution infrared observations, a computationally efficient radiative transfer model is needed to facilitate satellite data assimilation. In recent years the programmable commodity graphics processing unit (GPU) has evolved into a highly parallel, multi-threaded, many-core processor with tremendous computational speed and very high memory bandwidth. The radiative transfer model is very suitable for the GPU implementation to take advantage of the hardware's efficiency and parallelism where radiances of many channels can be calculated in parallel in GPUs. In this paper, we develop a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched in 2006 onboard the first European meteorological polar-orbiting satellites, METOP-A. Each IASI spectrum has 8461 spectral channels. The IASI radiative transfer model consists of three modules. The first module for computing the regression predictors takes less than 0.004% of CPU time, while the second module for transmittance computation and the third module for radiance computation take approximately 92.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Our GPU-based IASI radiative transfer model is developed to run on a low-cost personal supercomputer with four GPUs with total 960 compute cores, delivering near 4 TFlops theoretical peak performance. By massively parallelizing the second and third modules, we reached 364x speedup for 1 GPU and 1455x speedup for all 4 GPUs, both with respect to the original CPU-based single-threaded Fortran code with the -O{sub 2} compiling optimization. The significant 1455x speedup using a computer with four GPUs means that the proposed GPU-based high-performance forward model is able to compute one day's amount of 1,296,000 IASI spectra within nearly 10 min, whereas the original single CPU-based version will impractically take more than 10 days. This model runs over 80% of the theoretical memory bandwidth with asynchronous data transfer. A novel CPU-GPU pipeline implementation of the IASI radiative transfer model is proposed. The GPU-based high-performance IASI radiative transfer model is suitable for the assimilation of the IASI radiance observations into the operational numerical weather forecast model.

Huang Bormin, E-mail: bormin@ssec.wisc.ed [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Mielikainen, Jarno [Department of Computer Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

Equivalent isotropic scattering formulation for transient short-pulse radiative transfer in anisotropic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the transient short-pulse radiation transport through forward and backward anisotropic scattering planar media time-resolved transmittance.13­15 The complete transient radiative transfer equation has been conEquivalent isotropic scattering formulation for transient short-pulse radiative transfer

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

52

Project: (version of January 28, 2009) Sparse tensor product methods for radiative transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulating a dense gas at very high temperatures, energy transport by means of radiation has to be taken into account. However, as even the non-scattering stationary monochromatic radiative transfer equation s · x. Applying an adaptive sparse discretiza- tion to the radiative transfer equation [1] allows to significantly

Hiptmair, Ralf

53

A FAST FORWARD SOLVER OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER HAO GAO AND HONGKAI ZHAO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studying the numerical solutions to the radiative transport equation (RTE) or the within-group neutron transport equation [4, 13] in the field of neutron transport [4], atmospheric radiative transfer [1], heatA FAST FORWARD SOLVER OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION HAO GAO AND HONGKAI ZHAO Abstract

Soatto, Stefano

54

End-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of end-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent nuclear fuel are presented. Details of formation of neutron and gamma-radiation sources are analyzed. Distributed sources of different types of radiation are considered. A comparative analysis of calculated radiation characteristics is performed with the use of nuclear data from different ENDF/B and EAF files and ANSI/ANS and ICRP standards.

Linge, I. I.; Mitenkova, E. F., E-mail: mit@ibrae.ac.ru; Novikov, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nuclear Safety Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical radiative-transfer solutions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Illumination Engineering Society... . Stephens. On the fundamental solution of the radiative transfer equation. Journal of Astrophysical Research... . A numerical solution to...

56

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

57

TWO-DIMENSIONAL TRANSIENT RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport is time-dependent radiative transfer equation. The solution of the hyperbolic transient radiative-pulsed laser radiation interaction and transport within biological tissues. INTRODUCTION With the advent of the short-pulsed laser with the duration of the order of femtoseconds, transient laser radiation transport

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

58

Hybrid Characteristics: 3D radiative transfer for parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer method designed specifically for use with parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics codes. This new algorithm, which we call hybrid characteristics, introduces a novel form of ray tracing that can neither be classified as long, nor as short characteristics, but which applies the underlying principles, i.e. efficient execution through interpolation and parallelizability, of both. Primary applications of the hybrid characteristics method are radiation hydrodynamics problems that take into account the effects of photoionization and heating due to point sources of radiation. The method is implemented in the hydrodynamics package FLASH. The ionization, heating, and cooling processes are modelled using the DORIC ionization package. Upon comparison with the long characteristics method, we find that our method calculates the column density with a similarly high accuracy and produces sharp and well defined shadows. We show the quality of the new algorithm in an application to the photoevaporation of multiple over-dense clumps. We present several test problems demonstrating the feasibility of our method for performing high resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics calculations that span a large range of scales. Initial performance tests show that the ray tracing part of our method takes less time to execute than other parts of the calculation (e.g. hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh refinement), and that a high degree of efficiency is obtained in parallel execution. Although the hybrid characteristics method is developed for problems involving photoionization due to point sources, the algorithm can be easily adapted to the case of more general radiation fields.

Erik-Jan Rijkhorst; Tomasz Plewa; Anshu Dubey; Garrelt Mellema

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

A GENERAL CIRCULATION MODEL FOR GASEOUS EXOPLANETS WITH DOUBLE-GRAY RADIATIVE TRANSFER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new version of our code for modeling the atmospheric circulation on gaseous exoplanets, now employing a 'double-gray' radiative transfer scheme, which self-consistently solves for fluxes and heating throughout the atmosphere, including the emerging (observable) infrared flux. We separate the radiation into infrared and optical components, each with its own absorption coefficient, and solve standard two-stream radiative transfer equations. We use a constant optical absorption coefficient, while the infrared coefficient can scale as a power law with pressure; however, for simplicity, the results shown in this paper use a constant infrared coefficient. Here we describe our new code in detail and demonstrate its utility by presenting a generic hot Jupiter model. We discuss issues related to modeling the deepest pressures of the atmosphere and describe our use of the diffusion approximation for radiative fluxes at high optical depths. In addition, we present new models using a simple form for magnetic drag on the atmosphere. We calculate emitted thermal phase curves and find that our drag-free model has the brightest region of the atmosphere offset by {approx}12 Degree-Sign from the substellar point and a minimum flux that is 17% of the maximum, while the model with the strongest magnetic drag has an offset of only {approx}2 Degree-Sign and a ratio of 13%. Finally, we calculate rates of numerical loss of kinetic energy at {approx}15% for every model except for our strong-drag model, where there is no measurable loss; we speculate that this is due to the much decreased wind speeds in that model.

Rauscher, Emily [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modified Method of Characteristics for Transient Radiative Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions. The radiative transport equation is a hyperbolicTo solve the radiative transport equation for collimated

Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Spectrally enhancing near-field radiative heat transfer by exciting magnetic polariton in SiC gratings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate, for the first time, that near field radiative transport between 1D periodic grating microstructures separated by subwavelength vacuum gaps can be significantly enhanced by exciting magnetic resonance or polariton. Fluctuational electrodynamics that incorporates scattering matrix theory with rigorous coupled wave analysis is employed to exactly calculate the near field radiative heat flux between two SiC gratings. Besides the well known coupled surface phonon polaritons (SPhP), an additional spectral radiative heat flux peak, which is due to magnetic polariton, is found within the phonon absorption band of SiC. The mechanisms, behaviors and interplays between magnetic polariton, coupled SPhP, single interface SPhP, and Wood's anomaly in the near field radiative transport are elucidated in detail. The findings will open up a new way to control near field radiative heat transfer by magnetic resonance with micro or nanostructured metamaterials.

Yang, Yue

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER IN TISSUE WELDING AND SOLDERING WITH ULTRAFAST LASERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER IN TISSUE WELDING AND SOLDERING WITH ULTRAFAST LASERS Kyunghan Kim to incorporate transient radiation heat transfer in tissue welding and soldering with use of ultrafast lasers are performed between laser welding and laser soldering. The use of solder is found to substantially enhance

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

63

Radiative Transfer of Sound Waves in a Random Flow: Turbulent Scattering, Straining, and Mode-Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative Transfer of Sound Waves in a Random Flow: Turbulent Scattering, Straining, and Mode and Applied Mathematics Vol. 61, No. 5, pp. 1545-1577 RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SOUND WAVES IN A RANDOM FLOW the sound wave propagation in a random flow, whose mean flow is large compared with its fluctuation

Fannjiang, Albert

64

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the ZonalGEF Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the Zonal­GEF Method Walter to analyze radiative heat transfer in high porosity insulation materials which have a large scattering for LI900, a material used in the insulation tile for the space shuttle. Comparisons are presented

Yuen, Walter W.

65

Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer Andrei G depend, to a large extent, on foams formed on the surface of the molten glass and of the batch due models for thermophysical and transport properties and heat, mass, and radiation transfer in glass foams

Pilon, Laurent

66

Calculations of Electronic Excitation Transfer: Applications to Ordered Phases in Polymeric Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculations of Electronic Excitation Transfer: Applications to Ordered Phases in Polymeric, there is tremendous interest in the structures of polymeric materials.1 Industry often seeks to combine. The relationships between these physical parameters and the phase behavior and molecular architecture of a polymeric

Fayer, Michael D.

67

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau-sud Campus Polytechnique RD 128 91127 Palaiseau cedex, France Heat transfer between two plates of polar far-field value. In this article, we show that nanoscale heat transfer is dominated by the coupling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

PARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the radiative transport equation on parallel computers. Mathematical libraries developed by third parties the discrete ordi- nates method. They observed that the global nature of radiative transport resultedPARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD Gautham

Utah, University of

69

Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

Jerry Y. Harrington

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 109 (2008) 727740  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solution of the Fokker­Planck equation. This equation gives a good approximation to the radiative transport of this method. r 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Radiative transport equation; Fokker tissues is governed by the theory of radiative transport [1]. The radiative transport equation takes

Kim, Arnold D.

71

RADIATION DOSE CALCULATION FOR FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CLOSURE CELL EQUIPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculation evaluates the energy deposition rates in silicon, gamma and neutron flux spectra at various locations of interest throughout FHF closure cell. The physical configuration features a complex geometry, with particle flux attenuation of many orders of magnitude that cannot be modeled by computer codes that use deterministic methods. Therefore, in this calculation the Monte Carlo method was used to solve the photon and neutron transport. In contrast with the deterministic methods, Monte Carlo does not solve an explicit transport equation, but rather obtain answers by simulating individual particles, recording the aspects of interest of their average behavior, and estimates the statistical precision of the results.

D. Musat

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

RADIATIVE TRANSFER SIMULATIONS OF NEUTRON STAR MERGER EJECTA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mergers of binary neutron stars (NSs) are among the most promising gravitational wave (GW) sources. Next generation GW detectors are expected to detect signals from NS mergers within about 200 Mpc. The detection of electromagnetic wave (EM) counterparts is crucial to understanding the nature of GW sources. Among the possible EM emission from the NS merger, emission powered by radioactive r-process nuclei is one of the best targets for follow-up observations. However, predictions so far have not taken into account detailed r-process element abundances in the ejecta. We perform for the first time radiative transfer simulations of the NS merger ejecta including all the r-process elements from Ga to U. We show that the opacity of the NS merger ejecta is about ? = 10 cm{sup 2} g{sup –1}, which is higher than that of Fe-rich Type Ia supernova ejecta by a factor of ?100. As a result, the emission is fainter and lasts longer than previously expected. The spectra are almost featureless due to the high expansion velocity and bound-bound transitions of many different r-process elements. We demonstrate that the emission is brighter for a higher mass ratio of the two NSs and a softer equation of state adopted in the merger simulations. Because of the red color of the emission, follow-up observations in red optical and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths will be the most efficient. At 200 Mpc, the expected brightness of the emission is i = 22-25 AB mag, z = 21-23 AB mag, and 21-24 AB mag in the NIR JHK bands. Thus, observations with wide-field 4 m- and 8 m-class optical telescopes and wide-field NIR space telescopes are necessary. We also argue that the emission powered by radioactive energy can be detected in the afterglow of nearby short gamma-ray bursts.

Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Hotokezaka, Kenta, E-mail: masaomi.tanaka@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: hotoke@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Numerical simulation of three-dimensional combined convective radiative heat transfer in rectangular channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents a numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow and heat transfer in a channel with a backward-facing step. Flow was considered to be steady, incompressible, and laminar. The flow medium was treated to be radiatively...

Ko, Min Seok

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Near-field thermal radiation transfer controlled by plasmons in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that thermally excited plasmon-polariton modes can strongly mediate, enhance, and tune the near-field radiation transfer between two closely separated graphene sheets. The dependence of near-field heat exchange ...

Ilic, Ognjen

76

Author's personal copy Radiation transfer in photobiological carbon dioxide fixation and fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fuel production by microalgae Laurent Pilon a,Ã, Halil Berberoglu b,1 , Razmig Kandilian a a Mechanical Scattering Chlorophyll Ocean optics Hydrogen Lipid production Biofuels Cyanobacteria Light transfer a b s t r to photobiologically fixate carbon dioxide and convert solar energy into biofuels. Thus, careful radiation transfer

Pilon, Laurent

77

New model of calculating the energy transfer efficiency for the spherical theta-pinch device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion-beam-plasma-interaction plays an important role in the field of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A spherical theta pinch is proposed to act as a plasma target in various applications including a plasma stripper cell. One key parameter for such applications is the free electron density. A linear dependency of this density to the amount of energy transferred into the plasma from an energy storage was found by C. Teske. Since the amount of stored energy is known, the energy transfer efficiency is a reliable parameter for the design of a spherical theta pinch device. The traditional two models of energy transfer efficiency are based on assumptions which comprise the risk of systematical errors. To obtain precise results, this paper proposes a new model without the necessity of any assumption to calculate the energy transfer efficiency for an inductively coupled plasma device. Further, a comparison of these three different models is given at a fixed operation voltage for the full ...

Xu, G; Loisch, G; Xiao, G; Jacoby, J; Weyrich, K; Li, Y; Zhao, Y

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

accelerated radiative transfer: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dominated Outflows Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Plasma outflows from gamma-ray bursts (GRB), pulsar winds, relativistic jets, and ultra-intense laser targets radiate...

79

Correlation, entropy, and information transfer in black hole radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the discovery of Hawking radiation, its consistency with quantum theory has been widely questioned. In the widely described picture, irrespective of what initial state a black hole starts with before collapsing, it eventually evolves into a thermal state of Hawking radiations after the black hole is exhausted. This scenario violates the principle of unitarity as required for quantum mechanics and leads to the acclaimed "information loss paradox". This paradox has become an obstacle or a reversed touchstone for any possible theory to unify the gravity and quantum mechanics. Based on the results from Hawking radiation as tunneling, we recently show that Hawking radiations can carry off all information about the collapsed matter in a black hole. After discovering the existence of information-carrying correlation, we show in great detail that entropy is conserved for Hawking radiation based on standard probability theory and statistics. We claim that information previously considered lost remains hidden inside Hawking radiation. More specifically, it is encoded into correlations between Hawking radiations. Our study thus establishes harmony between Harking radiation and the unitarity of quantum mechanics, which establishes the basis for a significant milestone towards resolving the long-standing information loss paradox. The paper provides a brief review of the exciting development on Hawking raidation. In addition to summarize our own work on this subject, we compare and address other related studies.

Baocheng Zhang; Qingyu Cai; Mingsheng Zhan; Li You

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

Trace formulae for non-equilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation and heat transfer for arbitrary objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal non-equilibrium. The results can be expressed as basis-independent trace formulae in terms of the scattering operators of the individual objects. We prove that heat radiation of a single object is positive, and that heat transfer (for two arbitrary passive objects) is from the hotter to a colder body. The heat transferred is also symmetric, exactly reversed if the two temperatures are exchanged. Introducing partial wave-expansions, we transform the results for radiation, transfer and forces into traces of matrices that can be evaluated in any basis, analogous to the equilibrium Casimir force. The method is illustrated by (re)deriving the heat radiation of a plate, a sphere and a cylinder. We analyze the radiation of a sphere for different materials, emphasizing that a simplification often employed for metallic nano-spheres is typically invalid. We derive asymptotic formulae for heat transfer and non-equilibrium interactions for the cases of a sphere in front a plate and for two spheres, extending previous results. As an example, we show that a hot nano-sphere can levitate above a plate with the repulsive non-equilibrium force overcoming gravity -- an effect that is not due to radiation pressure.

Matthias Krüger; Giuseppe Bimonte; Thorsten Emig; Mehran Kardar

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solution of the equation of radiative transfer using a NewtonKrylov approach and adaptive mesh refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution of the equation of radiative transfer using a Newton­Krylov approach and adaptive mesh Available online 25 November 2011 Keywords: Radiation transport Discrete ordinates method Finite ordinates method (DOM) and finite-volume method (FVM) are used exten- sively to solve the radiative transfer

Groth, Clinton P. T.

82

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Purpose: The effect of low doses of low ^ linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation (LDIR, and pathway. Conclusions: These results show for the first time that low doses of radiation have an identifi

Rocke, David M.

83

Prediction of Protein Solubility from Calculation of Transfer Free Energy Harianto Tjong and Huan-Xiang Zhou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Protein Solubility from Calculation of Transfer Free Energy Harianto Tjong and Huan transfer free energy from the condensed phase to the solution phase was found to predict reasonably well to develop theoretical methods for predicting protein relative and abso- lute solubility. Such methods may

Weston, Ken

84

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 73 (2002) 239248  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method such as decomposition method, and it takes a CPU time that is proportional to the third power of ; Stabilized bi-conjugate gradient method (BiCGSTAB); Thermal radiation 1. Introduction It is important

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

85

Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don�t consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns and found that local effects were often much larger than the overall values mentioned above, and were especially large for high sun and near convective clouds such as cumulus. The study also found that statistical methods such as neural networks appear promising for enabling cloud models to consider radiative interactions between nearby atmospheric columns. Finally, through collaboration with German scientists, the project found that new methods (especially one called �stepwise kriging�) show great promise in filling gaps between cloud radar scans. If applied to data from the new DOE scanning cloud radars, these methods can yield large, continuous three-dimensional cloud structures for future radiative simulations.

Varnai, Tamas

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Model calculations of radiative capture of nucleons in MeV region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We address calculations of the neutron and the proton radiative capture at incident energies up to 20 MeV on medium and heavy nuclei. The main formalism used is the pre-equilibrium (exciton) model of {gamma} emission. A link to the Consistent Direct-Semidirect model is noticed as well. The resulting pre-equilibrium (plus equilibrium) calculations of the radiative capture excitation functions are compared to experimental data and also some cross section trends important for possible production of therapeutic radioisotopes are extracted.

Betak, E. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Acad. Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Philosophy and Sciences, Silesian Univ., 74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

OUMBE, Armel, WALD, Lucien, BLANC, Philippe, and SCHROEDTER-HOMSCHEIDT, Marion. Exploitation of radiative transfer model for assessing solar radiation: the relative importance of atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radiative transfer model for assessing solar radiation: the relative importance of atmospheric constituents, Germany * Corresponding Author, armel.oumbe@ensmp.fr Abstract Solar radiation is modified in its way: solar radiation, atmospheric optics, satellite images, Heliosat method 1. Introduction A wealth

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

14 Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer in Vegetation Canopies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport equa- tion. This equation has a very simple physical interpretation; it is a mathematical to correctly de- scribe the photon transport. Second, the radiation regime is substantially influenced, 1981, p. 144). This allows the transport equation to relate micro-scale properties of the medium

Myneni, Ranga B.

89

Radiative Transfer in Photocatalytic Systems Matteo Pasquali and Francesco Santarelli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; these components are usually anatase titanium dioxide, near-ultraviolet radiation, and oxygen, respectively as adsorption, chemical oxida- tion, and biodegradation) in that PCO can completely de- grade many classes of toxic organic compounds, forming only carbon dioxide and mineral acids, and it can achieve this within

Natelson, Douglas

90

Author's personal copy Radiative heat transfer in enhanced hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tube and heated in a furnace or by an incandescent lamp. It was observed that hydrogen release from the glass sample was faster and stronger when heated by an incandescent lamp than within a furnace. Here and the glass samples. In brief, the radiation emitted by the incandescent lamp is concentrated between 0

Pilon, Laurent

91

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 99 (2006) 341348  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure on non-LTE, non-diffusive radiation transport and X-ray production is discussed. r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Z-pinch plasma; K-shell X-ray production and spectroscopy; Opacity tungsten wires [2]. Strong j  B forces implode the wire array, which generates nearly 2 MJ of X-rays in o

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Heat-transfer calculations for a potted (solid matrix embedded) subassembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) subassemblies used in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) have been investigated for fuel-bundle distortion using a destructive examination method known as potting. The potting technique embeds and permanently fixes the fuel elements in a solid matrix that can be sectioned and polished to reveal details in the internal structure of the elements or subassembly. Thus, an advantage of the potting technique is that it permits investigation of the internal structure of the subassembly in situ, as this structure would be lost or significantly altered during subassembly disassembly. However, since the elements in the subassembly are radioactive, the potting material must efficiently conduct radioactive decay heat to the environment so that the melting or softening temperatures of the potting material are not exceeded. The purpose of this paper is to present the heat transfer calculations for a potted subassembly and to recommend a simplified method for solving similar problems.

Betten, P.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

PRECONDITIONED BI-CONJUGATE GRADIENT METHOD FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN SPHERICAL MEDIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A robust numerical method called the Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG) method is proposed for the solution of the radiative transfer equation in spherical geometry. A variant of this method called Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG-STAB) is also presented. These are iterative methods based on the construction of a set of bi-orthogonal vectors. The application of the Pre-BiCG method in some benchmark tests shows that the method is quite versatile, and can handle difficult problems that may arise in astrophysical radiative transfer theory.

Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Paletou, F.; Leger, L. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Toulouse-Tarbes, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 14 Ave. E. Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative

95

Radiative transfer with partial coherence in optically thick plasmas Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach to address radiative transfer prob- lems involves a transport equation of Boltzmann-type, referred to as "radiative transfer equation", accounting for radiation-matter interaction processes such as spon- taneous the use of a transport theory for photons unavoidable. Opac- ity models for radiative transfer are widely

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

Diffusion Approximation of Radiative Transfer Problems with Guillaume Bal \\Lambda Leonid Ryzhik y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ryzhik y Abstract We derive the diffusion approximation of transport equations with discontinuities at interfaces. The transport equations model the energy density of acoustic waves. The waves are reflected in the high frequency regime by a radiative transfer equation. This model has been first proposed

Ryzhik, Lenya

97

BTRAM: An Interactive Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model I.M. Chapman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiance incident on the spectrometer/radiometer. Computer simulations, known as radiative transfer models source of opacity at submillimetre wavelengths where many objects emit most of their energy. Although high altitude observatories (such as the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii and the Atacama

Naylor, David A.

98

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 64 (2000) 255}273  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s is the minimum of the total cross-section set, and consider the (vector) transport equation * * ( , )# ( , )" 1 2Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 64 (2000) 255}273 A discrete-ordinates solution for multigroup transport theory with upscattering C.E. Siewert Mathematics Department, North

Siewert, Charles E.

99

An Efficient Approach for Optical Radiative Transfer Tomography using the Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinates Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces a method to preform optical tomography, using 3D radiative transfer as the forward model. We use an iterative approach predicated on the Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinates Method (SHDOM) to solve the optimization problem in a scalable manner. We illustrate with an application in remote sensing of a cloudy atmosphere.

Levis, Aviad; Aides, Amit; Davis, Anthony B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Shape-independent limits to near-field radiative heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive shape-independent limits to the spectral radiative heat-transfer rate between two closely spaced bodies, generalizing the concept of a black body to the case of near-field energy transfer. By conservation of energy, we show that each body of susceptibility $\\chi$ can emit and absorb radiation at enhanced rates bounded by $|\\chi|^2 / \\operatorname{Im} \\chi$, optimally mediated by near-field photon transfer proportional to $1/d^2$ across a separation distance $d$. Dipole--dipole and dipole--plate structures approach restricted versions of the limit, but common large-area structures do not exhibit the material enhancement factor and thus fall short of the general limit. By contrast, we find that particle arrays interacting in an idealized Born approximation exhibit both enhancement factors, suggesting the possibility of orders-of-magnitude improvement beyond previous designs and the potential for radiative heat transfer to be comparable to conductive heat transfer through air at room temperature, and s...

Miller, Owen D; Rodriguez, Alejandro W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

Chandler, William P. (Tracy, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L. (San Ramon, CA); Rathkopf, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

Feister, Uwe [German Meteorological Service, Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatory, Am Observatorium 12, 15848 Lindenberg (Germany); Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich [German Social Accident Insurance Institution for Transport and Traffic, Ottenser Hauptstrasse 54, 22765 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

ccsd-00000318(version1):29Apr2003 Calculation of muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to atomic oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen Arnaud Dupays, Bruno Lepetit, J. Alberto Beswick, Carlo Rizzo Laboratoire Collisions, Agrgats and an oxygen atom are calculated in a constrained geometry one dimensional model for collision energies between energy dependence of muon transfer from the muonic hydrogen to an oxygen molecule, has been proposed [3

Boyer, Edmond

105

Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL. [Core Flow Test Loop; RODCON; HOTTEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium.

Conklin, J.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radiative transfer within non Beerian porous media with semitransparent and opaque phases in non equilibrium;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equilibrium; Application to reflooding of a nuclear reactor. Miloud Chahlafia,b,c , Fabien Belleta,b , Florian Transfer 55, 13-14 (2012) 3666-3676" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.02.067 #12;nuclear reactor flux Indexes - At the calculation point -+ Dimensionless 3 hal-00680676,version1-19Mar2012 #12;-(j) jth

Boyer, Edmond

107

Calculation of unsteady-state heat and mass transfer in steam injection wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and mass transfer computation. Results obtained from this study were compared to field data and re- sults obtained from a semi-unsteady-state heat transfer and steady-state mass transfer model. As actual downhole steam quality measurements were...- hole pressure, temperature, and quality data from steam injection wells is virtually nonexistent in the literature. One limitation is that no downhole tool has been developed to reliably measure steam quality. Be- cause of the lack of field data from...

Ruddy, Kenneth Edward

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effect of radiative heat transfer on the coagulation dynamics of combustion-generated particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the influences of radiation heat transfer on the size and number density evolution of small coagulating particles. On a microscopic level, radiative emission and/or absorption by the particle will perturb the gas temperature field adjacent to each particle. As a result of thermophoretic particle transport, the nonequilibrium condition can alter the collision rates with neighboring particles. A simplified analysis of the thermophoretic coagulation mechanism suggests that net radiative cooling of the particles can lead to an accelerated growth of [mu]m-sized particles, whereas net radiative heating can act to essentially freeze coagulation rates. On the macroscopic level, the addition or removal of heat in the gas through radiative absorption emission by the particle cloud can also significantly alter, through thermophoretic transport, the local particle number density. Under certain cases these effects can augment the accelerated coagulation rates that occur under radiative cooling conditions. We also examine the particular situation of equilibrium between particle cloud radiative absorption and emission - which results in no net macroscopic effect on the gas. 30 refs., 9 figs.

Mackowski, D.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Tassopoulos, M.; Rosner, D.E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Achermann, Marc (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Metamaterials coated with Silicon Carbide Film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC.By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonance for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

Basu, Soumyadipta; Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integral method for the calculation of Hawking radiation in dispersive media II. Asymmetric asymptotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analogue gravity experiments make feasible the realisation of black hole spacetimes in a laboratory setting and the observational verification of Hawking radiation. Since such analogue systems are typically dominated by dispersion, efficient techniques for calculating the predicted Hawking spectrum in the presence of strong dispersion are required. In the preceding paper, an integral method in Fourier space is proposed for stationary $1+1$-dimensional backgrounds which are asymptotically symmetric. Here, this method is generalised to backgrounds which are different in the asymptotic regions to the left and right of the scattering region.

Scott Robertson

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Integral method for the calculation of Hawking radiation in dispersive media I. Symmetric asymptotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawking radiation has become experimentally testable thanks to the many analogue systems which mimic the effects of the event horizon on wave propagation. These systems are typically dominated by dispersion, and give rise to a numerically soluble and stable ODE only if the rest-frame dispersion relation $\\Omega^{2}(k)$ is a polynomial of relatively low degree. Here we present a new method for the calculation of wave scattering in a one-dimensional medium of arbitrary dispersion. It views the wave equation as an integral equation in Fourier space, which can be solved using standard and efficient numerical techniques.

Scott Robertson; Ulf Leonhardt

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

Calculation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N GoodsMexico's EnergyCalculation of

116

Time-dependent Radiation Transfer in the Internal Shock Model Scenario for Blazar Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the time-dependent radiation transfer in blazar jets, within the internal shock model. We assume that the central engine, which consists of a black hole and an accretion disk, spews out relativistic shells of plasma with different velocity, mass, and energy. We consider a single inelastic collision between a faster (inner) and a slower (outer) moving shell. We study the dynamics of the collision and evaluate the subsequent emission of radiation via the synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton (SSC) processes after the interaction between the two shells has begun. The collision results in the formation of a forward shock (FS) and a reverse shock (RS) that convert the ordered bulk kinetic energy of the shells into magnetic field energy and accelerate the particles, which then radiate. We assume a cylindrical geometry for the emission region of the jet. We treat the self-consistent radiative transfer by taking into account the inhomogeneity in the photon density throughout the region. In this paper, we focus on understanding the effects of varying relevant input parameters on the simulated spectral energy distribution (SED) and spectral variability patterns.

Manasvita Joshi; Markus Boettcher

2010-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castaño, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Calculation of shielding door thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities using the ITS Monte Carlo program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shielding calculations for door thicknesses for megavoltage radiotherapy facilities with mazes are generally straightforward. To simplify the calculations, the standard formalism adopts several approximations relating to the average beam path, scattering coefficients, and the mean energy of the spectrum of scattered radiation. To test the accuracy of these calculations, the Monte Carlo program, ITS, was applied to this problem by determining the dose and energy spectrum of the radiation at the door for 4- and 10-MV bremsstrahlung beams incident on a phantom at isocenter. This was performed for mazes, one termed 'standard' and the other a shorter maze where the primary beam is incident on the wall adjacent to the door. The peak of the photon-energy spectrum at the door was found to be the same for both types of maze, independent of primary beam energy, and also, in the case of the conventional maze, of the primary beam orientation. The spectrum was harder for the short maze and for 10 MV vs. 4 MV. The thickness of the lead door for a short maze configuration was 1.5 cm for 10 MV and 1.2 cm for 4 MV vs. approximately less than 1 mm for a conventional maze. For the conventional maze, the Monte Carlo calculation predicts the dose at the door to be lower than given by NCRP 49 and NCRP 51 by about a factor of 2 at 4 MV but to be the same at 10 MV. For the short maze, the Monte Carlo predicts the dose to be a factor of 3 lower for 4 MV and about a factor of 1.5 lower for 10 MV. Experimental results support the Monte Carlo findings for the short maze.

Biggs, P.J. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

System and method for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a monte carlo based particle transport grid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method is disclosed for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a particle transport grid. In a first step of the method voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass are received. A second step in the method defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion. A third step in the method calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A fourth step in the method identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a fifth step in the method calculates radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes. A common volume calculation module inputs voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass, inputs voxel mass densities corresponding to a density of the target mass within each of the voxel volumes, defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion, and calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A dosel mass module, multiplies the common volumes by corresponding voxel mass densities to obtain incremental dosel masses, and adds the incremental dosel masses corresponding to the dosel volumes to obtain dosel masses. A radiation transport module identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a dose calculation module, coupled to the common volume calculation module and the radiation transport module, for calculating radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes.

Bergstrom, Paul M. (Livermore, CA); Daly, Thomas P. (Livermore, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA); Patterson, Jr., Ralph W. (Livermore, CA); Schach von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA); Garrett, Dewey N. (Livermore, CA); House, Ronald K. (Tracy, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L. (Livermore, CA); Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Fujino, Donald H. (San Leandro, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Parametric analysis of radiative-convective heat transfer around a circular cylinder in a cross flow using the finite volume radiation solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the outside vapor deposition (OVD) process, silica particles are deposited by thermophoretic force on the surface of a cylinder. This process is associated with complex physical phenomena such as heat transfer between a torch and a cylinder, chemical reaction for silica particle formation, and particle deposition. Since the OVD process is carried out in a very high temperature environment, radiative heat transfer should be taken into consideration. Here, the radiative-convective heat transfer around a circular cylinder in a cross flow of a radiating gas has been numerically analyzed using the finite volume radiation solution method in a nonorthogonal coordinate system. The cross-flow Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter is 40, and the fluid Prandtl number is assumed to be 0.7. The radiative heat transfer coupled with convection is reasonably predicted by the finite volume radiation solution method. Distributions of the local Nusselt number are investigated according to the variation of radiation parameters such as conduction-to-radiation parameter, optical thickness, scattering albedo, and cylinder wall emissivity.

Lee, K.H.; Lee, J.S.; Choi, M. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation for the near-ocean-surface high-resolution downwelling irradiance statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a numerical study of the near-surface underwater solar light statistics using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Advanced variance-reduction ...

Xu, Zao

122

A parametric study of shock jump chemistry, electron temperature, and radiative heat transfer models in hypersonic flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF SHOCK JUMP CHEMISTRY, ELECTRON TEMPERATURE, AND RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODELS IN HYPERSONIC FLOWS A Thesis by ROBERT BRIAN GREENDYKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF SHOCK JUMP CHEMISTRY, ELECTRON TEMPERATURE, AND RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODELS IN HYPERSONIC FLOWS A Thesis by ROBERT BRIAN...

Greendyke, Robert Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 155422 (2012) Near-field thermal radiation transfer controlled by plasmons in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in graphene Ognjen Ilic,1,* Marinko Jablan,2 John D. Joannopoulos,1 Ivan Celanovic,3 Hrvoje Buljan,2 and Marin-field radiation transfer between two closely separated graphene sheets. The dependence of near-field heat exchange interband or intraband processes. We predict maximum transfer at low doping and for plasmons in two graphene

Soljaèiæ, Marin

124

Eurotherm Seminar N81 Reactive Heat Transfer in Porous Media, Ecole des Mines d'Albi, France June 4-6, 2007 ET81-1 HEAT TRANSFER BY SIMULTANEOUS RADIATION-CONDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eurotherm Seminar N°81 Reactive Heat Transfer in Porous Media, Ecole des Mines d'Albi, France June 4-6, 2007 ET81- 1 HEAT TRANSFER BY SIMULTANEOUS RADIATION-CONDUCTION AND CONVECTION IN A HIGH for the packed bed. The comparison between the radiative heat transfer and the exchanges by conduction and forced

Boyer, Edmond

125

Investigation of Radiation and Chemical Resistance of Flexible HLW Transfer Hose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chemical transfer hose constructed of an EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) outer covering with a modified cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) lining was evaluated for use in high level radioactive waste transfer applications. Laboratory analysis involved characterization of the hose liner after irradiation to doses of 50 to 300 Mrad and subsequent exposure to 25% NaOH solution at 93 C for 30 days, simulating 6 months intermittent service. The XLPE liner mechanical and structural properties were characterized at varying dose levels. Burst testing of irradiated hose assemblies was also performed. Literature review and test results suggest that radiation effects below doses of 100 kGy are minimal, with acceptable property changes to 500 kGy. Higher doses may be feasible. At a bounding dose of 2.5 MGy, the burst pressure is reduced to the working pressure (1.38 MPa) at room temperature. Radiation exposure slightly reduces liner tensile strength, with more significant decrease in liner elongation. Subsequent exposure to caustic solutions at elevated temperature slightly increases elongation, suggesting an immersion/hydrolytic effect or possible thermal annealing of radiation damage. This paper summarizes the laboratory results and recommendations for field deployment.

E. Skidmore; Billings, K.; Hubbard, M.

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Testing the improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation at the periphery of the BOR-60 reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation in the elements of an experimental device located at the periphery of the BOR-60 reactor core results in a significant reduction in the discrepancies between the calculated and the experimental data. This allows us to conclude that the improved method has an advantage over the one used earlier.

Varivtsev, A. V., E-mail: vav3@niiar.ru; Zhemkov, I. Yu. [JSC “SSC RIAR,” Dimitrovgrad-10 (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Calculation of the scattering function of a multichannel scintillation detector used to record high-energy photon radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method of calculating the scattering function for a linear array of detectors. The authors consider the detector arrangement which in the best way utilizes the radiation flux but which to the greatest extent is affected by the scattering of radiation from one detector to another: optically separated scintillatorsf in the form of parallelepipeds are assumed to be closely packed in a linear array and directed toward the radiation source. In order to obtain estimates of the scattering function with an accuracy of 3-5% for x close to zero at radiation not less than 2 MeV, the leakage of secondary electrons are taken into account.

Zav'yalkin, F.M.; Osipov, S.P.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Milagro Version 2 An Implicit Monte Carlo Code for Thermal Radiative Transfer: Capabilities, Development, and Usage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have released Version 2 of Milagro, an object-oriented, C++ code that performs radiative transfer using Fleck and Cummings' Implicit Monte Carlo method. Milagro, a part of the Jayenne program, is a stand-alone driver code used as a methods research vehicle and to verify its underlying classes. These underlying classes are used to construct Implicit Monte Carlo packages for external customers. Milagro-2 represents a design overhaul that allows better parallelism and extensibility. New features in Milagro-2 include verified momentum deposition, restart capability, graphics capability, exact energy conservation, and improved load balancing and parallel efficiency. A users' guide also describes how to configure, make, and run Milagro2.

T.J. Urbatsch; T.M. Evans

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Analytical Green's function of the radiative transfer radiance for the infinite medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical solution of the radiative transfer equation for the radiance caused by an isotropic source which is located in an infinitely extended medium was derived using the P{sub N} method. The results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and excellent agreement was found. In addition, the radiance of the SP{sub N} approximation for the same geometry was derived. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations showed that the SP{sub N} radiance, although being more exact than the radiance derived from diffusion theory, has relatively large errors in many relevant cases.

Liemert, Andre; Kienle, Alwin [Institut fuer Lasertechnologien in der Medizin und Messtechnik, Helmholtzstrasse12, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Radiative heat transfer between two dielectric nanogratings in the scattering approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theoretical study of radiative heat transfer between dielectric nanogratings in the scattering approach. As a comparision with these exact results, we also evaluate the domain of validity of Derjaguin's Proximity Approximation (PA). We consider a system of two corrugated silica plates with various grating geometries, separation distances, and lateral displacement of the plates with respect to one another. Numerical computations show that while the PA is a good approximation for aligned gratings, it cannot be used when the gratings are laterally displaced. We illustrate this by a thermal modulator device for nanosystems based on such a displacement.

J. Lussange; R. Guérout; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A 3D radiative transfer framework: I. non-local operator splitting and continuum scattering problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a highly flexible framework to solve 3D radiation transfer problems in scattering dominated environments based on a long characteristics piece-wise parabolic formal solution and an operator splitting method. We find that the linear systems are efficiently solved with iterative solvers such as Gauss-Seidel and Jordan techniques. We use a sphere-in-a-box test model to compare the 3D results to 1D solutions in order to assess the accuracy of the method. We have implemented the method for static media, however, it can be used to solve problems in the Eulerian-frame for media with low velocity fields.

Peter H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

The radiative and combined mode heat transfer within the L-shaped nonhomogeneous and nongray participating media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solutions of pure radiative and combined radiative and conductive heat transfer within a L-shaped enclosure are presented. The enclosure contains a mixture of pulverized carbon particles, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}. Three different types of problems are solved: homogeneous radiative properties, nonhomogeneous radiative properties, and combined conduction-radiation problem with nonhomogeneous radiative properties. To obtain solutions for these problems, the YIX method is used. The YIX quadrature uses piecewise constant interpolation of the integrands. To handle the L-shaped enclosure, an ad hoc approach of searching the struck surface node in the line-of-sight is developed. The general approach of handling any arbitrary complex geometry is briefly described. A single point, implicit, quasi-Newton scheme is used to solve the energy equation when both the radiation and conduction heat transfer modes are present. The quasi-Newton works well for a wide range of dimensionless conduction-radiation parameter except when the parameter is less than 0.2, i.e., radiation is the dominant heat transfer mode.

Hsu, P.F. [Florida Inst. of Tech., Melbourne, FL (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Programs; Tan, Z. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Dept.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

Smith, A

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

MicroShield analysis to calculate external radiation dose rates for several spent fuel casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this MicroShield analysis is to calculate the external radiation, primarily gamma, dose rate for spent fuel casks. The reason for making this calculation is that currently all analyses of transportation risk assume that this external dose rate is the maximum allowed by regulation, 10 mrem/hr at 2 m from the casks, and the risks of incident-free transportation are thus always overestimated to an unknown extent. In order to do this, the program by Grove Software, MicroShield 7.01, was used to model three Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved casks: HI-STAR 100, GA-4, and NAC-STC, loaded with specific source material. Dimensions were obtained from NUREG/CR-6672 and the Certificates of Compliance for each respective cask. Detectors were placed at the axial point at 1 m and 2 m from the outer gamma shielding of the casks. In the April 8, 2004 publication of the Federal Register, a notice of intent to prepare a Supplemental Yucca Mountain Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1) was published by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in order to consider design, construction, operation, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the Yucca Mountain repository [1]. These more accurate estimates of the external dose rates could be used in order to provide a more risk-informed analysis. (authors)

Marincel, M.K. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Weiner, R.F.; Osborn, D.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M. [NECP Laboratory, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., Xi'an Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

On the calculation of flow and heat transfer characteristics for CANDU-type 19-rod fuel bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical study is reported of flow and heat transfer in a CANDU-type 19 rod fuel bundle. The flow domain of interest includes combinations of trangular, square, and peripheral subchannels. The basic equations of momentum and energy are solved with the standard k--epsilon model of turbulence. Isotropic turbulent viscosity is assumed and no secondary flow is considered for this steady-state, fully developed flow. Detailed velocity and temperature distributions with wall shear stress and Nusselt number distributions are obtained for turbulent flow of Re = 4.35 x 10/sup 4/, 10/sup 5/, 2 x 10/sup 5/, and for laminar flow of Re--2400. Friction factor and heat transfer ceofficients of various subchannels inside the full bundle are compared with those of infinite rod arrays of triangular or square arrangements. The calculated velocity contours of peripheral subchannel agreed reasonably with measured data.

Yuh-Shan Yueh; Ching-Chang Chieng

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

On the calculation of flow and heat transfer characteristics for CANDU-type 19-rod fuel bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical study is reported of flow and heat transfer in a CANDU-type 19 rod fuel bundle. The flow domain of interest includes combinations of triangular, square, and peripheral subchannels. The basic equations of momentum and energy are solved with the standard k-{epsilon} model of turbulence. Isotropic turbulent viscosity is assumed and no secondary flow is considered for this steady-state, fully developed flow. Detailed velocity and temperature distributions with wall shear stress and Nusselt number distributions are obtained for turbulent flow of Re = 4.35 {times} 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5}, 2 {times} 10{sup 5}, and for laminar flow of Re {approximately} 2,400. Friction factor and heat transfer coefficients of various subchannels inside the full bundle are compared with those of infinite rod arrays of triangular or square arrangements. The calculated velocity contours of peripheral subchannel agreed reasonably with measured data.

Yueh, Yuhshan; Chieng, Chingchang (National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan))

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Time-dependent calculations of transfer ionization by fast proton-helium collision in one-dimensional kinematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a transfer ionization (TI) reaction in the fast proton-helium collision $\\rm H^+ + He \\to H^0 + He^{2+} + e^-$ by solving a time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE) under the classical projectile motion approximation in one-dimensional kinematics. In addition, we construct various time independent analogues of our model using lowest order perturbation theory in the form of the Born series. By comparing various aspects of the TDSE and the Born series calculations, we conclude that the recent discrepancies of experimental and theoretical data may be attributed to deficiency of the Born models used by other authors. We demonstrate that the correct Born series for TI should include the momentum space overlap between the double ionization amplitude and the wave function of the transferred electron.

Vladislav V. Serov; A. S. Kheifets

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

One-And-A-Half-Centered Expansion Method in Charge-Transfer Calculations of Proton-Hydrogen Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Wilets and Gallaher. The discrepancy may be attributed to the inaccuracy in numerical calcula- tion. These two-centered expansions (TCE) consume much computing time. Reading, Ford, and Becker [23?25] have invented a set of one... ranges have been extended from 100 keV in previous work to 250 keV. The charge-transfer cross sections to the 2p state fit the experimental data at 30 keV and are almost the same as those calculated using TCE method by Cheshire and Shakeshaft...

Chen, Z. F.; Reading, John F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

New dose-mortality data based on 3-D radiation shielding calculation for concrete buildings at Nagasaki  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of radiation doses received during the World War II attack on Nagasaki provides an important source of biochemical information. More than 40 years after the war, it has been possible to make a satisfactory calculation of the doses to personnel inside reinforced concrete buildings by use of a 3-dimensional discrete ordinates code, TORT. The results were used to deduce a new value of the LD50 parameter that is in good agreement with traditional values. The new discrete ordinates software appears to have potential application to conventional radiation transport calculations as well. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.; Ingersoll, D.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Fragment transition density method to calculate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general approach, the Fragment Transition Density (FTD) scheme, is introduced to estimate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer in a molecular system. Within this method, the excitation energies and transition densities of the system are used to derive the coupling matrix element. The scheme allows one to treat systems where exciton donor and acceptor are close together and their exchange interaction and orbital overlap are significant. The FTD method can be applied in combination with any quantum mechanical approach to treat excited states of general nature including single-, double-, and higher excitations. Using FTD approach, we derive excitonic couplings for several systems computed with the CIS, TD DFT and MS-CASPT2 methods. In particular, it is shown that the estimated coupling values in DNA ?-stacks are strongly affected by the short-range electronic interaction of adjacent nucleobases.

Voityuk, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander.voityuk@icrea.cat [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona, Spain and Institut de Química Computacional i Catàlisi (IQCC), Universitat de Girona 17071 Girona (Spain)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

HYDRODYNAMIC AND RADIATIVE MODELING OF TEMPORAL H{alpha} EMISSION V/R VARIATIONS CAUSED BY DISCONTINUOUS MASS TRANSFER IN BINARIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H{alpha} emission V/R variations caused by discontinuous mass transfer in interacting binaries with a rapidly rotating accreting star are modeled qualitatively for the first time. The program ZEUS-MP was used to create a non-linear three-dimensional hydrodynamical model of a development of a blob of gaseous material injected into an orbit around a star. It resulted in the formation of an elongated disk with a slow prograde revolution. The LTE radiative transfer program SHELLSPEC was used to calculate the H{alpha} profiles originating in the disk for several phases of its revolution. The profiles have the form of a double emission and exhibit V/R and radial velocity variations. However, these variations should be a temporal phenomenon since imposing a viscosity in the given model would lead to a circularization of the disk and fading-out of the given variations.

Chadima, Pavel; Harmanec, Petr; Wolf, Marek [Astronomical Institute of the Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Firt, Roman [Mathematical Institute, University of Bayreuth, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Ruzdjak, Domagoj; Bozic, Hrvoje [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Koubsky, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.chadima@gmail.com [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of Radiometric Measurements from the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR): Two- and Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Modeling of an Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Cloud Deck  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1999, NASA launched the Terra satellite. This platform carries five instruments that measure important properties of the Earth climate system. One of these instruments is the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MISR. This instrument measures light reflected from the Earth at a spatial resolution of 275-1100 m, at four wavelengths (446, 558, 672, and 866 nm), and at nine different viewing angles that vary from +70 to -70 degrees along the direction of flight [Diner et al., 2002]. These multiangle data have the potential to provide information on aerosols, surface, and cloud characteristics that compliments traditional single-view-direction satellite measurements. Before this potential can be realized, the accuracy of the satellite radiance measurements must be carefully assessed, and the implications of the radiometric accuracy on remote-sensing algorithms must be evaluated. In this article, we compare MISR multiangle measurements against two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D radiative transfer calculations from an inhomogeneous cloud scene. Inputs to the radiative transfer code are based entirely on independently gathered data (ground-based radar, lidar, microwave radiometer, in situ aircraft data, etc.). The 2-D radiative transfer calculations compare favorably near nadir and in most of the forward scattering directions, but differ by as much as 10% in the backscattering directions. Using 3-D radiative transfer modeling, we show that this difference is due to the 3-D structure of the cloud deck, including variations in the cloud top height on scales less than 275 m, which are not resolved in the 2-D simulations. Comparison of the 2-D calculations to the MISR measurements, after accounting for the 3-D structure, show residual differences that are less than 4% at all angles at the MISR blue and green wavelengths. The comparison also reveals that the MISR measurements at the red and near-infrared wavelengths are too bright relative to measurements in the blue and green bands. On the basis of the results of this study, along with results from five other comparisons, the MISR calibration is being adjusted to reduce the red and nearinfrared Radiances.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent-and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required ~100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only ~2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Filippi, Anthony M [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing Based Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent- and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required {approx}100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only {approx}2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) - a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Fillippi, Anthony [Texas A& M University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Spectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared region: Single-scattering calculations and radiative sensitivity study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a parameterization of the bulk scattering properties is developed. The radiative properties of ice cloudsSpectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared region: Single-scattering calculations the spectral signature of ice clouds in the far-infrared (far-IR) spectral region from 100 to 667 cmÃ?1 (15

Baum, Bryan A.

147

Uncertainty-accounted calculational-experimental approach for improved conservative evaluations of VVER RPV radiation loading parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach of improved uncertainty-accounted conservative evaluation of vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) (reactor-) pressure-vessel (RPV) radiation loading parameters has been proposed. This approach is based on the calculational-experimental procedure, which takes into account C/E ratio, depending on over- or underestimation, and uncertainties of measured and calculated results. An application of elaborated approach to the full-scale ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments on Russian VVERs combined with neutron-transport calculations has been demonstrated in the paper. (authors)

Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N. [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety SEC NRS, Building 5, Malaya Krasnoselskaya Street, 2/8, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

An Analytical Model of Radiation-Induced Charge Transfer Inefficiency for CCD Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Space Agency's Gaia mission is scheduled for launch in 2013. It will operate at L2 for 5 years, rotating slowly to scan the sky so that its two optical telescopes will repeatedly observe more than one billion stars. The resulting data set will be iteratively reduced to solve for the position, parallax and proper motion of every observed star. The focal plane contains 106 large area silicon CCDs continuously operating in a mode where the line transfer rate and the satellite rotation are in synchronisation. One of the greatest challenges facing the mission is radiation damage to the CCDs which will cause charge deferral and image shape distortion. This is particularly important because of the extreme accuracy requirements of the mission. Despite steps taken at hardware level to minimise the effects of radiation, the residual distortion will need to be calibrated during the pipeline data processing. Due to the volume and inhomogeneity of data involved, this requires a model which describes the effec...

Short, Alexander; de Bruijne, Jos H J; Prod'homme, Thibaut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Multilevel bioluminescence tomography based on radiative transfer equation Part 1: l1 regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problem for the radiative transport equation,” Inv. Prob.the beginning, radiative transport equation (RTE) is used as

Gao, Hao; Zhao, Hongkai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation in the BOR-60 reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of theoretical and experimental studies aimed at determining the radiation heat generation in the BOR-60 reactor reveal the drawbacks of the computational methods used at present. An algorithm that is free from these drawbacks and allows one to determine the radiation heat generation computationally is proposed.

Varivtsev, A. V., E-mail: vav3@niiar.ru; Zhemkov, I. Yu. [JSC “SSC RIAR,” Dimitrovgrad-10 (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

ht. 1. Han Mass 7h&r. Vol. 13, pp. 13494357. Pergamon Pra 1970. PhIed in Great Britain RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN A CONSERVATIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involving radiative transport and wall temperature slip in a finite, absorbing, emitting gray medium, equation of transfer then equation (4) reduces to the simpler form where Z(z,Zl)is the radiation intensity, Zlis the In their work on radiative transport and wall direction cosine (as measured from the positive

Siewert, Charles E.

152

The evolved circumbinary disk of AC Her: a radiative transfer, interferometric and mineralogical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We aim to constrain the structure of the circumstellar material around the post-AGB binary and RV Tauri pulsator AC Her. We want to constrain the spatial distribution of the amorphous as well as of the crystalline dust. We present very high-quality mid-IR interferometric data that were obtained with MIDI/VLTI. We analyse the MIDI data and the full SED, using the MCMax radiative transfer code, to find a good structure model of AC Her's circumbinary disk. We include a grain size distribution and midplane settling of dust self-consistently. The spatial distribution of crystalline forsterite in the disk is investigated with the mid-IR features, the 69~$\\mu$m band and the 11.3~$\\mu$m signatures in the interferometric data. All the data are well fitted. The inclination and position angle of the disk are well determined at i=50+-8 and PA=305+-10. We firmly establish that the inner disk radius is about an order of magnitude larger than the dust sublimation radius. Significant grain growth has occurred, with mm-sized ...

Hillen, M; Menu, J; Van Winckel, H; Min, M; Mulders, G D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A revised model of the kidney for medical internal radiation dose calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are frequently the organs receiving the highest level of radioactivity and, therefore, the largest radiation dose. Short lived radiopharmaceuticals, that are now injected in millicurie quantities in nuclear medicine for rapid-sequence imaging of the brain... radionuclides (Appendix B). 17 These include the following radionuclides presently used in nuclear medicine: P-32, Cr-51, Co-57, Ga-67, Tc-99m, In-ill, I-123, Xe-127, I-131, Xe-133, and T1-201. If the radionuclide emits penetrating radiation, the code...

Patel, Jyoti Shivabhai

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Comparison of different global information sources used in surface radiative flux calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the Laboratoire de Me´te´orologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project surface albedos in the near-infrared remain poorly constrained (highly uncertain), they do not cause too

155

Modeling near-field radiative heat transfer from sharp objects using a general 3d numerical scattering technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the non-equilibrium radiative heat transfer between a plate and finite cylinders and cones, making the first accurate theoretical predictions for the total heat transfer and the spatial heat flux profile for three-dimensional compact objects including corners or tips. We find qualitatively different scaling laws for conical shapes at small separations, and in contrast to a flat/slightly-curved object, a sharp cone exhibits a local \\emph{minimum} in the spatially resolved heat flux directly below the tip. The method we develop, in which a scattering-theory formulation of thermal transfer is combined with a boundary-element method for computing scattering matrices, can be applied to three-dimensional objects of arbitrary shape.

McCauley, Alexander P; Krüger, Matthias; Johnson, Steven G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Diesel Cycle: Since we use a Closed System, the work and heat transfers are calculated from changes in internal energy u  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Cycle: Since we use a Closed System, the work and heat transfers are calculated from changes of Diesels (and therefore potential th) are likely to be much higher, because rather than worrying about pre-ignition, we are counting on self-ignition! 1 #12;On top of that, Diesel cycles have no throttling losses, so

157

Ultrasimple calculation of very-low-energy momentum-transfer and rotational-excitation cross sections: e-N2 scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, threshold behavior, and many-body effects such as bound-free correlation, but also for technological ap planetary atmospheres and photoelectric heating in astrophysics. Be- cause rotational energy levels are veryUltrasimple calculation of very-low-energy momentum-transfer and rotational-excitation cross

Morrison, Michael A.

158

Radiation Damage Calculations for the FUBR and BEATRIX Irradiations of Lithium Compounds in EBR-II and FFTF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Breeder Reactor (FUBR) and Breeder Exchange Matrix (BEATRIX) experiments were cooperative efforts by members of the International Energy Agency to investigate the irradiation behavior of solid breeder materials for tritium production to support future fusion reactors. Lithium ceramic materials including Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with varying {sup 6}Li enrichments from 0 to 95% were irradiated in a series of experiments in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR II) and in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) over a period of about 10 years from 1982 to 1992. These experiments were characterized in terms of the nominal fast neutron fluences and measured {sup 6}Li burnup factors, as determined by either mass spectrometry or helium measurements. Radiation damage in these compounds is caused by both the {sup 6}Li-burnup reaction and by all other possible neutron reactions with the atoms in the compound materials. In this report, displacements per atom (dpa) values have been calculated for each type of material in each of the various irradiations that were conducted. Values up to 11% {sup 6}Li-burnup and 130 dpa are predicted for the longest irradiations. The dpa cross sections were calculated for each compound using the SPECOMP computer code. Details of the dpa calculations are presented in the report. Total dpa factors were determined with the SPECTER computer code by averaging the dpa cross sections over the measured or calculated neutron flux spectra for each series of irradiations. Using these new calculations, previously measured radiation damage effects in these lithium compounds can be compared or correlated with other irradiation data on the basis of the dpa factor as well as {sup 6}Li-burnup.

LR Greenwood

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Three-Dimensional Radiation-Hydrodynamics Calculations of the Envelopes of Young Planets Embedded in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform global three-dimensional (3-D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the envelopes surrounding young planetary cores of 5, 10, and 15 Earth masses, located in a protoplanetary disk at 5 and 10 AU from a solar-mass star. We apply a nested-grid technique to resolve the thermodynamics of the disk at the orbital-radius length scale and that of the envelope at the core-radius length scale. The gas is modeled as a solar mixture of molecular and atomic hydrogen, helium, and their ions. The equation of state accounts for both gas and radiation, and gas energy includes contributions from rotational and vibrational states of molecular hydrogen and from ionization of atomic species. Dust opacities are computed from first principles, applying the full Mie theory. One-dimensional (1-D) calculations of planet formation are used to supplement the 3-D calculations by providing energy deposition rates in the envelope due to solids accretion. We compare 1-D and 3-D envelopes and find that masses and gas accretion ...

D'Angelo, Gennaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The convergence of an explicit finite difference solution for transient heat transfer in solids with radiation at one boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Interior Point 'n ' 17 8 ? 01 Temperature Resp C 2'( C 1, Wi Constant Tempera x = L, and Havin Transfer to a He Degree Absolute Calculated With Modulus as Per S at x/L = 0. 0 onse th a ture g Ra at S Temp a Mr tabi of Hea at dian ink.... The Fourier equation for one? dimensional heat conduction in solids with constant physical properties is BT K 0 T Qe gC Q~x (3 ? 01) The net radiant heat transfer rate between two gray bodies A and B at absolute temperature T and T will be B according...

Patel, Bhagubhai Desaibhai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effective field theory calculation of nd radiative capture at thermal energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross section for the thermal neutron capture by the deuteron is calculated with pionless Effective Field Theory(EFT). No new Three-Nucleon forces are needed up to next-to-next-to-leading order in order to achieve cut-off independent results, besides those fixed by the triton binding energy and Nd scattering length in the triton channel. The cross-section is accurately determined to be $\\sigma_{tot}=[0.503\\pm 0.003]mb$. At zero energies, the magnetic $M1$-transition gives the dominant contribution and is calculated up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO). Close agreement between the available experimental data and the calculated cross section is reached. We demonstrate convergence and cutoff independence order by order in the low-energy expansion.

H. Sadeghi; S. Bayegan; Harald W. Griesshammer

2006-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (H{sub ab}) for electron transfer in 11 ?-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute H{sub ab} values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants ? (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger ?-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA.

Kubas, Adam; Blumberger, Jochen, E-mail: j.blumberger@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, Felix [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Heck, Alexander; Elstner, Marcus [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Oberhofer, Harald [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Asymptotic Preserving Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Grey Radiative Transfer Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due equations, where the radiation transport equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation(2013), 138-156] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two

Xu, Kun

164

Radiative Transfer of Sound Waves in a Random Flow: Turbulent Scattering and ModeCoupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systematically to derive the radiative transport equations that describe the evolution of acoustic correlation : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 3.2 The radiative transport equations : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 of the radiative transport equations 21 B Derivation of the diffusion equation without flow­straining 23 C

Ryzhik, Lenya

165

Calculation of probabilities of transfer, recurrence intervals, and positional indices for linear compartment models. Environmental Sciences Division Publication no. 1544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six indices are presented for linear compartment systems that quantify the probable pathways of matter or energy transfer, the likelihood of recurrence if the model contains feedback loops, and the number of steps (transfers) through the system. General examples are used to illustrate how these indices can simplify the comparison of complex systems or organisms in unrelated systems.

Carney, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Gardner, R.H.; Mankin, J.B.; Post, W.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha radiative transfer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Fission and Nuclear Technologies 43 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 3, pp. 279-285 (2001)...

167

Self-consistent calculations of the strength function and radiative neutron capture cross section for stable and unstable tin isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The E1 strength function for 15 stable and unstable Sn even-even isotopes from A=100 till A=176 are calculated using the self-consistent microscopic theory which, in addition to the standard (Q)RPA approach, takes into account the single-particle continuum and the phonon coupling. Our analysis shows two distinct regions for which the integral characteristics of both the giant and pygmy resonances behave rather differently. For neutron-rich nuclei, starting from $^{132}$Sn, we obtain a giant E1 resonance which significantly deviates from the widely-used systematics extrapolated from experimental data in the $\\beta$-stability valley. We show that the inclusion of the phonon coupling is necessary for a proper description of the low-energy pygmy resonances and the corresponding transition densities for $A132$ region the influence of phonon coupling is significantly smaller. The radiative neutron capture cross sections leading to the stable $^{124}$Sn and unstable $^{132}$Sn and $^{150}$Sn nuclei are calculated with both the (Q)RPA and the beyond-(Q)RPA strength functions and shown to be sensitive to both the predicted low-lying strength and the phonon coupling contribution. The comparison with the widely-used phenomenological Generalized Lorentzian approach shows considerable differences both for the strength function and the radiative neutron capture cross section. In particular, for the neutron-rich $^{150}$Sn, the reaction cross section is found to be increased by a factor greater than 20. We conclude that the present approach may provide a complete and coherent description of the $\\gamma$-ray strength function for astrophysics applications. In particular, such calculations are highly recommended for a reliable estimate of the electromagnetic properties of exotic nuclei.

A. Avdeenkov; S. Goriely; S. Kamerdzhiev; S. Krewald

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

StaRMAP - A second order staggered grid method for spherical harmonics moment equations of radiative transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a simple method to solve spherical harmonics moment systems, such as the the time-dependent $P_N$ and $SP_N$ equations, of radiative transfer. The method, which works for arbitrary moment order $N$, makes use of the specific coupling between the moments in the $P_N$ equations. This coupling naturally induces staggered grids in space and time, which in turn give rise to a canonical, second-order accurate finite difference scheme. While the scheme does not possess TVD or realizability limiters, its simplicity allows for a very efficient implementation in Matlab. We present several test cases, some of which demonstrate that the code solves problems with ten million degrees of freedom in space, angle, and time within a few seconds. The code for the numerical scheme, called StaRMAP (Staggered grid Radiation Moment Approximation), along with files for all presented test cases, can be downloaded so that all results can be reproduced by the reader.

Benjamin Seibold; Martin Frank

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric radiative transfer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University Collection: Geosciences 49 The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks Summary: Number microns10.016.7 7.14 T261K 12;Radiative...

170

MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based on recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). These factors are fixed internally in the code, and are not part of the input option. Dose commitments which are available from the code are as follows: • Individual dose commitments for use in predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations (Radon and short-lived daughters are excluded) • Total individual dose commitments (impacts from all available radionuclides are considered) • Annual population dose commitments (regional, extraregional, total and cummulative). This model is primarily designed for uranium mill facilities, and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes.

Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations.

Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Multilayer Broken Clouds. Part II: Validation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second part of our two-part paper we estimated the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations for the mean radiance that were derived in Part I. In our analysis we used the three-dimensional (3D) cloud fields provided by (i) the stochastic Boolean model, (ii) large-eddy simulation model and (iii) satellite cloud retrieval. The accuracy of the obtained equations was evaluated by comparing the ensemble-averaged radiative properties that were obtained by the numerical averaging method (reference) and the analytical averaging method (approximation). The robustness of these equations was estimated by comparing the domain-averaged radiative properties obtained by using (i) the full 3D cloud structure (reference) and (ii) the bulk cloud statistics (approximation). It was shown that the approximated equations could provide reasonable accuracy ({approx}15%) for both the ensemble-averaged and domain-averaged radiative properties.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 64 (2000) 219}226  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the discrete-ordinates approximation to the transport equation in plane geometry. The Green's function of papers [1}3] concerning radiation-transport problems in plane geometry, linear-algebra techniques were of the Fourier-component (m50) problems basic to the general azimuth-dependent transport equation [6], and since

Siewert, Charles E.

174

Diffusion Approximation of Radiative Transfer Problems with Guillaume Bal \\Lambda Leonid Ryzhik y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propagation. The radiative transport equation for the evolution of the average phase space energy density a Ryzhik y September 16, 1998 Abstract We derive the diffusion approximation of transport equations with discontinuities at interfaces. The transport equations model the energy density of acoustic waves. The waves

Bal, Guillaume

175

Radiative transfer based scaling of LAI retrievals from reflectance data of different resolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is investigated with 1-km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data aggregated to different coarse into biogeophysical (energy and water exchanges) and biogeochemical (carbon and volatile organic compound exchanges. Vegetation leaf area index governs net radiation and its expenditure (energy balance), net primary production

Myneni, Ranga B.

176

Characterization of the solar light field within the ocean mesopelagic zone based on radiative transfer simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of the solar light field within the ocean mesopelagic zone based on radiative t The solar light field within the ocean from the sea surface to the bottom of the mesopelagic zone there is sufficient amount of solar light to support the process of photosynthesis, and below by the aphotic

Stramski, Dariusz

177

Multigroup half space moment approximations to the radiative heat transfer equations q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling) over astrophysics to combustion (e.g., in gas turbine combustion chambers). Since radiative heat into direction l 2 ½À1; 1. Furthermore, T ðx; tÞ is the material temperature. The heat conductivity is denoted with the following boundary conditions. For the material temper

Coudière, Yves

178

A novel approach for introducing cloud spatial structure into cloud radiative transfer parameterizations  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Subgrid-scale variability is one of the main reasons why parameterizations are needed in large-scale models. Although some parameterizations started to address the issue of subgrid variability by introducing a subgrid probability distribution function for relevant quantities, the spatial structure has been typically ignored and thus the subgrid-scale interactions cannot be accounted for physically. Here we present a new statistical-physics-like approach whereby the spatial autocorrelation function can be used to physically capture the net effects of subgrid cloud interaction with radiation. The new approach is able to faithfully reproduce the Monte Carlo 3D simulation results with several orders less computational cost, allowing for more realistic representation of cloud radiation interactions in large-scale models.

Huang, Dong [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, Yangang [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Heat Transfer between Graphene and Amorphous SiO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the heat transfer between graphene and amorphous SiO2. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and between the surfaces in the non-contact region. We consider the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies, and the heat transfer by the gas in the non-contact region. We find that the dominant contribution to the heat transfer result from the area of real contact, and the calculated value of the heat transfer coefficient is in good agreement with the value deduced from experimental data.

B. N. J. Persson; H. Ueba

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

180

Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust aerosols: A database for application to radiative transfer calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust aerosols: A database Applications and Research, Camp Spring, MD 20746, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 14 Optical properties Database a b s t r a c t This paper presents a user-friendly database software package

Liou, K. N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-InducedCloudPoisson Stochastic Radiative

182

Calculations of Nonlinear Wave-Packet Interferometry Signals in the Pump-Probe Limit as Tests for Vibrational Control over Electronic Excitation Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The preceding paper describes a strategy for externally influencing the course of short-time electronic excitation transfer (EET) in molecular dimers and observing the process by nonlinear wave-packet interferometry (nl-WPI). Within a sample of isotropically oriented dimers having a specified internal geometry, a vibrational mode internal to the acceptor chromophore can be preferentially driven by electronically nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman (or resonant infrared) excitation with a short polarized control pulse. A subsequent electronically resonant polarized pump then preferentially excites the donor, and EET ensues. Here we test both the control strategy and its spectroscopic investigation-with some sacrifice of amplitude-level detail-by calculating the pump-probe difference signal. That signal is the limiting case of the control-influenced nl-WPI signal in which the two pulses in the pump pulse-pair coincide, as do the two pulses in the probe pulse-pair. We present calculated pump-probe difference signals for (1) a model excitation-transfer complex in which two equal-energy monomers each support one moderately Franck-Condon active intramolecular vibration; (2) a simplified model of the covalent dimer dithia-anthracenophane, representing its EET dynamics following selective impulsive excitation of the weakly Franck-Condon active anthracene vibration at 385 cm-1; and (3) a model complex featuring moderate electronic-vibrational coupling in which the site energy of the acceptor chromophore is lower than that of the donor.

Jason D. Biggs; Jeffrey A. Cina

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

Astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture (12)N(p,gamma)(13)O determined from the (14)N((12)N,(13)O)(13)C proton transfer reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross section of the radiative proton capture reaction on the drip line nucleus (12)N was investigated using the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) method. We have used the (14)N((12)N,(13)O)(13)C proton transfer reaction at 12 Me...

Banu, A.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Frequency-Selective Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Photonic Crystal Slabs: A Computational Approach for Arbitrary Geometries and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy from a hot to a cold body is well known to be enhanced (even exceeding the black- body limit) whenFrequency-Selective Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Photonic Crystal Slabs of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 Department

Soljaèiæ, Marin

185

Solutions of the equation of radiative transfer by matrix operator techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Rayleigh Scattering for us = 1 and Various Values of the Optical Thickness r as a Function of the Cosine of the Nadir Angle u. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 3. Upward Radiance at Top of the Atmosphere for Haze M Scattering for uc = 1... with a given radius is proportional to r exp(-8. 944 r '), where r is the particle radius. The mode radius or size of maximum frequency in the distribution is 0. 05 p. The single scattering phase function is calculated assuming a wavelength of 0. 75 u...

Catchings, Frances Eugenia King

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ab initio calculation of proton-coupled electron transfer rates using the external-potential representation: A ubiquinol complex in solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) treatment of chemical reactions in condensed phases, one solves the electronic Schroedinger equation for the solute (or an active site) under the electrostatic field from the environment. This Schroedinger equation depends parametrically on the solute nuclear coordinates R and the external electrostatic potential V. This fact suggests that one may use R and V as natural collective coordinates for describing the entire system, where V plays the role of collective solvent variables. In this paper such an (R,V) representation of the QM/MM canonical ensemble is described, with particular focus on how to treat charge transfer processes in this representation. As an example, the above method is applied to the proton-coupled electron transfer of a ubiquinol analog with phenoxyl radical in acetonitrile solvent. Ab initio free-energy surfaces are calculated as functions of R and V using the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method, the equilibrium points and the minimum free-energy crossing point are located in the (R,V) space, and then the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are evaluated approximately. The results suggest that a stiffer proton potential at the transition state may be responsible for unusual KIEs observed experimentally for related systems.

Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Shigeki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

A High-Order-Accurate GPU-Based Radiative Transfer Equation Solver for Combustion and Propulsion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative heat flux through the grid element boundary ˆ sstair-case grid. Figure 5 shows the net radiative heat fluxgrid consisted of 6872 tetrahedral elements. The dimensionless radiative heat

He, Xing; Lee, Euntaek; Wilcox, Lucas; Munipalli, Ramakanth; Pilon, Laurent

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Radiative Transfer, RAD-13 June 28, 2013, Kuadasi, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Kuadasi, Turkey RAD-13-040 SPECTRAL RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF THREE-DIMENSIONALLY ORDERED MACROPOROUS CERIA

189

Thermal hydraulic calculations to support increase in operating power in McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center(MNRC) TRIGA reactor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 2.0 MW. The calculation results show the reactor to havecalculations performed by others. Core loading data and measured fhel temperatures for a Bangladesh reactor

Jensen, R. T.; Newell, Daniel L.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

191

Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Finland by M. HW1'aien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries ineluding the United States where Perez (1986) presented a method for deriving beam radiation from a series of vertically mounted pyranometers...

Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Clouds in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. IV. On the scattering greenhouse effect of CO2 ice particles: Numerical radiative transfer studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owing to their wavelengths dependent absorption and scattering properties, clouds have a strong impact on the climate of planetary atmospheres. Especially, the potential greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds in the atmospheres of terrestrial extrasolar planets is of particular interest because it might influence the position and thus the extension of the outer boundary of the classic habitable zone around main sequence stars. We study the radiative effects of CO2 ice particles obtained by different numerical treatments to solve the radiative transfer equation. The comparison between the results of a high-order discrete ordinate method and simpler two-stream approaches reveals large deviations in terms of a potential scattering efficiency of the greenhouse effect. The two-stream methods overestimate the transmitted and reflected radiation, thereby yielding a higher scattering greenhouse effect. For the particular case of a cool M-type dwarf the CO2 ice particles show no strong effective scattering greenhouse eff...

Kitzmann, D; Rauer, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Monte Carlo solution methods in a moment-based scale-bridging algorithm for thermal radiative transfer problems: Comparison with Fleck and Cummings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a moment-based scale-bridging algorithm for thermal radiative transfer problems. The algorithm takes the form of well-known nonlinear-diffusion acceleration which utilizes a low-order (LO) continuum problem to accelerate the solution of a high-order (HO) kinetic problem. The coupled nonlinear equations that form the LO problem are efficiently solved using a preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method. This work demonstrates the applicability of the scale-bridging algorithm with a Monte Carlo HO solver and reports the computational efficiency of the algorithm in comparison to the well-known Fleck-Cummings algorithm. (authors)

Park, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Densmore, J. D. [Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States); Wollaber, A. B.; Knoll, D. A.; Rauenzahn, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A WRF Simulation of the Impact of 3-D Radiative Transfer on Surface Hydrology over the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate 3-D mountains/snow effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, applied at a 30 km grid resolution, is used in conjunction with a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization covering a time period from 1 November 2007 to 31 May 2008, during which abundant snowfall occurred. A comparison of the 3-D WRF simulation with the observed snow water equivalent (SWE) and precipitation from Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites shows reasonable agreement in terms of spatial patterns and daily and seasonal variability, although the simulation generally has a positive precipitation bias. We show that 3-D mountain features have a profound impact on the diurnal and monthly variation of surface radiative and heat fluxes, and on the consequent elevation dependence of snowmelt and precipitation distributions. In particular, during the winter months, large deviations (3-DPP, in which PP denotes the plane-parallel approach) of the monthly mean surface solar flux are found in the morning and afternoon hours due to shading effects for elevations below 2.5 km. During spring, positive deviations shift to the earlier morning. Over mountaintops higher than 3 km, positive deviations are found throughout the day, with the largest values of 40-60Wm?2 occurring at noon during the snowmelt season of April to May. The monthly SWE deviations averaged over the entire domain show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, which leads to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, positive SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Overall, this study shows that deviations of SWE due to 3-D radiation effects range from an increase of 18%at the lowest elevation range (1.5-2 km) to a decrease of 8% at the highest elevation range (above 3 km). Since lower elevation areas occupy larger fractions of the land surface, the net effect of 3-D radiative transfer is to extend snowmelt and snowmelt-driven runoff into the warm season. Because 60-90% of water resources originate from mountains worldwide, the aforementioned differences in simulated hydrology due solely to 3-D interactions between solar radiation and mountains/snow merit further investigation in order to understand the implications of modeling mountain water resources, and these resources’ vulnerability to climate change and air pollution.

Liou, K. N.; Gu, Y.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lee, W- L.; Fovell, R. G.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang {\\itshape et al.}, we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation.

Liu, Yangjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Calculation of collective effects and beam lifetimes for the LBL (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory) 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In designing a third-generation high brightness synchrotron radiation source, attention must be paid to the various collective effects that can influence beam performance. We report on calculations, performed with the code ZAP, of the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime (from both Touschek and gas scattering) for our 1-2 GeV storage ring. In addition, we estimate the growth times for both longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities. Bunch lengths of about 20 ps should be obtainable and intrabeam scattering emittance growth is small. For a limiting undulator gap of 1 cm and residual gas pressure of 1n Torr, the beam lifetime is about 5 hours in the single-bunch mode; in the multibunch mode, lifetimes in excess of 6 hours are expected. These results indicate that all performance goals for the facility should be achievable.

Chattopadhyay, S.; Zisman, M.S.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Electron-Transfer from H-2 and Ar to Stored Multiply Charged Argon Ions Produced by Synchrotron Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for collisions of He and Ne with doubly charged ions of the lanthanide series, La +, Ce +, etc. , the ionization poten- tials of multiply charged ions greatly exceed those of atoms or molecules with which they collide, so electron transfer from the neutral...

Kravis, S. D.; Church, David A.; Johnson, B. M.; Meron, M.; Jones, K. W.; Levin, J. C.; Sellin, I. A.; Azuma, Y.; Berrahmansour, N.; Berry, H. G.; Druetta, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Radiative Transfer, RAD-13 June 2-8, 2013, Kuadasi, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of external irradiation, and thus needs to be examined by the comparison with the direct Monte Carlo simulation. The computational study with realistic geometrical and optical parameters of the problem nanoshells G irradiation J diffuse component of radiation intensity m complex index of refraction, n - i n

200

Single Transition State Serves Two Mechanisms. Ab Initio Classical Trajectory Calculations of the Substitution-Electron Transfer Branching Ratio in CH2O-+ CH3Cl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Sub(C) valley. Analysis of the initial conditions did not reveal any definitive factors, the temperature dependence of the branching ratio is a reflection of the shape of the potential energy surface of numerous theoretical studies.25-33 The ET products can be formed either by an outersphere electron transfer

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

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201

Induction and Persistence of Large ?H2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of ?-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (?H2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of ?H2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of ?H2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in ?H2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 ?m{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of ?H2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

How to Calculate Molecular Column Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is con...

Mangum, Jeffrey G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Radiation Doses to Members of the U.S. Population from Ubiquitous Radionuclides in the Body: Part 2, Methods and Dose Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is part two of a three-part series investigating annual effective doses to residents of the United States from intakes of ubiquitous radionuclides, including radionuclides occurring naturally, radionuclides whose concentrations are technologically enhanced, and anthropogenic radionuclides. This series of papers explicitly excludes intakes from inhaling 222Rn, 220Rn, and their short-lived decay products; it also excludes intakes of radionuclides in occupational and medical settings. Part one reviewed, summarized, characterized, and grouped all published and some unpublished data for U.S. residents on ubiquitous radionuclide concentrations in tissues and organs. Assumptions about equilibrium with long-lived parents are made for the 28 other radionuclides in these series lacking data. This paper describes the methods developed to group the collected data into source regions described in the Radiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR) dosimetric methodology. Methods for converting the various units of data published over 50 years into a standard form are developed and described. Often, meaningful values of uncertainty of measurements were not published so that variability in data sets is confounded with measurement uncertainty. A description of the methods developed to estimate variability is included in this paper. The data described in part one are grouped by gender and age to match the RADAR dosimetric phantoms. Within these phantoms, concentration values are grouped into source tissue regions by radionuclide, and they are imputed for source regions lacking tissue data. Radionuclide concentrations are then imputed for other phantoms’ source regions with missing concentration values, and the uncertainties of the imputed values are increased. The content concentrations of hollow organs are calculated, and activities are apportioned to the bone source regions using assumptions about each radionuclide’s bone-seeking behavior. The data sets are then ready to be used to estimate equivalent doses to target tissues from these source regions. The target tissues are then mapped to lists of tissues with International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) tissue weighting factors, or they are mapped to surrogate tissue regions when there is no direct match. Effective doses, using ICRP tissue weighting factors recommended in 1977, 1990, and 2007, are calculated from tissue and organ equivalent doses.

Watson, David J.; Strom, Daniel J.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Radiation Transport Calculations and Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of Quality Assurance is briefly considered.

Fasso, Alberto; /SLAC; Ferrari, A.; /CERN

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

charlotb

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

J.S. Tang

2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Characterizing the hohlraum radiation via one-end driven experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new experiment is designed and performed on the Shenguang III laser facility with the first eight available beams to characterizing the hohlraum radiation, in which the hohlraum with laser entrance holes on both ends is driven through one-end only. The experiment enables us to identify the x-ray radiations originated from the hohlraum reemission wall and high-Z bubble plasmas utilizing their position and spectral characters, which provides a better test on the associated hohlraum models. The total and M-band x-ray radiation fluxes are measured with the flat response x-ray detectors and the filtered M-band x-ray detectors, respectively. Numerical simulations are conducted with the two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-INTEGRATION using the multi-group radiation transfer and/or diffusion models. It is found that the experimentally measured temporal profiles and angular distributions of hohlraum radiation are in good agreement with the predictions of simulation using radiation transfer models, but differ significantly from the results obtained with the multi-group radiation diffusion calculations. We thus note that to accurately represent the hohlraum radiation, a true radiation transfer model is essential.

Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang, E-mail: zou-shiyang@iapacm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15800 – Calculators – GOOD AND BAD. ONLY ONE-LINE scientific calculators are permitted. *RECOMMENDED CALCULATOR: TI-30XA(See Below).

charlotb

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

On the influence of the companion star in Eta Carinae: 2D radiative transfer modeling of the ultraviolet and optical spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present 2D radiative transfer modeling of the Eta Carinae binary system accounting for the presence of a wind-wind collision (WWC) cavity carved in the optically-thick wind of the primary star. By comparing synthetic line profiles with HST/STIS spectra obtained near apastron, we show that the WWC cavity has a strong influence on multi-wavelength diagnostics. This influence is regulated by the modification of the optical depth in the continuum and spectral lines. We find that H-alpha, H-beta, and Fe II lines are the most affected by the WWC cavity, since they form over a large volume of the primary wind. These spectral lines depend on latitude and azimuth since, according to the orientation of the cavity, different velocity regions of a spectral line are affected. For 2D models with orientation corresponding to orbital inclination angle 110deg < i < 140deg and longitude of periastron 210deg < omega < 330deg, the blueshifted and zero-velocity regions of the line profiles are the most affected. Th...

Groh, Jose H; Madura, Thomas I; Weigelt, Gerd

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/120 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven �bo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering / Värme Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/120 Pic: B�88 �bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/120 5.1 Conductive heat transfer �bo Akademi

Zevenhoven, Ron

211

Sensitivity Study of the Effects of Mineral Dust Particle Nonsphericity and Thin Cirrus Clouds on MODIS Dust Optical Depth Retrievals and Direct Radiative Forcing Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A special challenge posed by mineral dust aerosols is associated with their predominantly nonspherical particle shapes. In the present study, the scattering and radiative properties for nonspherical mineral dust aerosols at violet-to-blue (0.412, 0...

Feng, Qian

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars with masses of >~ 20 solar masses have short Kelvin times that enable them to reach the main sequence while still accreting from their natal clouds. The resulting nuclear burning produces a huge luminosity and a correspondingly large radiation pressure force on dust grains in the accreting gas. This effect may limit the upper mass of stars that can form by accretion. Indeed, simulations and analytic calculations to date have been unable to resolve the mystery of how stars of 50 solar masses and up form. We present two new ideas to solve the radiation pressure problem. First, we use three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study the collapse of massive cores. We find that in three dimensions a configuration in which radiation holds up an infalling envelope is Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, leading radiation driven bubbles to collapse and accretion to continue. We also present Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations showing that the cavities created by protostellar winds provides a valve that allow radiation to escape the accreting envelope, further reducing the ability of radiation pressure to inhibit accretion.

Mark R. Krumholz; Richard I. Klein; Christopher F. McKee

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Calculator Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

charlotb

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

216

Evaluation of GCM Column Radiation Models Under Cloudy Conditions with The Arm BBHRP Value Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of the project was to improve the transfer of solar and thermal radiation in the most sophisticated computer tools that are currently available for climate studies, namely Global Climate Models (GCMs). This transfer can be conceptually separated into propagation of radiation under cloudy and under cloudless conditions. For cloudless conditions, the factors that affect radiation propagation are gaseous absorption and scattering, aerosol particle absorption and scattering and surface albedo and emissivity. For cloudy atmospheres the factors are the various cloud properties such as cloud fraction, amount of cloud condensate, the size of the cloud particles, and morphological cloud features such as cloud vertical location, cloud horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity and cloud shape and size. The project addressed various aspects of the influence of the above contributors to atmospheric radiative transfer variability. In particular, it examined: (a) the quality of radiative transfer for cloudless and non-complex cloudy conditions for a substantial number of radiation algorithms used in current GCMs; (b) the errors in radiative fluxes from neglecting the horizontal variabiity of cloud extinction; (c) the statistical properties of cloud horizontal and vertical cloud inhomogeneity that can be incorporated into radiative transfer codes; (d) the potential albedo effects of changes in the particle size of liquid clouds; (e) the gaseous radiative forcing in the presence of clouds; and (f) the relative contribution of clouds of different sizes to the reflectance of a cloud field. To conduct the research in the various facets of the project, data from both the DOE ARM project and other sources were used. The outcomes of the project will have tangible effects on how the calculation of radiative energy will be approached in future editions of GCMs. With better calculations of radiative energy in GCMs more reliable predictions of future climate states will be attainable, thus affecting public policy decisions with great impact to public life.

Dr. Lazaros Oreopoulos and Dr. Peter M. Norris

2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

Kurs, André

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 19-23, 2009, San Francisco, CA, USA HT2009-88261 SIMULATION OF FOCUSED RADIATION PROPAGATION AND TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN TURBID-dependent radiation and conduction bio-heat transfer model. Ultrashort pulsed radiation transport in the cylindrical

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

220

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Ferrous-Ferric Electron Transfer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Transfer in a Hydrolyzing Aqueous Solution: Calculation of the pH Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Ferrous-Ferric Electron Transfer in a Hydrolyzing Aqueous Solution:...

222

Efficient natural defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes in T and B cell-deficient allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras. Preactivated macrophages are the main effector cells in an early phase after bone marrow transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation chimeras in the early phase after bone marrow transplantation are a good model to study the efficiency of the body's nonspecific defense system represented by macrophages (M phi), polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and NK cells. These cell types are present in large numbers in spleen and liver at that time, whereas the specific immune system represented by T and B cells is functionally deficient. We previously reported enhanced activities in vitro of M phi (and PMN) from recipient animals in an early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer. We here demonstrate that these activities result in enhanced spontaneous resistance against Listeria monocytogenes in vivo: CFU of L. monocytogenes in spleen and liver 48 h after infection were about 1 or 2 to 4 log steps less than in untreated control mice of donor or host haplotype. This enhanced resistance decreased over the 4-mo period after marrow transfer. Preactivated M phi were identified as the most important effector cells. Isolated from spleen and peritoneal cavity, they performed enhanced killing of phagocytosed Listeria. Such preactivated M phi occurred in recipient animals after transfer of allogeneic but not of syngeneic bone marrow. The precise mechanism of M phi activation in the allogeneic radiation chimera in the complete absence of any detectable T cell function is not clear at present. However, these preactivated M phi display an important protective effect against L. monocytogenes: chimeras could eliminate Listeria without acquisition of positive delayed-type sensitivity when infected with 10(3) bacteria. An inoculum of 5 . 10(3) L. monocytogenes resulted either in prolonged survival compared with normal mice of the recipient haplotype or in definitive survival accompanied by a positive delayed-type sensitivity.

Roesler, J.; Groettrup, E.B.; Baccarini, M.; Lohmann-Mattes, M.L. (Fraunhofer-Institut ITA, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscopal radiation effects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will introduce the theory of radiative transfer; the second part Summary: to greenhouse effect and solar radiation 6. Radiative heating and cooling a. The Chapman layer b....

224

1 Copyright 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with biological media during biomedical laser therapeutic applications [1-6], involve the transport of radiative of radiative transfer, accurate solutions of the Equation of Radiative Transfer (ERT) are required. The ERT 8-12, 2012, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico HT2012-58307 NORMALIZATION FOR ULTRAFAST RADIATIVE TRANSFER

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

225

Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

Johnson, D.C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Theoretical and Numerical Analysis of Polarization for Time Dependent Radiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport equation with respect to the polariza- tion parameters solve the matrix-valued radiative transferTheoretical and Numerical Analysis of Polarization for Time Dependent Radiative Transfer Equations@math.stanford.edu Abstract We consider the matrix-valued radiative transfer equations for the Stokes param- eters

Bal, Guillaume

227

ME 339 Heat Transfer ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 339­ Heat Transfer Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 339 ­ Heat Transfer Spring 2010 Required convection; radiation; introduction to phase change heat transfer and to heat exchangers. Prerequisite(s): ME, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, 6th ed., Wiley Other Required Material: NA Course Objectives

Ben-Yakar, Adela

228

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

229

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca + , Sr + , Ba +) and Yb + are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions are also calculated, showing that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level.

Humberto Da Silva Jr; Maurice Raoult; Mireille Aymar; Olivier Dulieu

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca + , Sr + , Ba +) and Yb + are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions are also calculated, showing that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level.

Silva, Humberto Da; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVERADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER EQUATIONS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer. This system of equations­Brakhage algorithm. Key words. conductive­radiative heat transfer, multilevel algorithm, compact fixed point problems integro­differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer

234

AndreiG.Fedorov Title: George W. Woodruff Professorship in Heat Transfer, Combustion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AndreiG.Fedorov Title: George W. Woodruff Professorship in Heat Transfer, Combustion and Energy Research Areas of Interest Heat Transfer, combustion, and energy systems Bioengineering, lab ionization and imaging for bioanalytical mass spectrometry Thermal radiation heat transfer Thermal

Garmestani, Hamid

235

Development of a Heat Transfer Model for the Integrated Facade Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat transfer process of facade heating (mullion radiators) in a pilot research project in Pittsburgh, PA. The heat transfer model for facade heating is developed and verified by measured data. The comparison shows that the heat transfer model predicts...

Gong, X.; Archer, D. H.; Claridge, D. E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ME 544 Advanced Heat Transfer Spring 2013 Time: 2pm-3pm MWF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ME 544 Advanced Heat Transfer Spring 2013 Time: 2pm-3pm MWF Location: B4 Instructor: Dr. Allan and engineering applications of heat transfer including conduction, convection, and radiation. Course Learning, convection, and radiation heat transfer modes. 2. Determine the dominant modes of heat transfer, and apply

237

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Adsorption of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) on Si(111)-7x7 at room temperature studied by synchrotron radiation core-level spectroscopies and excited-state density functional theory calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The room temperature adsorption of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}-C{identical_to}N) on Si(111)-7x7 is examined by synchrotron radiation N 1s x-ray photoemission and x-ray absorption spectroscopies. The experimental spectroscopic data point to multiple adsorption geometries. Candidate structures are optimized using density functional theory (DFT), the surface being simulated by silicon clusters encompassing one (adjacent) adatom-rest atom pair. This is followed by the DFT calculation of electron transition energies and cross sections. The comparison of theoretical spectra with experimental ones indicates that the molecule is adsorbed on the surface under two forms, a nondissociated geometry (an sp{sup 2}-hybridized CN) and a dissociated one (leading to a pendent sp-hybridized CN). In the nondissociative mode, the molecule bridges an adatom-rest atom pair. For bridge-type models, the discussion of the core-excited state calculations is focussed on the so-called silicon-molecule mixed-state transitions that strongly depend on the breaking or not of the adatom backbonds and on the attachment of the nitrogen end either to the adatom or to the rest atom. Concerning the dissociated state, the CH bond cleavage leads to a cyanomethyl (Si-CH{sub 2}-CN) plus a silicon monohydride, which accounts for the spectroscopic evidence of a free C{identical_to}N group (we do not find at 300 K any spectroscopic evidence for a C{identical_to}N group datively bonded to a silicon atom via its nitrogen lone pair). Therefore the reaction products of acetonitrile on Si(111)-7x7 are similar to those detected on the Si(001)-2x1 surface at the same temperature, despite the marked differences in the reconstruction of those two surfaces, especially the distance between adjacent silicon broken bonds. In that respect, we discuss how adatom backbond breaking in the course of adsorption may explain why both surface orientations react the same way with acetonitrile.

Bournel, F.; Carniato, S.; Dufour, G.; Gallet, J.-J.; Ilakovac, V.; Rangan, S.; Rochet, F.; Sirotti, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, Boite Postale 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at Earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the TUV radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radi...

Thomas, Brian C; Snyder, Brock R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22400 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

OwenDavis

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

Lazarine, Alexis D

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced, melt-water, film-boiling heat transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In evaluation of severe-accident sequences for water-cooled nuclear reactors, molten core materials may be postulated to be released into the containment and accumulate on concrete. The heatup and decomposition of concrete is accompanied by the release of water vapor and carbon dioxide gases. Gases flowing through the melt upper surface can influence the rates of heat transfer to water overlying the melt. In particular, the gas flow through the interface can be envisioned to enhance the heat removal from the melt. A mechanistic model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe film-boiling heat transfer between a molten pool and an overlying coolant layer in the presence of sparging gas. The model favorably predicts the lead-Feron 11 data of Greene and Greene et al. for which the calculations indicate that area enhancement in the conduction heat transfer across the film is the predominant mechanism leading to augmentation in the heat flux as the gas velocity increases. Predictions for oxidic corium indicate a rapid increase in film-boiling heat flux as the gas velocity rises. The predominant mode of heat transfer for this case is radiation, and the increase in heat flux with gas velocity is primarily a result of interfacial area enhancement of the radiation component of the overall heat transfer coefficient. The CORQUENCH model has been incorporated into the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code{sup 6} for the analysis of transient spreading in containments.

Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Available transfer capability and first order sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of calculating Available Transfer Capability and the exploration of the first order effects of certain power system network variables are described. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ordered that bulk electrical control areas must provide to market participants a ``commercially viable`` network transfer capability for the import, export, and through-put of energy. A practical method for deriving this transfer capability utilizing both linear and non-linear power flow analysis methods is developed that acknowledges both thermal and voltage system limitations. The Available Transfer Capability is the incremental transfer capability derived by the method reduced by margins. A procedure for quantifying the first order effect of network uncertainties such as load forecast error and simultaneous transfers on the calculated transfer capability of a power system snapshot are explored. The quantification of these network uncertainties can provide information necessary for system operation, planning, and energy market participation.

Gravener, M.H. [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States)] [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States); Nwankpa, C. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multilayer-weighted transmittance functions for use in broadband irradiance and turbidity calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physically-modelled method is presented to obtain an accurate transmittance and optical depth for various extinction processes (Rayleigh scattering, aerosol extinction, and absorption by ozone, nitrogen dioxide, uniformly mixed gases, and water vapor) affecting the transfer of shortwave radiation in a cloudless atmosphere. The integration over the shortwave solar spectrum is performed with a more realistic weighting function than the conventional one. The calculation and properties of the aerosol optical depth are discussed in detail, as well as its proper use in atmospheric turbidity studies.

Gueymard, C. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic k-shell radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: media. Specifically, we provide: (i) an anisotropic version of the radiative transport equation (RTE... scattering model in section 4. 3 Anisotropic Radiative Transfer The...

248

Measurements and modeling of soot formation and radiation in microgravity jet diffusion flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. On modeling, the authors have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed {beta}-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude-Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar flames and turbulent jet flames. Predicted soot volume fraction results also agree with the data for 1-g and 0-g laminar jet flames as well as 1-g turbulent jet flames.

Ku, J.C.; Tong, L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Greenberg, P.S. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Microgravity Combustion Branch

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Approach for calculating population doses using the CIDER computer code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an approach for calculating radiation doses for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. The approach utilizes the CIDER computer code.

Shipler, D.B.

1993-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Linear Kinetic Heat Transfer: Moment Equations, Boundary Conditions, and Knudsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] and phonons [6], and the radiative transfer equation [7]. The solution of any kinetic equation is usually][25], radiative transfer [7][26], and phonon transport in crystals [6]. Despite the long history, and success method, and the methods employed in [18][19][20], are based solely on the transport equations in the bulk, and

Struchtrup, Henning

251

Radiation Modeling In Fluid Flow Iain D. Boyd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Closing remarks #12;3 Radiation In Fluid Flows · Radiation transport is an important phenomenon in many 5800 K #12;7 Fundamentals of Radiation Transport · Radiation does not require a medium !!! dI (s, ! ) ds +(p +g )I (s, ! )+ p I (s, ! ) Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) - spectral intensity

Wang, Wei

252

SciTech Connect: Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; RADIOTHERAPY; PLANNING; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY...

253

Radiative Transfer in Reflection Edvald Ingi Gislason  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unique skills and deep understanding of the theory involved proved vital to the success of this project coming from stars within them. With development of new algorithms and hardware, improvements can be made

254

Posters Comparison of Stochastic Radiation Transfer Predictions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014SocietyJ. Dudhia51 Posters A594173619

255

Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014SocietyJ. Dudhia51 Posters7551773313

256

Sandia National Laboratories: understanding radiative energy transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialstheterahertz sources and detectorsunderstanding

257

How Do Calculators Calculate? Helmut Knaust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not convert numbers to base 2. They use a binary-coded decimal (BCD) system instead. Calculators can only

Knaust, Helmut

258

ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative transfer calculations, will be acquired using the aircraft and surface facilities available to ARESE. This document outlines the scientific approach and measurement requirements of the project.

Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Data Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is aID Service First DOIData Transfer

260

Transferring Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfor a CleanTransfer Service,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Transferring Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfor a CleanTransfer

262

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

263

Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and "fifth force" searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called "chameleon" mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary re...

Baum, S; Hoffmann, D H H; Karuza, M; Semertzidis, Y K; Upadhye, A; Zioutas, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

FALL 2011 EMEC 326 DR. RUHUL AMIN HEAT TRANSFER 201 C Roberts Hall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2011 EMEC 326 DR. RUHUL AMIN HEAT TRANSFER 201 C Roberts Hall Phone: 994-6295 POLICY STATEMENT, convection, and radiation formulations. Introduction to heat transfer equipment. Course credit: 4

Dyer, Bill

266

Dt2boool2> Nora Heat Transfer Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dt2boool2> Nora Heat Transfer Correlations in Nuclear Reactor Safety Calculations VW �Aiiatt�aii #12;fcflison cufiMiMltt lor yhdyiifci aomicantfgy RIS0-M-25O4 6«.*). HEAT TRANSFER of work 26 3. PRESENT KNOWLEDGE 27 3.1. General considerations 27 3.2. Heat transfer in different flow

267

RECENT ADVANCES IN HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

509 RECENT ADVANCES IN HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM 1 C. JOHANNES Service de Recherches Appliquées, L boiling, forced convection heat transfer. Relations between critical nucleate flux and some parameters confronted with the problem of calculating the heat transfer from the helium to the superconducting material

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

Aleksey Ilyin

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Original Impact Calculations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

270

FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

Shapiro, A.B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

González, Matthias; Commerçon, Benoît; Masson, Jacques

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O radiative forcing resulting from a supersonic jet transport emission scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tropospheric radiative forcing has been calculated for ozone and water vapor perturbations caused by a realistic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft emission scenario. Atmospheric profiles of water vapor and ozone were obtained using the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model (CRT) of the global troposphere and stratosphere. IR radiative forcing calculations were made with the LLNL correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model. UV-Visible-Near IR radiative forcing calculations were made with the LLNL two stream solar radiation model. For the case of water vapor the IR and Near IR radiative forcing was determined at five different latitudes and then averaged using an appropriate latitudinal average to obtain the global average value. Global average values of radiative forcing were approximately 1.2--2.6 10{sup {minus}3} W/m{sup 2}, depending on the background atmospheric water vapor profile. This result is consistent with prior published values for a similar aircraft scenario and supports the conclusion that the water vapor climate forcing effect is very small. The radiative forcing in the IR and UV-Visible spectral ranges, due to the ozone perturbation, was calculated for the globally averaged atmosphere. Global average values of the radiative forcing were 0.034 W/m{sup 2} for the UV-Visible spectral range and 0.006 W/m{sup 2} for the IR spectral range (0.04 W/m{sup 2} total). This result is also consistent with the range of published values obtained for a similar HSCT scenario. As was the case for water vapor, the ozone forcing is too small to be of major consequence.

Grossman, A.S.; Kinnison, D.E.; Penner, J.E.; Grant, K.E.; Tamaresis, J.; Connell, P.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Research Div.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Aggregated Transfer Factors For Small Mammals Collected From the Exposed Sediments Of A 137 Cs Contaminated Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 137}Cs transfer factors were computed for small mammals collected from the dried sediment areas of a partially drained, contaminated reservoir. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations were heterogeneous on small and large spatial scales, with a geometric mean of 253.1 Bq/kg dry weight. About 50% of the variance in cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus tissue {sup 137}Cs levels was explained by variation in soil {sup 137}Cs levels. Soil to animal transfer factors (whole body dry weight) averaged 6.0 for cotton rats and 1.2 for cotton mice Peromyscus gossypinus. These values are similar to {sup 137}Cs transfer factors for herbivorous, homeothermic animals from other contaminated ecosystems. Site-specific transfer factors can significantly affect the estimation of dose. In the RESRAD-BIOTA dose model, the default transfer factor for {sup 137}Cs in terrestrial animals is 110 resulting in an estimate of radiation dose to terrestrial biota that is 16 times more than the dose calculated with the actual measured transfer factor.

Paller, Michael H.; Jannika, G. Timothy; Wike, Lynn D

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

Daylighting Calculation in DOE-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 3.2.2 Luminous Efficacy of Solar Radiation . . . . . . .The Availability of Solar Radiation. and Daylight",incidence TSOLNM for solar radiation. TSOLDF =

Winkelmann, F.C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cooling load calculations for radiant systems: are they the same traditional methods?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat transfer is handled in traditional cooling load calculationheat gain is well recognized by cooling load calculationload calculations for radiant systems should use the ASHRAE heat

Bauman, Fred; Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Experimental investigations of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and two-phase mixture-level swell under high-pressure low heat-flux conditions. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are reported from a series of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and mixture-level swell tests. Experimental testing was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). The THTF is an electrically heated bundle test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those in a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. The objective of heat transfer testing was to acquire heat transfer coefficients and fluid conditions in a partially uncovered bundle. Testing was performed in a quasi-steady-state mode with the heated core 30 to 40% uncovered. Linear heat rates varied from 0.32 to 2.22 kW/m.rod (0.1 to 0.68 kW/ft.rod). Under these conditions peak clad temperatures in excess of 1050 K (1430/sup 0/F) were observed, and total heat transfer coefficients ranged from 0.0045 to 0.037 W/cm/sup 2/.K (8 to 65 Btu/h.ft/sup 2/./sup 0/F). Spacer grids were observed to enhance heat transfer at, and downstream of, the grid. Radiation heat transfer was calculated to account for as much as 65% of total heat transfer in low-flow tests.

Anklam, T. M.; Miller, R. J.; White, M. D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

279

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Photo-Thermal Transfer Function of Dielectric Mirrors for Precision Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photo-thermal transfer function from absorbed power incident on a dielectric mirror to the effective mirror position is calculated using the coating design as input. The effect is found to change in amplitude and sign for frequencies corresponding to diffusion length comparable to the coating thickness. Transfer functions are calculated for the $Ti$-doped ${\\rm Ta_2O_5:SiO_2}$ coating used in Advanced LIGO and for a crystalline ${\\rm Al_xGa_{1-x}As}$ coating. The shape of the transfer function at high frequencies is shown to be a sensitive indicator of the effective absorption depth, providing a potentially powerful tool to distinguish coating-internal absorption from surface contamination related absorption. The sign change of the photo-thermal effect could also be useful to stabilize radiation pressure-based opto-mechanical systems. High frequency corrections to the previously published thermo-optic noise estimates are also provided. Finally, estimating the quality of the thermo-optic noise cancellation occurring in fine-tuned ${\\rm Al_xGa_{1-x}As}$ coatings requires the detailed heat flow analysis done in this paper.

Stefan W. Ballmer

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

IntroductiontoProcessEngineering(PTG) 5. Heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#5/6 IntroductiontoProcessEngineering(PTG) VST rz13 1/114 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven Ã?boProcessEngineering(PTG) VST rz13 Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/114 Pic: BÃ?88 #12;#5/6 IntroductiontoProcessEngineering(PTG) VST rz13 3/114 5.1 Conductive heat transfer #5/6 Introductionto

Zevenhoven, Ron

282

Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

Metz, Philip D. (Rocky Point, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2008 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2008 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress transfer authorities established by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106

Perkins, Richard A.

284

7, 72357275, 2007 Adaptive radiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Two adaptive radiative transfer schemes for numerical weather prediction models V. Venema 1 , A numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. The atmosphere and the land surface are complex-stream approximation. In most weather prediction models these parameterisation schemes are therefore called infre

Boyer, Edmond

285

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Radiative Characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: An Example from M-PACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

de Boer, Gijs; Collins, William D.; Menon, Surabi; Long, Charles N.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Proceedings of the 8 International Symposium on Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, contributions from radiation can be determined via solution of the Equation of Radiative Transfer (ERT equation can lead to significant error, due to the short time-duration of the transport processes, Beijing, China ISHT8-07-05 MODELING OF ULTRAFAST LASER TRANSPORT AND APPLICATIONS Zhixiong Guo Rutgers

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

288

New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

Böcklin, Christoph, E-mail: boecklic@ethz.ch; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg [Institute of Electromagnetic Fields, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Control Dewar Subcooler Heat Exchanger Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculations done to size the control dewar subcooler were done to obtain a sufficient subcooler size based on some conservative assumptions. The final subcooler design proposed in the design report will work even better because (1) It has more tubing length, and (2) will have already subcooled liquid at the inlet due to the transfer line design. The subcooler design described in the 'Design Report of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid for the Fermilab D0 Detector Upgrade' is the final design proposed. A short description of this design follows. The subcooler is constructed of 0.50-inch OD copper tubing with 1.0-inch diameter fins. It has ten and one half spirals at a 11.375-inch centerline diameter to provide 31 feet of tubing length. The liquid helium supply for the solenoid flows through the subcooler and then is expanded through a J-T valve. The subcooler spirals are immersed in the return two phase helium process stream. The return stream is directed over the finned tubing by an annulus created by a 10-inch pipe inside a 12-inch pipe. The transfer line from the refrigerator to the control dewar is constructed such that the liquid helium supply tube is in the refrigerator return stream, thereby subcooling the liquid up to the point where the u-tubes connect the transfer line to the control dewar. The subcooler within the control dewar will remove the heat picked up in the helium supply u-tube/bayonets. The attached subcooler/heat exchanger calculations were done neglecting any subcooling in the transfer line. All heat picked up in the transfer line from the refrigerator storage dewar to the control dewar is absorbed by the supply stream. The subcooler was sized such that the two phase supply fluid is subcooled at 1.7 atm pressure and when expanded through a JT valve to 1.45 atm pressure it is at a saturated liquid state. The calculations apply during steady state operation and at a flow rate of 16 g/s. The analysis of the heat exchanger was broken into two parts relating to the heat transfer mode taking place. The first part is considered the condensing part in which the helium supply stream is changed from two phase fluid to one phase liquid. The second part is the subcooling part where the liquid temperature is lowered, i.e.. subcooled. A summary of the calculations and results appears on the next page. The raw calculations follow the summary.

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER Vol. 14, No. 4, OctoberDecember 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER Vol. 14, No. 4, October­December 2000 Multidimensional are optical tomographyof tissue, remote sensing of oceansand atmospheres, laser material processing radiative heat transfer in participat- ing media in recent years. However, the analysis of radiative heat

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

291

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

293

Aqueous systems from first-principles : structure, dynamics and electron-transfer reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we show for the first time how it is possible to calculated fully from first-principles the diabatic free-energy surfaces of electron-transfer reactions. The excitation energy corresponding to the transfer ...

Sit, Patrick Hoi Land

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ELEG620: Solar Electric Systems University of Delaware, ECE Spring 2008 C. Honsberg Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELEG620: Solar Electric Systems University of Delaware, ECE Spring 2008 C. Honsberg Solar Radiation Solar Radiation: Effects of atmosphere, angular dependence of radiation, variation of solar radiation ­ Calculation of Solar Radiation: · Estimate of intensity of solar radiation · Angular Dependence ­ Solar Noon

Honsberg, Christiana

296

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mass Transfer from Giant Donors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in he donor's response to mass loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass transfer rate via $L_1$ allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolv...

Pavlovskii, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute calculous gallbladder Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

brain and arterial plasma data. Radiation... -absorbed doses were calculated using the MIRD Committee scheme. Results: After 11C-NOP-1A injection, peak uptake... Analysis...

299

HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

Boyer, Edmond

300

Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer in Window Frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer Arasteh and Dragan Curcija ABSTRACT Accurately analyzing heat transfer in window frame cavities radiation heat-transfer effects.) We examine three representative complex cavity cross-section profiles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

Lenert, Andrej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Model calculations of nuclear data for biologically-important elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe calculations of neutron-induced reactions on carbon and oxygen for incident energies up to 70 MeV, the relevant clinical energy in radiation neutron therapy. Our calculations using the FKK-GNASH, GNASH, and ALICE codes are compared with experimental measurements, and their usefulness for modeling reactions on biologically-important elements is assessed.

Chadwick, M.B.; Blann, M.; Reffo, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Young, P.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Calculated corrections to superallowed Fermi beta decay: New evaluation of the nuclear-structure-dependent terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is accurate calculations for the radiative and isospin symmetry-breaking corrections that must be applied to the experimental data. We present a new and consistent set of calculations for the nuclear-structure-dependent components of these corrections...

Towner, IS; Hardy, John C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

INL Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Through collaboration with industry partners, INL's Technology Deployment office makes available to American agencies and international organizations unique...

305

Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer in Horizontal Window Frames with Internal Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper assesses the accuracy of the simplified frame cavity conduction/convection and radiation models presented in ISO 15099 and used in software for rating and labeling window products. Temperatures and U-factors for typical horizontal window frames with internal cavities are compared; results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations with detailed radiation modeling are used as a reference. Four different frames were studied. Two were made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and two of aluminum. For each frame, six different simulations were performed, two with a CFD code and four with a building-component thermal-simulation tool using the Finite Element Method (FEM). This FEM tool addresses convection using correlations from ISO 15099; it addressed radiation with either correlations from ISO 15099 or with a detailed, view-factor-based radiation model. Calculations were performed using the CFD code with and without fluid flow in the window frame cavities; the calculations without fluid flow were performed to verify that the CFD code and the building-component thermal-simulation tool produced consistent results. With the FEM-code, the practice of subdividing small frame cavities was examined, in some cases not subdividing, in some cases subdividing cavities with interconnections smaller than five millimeters (mm) (ISO 15099) and in some cases subdividing cavities with interconnections smaller than seven mm (a breakpoint that has been suggested in other studies). For the various frames, the calculated U-factors were found to be quite comparable (the maximum difference between the reference CFD simulation and the other simulations was found to be 13.2 percent). A maximum difference of 8.5 percent was found between the CFD simulation and the FEM simulation using ISO 15099 procedures. The ISO 15099 correlation works best for frames with high U-factors. For more efficient frames, the relative differences among various simulations are larger. Temperature was also compared, at selected locations on the frames. Small differences was found in the results from model to model. Finally, the effectiveness of the ISO cavity radiation algorithms was examined by comparing results from these algorithms to detailed radiation calculations (from both programs). Our results suggest that improvements in cavity heat transfer calculations can be obtained by using detailed radiation modeling (i.e. view-factor or ray-tracing models), and that incorporation of these strategies may be more important for improving the accuracy of results than the use of CFD modeling for horizontal cavities.

Gustavsen, Arlid; Kohler, Christian; Dalehaug, Arvid; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Heat Transfer Guest Editorial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

307

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

Perkins, Richard A.

308

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2009 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2009 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress in accordance with 15 USC Sec 3710(g)(2) for an annual summary on the implementation of technology transfer

Perkins, Richard A.

309

ENHANCING THE TRANSFER STUDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efforts #12;Who Are Ohio State Transfer Students? #12;TRANSFER PROFILE DatafromSU12,AU12,SP13 3 as NFYS: 576 Average Transfer Hours of Enrolled Student: 52.2 Living on Campus: 470 Total # Sending Expectations (time management skills, balancing a more rigorous course load, study skills) 13.24% Majors (how

310

22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. Discusses natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, ...

Coderre, Jeffrey A.

311

Calculating Vessel Volumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This summarizes a demonstration at the "Metron" conference (April 2002, Yale University), using a computer program to calculate the capacity of pots drawn on the computer screen and then given one dimension (e.g., its ...

Younger, John G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol direct radiative Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transfer Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Science William D. Collins... system. Naturally occurring aerosols reflect some of the incident solar radiation back to space before... the...

313

SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

Jozef Klacka

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José, E-mail: jsdehesa@upv.es

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, B.T.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

Robert G. Ellingson

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd [Environmental Effects Branch, EM50, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

ON THE SOLAR RADIATION BUDGET AND THE CLOUD ABSORPTION ANOMALY DEBATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE SOLAR RADIATION BUDGET AND THE CLOUD ABSORPTION ANOMALY DEBATE ZHANQING LI Department-of-the-art radiative transfer models. 1. Introduction Solar radiation is the ultimate source of energy for the planet of solar radiation, which is unfortunately still fraught with large uncertainties (Wild et al. 1995; Li et

Li, Zhanqing

323

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

325

Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

Ghan, Steven J.

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

Triplett, C.E.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radiation dosimetry and medical physics calculations using MCNP 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is given in Fig. 10 on the following page. The phantom is a standard ISO water filled slab phantom with external dimensions 30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm. The front wall of the phantom is 0.25 cm thick polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, (8% 21 hydrogen, 32...% oxygen, and 60% carbon) while the remaining walls are all 1 cm thick PMMA. The phantom is filled with water. Fig. 10. Side view of MCNP geometry plot for problem 4. The TLD model is centered on the front face of the phantom with the long axis...

Redd, Randall Alex

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012magnetic

329

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

2.13 HEAT TRANSFER & FLUID FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS 2.13.7-1 Molecular dynamics methods in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.13 HEAT TRANSFER & FLUID FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS 2.13.7-1 2.13.7 Molecular dynamics methods in microscale heat transfer Shigeo Maruyama A. Introduction In normal heat transfer and fluid flow calculations of molecules. This situation is approached in microscale heat transfer and fluid flow. Molecular level

Maruyama, Shigeo

332

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

333

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

334

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

HIGEE Mass Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

337

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

338

Bus transfer analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses bus transfer schemes and the methodology used in modeling and analysis. Due to the unavailability of generic acceptance criteria, simulations were performed to analyze the actual fast bus transfer operations at four operating nuclear power generating stations. Sample simulation results illustrating the transient variations in motors currents and torques are included. The analyses were performed to ensure that motors and other rotating parts are not subjected to excessive or accumulated stresses caused by bus transfer operations. A summary of the experience gained in the process of performing this work and suggested bus transfer acceptance criteria are also presented.

Weronick, R.; Hassan, I.D. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Lyndhurst, NJ (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Technology Transfer Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

340

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

NELSON RL

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

343

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

344

11th International Conference of Radiation Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

NONE

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

Medium-induced multi-photon radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Moli\\`{e}re limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

Hao Ma; Carlos A. Salgado; Konrad Tywoniuk

2011-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gravitational Radiation in Noncommutative Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational radiation power of a binary system in a noncommutative space is derived and it's rate of the period decrease is calculated to first order in noncommutativity parameter. By comparing the theoretical results with the observational data of the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, we find a bound on the noncommutativity parameter.

A. Jahan; N. Sadeghnezhad

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Friedmann equation is derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the constant in the curvature term determined by matching with the present values of the Hubble parameter and energy density. General relativity is needed only for the luminosity distance, to describe how the curvature of space, determined by the energy density, can change the intensity of light by changing the area of the sphere to which the light has spread. Thirty-one problems are included.

Thomas F. Jordan

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

SWAMI II technology transfer plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements. Portions of the LLW system are several decades old, or older, and do not comply with current environmental protection regulations. Several subsystems of the LLW system have been designated to receive a state-of-the-art replacement and refurbishment. One such subsystem serves Building 2026, the High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory. This assessment focuses on the scope of work for the Building 2026 replacement LLW Collection and Transfer System, including the provision of a new Monitoring and Control Station (Building 2099) to receive, store, and treat (adjust pH) low level radioactive waste.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide Complexes in the Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide...

353

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related LinksCalculatorsRelative

355

ARM - Index of Calculators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX NewsCalculators Outreach Home Room

356

Using Graphical Representations to Support the Calculation of Infusion Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Graphical Representations to Support the Calculation of Infusion Parameters Sandy J. J. Gould in which participants were asked to solve a num- ber of infusion parameter problems that were represented representations transfer to actual workplace settings. Keywords: Graphical reasoning, infusion pumps, re

Subramanian, Sriram

357

Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

Baudouy, B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Technology transfer 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and the heat transfer between the surfaces in the noncontact regions. We apply a recently developed contact mechanics theory, which accounts for the hierarchical nature of the contact between solids with roughness on many different length scales. For elastic contact, at the highest (atomic) resolution the area of real contact typically consists of atomic (nanometer) sized regions, and we discuss the implications of this for the heat transfer. For solids with very smooth surfaces, as is typical in many modern engineering applications, the interfacial separation in the non-contact regions will be very small, and for this case we show the importance of the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies.

B. N. J. Persson; B. Lorenz; A. I. Volokitin

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

New equation calculates thermal conductivities of C[sub 1]-C[sub 4] gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design of heat exchangers, heat-transfer coefficients are commonly calculated for individual items. These calculations require knowledge of the thermal conductivities of the species involved. The calculation require knowledge of the thermal conductivities of the species involved. The calculation of the overall heat-transfer coefficient for a heat exchanger also requires thermal conductivity data for the individual species. In fact, thermal conductivity is the fundamental property involved in heat transfer. Ordinarily, thermal conductivities are either measured experimentally or estimated using complex correlations and models. Engineers must search existing literature for the values needed. Here, a compilation of thermal conductivity data for gases is presented for a wide temperature range. Using these data with the accompanying equation will enable engineers to quickly determine values at the desired temperatures. The results are provided in an easy-to-use tabular format, which is especially helpful for rapid calculations using a personal computer or hand-held calculator.

Yaws, C.L.; Lin, X.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of newly.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere Article Infrared Absorption Spectra, Radiative Efficiencies, and Global Warming Potentials of Newly of 600­1730 cm-1 . These spectra are then used to calculate the radiative efficiencies and global warming

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

364

Source storage and transfer cask: Users Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storage and shield cask for the dual californium source is designed to shield and transport up to 3.7 mg (2 Ci) of /sup 252/Cf. the cask meets Department of Transportation (DOT) license requirements for Type A materials (DOT-7A). The cask is designed to transfer sources to and from the Flourinel and Fuel Storage (FAST) facility delayed-neutron interrogator. Californium sources placed in the cask must be encapsulated in the SR-CF-100 package and attached to Teleflex cables. The cask contains two source locations. Each location contains a gear box that allows a Teleflex cable to be remotely moved by a hand crank into and out of the cask. This transfer procedure permits sources to be easily removed and inserted into the delayed-neutron interrogator and reduces personnel radiation exposure during transfer. The radiation dose rate with the maximum allowable quantity of californium (3.7 mg) in the cask is 30 mR/h at the surface and less than 2 mR/h 1 m from the cask surface. This manual contains information about the cask, californium sources, describes the method to ship the cask, and how to insert and remove sources from the cask. 28 figs.

Eccleston, G.W.; Speir, L.G.; Garcia, D.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

368

Technology Transfer Office November 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer Office November 2009 INVENTION AGREEMENT In consideration of my employment in writing to Dartmouth through the Technology Transfer Office any such discovery or invention and identify

Myers, Lawrence C.

369

Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

Covey, Debra

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

Covey, Debra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM LIST Name Organization Fairbanks, Mary H. AU Garnett-Harris, Deborah A. AU James, Debra A. AU Johnston, Robyne AU May, Melanie P. AU Pickens,...

373

Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of work in section F.

Pannala, S; D'Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Parallel Reacting Flow Calculations for Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor Design 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, memory, and scalability of distributed memory parallel computers. An unstructured finite element transport from the fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Both works used solution procedures that require the reacting flow model and numerical method and summarize representative calculations using MPSalsa

Devine, Karen

375

A FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVERADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER EQUATIONS IN TWO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12; The isotropic, monoenergetic, radiative transport equation is [10], [25], [34], \\Omega \\Delta r r­ differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer in two spaceA FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVE­RADIATIVE HEAT

376

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference Las Vegas, Nevada, USA July 21-23, 2003 HT2003-47449 HEAT TRANSFER FROM A MOVING AND EVAPORATING MENISCUS ON A HEATED SURFACE meniscus with complete evaporation of water without any meniscus break-up. The experimental heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

377

Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer Departments. #12;Resources, framing, and transfer p. 2 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer, Andrew Elby of activating resources, a language with an explicitly manifold view of cognitive structure. In this chapter, we

Hammer, David

378

A CLASS OF PHYSICALLY MOTIVATED CLOSURES FOR RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics use the relativistic Boltzmann equation to describe the kinetics of photons. It is difficult to solve the six-dimensional time-dependent transfer equation unless the problem is highly symmetric or in equilibrium. When the radiation field is smooth, it is natural to take angular moments of the transfer equation to reduce the degrees of freedom. However, low order moment equations contain terms that depend on higher order moments. To close the system of moment equations, approximations are made to truncate this hierarchy. Popular closures used in astrophysics include flux-limited diffusion and the M{sub 1} closure, which are rather ad hoc and do not necessarily capture the correct physics. In this paper, we propose a new class of closures for radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics. We start from a different perspective and highlight the consistency of a fully relativistic formalism. We present a generic framework to approximate radiative transfer based on relativistic Grad's moment method. We then derive a 14-field method that minimizes unphysical photon self-interaction.

Chan, Chi-kwan, E-mail: ckchan@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Data Transfer Kit: A geometric rendezvous-based tool for multiphysics data transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Data Transfer Kit (DTK) is a software library designed to provide parallel data transfer services for arbitrary physics components based on the concept of geometric rendezvous. The rendezvous algorithm provides a means to geometrically correlate two geometric domains that may be arbitrarily decomposed in a parallel simulation. By repartitioning both domains such that they have the same geometric domain on each parallel process, efficient and load balanced search operations and data transfer can be performed at a desirable algorithmic time complexity with low communication overhead relative to other types of mapping algorithms. With the increased development efforts in multiphysics simulation and other multiple mesh and geometry problems, generating parallel topology maps for transferring fields and other data between geometric domains is a common operation. The algorithms used to generate parallel topology maps based on the concept of geometric rendezvous as implemented in DTK are described with an example using a conjugate heat transfer calculation and thermal coupling with a neutronics code. In addition, we provide the results of initial scaling studies performed on the Jaguar Cray XK6 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for a worse-case-scenario problem in terms of algorithmic complexity that shows good scaling on 0(1 x 104) cores for topology map generation and excellent scaling on 0(1 x 105) cores for the data transfer operation with meshes of O(1 x 109) elements. (authors)

Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Pawlowski, R. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technology transfer @ VUB Hugo Loosvelt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13/12/2012 Technology transfer @ VUB Hugo Loosvelt #12;VUB in Brussels www.vub.ac.be including or conclude licensing contracts #12;Technology transfer TTI assists academics to realise knowledge transfer by needed for R&D collaboration, licensing and spin-out company formation Technology transfer is the process

Steels, Luc

382

POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff to CSU including (but not limited to) helping transfer students explore study skills, time management

383

Richard Bland College Transfer Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Technology-IDT Interdisciplinary Studies-IDS International Business-INBU International Studies-IS ItalianRichard Bland College Transfer Guide #12;Using the Transfer Guide Thank you for your interest in Old Dominion University!!! The ODU Transfer Guide is designed to assist students transferring to ODU

384

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

Sigg, Raymond A. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

Sigg, R.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

ENRAF gauge reference level calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radial heat transfer from a moving plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The plasma temperature is assumed constant axially and rad'ally and equal to the value at the exit of tl. e arc. chamber. This temperature was used in the determ'r. a- tion of the Nusselt number a, d the Reynolds number used in the above correlatior... and measured values and estimated the accuracy of the heat flux data to be within Measurements of the total continuum radiatior. or simply the energy transferred by radiation from a wall stabilized argon plasma arc were made by Barzelay (14), Comparisons...

Johnson, James Randall

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A novel nanometric DNA thin film as a sensor for alpha radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440­746, Korea. The unexpected nuclear accidents have radiation. Due to the high linear energy transfer value, sensors designed to detect such radiation require be one of promising candidates for the development of online radiation sensors. T he Fukushima nuclear

Cai, Long

389

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radiative Transfer, Satellite Retrieval Systems and 32 Years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computer · DEC VAX systems driving Adage image processors #12;NOAA also using Gould SEL computers on the Gould to ingest the Mode AAA data for VAS multispectral imagery · I wrote code on the VAX to talk with the Gould and have the Gould extract an image sector from the ingest sector and pass it out to the VAX

Kuligowski, Bob

391

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J.A. Lercher, “Hydrogen Storage in Microspheres - FinalHydrogen Program Review Hydrogen Storage”, U.S. DepartmentAn overview of hydrogen storage methods”, in Hydro- gen

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 100 (2006) 457469  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, College Station, TX 77843, USA b Remote sensing Division, Code 7232, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington

393

EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER FROM COMPLEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALLAN WILSON Bachelor of Science Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma 2005 Submitted Allan, who taught me to set lofty goals and always give my best. And although your lives were not long

394

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a heating lamp emitting in the visible and near infraredwith heating in a furnace at 400 o C. The infrared lamp was

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vie, and Ø. Ulleberg, “Hydrogen Production and Storage - R&Dfor production. The procedure for hydrogen storage and

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Radiation-transparent windows, method for imaging fluid transfers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin, x-ray-transparent window system for environmental chambers involving pneumatic pressures above 40 bar is presented. The window allows for x-ray access to such phenomena as fuel sprays injected into a pressurized chamber that mimics realistic internal combustion engine cylinder operating conditions.

Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Wang, Jin (Burr Ridge, IL)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 106 (2007) 325347  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, aerosol polarimetry sensor; ATSR, along track scanning radiometer; AVHRR, advanced very high resolution radiometer; CALIPSO, cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observations; CLAMS, Chesapeake model; GEWEX, global energy and water cycle experiment; GHG, greenhouse gas; GOME, global ozone

398

Uncertainty of microwave radiative transfer computations in rain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

retrieval using new thermodynamic observations; and 3) to investigate the characteristics of four different RT codes. Firstly, a plane-parallel RT Model (RTM) of n layers in light rainfall was used for the analytical and computational derivation...

Hong, Sung Wook

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

399

Efficient wireless non-radiative mid-range energy transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wire grid was deployed, seri- ous interest and effort was devoted (most notably by Nikola Tesla [1]) towards storage) justifies revisiting investigation of this issue. Today, we face a different challenge than Tesla

Soljaèiæ, Marin

400

Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roof temperatures. It was found that a radiant barrier such as aluminum foil can reduce the heat flux significantly. Experimental results were compared to a Three-Region approximate solution developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The model...

Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 103 (2007) 168174  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.05.010 Ã?Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 303 871 2897; fax: +1 303 871 4405. E-mail addresses: agoldman@du.edu, goldman

402

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 101 (2006) 404410  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of monochromatic light impinging on any point of DS in directions confined to a small solid angle O (called, New York, NY 10025, USA Abstract We revisit the optical theorem relevant to the far-established fact which states that extinction is caused by the interference of the incident and the forward

403

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

samples are exposed to an incandescent lamp. Acknowledgmentin a furnace or by an incandescent lamp. It was observedwhen heated by an incandescent lamp than within furnace.

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 7980 (2003) 11711188  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.elsevier.com/locate/jqsrt The spectral signature of mixed-phase clouds composed of non-spherical ice crystals and spherical liquid and ice particles may be present. This is typically known as a "mixed-phase" cloud condition the bulk scattering properties of mixed-phase clouds by a linear weighting of the contributions of ice

Baum, Bryan A.

405

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 70 (2001) 473504  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the asymmetry parameter of the phase function for ice crystals smaller than 40 m. For particles larger than­13 m spectral region contains a wealth of information that is very useful for the retrieval of ice properties of nonspherical ice crystals that are fundamental to the IR retrieval implementation, we use

Baum, Bryan A.

406

NNSA Transfers Responsibility for Radiation Detection System to China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogosAdministrationNetworkNuclearNationalTimeline

407

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Radiative Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAn AssessmentARM EngineeringOnatmospheric profilesModeling

408

Present and Future Computing Requirements Radiative Transfer of Astrophysical Explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point07.06

409

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 98 (2006) 122129  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and unaccounted-for solar energy sink in the atmosphere. We spectrally resolve, for the first time, all solar

Zender, Charles

410

CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline Rock -COPPE Incubator JumpISES- 2003 CROSS

411

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, O?ce of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructurefuel cells, (d) the large amount of energy required to compress hydrogen

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 73 (2002) 285296  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials processing applications ranging from metallurgical slag foaming to batch foams in glass melting- cations. One example is glass foams formed on the surface of batch logs of raw materials during the glass the foams formed on the free surface of the molten glass that possess a structure of multiple layers

Fan, Tai-Hsi

413

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermal SolarAllocatioBasics of Radiation Gamma

414

Reconciling Ground-Based and Space-Based Estimates of the Frequency of Occurrence and Radiative Effect of Clouds around Darwin, Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to investigate whether estimates of the cloud frequency of occurrence and associated cloud radiative forcing as derived from ground-based and satellite active remote sensing and radiative transfer calculations can be reconciled over a well instrumented active remote sensing site located in Darwin, Australia, despite the very different viewing geometry and instrument characteristics. It is found that the ground-based radar-lidar combination at Darwin does not detect most of the cirrus clouds above 10 km (due to limited lidar detection capability and signal obscuration by low-level clouds) and that the CloudSat radar - Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) combination underreports the hydrometeor frequency of occurrence below 2 km height, due to instrument limitations at these heights. The radiative impact associated with these differences in cloud frequency of occurrence is large on the surface downwelling shortwave fluxes (ground and satellite) and the top-of atmosphere upwelling shortwave and longwave fluxes (ground). Good agreement is found for other radiative fluxes. Large differences in radiative heating rate as derived from ground and satellite radar-lidar instruments and RT calculations are also found above 10 km (up to 0.35 Kday-1 for the shortwave and 0.8 Kday-1 for the longwave). Given that the ground-based and satellite estimates of cloud frequency of occurrence and radiative impact cannot be fully reconciled over Darwin, caution should be exercised when evaluating the representation of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions in large-scale models and limitations of each set of instrumentation should be considered when interpreting model-observations differences.

Protat, Alain; Young, Stuart; McFarlane, Sally A.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Mace, Gerald G.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Long, Charles N.; Berry, Elizabeth; Delanoe, Julien

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Calibrating the MKAR array using transfer functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing regional discriminants (RDs) at any given seismic station requires a ground-truth database of waveforms from both earthquakes and explosions. Recently installed stations used for seismic monitoring have no single charge explosions on which to base discriminants. We have developed a procedure to map information from surrogate stations, having a long recording history, to newly installed operational stations. We investigated a method to compute transfer functions using known effective 13Ds for a database of earthquakes and explosions located near the Lop Nor nuclear test site and recorded at the KNET array in Kyrgyzstan. For specific source-station paths, transfer functions work well. However, preliminary analysis of India and Pakistan nuclear tests indicate strong azimuthal dependence in the construction of reliable transfer functions. The success of the preliminary work suggests we can apply the same technique to calibrate the recently installed MKAR array using the Global Seismic Network station MAKZ as a surrogate. Both MKAR, an 11-element array operational since 2000, and MAKZ (including its earlier counterpart MAK), operating very broadband instruments since 1994, are located in Eastern Kazakhstan and separated by 25 km. To perform the calibration requires additional considerations not taken into account during the initial investigation: (1) utilizing amplitude spectra, rather than using RDs, to calculate transfer functions; (2) computing transfer functions for a range of azimuths, as we believe the transfer function are azimuthally dependent; and (3) determining whether working with each array element separately or developing a single-input/multiple-output model will provide more stable results and better error estimates.

Renwald, M. D. (Marie D.); Taylor, S. R. (Steven R.); Wallace, Terry C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The two dimensional Cerenkov radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the power spectrum of photons generated by charged particle moving in parallel direction to the graphene-like structure with index of refraction n. While the graphene sheet is conductive, some graphene-like structures, for instance graphene with implanted ions, or, also 2D-glasses, are dielectric media, and it means that it enables the experimental realization of the Cerenkov radiation. We calculate it from the viewpoint of the Schwinger theory of sources.

Miroslav Pardy

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International RecommendationsCalculation of Natural Daylight," CIE PUBLICATION No. 16,Committee E-3.2, "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

CALCULATING INTERIOR DAYLIGHT ILLUMINATION WITH A PROGRAMMABLE HAND CALCULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee E-3.2, "Daylight: International Recommendationsthe Calculation of Natural Daylight, 11 CIE PUBLICATION No.Committee E-3.2 1 "Natural Daylight: Official Recommenda-

Bryan, Harvey J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A Green's function formalism of energy and momentum transfer in fluctuational electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative energy and momentum transfer due to fluctuations of electromagnetic fields arising due to temperature difference between objects is described in terms of the cross-spectral densities of the electromagnetic fields. We derive relations between thermal non-equilibrium contributions to energy and momentum transfer and surface integrals of tangential components of the dyadic Green's functions of the vector Helmholtz equation. The expressions derived here are applicable to objects of arbitrary shapes, dielectric functions, as well as magnetic permeabilities. For the case of radiative transfer, we derive expressions for the generalized transmissivity and generalized conductance that are shown to obey reciprocity and agree with theory of black body radiative transfer in the appropriate limit.

Arvind Narayanaswamy; Yi Zheng

2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Radiative acceleration and transient, radiation-induced electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiative acceleration of particles and the electrostatic potential fields that arise in low density plasmas hit by radiation produced by a transient, compact source are investigated. We calculate the dynamical evolution and asymptotic energy of the charged particles accelerated by the photons and the radiation-induced electric double layer in the full relativistic, Klein-Nishina regime. For fluxes in excess of $10^{27}$ ${\\rm erg} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$, the radiative force on a diluted plasma ($n\\la 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$) is so strong that electrons are accelerated rapidly to relativistic speeds while ions lag behind owing to their larger inertia. The ions are later effectively accelerated by the strong radiation-induced double layer electric field up to Lorentz factors $\\approx 100$, attainable in the case of negligible Compton drag. The asymptotic energies achieved by both ions and electrons are larger by a factor 2--4 with respect to what one could naively expect assuming that the electron-ion assembly is a rigidly coupled system. The regime we investigate may be relevant within the framework of giant flares from soft gamma-repeaters.

L. Zampieri; R. Turolla; L. Foschini; A. Treves

2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Comparing the accuracy of four-dimensional photon dose calculations with three-dimensional calculations using moving and deforming phantoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculation algorithms, which explicitly incorporate respiratory motion in the calculation of doses, have the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations in thoracic treatment planning; however, they generally require greater computing power and resources than currently used for three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations. The purpose of this work was to quantify the increase in accuracy of 4D dose calculations versus 3D dose calculations. Methods: The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measurements made with two phantoms. Specifically, the authors used a rigid moving anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom with a deformable lung insert. To incorporate a clinically relevant range of scenarios, they programed the phantoms to move and deform with two motion patterns: A sinusoidal motion pattern and an irregular motion pattern that was extracted from an actual patient's breathing profile. For each combination of phantom and motion pattern, three plans were created: A single-beam plan, a multiple-beam plan, and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Doses were calculated using 4D dose calculation methods as well as conventional 3D dose calculation methods. The rigid moving and deforming phantoms were irradiated according to the three treatment plans and doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiochromic film. The accuracy of each dose calculation algorithm was assessed using measured-to-calculated TLD doses and a {gamma} analysis. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measured-to-calculated TLD ratios among 4D and 3D dose calculations. The {gamma} results revealed that 4D dose calculations had significantly greater percentage of pixels passing the 5%/3 mm criteria than 3D dose calculations. Conclusions: These results indicate no significant differences in the accuracy between the 4D and the 3D dose calculation methods inside the gross tumor volume. On the other hand, the film results demonstrated that the 4D dose calculations provided greater accuracy than 3D dose calculations in heterogeneous dose regions. The increase in accuracy of the 4D dose calculations was evident throughout the planning target volume.

Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Balter, Peter; Followill, David S.; Alvarez, Paola E.; White, R. Allen; Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

C.E. Sanders

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

426

Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Importance of Compton scattering for radiation spectra of isolated neutron stars with weak magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergent model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are widely used to fit the observed soft X-ray spectra of different types of isolated neutron stars. We investigate the effect of Compton scattering on the emergent spectra of hot (T_eff > 10^6 K) isolated neutron stars with weak magnetic fields. In order to compute model atmospheres in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium we solve the radiation transfer equation with the Kompaneets operator. We calculate a set of models with effective temperatures in the range 1 - 5 * 10^6 K, with two values of surface gravity (log g = 13.9 and 14.3) and different chemical compositions. Radiation spectra computed with Compton scattering are softer than those computed without Compton scattering at high energies (E > 5 keV) for light elements (H or He) model atmospheres. The Compton effect is more significant in H model atmospheres and models with low surface gravity. The emergent spectra of the hottest (T_eff > 3 * 10^6 K) model atmospheres can be described by diluted blackbody spectra with hardness factors ~ 1.6 - 1.9. Compton scattering is less important in models with solar abundance of heavy elements.

V. Suleimanov; K. Werner

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Angular Size-Redshift: Experiment and Calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper the next attempt is made to clarify the nature of the Euclidean behavior of the boundary in the angular size-redshift cosmological test. It is shown experimentally that this can be explained by the selection determined by anisotropic morphology and anisotropic radiation of extended radio sources. A catalogue of extended radio sources with minimal flux densities of about 0.01 Jy at 1.4 GHz was compiled for conducting the test. Without the assumption of their size evolution, the agreement between the experiment and calculation was obtained both in the Lambda CDM model (Omega_m=0.27 , Omega_v=0.73.) and the Friedman model (Omega = 0.1 ).

Amirkhanyan, V R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

431

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2. Radiation Safety Committee (RSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.4. Radiation Safety Office (RSO

Rubloff, Gary W.

432

Plastic container bagless transfer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

Howard Baer

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November...

435

A vectorized heat transfer model for solid reactor cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new generation of nuclear reactors includes designs that are significantly different from light water reactors. Among these new reactor designs is the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). In addition, nuclear thermal rockets share a number of similarities with terrestrial HTGRs and would be amenable to similar types of analyses. In these reactors, the heat transfer in the solid core mass is of primary interest in design and safety assessment. One significant safety feature of these reactors is the capability to withstand a loss of pressure and forced cooling in the primary system and still maintain peak fuel temperatures below the safe threshold for retaining the fission products. To accurately assess the performance of gas-cooled reactors during these types of transients, a Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions. Also, HERA has been used to analyze a depressurized loss of forced cooling transient in a HTGR with a very detailed three-dimensional input model. The results compare favorably with other means of analysis and provide further validation of the models and methods. 18 refs., 11 figs.

Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A unified radiative magnetohydrodynamics code for lightning-like discharge simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code is developed for solving the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the effects of self-consistent magnetic field, thermal conduction, resistivity, gravity, and radiation transfer, which when combined with specified pulse current models and plasma equations of state, can be used as a unified lightning return stroke solver. The differential equations are written in the covariant form in the cylindrical geometry and kept in the conservative form which enables some high-accuracy shock capturing schemes to be equipped in the lightning channel configuration naturally. In this code, the 5-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme combined with Lax-Friedrichs flux splitting method is introduced for computing the convection terms of the MHD equations. The 3-order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta integral operator is also equipped to keep the time-space accuracy of consistency. The numerical algorithms for non-ideal terms, e.g., artificial viscosity, resistivity, and thermal conduction, are introduced in the code via operator splitting method. This code assumes the radiation is in local thermodynamic equilibrium with plasma components and the flux limited diffusion algorithm with grey opacities is implemented for computing the radiation transfer. The transport coefficients and equation of state in this code are obtained from detailed particle population distribution calculation, which makes the numerical model is self-consistent. This code is systematically validated via the Sedov blast solutions and then used for lightning return stroke simulations with the peak current being 20?kA, 30?kA, and 40?kA, respectively. The results show that this numerical model consistent with observations and previous numerical results. The population distribution evolution and energy conservation problems are also discussed.

Chen, Qiang, E-mail: cq0405@126.com; Chen, Bin, E-mail: emcchen@163.com; Xiong, Run; Cai, Zhaoyang [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment and Electro-optical Engineering, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment and Electro-optical Engineering, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Chen, P. F., E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Residential Slab-On-Grade Heat Transfer in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer through an uninsulated slab on grade is calculated using a simple method developed by Kusuda. The seasonal and annual slab loads are graphed as a function of annual average soil temperature, Tm, for a variety of floor system...

Clark, E.; Ascolese, M.; Collins, W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

439

Heat transfer in katabatic flow Measurements on the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer in katabatic flow Measurements on the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland M. de Graaf #12;Heat transfer in katabatic flow Measurements on the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland Martin de is used to calculate surface heat fluxes over glaciers. As determination of surface fluxes still

Graaf, Martin de

440

Effect of surface conditions on boiling heat transfer of refrigerants in shell-and-tube evaporators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results are presented for the boiling heat transfer performance of R 22 and R 717 on surfaces with porous metallized coatings. A calculational-theoretical model is given for predicting the heat transfer of refrigerants boiling on a bundle of finned tubes.

Danilova, G.N.; Dyundin, V.A.; Borishanskaya, A.V.; Soloviyov, A.G.; Vol'nykh, Y.A.; Kozyrev, A.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electronic structure calculations of radical reactions for poly(methyl methacrylate) degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exposed to UV light in low-Earth orbit (LEO) conditions experience degradation. Under LEO conditionsElectronic structure calculations of radical reactions for poly(methyl methacrylate) degradation to calculate the reaction energetics for decomposition reactions of radicals formed from UV radiation

442

Wireless Power Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wireless Power Transfer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

None

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

444

Data Transfer Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is aID Service First DOIData Transfer»

445

Transfers | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe Sun andDepartment ofFanTransactive1/08Transfers

446

Transfer reactions at ATLAS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfor a CleanTransfer Service

447

NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and ResourcesOther FederalNicheTechnology Transfer Ombuds

448

Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas Vladimir I. Fisher*, Dimitri V. Fisher, Yitzhak Maron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas Vladimir I. Fisher*, Dimitri V populations and the radiation field in transient non-equilibrium plasmas. In this model, the plasma density to a self-consistent treatment of the radiative transfer. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the atomic

449

Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Study of cloud properties from single-scattering, radiative forcing, and retrieval perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation reports on three different yet related topics in light scattering computation, radiative transfer simulation, and remote sensing implementation, regarding the cloud properties and the retrieval of cloud properties from satellite...

Lee, Yong-Keun

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

451

Synchrotron Radiation at Radio Frequencies from Cosmic Ray Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the properties of extensive cosmic ray air showers and describe a simple model of the radio-frequency radiation generated by shower electrons and positrons as they bend in the Earth's magnetic field. We perform simulations by calculating the trajectory and radiation of a few thousand charged shower particles. The results are then transformed to predict the strength and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the whole shower.

Denis A. Suprun; Peter W. Gorham; Jonathan L. Rosner

2003-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Synchrotron Radiation at Radio Frequencies from Cosmic Ray Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the properties of extensive cosmic ray air showers and describe a simple model of the radio-frequency radiation generated by shower electrons and positrons as they bend in the Earth's magnetic field. We perform simulations by calculating the trajectory and radiation of a few thousand charged shower particles. The results are then transformed to predict the strength and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the whole shower.

Suprun, D A; Rosner, Jonathan L; Suprun, Denis A.; Gorham, Peter W.; Rosner, Jonathan L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

An electronic radiation of blackbody: Cosmic electron background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe owns the electronic radiation of blackbody at temperature 2.725 K, which we call the cosmic electron background. We calculate its radiation spectrum. The energy distribution of number density of electrons in the cosmic electron background becomes zero as energy goes to both zero and infinity. It has one maximum peak near the energy level of 10**(-23) J.

Jian-Miin Liu

2008-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

GENII. Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Suite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GENII was developed to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) into the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. GENII is a coupled system of seven programs and the associated data libraries that comprise the Hanford Dosimetry System (Generation II) to estimate potential radiation doses to individuals or populations from both routine and accidental releases of radionuclides to air or water and residual contamination from spills or decontamination operations. The GENII system includes interactive menu-driven programs to assist the user with scenario generation and data input,internal and external dose factor generators, and environmental dosimetry programs. The programs analyze environmental contamination resulting from both far-field and near-field scenarios. A far-field scenario focuses outward from a source, while a near-field scenario focuses in toward a receptor. GENII can calculate annual dose, committed dose, and accumulated dose from acute and chronic releases from ground or elevated sources to air or water and from initial contamination of soil or surfaces and can evaluate exposure pathways including direct exposure via water, soil, air, inhalation pathways, and ingestion pathways. In addition, GENII can perform 10,000 years migration analyses and can be used for retrospective calculations of potential radiation doses resulting from routine emissions and for prospective dose calculations for purposes such as siting facilities, environmental impact statements, and safety analysis reports.

Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA, (United States)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Charmonium meson and hybrid radiative transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the non-relativistic limit of the QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge, to describe radiative transitions between conventional charmonium states and from the lowest multiplet of cc¯ hybrids to charmonium mesons. The results are compared to potential quark models and lattices calculations.

Guo, Peng [Indiana U., JLAB; Yépez-Martínez, Tochtli [Indiana U.; Szczepaniak, Adam P. [Indiana U., JLAB

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Absorption of solar radiation by solar neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the absorption probability of photons radiated from the surface of the Sun by a left-handed neutrino with definite mass and a typical momentum for which we choose |p_1|=0.2 MeV, producing a heavier right-handed antineutrino. Considering two transitions the \

G. Duplancic; P. Minkowski; J. Trampetic

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

458

Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

Optical properties and energy transfer processes of Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}- codoped fluorotellurite glass under 1550?nm excitation for 2.0??m applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates 2.0??m emission properties and energy transfer processes in the Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass. The measured absorption spectra demonstrate that the codoped sample can be pumped by 1550?nm excitation efficiently. Judd-Ofelt and radiative parameters are calculated and discussed. Intensive 2.0??m emission originating from Ho{sup 3+}: {sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is observed and a long lifetime (11?ms) of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level is measured when Ho{sup 3+} ions are sensitized by Er{sup 3+} ions. Meanwhile, the upconversion spectra of the Er{sup 3+} singly and codoped samples are obtained and the energy transfer processes of the two ions is discussed based on the change of the upconversion emissions. The microscopic interaction parameters of the phonon-assisted (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}) process are calculated and the microparameter reaches as high as 10.1?×?10{sup ?41} cm{sup 6}/s. Hence, these results indicate that this Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass will be a suitable material for developing solid state laser around 2.0??m.

Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative transfer calculations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We dis...

Graziani, L; Schneider, R; Kawata, D; de Bennassuti, M; Maselli, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

Mather, James

463

Production and Transfer of Energy and Information in Hamiltonian Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an ``experimental'' implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented.

Ch. G. Antonopoulos; E. Bianco-Martinez; M. S. Baptista

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

464

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr.; Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

466

Solar2014: The 52nd Annual Conference of the Australian Solar Council 1 Open cavity receiver geometry influence on radiative losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Radiative transfer, Ray tracing. Abstract Open cavity receivers can be used to efficiently absorb concentrated solar radiation and transfers this heat to a Heat Carrier (HC). Recent advances in CSPSolar2014: The 52nd Annual Conference of the Australian Solar Council 1 Open cavity receiver

467

Heat transfer probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

Technology transfer 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

Mehrdad Massoudi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Baccalaureate Degree, Radiation Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Radiation Sciences Interest · Follow applicable instructions for First-Year , Transfer, or International applicable instructions for Transfer or International Students · Apply to and rank order the following.medicine.uiowa.edu/radsci PH: 319-353-8388 Radiologic Technology Tracks Admission and Degree Requirements Admission

471

Particle Radiation From Gibbons-Maeda Black Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the particle radiation from Gibbons-Maeda black hole. Taking into account the self-gravitation of the particle, we calculate the tunnelling rate of the massless particle across the horizon, then we promote the work to the radiation of the charged particle. The calculations prove that the rate of tunnelling equals precisely the exponent of the difference of the black hole entropy before and after emission and the radiation spectrum deviates from exact thermal. The conclusion supports the viewpoint of information conservation.

Heng-Zhong Fang; Jian-Yang Zhu

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

472

Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

Meijssen, T.E.M.

1981-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

Forward and reverse energy transfer in Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transport of electronic excitations among chromophores randomly distributed in Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers is described. In this theoretical analysis, it has been assumed that excitation energy can be transferred forward and reverse between two-dimensional layers. Fluorescence decays have been calculated for each layer. A numerical analysis of fluorescence decays is given in order to show the influence of reverse energy transfer on photophysical properties of Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers. The discussion of results in connection with recent and future experimental studies is presented.

Sienicki, K. (Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada))

1990-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

474

Deposition of thin silicon layers on transferred large area graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical vapor deposition of Si onto transferred graphene is investigated. At elevated temperatures, Si nucleates preferably on wrinkles and multilayer graphene islands. In some cases, however, Si can be quasi-selectively grown only on the monolayer graphene regions while the multilayer islands remain uncovered. Experimental insights and ab initio calculations show that variations in the removal efficiency of carbon residuals after the transfer process can be responsible for this behavior. Low-temperature Si seed layer results in improved wetting and enables homogeneous growth. This is an important step towards realization of electronic devices in which graphene is embedded between two Si layers.

Lupina, Grzegorz, E-mail: lupina@ihp-microelectronics.com; Kitzmann, Julia; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Dabrowski, Jarek; Wolff, Andre; Mehr, Wolfgang [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)] [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

476

Radiative forcing from aircraft NOx emissions: Mechanisms and seasonal dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependence. The long-term globally integrated annual mean net forcing calculated here is approximately zero, related to the annual cycle in photochemistry; the O3 radiative forcing calculations also have a seasonal, although earlier work suggests a small net positive forcing. The model design (e.g., upper tropospheric

477

Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

Pieper, S.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride-terminated nanocrystals to graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4× reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices.

Ajayi, O. A., E-mail: oaa2114@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Wong, C. W., E-mail: oaa2114@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Center for Integrated Science and Engineering, Solid-State Science and Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Anderson, N. C.; Wolcott, A.; Owen, J. S. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cotlet, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, New York 11973 (United States); Petrone, N.; Hone, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Gu, T.; Gesuele, F. [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Center for Integrated Science and Engineering, Solid-State Science and Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

479

Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits.

Im, Kwan H. (Naperville, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Burr Ridge, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace is described having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits. 7 figs.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. (Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. [Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation in Gases with a NarrowBand Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, France (\\Phi) now at the Institute of Energy and Power Plant Technology, TH Darmstadt, 64287 DarmstadtMonte Carlo Simulation of Radiation in Gases with a Narrow­Band Model and a Net is used for simulation of radiative heat transfers in non­gray gases. The proposed procedure is based

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

485

To be submitted to ApJ A Formalism for Covariant Polarized Radiative Transport by Ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To be submitted to ApJ A Formalism for Covariant Polarized Radiative Transport by Ray Tracing that the transport equation in vacuo is kµ µN = 0. We show that this is equivalent to Broderick & Blandford (2004)'s a procedure for solving the polarized radiative transfer equation in a curved spacetime. Other possible

Gammie, Charles F.

486

Optical Properties and Radiation-Enhanced Evaporation of Nanofluid Fuels Containing Carbon-Based Nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and thermal systems as an advanced heat-transfer fluid, e.g., advanced cooling of electronics systemsOptical Properties and Radiation-Enhanced Evaporation of Nanofluid Fuels Containing Carbon characteristics of nanofluid fuels with stable suspension of carbon-based nanostructures under radiation

Qiao, Li

487

On the approximation of local and linear radiative damping in the middle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmosphere. In general, this damping is a nonlocal process in which heat is transferred to and from remote form 13 November 2009) ABSTRACT The validity of approximating radiative heating rates in the middle'') is investigated. Using radiative heating rate and temperature output from a chemistry­climate model with realistic

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

488

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya