Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

2

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific James H set of atmospheric remote sensing instruments at sites around the world, including three radiative fluxes and heating rates. Maxima in cloud occurrence are found in the boundary layer and the upper

4

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

Shupe, Matthew

5

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating theDepartmentSensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and

6

Assessment of Uncertainty in Cloud Radiative Effects and Heating Rates through Retrieval Algorithm Differences: Analysis using 3-years of ARM data at Darwin, Australia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-based radar and lidar observations obtained at the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Tropical Western Pacific site located in Darwin, Australia are used to retrieve ice cloud properties in anvil and cirrus clouds. Cloud microphysical properties derived from four different retrieval algorithms (two radar-lidar and two radar only algorithms) are compared by examining mean profiles and probability density functions of effective radius (Re), ice water content (IWC), extinction, ice number concentration, ice crystal fall speed, and vertical air velocity. Retrieval algorithm uncertainty is quantified using radiative flux closure exercises. The effect of uncertainty in retrieved quantities on the cloud radiative effect and radiative heating rates are presented. Our analysis shows that IWC compares well among algorithms, but Re shows significant discrepancies, which is attributed primarily to assumptions of particle shape. Uncertainty in Re and IWC translates into sometimes-large differences in cloud radiative effect (CRE) though the majority of cases have a CRE difference of roughly 10 W m-2 on average. These differences, which we believe are primarily driven by the uncertainty in Re, can cause up to 2 K/day difference in the radiative heating rates between algorithms.

Comstock, Jennifer M.; Protat, Alain; McFarlane, Sally A.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

Moran, Thomas G., E-mail: moran@grace.nascom.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

369 Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard Josabel Belliure* Luis M. Carrascal Department of Evolutionary Ecology´ Gutie´rrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain Accepted 6/6/02 ABSTRACT Heliothermy (heat gain by radiation

Carrascal, Luis M.

11

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

12

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

Mather, James

14

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumberDoppler ARM Data

15

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, P.H.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations . Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations . Abstract:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evidence for thermalization of surface-desorbed molecules at heating rates of 108  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence for thermalization of surface-desorbed molecules at heating rates of 108 K/s C. R of aniline-d7 from a single-crystal surface 0001 of sapphire Al2O3 at a heating rate on the order of 108 K/s was studied using pulsed infrared laser radiation for desorption and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization

Zare, Richard N.

25

Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 2. Relative effects of solar radiative and latent heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar radiative and latent heating Xiaoli Zhang,1 Jeffrey M. Forbes,1 and Maura E. Hagan2 Received 11 study examines the relative importance of radiative heating and latent heating in accounting (GSWM) and new tidal heating rates derived from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP

Forbes, Jeffrey

26

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS A. Kersch1 W. Moroko2 A. Schuster1 1Siemens of Quasi-Monte Carlo to this problem. 1.1 Radiative Heat Transfer Reactors In the manufacturing of the problems which can be solved by such a simulation is high accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer

27

Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

31

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

32

Heat pump augmented radiator for low-temperature space applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closed-cycle, space-based heat rejection systems depend solely on radiation to achieve their heat dissipation function. Since the payload heat rejection temperature is typically 50 K above that of the radiation sink in near earth orbit, the size and mass of these systems can be appreciable. Size (and potentially mass) reductions are achievable by increasing the rejection temperature via a heat pump. Two heat pump concept were examined to determine if radiator area reductions could be realized without increasing the mass of the heat rejection system. The first was a conventional, electrically-driven vapor compression system. The second is an innovative concept using a solid-vapor adsorption system driven by reject heat from the prime power system. The mass and radiator area of the heat pumpradiator systems were compared to that of a radiator only system to determine the merit of the heat pump concepts. Results for the compressor system indicated that the mass minimum occured at a temperature lift of about 50 K and radiator area reductions of 35% were realized. With a radiator specific mass of 10 kgm/sup 2/, the heat pump system is 15% higher than the radiator only baseline system. The complex compound chemisorption systems showed more promising results. Using water vapor as the working fluid in a single stage heat amplifier resulted in optimal temperature lifts exceeding 150 K. This resulted in a radiator area reduction of 83% with a mass reduction of 64%. 7 refs., 9 figs.

Olszewski, M.; Rockenfeller, U.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASIMONTE CARLO METHODS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI­MONTE CARLO METHODS \\Lambda A. Kersch 1 W. Morokoff 2 A accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer from the heater to the wafer. Figure 1 shows the draft Carlo simulation is often used to solve radiative transfer problems where complex physical phenomena

34

Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Heat Release Rates | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Celland Contractors |DOCUMENT RELEASEHave0-1Heat Pump SystemHeat

36

Tables for solution of the heat-conduction equation with a time-dependent heating rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tables are presented for the solution of the transient onedimensional heat flow in a solid body of constant material properties with the heating rate at one boundary dependent on time. These tables allow convenient and ...

Bergles A. E.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

MGH RADIATION ONCOLOGY REDUCED RATE MULTI-VISIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MGH RADIATION ONCOLOGY REDUCED RATE MULTI-VISIT PARKING PROGRAM MGH Radiation Oncology Parking Programs enable patients undergoing radiation therapy to either self-park as close to the hospital patients currently in a treatment program; radiation therapy patients must have a minimum of two scheduled

Mootha, Vamsi K.

38

AOSC 621AOSC 621 Radiative Heating/CoolingRadiative Heating/Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Why drop off near sfc? 4 #12;Net flux Net flux: F = F+ - F- 1 2 F-(1) F+(1) F-(2) F+(2) Net energy at the top of the atmosphere is zero. Then we can write 1' ' )',( )'()0,()( 0 * dz dz zzdT zBzTBzF z z F F · The heating rate at z is defined as follows: )( )( d zdF zH net four termsofconsistwilland dz A

Li, Zhanqing

39

Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 microns above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300 plus or minus 30 per second for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

Epstein, R J; Leibfried, D; Wesenberg, J H; Bollinger, J J; Amini, J M; Blakestad, R B; Britton, J; Home, J P; Itano, W M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Langer, C; Ozeri, R; Shiga, N; Wineland, D J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Aspects of coal pyrogenation with high heating rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper describes the conversion of different rank coals into coke of required quality, influenced by heating rate variation. The study has been made for romanian coals and the imported coals too. Theoretical aspects of the coking process kinetics with special practical applications are shown. In Romania, classical coke making technology involves some theoretical and practical problems because of the local coal supply, weak in coking coals. Petrographical methods, as a complementary source of information for coking mechanisms understanding were used, for blends with high content of weakly coking coals. The results reveal the importance of rank and petrographical composition determinations for complex blends making. The paper continues previous studies of coke making kinetics, influenced by heating rate variation. On the basis of the relationship between coal charge composition and coke structure, including its use in the blast furnace, the influence of an increase in heating rate on the structure of the coke produced from different rank and petrographical composition coals, was studied. The heating rates ranged between 3 and 40 C/min. The structural changes produced during pyrogenation were more evident for the heating rates: 3, 6, 10 and 40 C/min. Table 2 reveals the optical aspects of coke matrix and inertinitic inclusions evolution, that is, the differences in structure arrangement by changing the plastic phase characteristics due to the increase in the heating rate.

Panaitescu, C.; Barca, F. [Politehnica Univ., Bucharest (Romania); Predeanu, G.; Albastroiu, P. [Metallurgical Research Inst., Bucharest (Romania)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effect of radiative heat transfer on the coagulation dynamics of combustion-generated particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the influences of radiation heat transfer on the size and number density evolution of small coagulating particles. On a microscopic level, radiative emission and/or absorption by the particle will perturb the gas temperature field adjacent to each particle. As a result of thermophoretic particle transport, the nonequilibrium condition can alter the collision rates with neighboring particles. A simplified analysis of the thermophoretic coagulation mechanism suggests that net radiative cooling of the particles can lead to an accelerated growth of [mu]m-sized particles, whereas net radiative heating can act to essentially freeze coagulation rates. On the macroscopic level, the addition or removal of heat in the gas through radiative absorption emission by the particle cloud can also significantly alter, through thermophoretic transport, the local particle number density. Under certain cases these effects can augment the accelerated coagulation rates that occur under radiative cooling conditions. We also examine the particular situation of equilibrium between particle cloud radiative absorption and emission - which results in no net macroscopic effect on the gas. 30 refs., 9 figs.

Mackowski, D.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Tassopoulos, M.; Rosner, D.E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Property:HeatRate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:PlugNumberOfArraProjectTypeTopic2GrossGen JumpRating Jump

43

Enhanced radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates in the framework of the scattering theory. We predict an enhancement of the heat transfer as we increase the depth of the corrugations while keeping the distance of closest approach fixed. We interpret this effect in terms of the evolution of plasmonic and guided modes as a function of the grating's geometry.

R. Guérout; J. Lussange; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -P. Hugonin; D. A. R. Dalvit; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Author's personal copy Radiative heat transfer in enhanced hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tube and heated in a furnace or by an incandescent lamp. It was observed that hydrogen release from the glass sample was faster and stronger when heated by an incandescent lamp than within a furnace. Here and the glass samples. In brief, the radiation emitted by the incandescent lamp is concentrated between 0

Pilon, Laurent

45

Trace formulae for non-equilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation and heat transfer for arbitrary objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal non-equilibrium. The results can be expressed as basis-independent trace formulae in terms of the scattering operators of the individual objects. We prove that heat radiation of a single object is positive, and that heat transfer (for two arbitrary passive objects) is from the hotter to a colder body. The heat transferred is also symmetric, exactly reversed if the two temperatures are exchanged. Introducing partial wave-expansions, we transform the results for radiation, transfer and forces into traces of matrices that can be evaluated in any basis, analogous to the equilibrium Casimir force. The method is illustrated by (re)deriving the heat radiation of a plate, a sphere and a cylinder. We analyze the radiation of a sphere for different materials, emphasizing that a simplification often employed for metallic nano-spheres is typically invalid. We derive asymptotic formulae for heat transfer and non-equilibrium interactions for the cases of a sphere in front a plate and for two spheres, extending previous results. As an example, we show that a hot nano-sphere can levitate above a plate with the repulsive non-equilibrium force overcoming gravity -- an effect that is not due to radiation pressure.

Matthias Krüger; Giuseppe Bimonte; Thorsten Emig; Mehran Kardar

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Z{sub i} = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (? = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (? = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ? 4×10{sup 8} V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter ? = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

Dey, R. [D-203, Samruddhi Residency, Motera, Ahmedabad-380009, Gujarat (India)] [D-203, Samruddhi Residency, Motera, Ahmedabad-380009, Gujarat (India); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)] [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be glassified by cooling using hyper- quenching techniques (i.e., with rates of the order of 105 K/s [8Cooling rate, heating rate, and aging effects in glassy water Nicolas Giovambattista,1 H. Eugene of water molecules during the process of generating a glass by cooling, and during the process

Sciortino, Francesco

48

Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 RS-PO-0001-001.docW.RadiationFilms.Radiative

49

Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 RS-PO-0001-001.docW.RadiationFilms.Radiative

50

Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Prediction of the heat release rate of wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for the heat release rate of wood during flaming combustion was developed during this research. It includes the effects of char shrinkage, multiple chemical components, adsorbed moisture, internal convective cooling and the variation of the thermophysical and thermochemical properties with temperature and the mass retention fraction of the char. It does not include char oxidation or diffusion of moisture and volatile pyrolysis products toward the rear surface. It calculates the time to ignition, mass burning rate, heat release rate, heat of combustion, heat of gasification and depth of char. An important part of this research was the determination of the thermochemical and thermophysical properties required by the model. An apparatus was developed for determining the kinetic parameters and the heat of combustion of the volatiles under conditions similar to those in the interior of a flaming slab of wood. Data were obtained on each of the four major chemical components present in Douglas fir. Thermal diffusivity measurements on Douglas fir and its char yielded an average value of 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} s{sup 2}/s which was nearly independent of temperature and mass retention fraction of the char for temperature sup to 500{degree}C and for mass-retention fractions above 0.30.

Parker, W.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Radiative heat transfer in a hydrous mantle transition zone Sylvia-Monique Thomas a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transfer in a hydrous mantle transition zone Sylvia-Monique Thomas a,n , Craig R contribute significantly to heat transfer in the mantle and demonstrate the importance of radiative heat, radiative heat transfer was considered relatively unimportant in the mantle. Earlier experimental work

Jacobsen, Steven D.

53

Standby Rates for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in technology, low natural gas prices, and more flexible and positive attitudes in government and utilities are making distributed generation more viable. With more distributed generation, notably combined heat and power, comes an increase in the importance of standby rates, the cost of services utilities provide when customer generation is not operating or is insufficient to meet full load. This work looks at existing utility standby tariffs in five states. It uses these existing rates and terms to showcase practices that demonstrate a sound application of regulatory principles and ones that do not. The paper also addresses areas for improvement in standby rates.

Sedano, Richard [Regulatory Assistance Partnership; Selecky, James [Brubaker & Associates, Inc.; Iverson, Kathryn [Brubaker & Associates, Inc.; Al-Jabir, Ali [Brubaker & Associates, Inc.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Historical mutation rates predict susceptibility to radiation in Chernobyl birds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historical mutation rates predict susceptibility to radiation in Chernobyl birds A. P. MÃ?LLER* , J in the evolutionary past. Radioactive contamination from Chernobyl constitutes one such extreme perturbation of radiation from Chernobyl are also the species that in the past have been most susceptible to factors

Mousseau, Timothy A.

55

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Resistive Wall Heating of the Undulator in High Repetition Rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In next generation high repetition rate FELs, beam energy loss due to resistive wall wakefields will produce significant amount of heat. The heat load for a superconducting undulator (operating at low temperature), must be removed and will be expensive to remove. In this paper, we study this effect in an undulator proposed for a Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) at LBNL. We benchmark our calculations with measurements at the LCLS and carry out detailed parameter studies using beam from a start-to-end simulation. Our preliminarym results suggest that the heat load in the undulator is about 2 W/m or lower with an aperture size of 6 mm for nominal NGLS preliminary design parameters.

Qiang, J; Corlett, J; Emma, P; Wu, J

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez; Wang-Kong Tse; Diego A. R. Dalvit

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near- field heat transfer. We also

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

59

Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer in an Axisymmetric Closed Chamber: An Application to Crystal University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook N.Y. 11794 ABSTRACT Radiative heat transfer plays simulating radiative heat transfer in the crystal and in the region above the melt containing gas under

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

60

Imaginary-time method for radiative capture reaction rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new computational method for astrophysical reaction rate of radiative capture process. In the method, an evolution of a wave function is calculated along the imaginary-time axis which is identified as the inverse temperature. It enables direct evaluation of reaction rate as a function of temperature without solving any scattering problem. The method is tested for two-body radiative capture reaction, ${^{16}{\\rm O}}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{20}{\\rm Ne}}$, showing that it gives identical results to that calculated by the ordinary procedure. The new method will be suited for calculation of triple-alpha radiative capture rate for which an explicit construction of the scattering solution is difficult.

Kazuhiro Yabana; Yasuro Funaki

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Shape-independent limits to near-field radiative heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive shape-independent limits to the spectral radiative heat-transfer rate between two closely spaced bodies, generalizing the concept of a black body to the case of near-field energy transfer. By conservation of energy, we show that each body of susceptibility $\\chi$ can emit and absorb radiation at enhanced rates bounded by $|\\chi|^2 / \\operatorname{Im} \\chi$, optimally mediated by near-field photon transfer proportional to $1/d^2$ across a separation distance $d$. Dipole--dipole and dipole--plate structures approach restricted versions of the limit, but common large-area structures do not exhibit the material enhancement factor and thus fall short of the general limit. By contrast, we find that particle arrays interacting in an idealized Born approximation exhibit both enhancement factors, suggesting the possibility of orders-of-magnitude improvement beyond previous designs and the potential for radiative heat transfer to be comparable to conductive heat transfer through air at room temperature, and s...

Miller, Owen D; Rodriguez, Alejandro W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, R.A.

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, the HAARP heater is the most powerful ionospheric heater, with 3.6GW of effective power using HF heating, Cyclones and localized heating Fran De Aquino Maranhao State University, Physics Department, S

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source P. Boulet - mail Pascal.Boulet@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr Keywords : heat transfer, radiative transfer, vaporization, convection, water spray Abstract Heat transfer inside a participating medium, made of droplets flowing in gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP 1bbhrpripbe1mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP 1bbhrpripbe1mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

69

Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Radiation Pressure Supported AGN Tori with Hard X-Ray and Stellar Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics and structure of toroidal obscuration around AGN remain uncertain and controversial. In this paper we extend earlier work on the dynamical role of infrared radiation pressure by adding the effects of two kinds of distributed heating: Compton-heating due to hard X-rays from the nucleus and local starlight heating. We find numerical solutions to the axisymmetric hydrostatic equilibrium, energy balance, and photon diffusion equations including these effects. Within the regime of typical parameters, the two different sources of additional heating have very similar effects: the density profile within the torus becomes shallower both radially and vertically, but for plausible heating rates, there is only minor change (relative to the source-free case) in the distribution of column density with solid angle. The most interesting consequence of distributed heating is that it selects out a relatively narrow range of parameters permitting an equilibrium, particularly $(L/L_E)/\\tau_T$. We discuss the implications of both the narrowness of the permitted range and its approximate coincidence with the range inferred from observations.

Jiming Shi; Julian H. Krolik

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

71

Field dependent emission rates in radiation damaged GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the temperature and field dependence of emission rates from five traps in electron damaged GaAs. Four of the traps have previously been identified as radiation defects. One of the traps, seen in higher doped diodes, has not been previously identified. We have fit the data to a multiphonon emission theory that allows recombination in GaAs to be characterized over a broad range of temperature and electric field. These results demonstrate an efficient method to calculate field-dependent emission rates in GaAs.

Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.; Wampler, W. R.; Lang, D. V.; Seager, C. H.; Campbell, J. M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1415 (United States)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating DAVID W. J of anomalous diabatic heating in the polar stratosphere as stratospheric temperatures relax to climatology

73

Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions by Carl, Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions KTH Nuclear Reactor power is limited by a phenomenon called critical heat flux (CHF). It appears as a sudden detoriation

Haviland, David

74

Effect of Heating Rate on Glass Foaming: Transition to Bulk Foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foaming of glass is an undesirable side effect of glass fining. According to a recent experimental study, the gas-phase volume in the melt heated at a constant rate dramatically increased with an increased rate of heating. This observation indicates that an increased rate of heating (a natural consequence of the increased processing rate experienced as a result of transition to oxy-fuel firing) may exert a substantial influence on glass foaming in advanced glass-melting furnaces. This paper attributes this effect to the change of mode of foam formation in response to an increased rate of heating.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical 2012; accepted 14 December 2012; published 31 January 2013. [1] Radiative heating profiles. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating

76

A study of the volatile matter of coal as a function of the heating rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the volatile matter yields as a function of the heating rate was conducted. A suite of 21 coal and coke samples varying in rank from anthracitic to lignitic and heating rates from 10{degrees}C/min to about 450{degrees}C/min were used in the study. Heating rates up to 60{degrees}C per minute, which are typically used in ASTM Test Method 5142 (instrumental Proximate Analysis), were achieved in a macro thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) system. Heating rates of 50-200{degrees}C/min were obtained in a micro TGA system. All measurements were made in a nitrogen atmosphere. The results of the study illustrate the dependence of the volatile matter yield on the heating rate. For most coals and cokes the optimum heating rate for determining volatile matter values that agree with those obtained by ASTM Method D 3175 appears to be in the 100-150{degrees}C range.

Yanes, E.; Wilhite, D.; Riley, J.M. Jr. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Heat resistance and outgrowth of clostridium perfringens spores as affected by the type of heating medium, and heating and cooling rates in ground pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and cured ground pork (CGP) at 75ºC. The effect of the heating rate on HR, germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in CGP was determined by increasing the temperature from 20 to 75ºC at a rate of 4, 8, and 12ºC/h prior to heating and holding at 75...

Marquez Gonzalez, Mayra

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER IN TISSUE WELDING AND SOLDERING WITH ULTRAFAST LASERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER IN TISSUE WELDING AND SOLDERING WITH ULTRAFAST LASERS Kyunghan Kim to incorporate transient radiation heat transfer in tissue welding and soldering with use of ultrafast lasers are performed between laser welding and laser soldering. The use of solder is found to substantially enhance

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

79

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the ZonalGEF Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the Zonal­GEF Method Walter to analyze radiative heat transfer in high porosity insulation materials which have a large scattering for LI900, a material used in the insulation tile for the space shuttle. Comparisons are presented

Yuen, Walter W.

80

Improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation in the BOR-60 reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of theoretical and experimental studies aimed at determining the radiation heat generation in the BOR-60 reactor reveal the drawbacks of the computational methods used at present. An algorithm that is free from these drawbacks and allows one to determine the radiation heat generation computationally is proposed.

Varivtsev, A. V., E-mail: vav3@niiar.ru; Zhemkov, I. Yu. [JSC “SSC RIAR,” Dimitrovgrad-10 (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer Andrei G depend, to a large extent, on foams formed on the surface of the molten glass and of the batch due models for thermophysical and transport properties and heat, mass, and radiation transfer in glass foams

Pilon, Laurent

82

Radiation dose-rate meter using an energy-sensitive counter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation dose-rate meter is provided which uses an energy-sensitive detector and combines charge quantization and pulse-rate measurement to monitor radiation dose rates. The charge from each detected photon is quantized by level-sensitive comparators so that the resulting total output pulse rate is proportional to the dose-rate.

Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with trapping height of approximately 240 micron. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

N. Daniilidis; S. Narayanan; S. A. Möller; R. Clark; T. E. Lee; P. J. Leek; A. Wallraff; St. Schulz; F. Schmidt-Kaler; H. Häffner

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a heating lamp emitting in the visible and near infraredwith heating in a furnace at 400 o C. The infrared lamp was

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-Phonon Polariton Contribution to Nanoscale Radiative Heat Transfer. Emmanuel Rousseau-sud Campus Polytechnique RD 128 91127 Palaiseau cedex, France Heat transfer between two plates of polar far-field value. In this article, we show that nanoscale heat transfer is dominated by the coupling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers) of reacting hypersonic turbulent boundary layers at conditions typical of reen- try vehicles. Surface heat in designing hypersonic vehicles is to predict aerothermo- dynamic heating. When the boundary layer

Martín, Pino

87

PARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the radiative transport equation on parallel computers. Mathematical libraries developed by third parties the discrete ordi- nates method. They observed that the global nature of radiative transport resultedPARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD Gautham

Utah, University of

88

High pressure low heat rate phosphoric acid fuel cell stack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high pressure phosphoric acid fuel cell stack assembly is described comprising: (a) a stack of fuel cells for producing electricity, the stack including cathode means, anode means, and heat exchange means; (b) means for delivering pressurized air to the cathode means; (c) means for delivering a hydrogen rich fuel gas to the anode means for electrochemically reacting with oxygen in the pressurized air to produce electricity and water; (d) first conduit means connected to the cathode means for exhausting a mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water from the cathode means; (e) second conduit means connected to the first conduit means for delivering a water fog to the first conduit means for entrainment in the mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water to form a two phase coolant having a gaseous air phase and an entrained water droplet phase; (f) means for circulating the coolant to the heat exchange means to cool the stack solely through vaporization of the water droplet phase in the heat exchange means whereby a mixed gas exhaust of air and water vapor is exhausted from the heat exchange means; and (g) means for heating the mixed gas exhaust and delivering the heated mixed gas exhaust at reformer reaction temperatures to an autothermal reformer in the stack assembly for autothermal reaction with a raw fuel to form the hydrogen rich fuel.

Wertheim, R.J.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nano-engineering the boiling surface for optimal heat transfer rate and critical heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects on pool boiling characteristics such as critical heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient of different surface characteristics such as surface wettability, roughness, morphology, and porosity are not well ...

Phillips, Bren Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFPRINT Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating traps A. Stotland, D;Europhysics Letters (EPL) has a new online home at www.epljournal.org Take a look for the latest journal news.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/86/10004 Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating

Cohen, Doron

91

ELECTRIC CO-HEATING: A METHOD FOR EVALUATING SEASONAL HEATING EFFICIENCIES AND HEAT LOSS RATES IN DWELLINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heating efficiency, inexpensive and practical diagnosti.c techniques are needed, such as pressuriza- tion, infrared

Modera, M.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Simulation of Infrared Laser Heating of Silica Using Heat Conduction and Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations Adapted for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized, transient heating of materials using micro-scale, highly absorbing laser light has been used in many industries to anneal, melt and ablate material with high precision. Accurate modeling of the relative contributions of conductive, convective and radiative losses as a function of laser parameters is essential to optimizing micro-scale laser processing of materials. In bulk semi-transparent materials such as silicate glass melts, radiation transport is known to play a significantly larger role as the temperature increases. Conventionally, radiation is treated in the frequency-averaged diffusive limit (Rosseland approximation). However, the role and proper treatment of radiative processes under rapidly heated, high thermal gradient conditions, often created through laser-matter interactions, is at present not clear. Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, they derive the corresponding time-dependent multi-frequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. They are interested in modeling infrared laser heating of silica over sub-millimeter length scales, and at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, they retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. They derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The effect of a temperature-dependent absorption index is explored through construction of a multi-phonon dielectric function that includes mode dispersion. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals yielding a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Simulations are presented. To demonstrate the bulk heat loss due to radiation and the effect of the radiation's temporal derivative, they model cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. Retaining the derivative enables correctly modeling the loss of photons initially present in the slab. Other simulations model irradiating silica discs (of approximately 5 mm radii and thickness) with a CO2 laser: {lambda} = 10.59 and 4.6 um, Gaussian profile, r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay. By surrounding the disks in room-temperature air, they make use of the boundary conditions described above.

Shestakov, A I; Matthews, M J; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dependency of Heat Transfer Rate on the Brinkman Number in Microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated circuit technology. To come up with the heat generation, microscale cooling has been thought as a promising technology. Prediction of heat transfer rate is crucial in design of microscale cooling device but is not clearly understood yet. This work proposes a new correlation between heat transfer rate and Brinkman number which is nondimensional number of viscosity, flow velocity and temperature. It is expected that the equation proposed by this work can be useful to design microchannel cooling device.

H. S. Park

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Numerical simulation of three-dimensional combined convective radiative heat transfer in rectangular channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents a numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow and heat transfer in a channel with a backward-facing step. Flow was considered to be steady, incompressible, and laminar. The flow medium was treated to be radiatively...

Ko, Min Seok

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Membrane heat pipe development for space radiator applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A self-deploying membrane heat pipe (SMHP) is being designed and fabricated to operate in an in-cabin experiment aboard a STS flight. The heat pipe comprises a mylar membrane with a woven fabric arterial wick and R-11 as the working fluid. Preliminary results indicate that this SMHP design will successfully expand and retract in response to an applied heat load; the retraction force is provided by a constant force spring.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

samples are exposed to an incandescent lamp. Acknowledgmentin a furnace or by an incandescent lamp. It was observedwhen heated by an incandescent lamp than within furnace.

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Design considerations for a thermophotovoltaic energy converter using heat pipe radiators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss concepts for using high temperature heat pipes to transport energy from a heat source to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converter. Within the converter, the condenser portion of each heat pipe acts as a photon radiator, providing a radiant flux to adjacent TPV cells, which in turn create electricity. Using heat pipes in this way could help to increase the power output and the power density of TPV systems. TPV systems with radiator temperatures in the range of 1,500 K are expected to produce as much as 3.6 W/cm{sup 3} of heat exchanger volume at an efficiency of 20% or greater. Four different arrangements of heat pipe-TPV energy converters are considered. Performance and sizing calculations for each of the concepts are presented. Finally, concerns with this concept and issues which remain to be considered are discussed.

Ashcroft, J.; DePoy, D. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Multigroup half space moment approximations to the radiative heat transfer equations q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling) over astrophysics to combustion (e.g., in gas turbine combustion chambers). Since radiative heat into direction l 2 ½À1; 1. Furthermore, T ðx; tÞ is the material temperature. The heat conductivity is denoted with the following boundary conditions. For the material temper

Coudière, Yves

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Investigation of the effects of heating rate on coking of shale during retorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The retorting of oil shale distributes organic carbon among three possible products: the liquid product, the noncondensible product, and the residual carbon (coke). The production of coke is detrimental because of the economic effects caused by the loss of organic carbon to this relatively intractable carbon form. Two reference oil shales, a Mahogany zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation oil shale from Colorado and a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany oil shale from Kentucky, were studied to evaluate the conditions that affect coke production during retorting. The variable that was studied in these experiments was the heating rate during retorting because heating rate has been indicated to have a direct effect on coke production (Burnham and Clarkson 1980). The six heating rates investigated covered the range from 1 to 650/degree/C/h (1.8 to 1169/degree/F/h). The data collected during these experiments were evaluated statistically in order to identify trends. The data for the eastern reference oil shale indicated a decrease in coke formation with increases in the heating rate. The liquid and noncondensible product yields both increased with increasing heating rate. The distribution of products in relation to retort heating rate follows the model suggested by Burnham and Clarkson (1980). Coke production during the retorting of western reference oil shale was found to be constant in relation to heating rate. The liquid product yield increased with increasing heating rate but the trend could not be verified at the 95% confidence level. The coke production observed in these experiments does not follow the prediction of the model. This may indicate that coke formation occurs early in the retorting process and may be limited by the availability of organic materials that form coke. 6 refs., 10 tabs.

Guffey, F.D.; Hunter, D.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal radiation of laser heated niobium clusters Nb{sub N}{sup +}, 8 ? N ? 22  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal radiation from small, laser heated, positively charged niobium clusters has been measured. The emitted power was determined by the quenching effect on the metastable decay, employing two different experimental protocols. The radiative power decreases slightly with cluster size and shows no strong size-to-size variations. The magnitude is 40–50 keV/s at the timescale of several microseconds, which is the measured crossover time from evaporative to radiative cooling.

Hansen, Klavs [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Li, Yejun; Kaydashev, Vladimir; Janssens, Ewald [Laboratory of Solid State Physics and Magnetism, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gas temperature profiles at different flow rates and heating rates suffice to estimate kinetic parameters for fluidised bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental work on estimation kinetic parameters for combustion was conducted in a bench-scale fluidised bed (FB: 105x200mm). Combustion medium was obtained by using an electrical heater immersed into the bed. The ratio of heating rate (kJ/s) to molar flow rate of air (mol/s) regulated by a rheostat so that the heat of combustion (kJ/mol) can be synthetically obtained by an electrical power supply for relevant O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration (C{sub 0}). O{sub 2}-restriction ratio ({beta}) was defined by the ratio of O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration to O{sub 2}-air concentration (C{sub O{sub 2}-AIR}) at prevailing heating rates. Compressed air at further atmospheric pressure ({approx_equal}102.7kPa) entered the bed that was alumina particles (250{mu}m). Experiments were carried out at different gas flow rates and heating rates. FB was operated with a single charge of (1300g) particles for obtaining the T/T{sub 0} curves, and than C/C{sub 0} curves. The mathematical relationships between temperature (T) and conversion ratio (X) were expressed by combining total energy balance and mass balance in FB. Observed surface reaction rate constants (k{sub S}) was obtained from the combined balances and proposed model was also tested for these kinetic parameters (frequency factor: k{sub 0}, activation energy: E{sub A}, and reaction order: n) obtained from air temperature measurements. It was found that the model curves allow a good description of the experimental data. Thus, reaction rate for combustion was sufficiently expressed. (author)

Suyadal, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ankara University, 06100-Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Property:Heat Recovery Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:PlugNumberOfArraProjectTypeTopic2GrossGen JumpRating Jump to:

105

Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roof temperatures. It was found that a radiant barrier such as aluminum foil can reduce the heat flux significantly. Experimental results were compared to a Three-Region approximate solution developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The model...

Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effects of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens; a comparison of effects of two different exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Donovan, Effect of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens: Comparison of the radiosensi- tivity of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res, 48, 40-52 (1971). 18. Alison P. Casarett, Radiation ~Biolo . p. 159. Prentice-Hall, Inc. , Englewood Cliffs... EFFECTS OF GAMMA RADIATION ON SL'RNATIA MARCESCENS A COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT EXPOSURE RATES A Thesis by CHRISTY ANNETTE MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Moore, Christy Annette

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in C III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes for the astrophysically-important Be-like ion C III. For the calculations, 166 levels belonging to the $n \\le$ 5 configurations are considered and the {\\sc grasp} (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted. Einstein A-coefficients are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions, while lifetimes are compared with available measurements as well as theoretical results, and no large discrepancies noted. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1\\% for a majority of levels, and A-values to better than 20\\% for most transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code ({\\sc darc}) is used. A wide energy range, up to 21 Ryd, is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 8...

Aggarwal, K M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Heat transfer including radiation and slag particles evolution in MHD channel-I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of convective and radiative heat transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic channel are provided. Calculations performed for a base load-size channel indicate that heat transfer by gas radiation almost equals that by convection for smooth walls, and amounts to 70% as much as the convective heat transfer for rough walls. Carbon dioxide, water vapor, and potassium atoms are the principal participating gases. The evolution of slag particles by homogeneous nucleation and condensation is also investigated. The particle-size spectrum so computed is later utilized to analyze the radiation enhancement by slag particles in the MHD diffuser. The impact of the slag particle spectrum on the selection of a workable and design of an efficient seed collection system is discussed.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the P{sub n} method with {approx}500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiation diffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2-12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 {mu}m laser light for 5-10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. We show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heating radiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

Colvin, Jeffrey; Shestakov, Aleksei; Stoelken, James; Vignes, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in xenon clusters in the eikonal approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) heating rates in the eikonal approximation (EA). The present analysis is performed using the plasma-screened Rogers and Debye potentials for Xe clusters with two different charge states (6 and 10). We compare the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) and classical-simulation (CL-sim) (Moll et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 033303 (2012)) calculations for clusters in infrared light. Calculations have been performed for the field strength of 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} V/cm. We find that compared to the FBA and CL-sim methods, the IB heating rate in the EA is less sensitive to the choice of the two potentials considered here. The present EA calculation shows that the influence of the inner structure of atomic ion on the heating rate is more prominent for the smaller ion charge (Xe{sup 6+}). In the case of low laser field approximation based on the elastic transport cross sections, it is seen that in contrast to the FBA and classical methods, the heating rate predicted by the EA does not deviate much all over the range of mean kinetic energy of electrons (20-500 eV) considered here for both the charge states of xenon (Xe{sup 6+} and Xe{sup 10+}). Furthermore, for the Rogers potential, EA is found to be in closer agreement with the classical method than the FBA. We also compare the results of the IB heating rate using the present and low-field approximation approaches to the above three methods and observe that the magnitudes of the IB heating rate calculated in the low field approximation are, in general, higher than the corresponding values predicted by the present approach for both the electron-ion potentials.

Dey, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math, 711202 West Bengal (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Proceedings: 2003 EPRI Heat Rate Improvement Conference: January 28-30, 2003, Birmingham, AL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Every utility strives both to become a low-cost electricity producer and to meet the emission standards set by the Clean Air Act Amendment. In the early round of cost and emission reduction, most utilities opted to blend or switch to lower-cost fuels such as Powder River Basin coal and natural gas. Over the years, EPRI, industry vendors, and the utilities themselves have learned not only to reduce the difficulties encountered with fuel blending and switching, but also to improve plant heat rate with various cost-effective solutions. The 2003 Heat Rate Improvement Conference provided an opportunity for the industry to share its knowledge and experience.

None

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Methodology for Calculating Cooling and Heating Energy-Imput-Ratio (EIR) From the Rated Seasonal Performance Efficiency (SEER or HSPF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report provides the recommendations to calculate cooling and heating energy-input-ratio (EIR) for DOE-2 simulations excluding indoor fan energy, from the rated cooling and heating seasonal performance efficiency (i.e., SEER or HSPF) that does...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Heat-rate improvements obtained by retubing condensers with new, enhanced tube types  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant fuel savings can be achieved at power plants by retubing the condensers with enhanced tubes. Because of the higher overall heat-transfer coefficient, the exhaust steam is condensed at a lower pressure and the plant efficiency is therefore increased or plant heat rate is reduced. Only the spirally indented type of enhanced tube is currently being used in the U.S. and most other countries; however, different types of enhanced tubes have been proposed for power-plant condensers, each with their own set of attributes. This paper determines what attributes and their magnitudes of enhanced tubes lead to the most energy savings as measured by reduction of the plant heat rate. The particular attributes considered are the inside and outside enhancement levels, the inside efficiency index (inside enhancement level divided by pressure-drop increase), and the enhanced-tube fouling-rate multiplier. Two particular condensers were selected because all necessary information were known from previous heat-rate studies such as the condenser geometry, the circulating-water pump and system information, and the low-pressure turbine characteristics. These are {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} condensers and therefore the finding will be representative for many other condenser-retubing applications. However, the authors strongly recommend that an economic evaluation be performed at each site to determine the energy savings and payback time. This generic investigation showed that the outside enhancement level is the most important attribute, and a value of about 1.5 can lead to heat-rate savings of about 20 to 40 Btu/kW-hr. Increasing the inside enhancement is less effective because of the increased pressure drop that leads to a reduction of the coolant flow rate and velocity.

Rabas, T.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Taborek, J. [Consulting Services, Virginia Beach, VA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

7-106 A reversible heat pump is considered. The temperature of the source and the rate of heat transfer to the sink are to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7-39 7-106 A reversible heat pump is considered. The temperature of the source and the rate of heat transfer to the sink are to be determined. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily. Analysis Combining.5¸ ¹ · ¨ © § ¸ ¸ ¹ · ¨ ¨ © § 1.6 1 1)K300( COP 1 1 maxHP, HL TT Based upon the definition of the heat pump coefficient

Bahrami, Majid

117

Black carbon radiative heating effects on cloud microphysics and implications for the aerosol indirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thought. 1. Introduction Black Carbon (BC) has important effects on climate, owing to its ability of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125, USA Abstract. This work examines the effect of black carbon (BC) radiative heating on cloud droplet formation. Changes in cloud droplet concentration and cloud albedo due

Nenes, Athanasios

118

Lecture 3 week 2/3 2012: Solar radiation, the greenhouse, global heat engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....cycles of cold and warm climate. Averaged over the globe, sunlight falling on Earth in July (aphelion) is indeedLecture 3 week 2/3 2012: H 222c Solar radiation, the greenhouse, global heat engine http://en.wikipedia.org/ #12;#12;The 3 streams of this course (see syllabus) 1.Energy forms of energy concentrated, dilute

119

Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar radiation (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W solar furnace of Solar Energy Laboratory in Odeillo (France). Revue Phys. Appl. 15 (1980) 423-426 MARS423 Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar exposed to the solar radiation. These quantities may be expressed in any set consistent units. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

Development of an On-Line Expert System: Heat Rate Degradation Expert System Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An on-line expert system for fossil-fueled power plants, the "Heat Rate Degradation Expert System Advisor," is being developed. This expert system will operate on a microcomputer and will interface with existing plant data acquisition and/or thermal...

Sopocy, D. M.; Henry, R. E.; Gehl, S.; Divakaruni, S. M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

RIS-M-2185 CALCULATION OF HEAT RATING AND BURN-UP FOR TEST FUEL PINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISØ-M-2185 CALCULATION OF HEAT RATING AND BURN-UP FOR TEST FUEL PINS IRRADIATED IN DR3 C. Bagger of fuel pins irradiated in HP1 rigs. The calculations are carried out rather detailed, especially of the data. INIS Descriptors . BURN-UP, CALORIMETRY, COMPUTER CALCULATIONS, DR-3, FISSION, FUEL ASSEMBLIES

122

Kinetics of silicide formation over a wide range of heating rates spanning six orders of magnitude  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kinetic processes involving intermediate phase formation are often assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. This behavior is usually inferred from limited data over narrow temperature intervals, where the exponential dependence is generally fully satisfied. However, direct evidence over wide temperature intervals is experimentally challenging and data are scarce. Here, we report a study of silicide formation between a 12?nm film of palladium and 15?nm of amorphous silicon in a wide range of heating rates, spanning six orders of magnitude, from 0.1 to 10{sup 5?}K/s, or equivalently more than 300?K of variation in reaction temperature. The calorimetric traces exhibit several distinct exothermic events related to interdiffusion, nucleation of Pd{sub 2}Si, crystallization of amorphous silicon, and vertical growth of Pd{sub 2}Si. Interestingly, the thickness of the initial nucleation layer depends on the heating rate revealing enhanced mass diffusion at the fastest heating rates during the initial stages of the reaction. In spite of this, the formation of the silicide strictly follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence over the whole temperature interval explored. A kinetic model is used to fit the calorimetric data over the complete heating rate range. Calorimetry is complemented by structural analysis through transmission electron microscopy and both standard and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

Molina-Ruiz, Manel; Lopeandía, Aitor F.; Gonzalez-Silveira, Marta; Garcia, Gemma; Clavaguera-Mora, Maria T. [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Peral, Inma [ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, 08290 Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier, E-mail: javier.rodriguez@uab.cat [Grup de Nanomaterials i Microsistemes, Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); MATGAS Research Centre, UAB Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy levels, radiative rates, and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Li-like ions with 21?Z?28  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Li-like ions with 21?Z?28. The General-Purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates, while for determining the collision strengths and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates, and line strengths are listed for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions among the lowest 24 levels of the Li-like ions considered. Collision strengths have been averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and the effective collision strengths obtained are given over a wide temperature range up to 10{sup 7.8} K. Additionally, lifetimes are listed for all calculated levels of these ions. Finally, extensive comparisons are made with results available in the literature, as well as with our analogous calculations for all parameters with the Flexible Atomic Code, in order to assess the accuracy of the results.

Aggarwal, Kanti M., E-mail: K.Aggarwal@qub.ac.uk; Keenan, Francis P.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy levels, radiative rates, and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Li-like ions with 12?Z?20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Li-like ions with 12?Z?20. The GRASP (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates, while for determining the collision strengths and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates, and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions among the lowest 24 levels of the Li-like ions considered. Collision strengths have been averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and the effective collision strengths obtained are reported over a wide temperature range up to 10{sup 7.4} K. Additionally, lifetimes are also listed for all calculated levels of the ions. Finally, extensive comparisons are made with results available in the literature, as well as with our parallel calculations for all parameters with the Flexible Atomic Code, in order to assess the accuracy of the reported results.

Aggarwal, Kanti M., E-mail: K.Aggarwal@qub.ac.uk; Keenan, Francis P.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heat transfer performance of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heat transfer and absorption characteristics of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation are theoretically investigated. Since the heat loss ratio of the infrared radiation has maximum at moderate energy flux, the heat absorption efficiency will first increase and then decrease with the incident energy flux. The local absorption efficiency will increase with the flow velocity, while the wall temperature drops quickly. Because of the unilateral concentrated solar radiation and different incident angle, the heat transfer is uneven along the circumference. Near the perpendicularly incident region, the wall temperature and absorption efficiency slowly approaches to the maximum, while the absorption efficiency sharply drops near the parallelly incident region. The calculation results show that the heat transfer parameters calculated from the average incident energy flux have a good agreement with the average values of the circumference under different boundary conditions. For the whole pipe with coating of Pyromark, the absorption efficiency of the main region is above 85%, and only the absorption efficiency near the parallelly incident region is below 80%. In general, the absorption efficiency of the whole pipe increases with flow velocity rising and pipe length decreasing, and it approaches to the maximum at optimal concentrated solar flux. (author)

Jianfeng, Lu; Jing, Ding [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jianping, Yang [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of the Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

-Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

McCune, Bruce

127

Melting processes of oligomeric ? and ? isotactic polypropylene crystals at ultrafast heating rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The melting behaviors of ? (stable) and ? (metastable) isotactic polypropylene (iPP) crystals at ultrafast heating rates are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics method. Quantitative information about the melting processes of ?- and ?-iPP crystals at atomistic level is achieved. The result shows that the melting process starts from the interfaces of lamellar crystal through random dislocation of iPP chains along the perpendicular direction of lamellar crystal structure. In the melting process, the lamellar crystal gradually expands but the corresponding thickness decreases. The analysis shows that the system expansion lags behind the crystallinity decreasing and the lagging extents for ?- and ?-iPP are significantly different. The apparent melting points of ?- and ?-iPP crystals rise with the increase of the heating rate and lamellar crystal thickness. The apparent melting point of ?-iPP crystal is always higher than that of ?-iPP at differently heating rates. Applying the Gibbs-Thomson rule and the scaling property of the melting kinetics, the equilibrium melting points of perfect ?- and ?-iPP crystals are finally predicted and it shows a good agreement with experimental result.

Ji, Xiaojing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Xuehao, E-mail: xhhe@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Jiang, Shichun, E-mail: xhhe@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: scjiang@tju.edu.cn [School of Material, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)] [School of Material, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

Schumacher, Courtney

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

Parametric analysis of radiative-convective heat transfer around a circular cylinder in a cross flow using the finite volume radiation solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the outside vapor deposition (OVD) process, silica particles are deposited by thermophoretic force on the surface of a cylinder. This process is associated with complex physical phenomena such as heat transfer between a torch and a cylinder, chemical reaction for silica particle formation, and particle deposition. Since the OVD process is carried out in a very high temperature environment, radiative heat transfer should be taken into consideration. Here, the radiative-convective heat transfer around a circular cylinder in a cross flow of a radiating gas has been numerically analyzed using the finite volume radiation solution method in a nonorthogonal coordinate system. The cross-flow Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter is 40, and the fluid Prandtl number is assumed to be 0.7. The radiative heat transfer coupled with convection is reasonably predicted by the finite volume radiation solution method. Distributions of the local Nusselt number are investigated according to the variation of radiation parameters such as conduction-to-radiation parameter, optical thickness, scattering albedo, and cylinder wall emissivity.

Lee, K.H.; Lee, J.S.; Choi, M. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Friedmann-like collapsing model of a radiating sphere with heat flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper considers a spherical body consisting of a fluid with heat flow which radiates in its exterior a null fluid described by the outgoing Vaidya's metric. A Friedmann-like exact solution of the interior Einstein field equations is given. It is proved that this solution, matched with the outgoing Vaidya matric, represents a physically reasonble collapsing model which, when the heat flow is switched off, reduces to the well-known collapsing model with dust. The proposed model has the remarkable property that even if the heat flow is small, the horizon will never be formed because, before this happens, the collapsing body will be destroyed by opposite gradients of pressure. 6 references.

Kolassis, C.A.; Santos, N.O.; Tsoubelis, D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Metamaterials coated with Silicon Carbide Film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC.By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonance for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

Basu, Soumyadipta; Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

Smith, A

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spectrally enhancing near-field radiative heat transfer by exciting magnetic polariton in SiC gratings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate, for the first time, that near field radiative transport between 1D periodic grating microstructures separated by subwavelength vacuum gaps can be significantly enhanced by exciting magnetic resonance or polariton. Fluctuational electrodynamics that incorporates scattering matrix theory with rigorous coupled wave analysis is employed to exactly calculate the near field radiative heat flux between two SiC gratings. Besides the well known coupled surface phonon polaritons (SPhP), an additional spectral radiative heat flux peak, which is due to magnetic polariton, is found within the phonon absorption band of SiC. The mechanisms, behaviors and interplays between magnetic polariton, coupled SPhP, single interface SPhP, and Wood's anomaly in the near field radiative transport are elucidated in detail. The findings will open up a new way to control near field radiative heat transfer by magnetic resonance with micro or nanostructured metamaterials.

Yang, Yue

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A parametric study of shock jump chemistry, electron temperature, and radiative heat transfer models in hypersonic flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF SHOCK JUMP CHEMISTRY, ELECTRON TEMPERATURE, AND RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODELS IN HYPERSONIC FLOWS A Thesis by ROBERT BRIAN GREENDYKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF SHOCK JUMP CHEMISTRY, ELECTRON TEMPERATURE, AND RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODELS IN HYPERSONIC FLOWS A Thesis by ROBERT BRIAN...

Greendyke, Robert Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radiation and Reason Why radiation at modest dose rates is quite harmless and current radiation safety regulations are flawed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data on the impact of ionising radiation on life are examined in the light of evolutionary biology. This comparison confirms that fear of nuclear radiation is not justified by science itself; rather it originates in a failure of public trust in nuclear science, a relic of the international politics of the Cold War era. Current ionisation safety regulations appease this fear but without scientific support and they need fundamental reformulation. This should change the reaction to accidents like Fukushima, the cost of nuclear energy and the application of nuclear technology to the supply of food and fresh water. Such a boost to the world economy would require that more citizens study and appreciate the science involved – and then tell others -- not as much fun as the Higgs, perhaps, but no less important! www.radiationandreason.com

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Trade-offs between NO{sub x} heat rate and opacity at Morgantown Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In work carried out at Morgantown Unit 2, PEPCO and Lehigh University developed techniques for optimizing the operation of an ABB-CE LNCFS III low NO{sub x} firing system. Because of marginal ESP capacity, the ability to reduce NO{sub x} is limited by opacity excursions at this unit. Using a parametric boiler testing approach, and guided by neural network techniques for analysis of the data, control settings were identified which minimize the full load heat rate as a function of the target NO{sub x} level, subject to a stack opacity constraint.

D`Agostini, M.; Walsh, R.; Eskenazi, D.; Levy, E. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Electric field noise above surfaces: a model for heating rate scaling law in ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for the scaling laws of the electric field noise spectral density as a function of the distance, $d$, above a conducting surface. Our analytical approach models the patch potentials by introducing a correlation length, $\\zeta$, of the electric potential on the surface. The predicted scaling laws are in excellent agreement with two different classes of experiments (cold trapped ions and cantilevers), that span at least four orders of magnitude of $d$. According to this model, heating rate in miniature ion traps could be greatly reduced by proper material engineering.

Romain Dubessy; Thomas Coudreau; Luca Guidoni

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

Radiation bronchitis and stenosis secondary to high dose rate endobronchial irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to describe a new clinical entity observed in follow-up bronchoscopies in patients who were treated with high dose rate and medium dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy of the tracheobronchial tree. Patients were treated by protocol with medium dose rate, 47 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 5 mm depth times three fractions, high dose rate 144 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions and high dose rate 151 patients receiving cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions followed by bronchoscopy. Incidence of this entity was 9% for the first group, 12% for the second, and 13% for the third group. Reactions were grade 1 consisting of mild inflammatory response with a partial whitish circumferential membrane in an asymptomatic patient; grade 2, thicker complete white circumferential membrane with cough and/or obstructive problems requiring intervention; grade 3, severe inflammatory response with marked membranous exudate and mild fibrotic reaction; and grade 4 a predominant fibrotic reaction with progressive stenosis. Variables associated with a slightly increased incidence of radiation bronchitis and stenosis included: large cell carcinoma histology, curative intent, prior laser photoresection, and/or concurrent external radiation. Survival was the strongest predictor of the reaction. Radiation bronchitis and stenosis is a new clinical entity that must be identified in bronchial brachytherapy patients and treated appropriately. 23 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Speiser, B.L. (St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States)); Spratling, L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Direct and sequential radiative three-body reaction rates at low temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the low-temperature reaction rates for radiative capture processes of three particles. We compare direct and sequential capture mechanisms and rates using realistic phenomenological parametrizations of the corresponding photodissociation cross sections.Energy conservation prohibits sequential capture for energies smaller than that of the intermediate two-body structure. A finite width or a finite temperature allows this capture mechanism. We study generic effects of positions and widths of two- and three-body resonances for very low temperatures. We focus on nuclear reactions relevant for astrophysics, and we illustrate with realistic estimates for the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ and $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$-$n$ radiative capture processes. The direct capture mechanism leads to reaction rates which for temperatures smaller than 0.1 GK can be several orders of magnitude larger than those of the NACRE compilation.

E. Garrido; R. de Diego; D. V. Fedorov; A. S. Jensen

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Eurotherm Seminar N81 Reactive Heat Transfer in Porous Media, Ecole des Mines d'Albi, France June 4-6, 2007 ET81-1 HEAT TRANSFER BY SIMULTANEOUS RADIATION-CONDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eurotherm Seminar N°81 Reactive Heat Transfer in Porous Media, Ecole des Mines d'Albi, France June 4-6, 2007 ET81- 1 HEAT TRANSFER BY SIMULTANEOUS RADIATION-CONDUCTION AND CONVECTION IN A HIGH for the packed bed. The comparison between the radiative heat transfer and the exchanges by conduction and forced

Boyer, Edmond

143

The radiative and combined mode heat transfer within the L-shaped nonhomogeneous and nongray participating media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solutions of pure radiative and combined radiative and conductive heat transfer within a L-shaped enclosure are presented. The enclosure contains a mixture of pulverized carbon particles, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}. Three different types of problems are solved: homogeneous radiative properties, nonhomogeneous radiative properties, and combined conduction-radiation problem with nonhomogeneous radiative properties. To obtain solutions for these problems, the YIX method is used. The YIX quadrature uses piecewise constant interpolation of the integrands. To handle the L-shaped enclosure, an ad hoc approach of searching the struck surface node in the line-of-sight is developed. The general approach of handling any arbitrary complex geometry is briefly described. A single point, implicit, quasi-Newton scheme is used to solve the energy equation when both the radiation and conduction heat transfer modes are present. The quasi-Newton works well for a wide range of dimensionless conduction-radiation parameter except when the parameter is less than 0.2, i.e., radiation is the dominant heat transfer mode.

Hsu, P.F. [Florida Inst. of Tech., Melbourne, FL (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Programs; Tan, Z. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Dept.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electromagnetic Radiation in Hot QCD Matter: Rates, Electric Conductivity, Flavor Susceptibility and Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the general features of the electromagnetic radiation from a thermal hadronic gas as constrained by chiral symmetry. The medium effects on the electromagnetic spectral functions and the partial restoration of chiral symmetry are quantified in terms of the pion densities. The results are compared with the electromagnetic radiation from a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma in terms of the leading gluon condensate operators. We use the spectral functions as constrained by the emission rates to estimate the electric conductivity, the light flavor susceptibility and diffusion constant across the transition from the correlated hadronic gas to a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma.

Chang-Hwan Lee; Ismail Zahed

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Radiative heat transfer between two dielectric nanogratings in the scattering approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a theoretical study of radiative heat transfer between dielectric nanogratings in the scattering approach. As a comparision with these exact results, we also evaluate the domain of validity of Derjaguin's Proximity Approximation (PA). We consider a system of two corrugated silica plates with various grating geometries, separation distances, and lateral displacement of the plates with respect to one another. Numerical computations show that while the PA is a good approximation for aligned gratings, it cannot be used when the gratings are laterally displaced. We illustrate this by a thermal modulator device for nanosystems based on such a displacement.

J. Lussange; R. Guérout; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Summary We compared radiation-use efficiency of growth (), defined as rate of biomass accumulation per unit of ab-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ocean ecosystems. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400­700 nm) ab- sorbed by plant canopies canSummary We compared radiation-use efficiency of growth (), defined as rate of biomass accumulation per unit of ab- sorbed photosynthetically active radiation, of forest plots ex- posed to ambient (~360

DeLucia, Evan H.

147

Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

The rate constant for radiative association of HF: Comparing quantum and classical dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiative association for the formation of hydrogen fluoride through the A{sup 1}? ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} and X{sup 1}?{sup +} ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} transitions is studied using quantum and classical dynamics. The total thermal rate constant is obtained for temperatures from 10 K to 20 000 K. Agreement between semiclassical and quantum approaches is observed for the A{sup 1}? ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} rate constant above 2000 K. The agreement is explained by the fact that the corresponding cross section is free of resonances for this system. At temperatures below 2000 K we improve the agreement by implementing a simplified semiclassical expression for the rate constant, which includes a quantum corrected pair distribution. The rate coefficient for the X{sup 1}?{sup +} ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} transition is calculated using Breit–Wigner theory and a classical formula for the resonance and direct contributions, respectively. In comparison with quantum calculations the classical formula appears to overestimate the direct contribution to the rate constant by about 12% for this transition. Below about 450 K the resonance contribution is larger than the direct, and above that temperature the opposite holds. The biggest contribution from resonances is at the lowest temperature in the study, 10 K, where it is more than four times larger than the direct. Below 1800 K the radiative association rate constant due to X{sup 1}?{sup +} ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} transitions dominates over A{sup 1}? ? X{sup 1}?{sup +}, while above that temperature the situation is the opposite.

Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magngu@chem.gu.se; Monge-Palacios, M.; Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Heat transfer rates for filmwise, dropwise, and superhydrophobic condensation on silicon substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensation, a two-phase heat transfer processes, is commonly utilized in industrial systems. Condensation heat transfer can be optimized by using surfaces in which dropwise condensation (DWC) occurs, and even further ...

Hery, Travis M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Estimation of Rate of Heat Release by Means of Oxygen Consumption Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat release of combustible wall linings during full-scale room fire tests, William Parker, Huggett to the release of heat, the combustion process consumes oxygen. As part of his work on the ASTM E 84 tunnel test released per unit mass of material consumed (i.e., the specific heat of combustion), varied greatly

Womeldorf, Carole

152

A correlated K-distribution model of the heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a molecular mixture in the 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1] wavelength region in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For this report a prototype infrared radiative transfer model using a correlated k-distribution technique to calculate the transmission between atmospheric levels has been used to calculate the radiative fluxes and heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a mixture of the major molecular absorbers in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km. The mixture consists of H[sub 2]O, CO[sub 2], O[sub 3], CH[sub 4], and N[sub 2]O. The wave number range considered is 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1]. The use of the k-distribution method allows 25 cm[sup [minus]1] wave number bins to produce fluxes and heating rates which are within ten percent of the results of detailed line by line calculations.

Grossman, A S; Grant, K E

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Testing the improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation at the periphery of the BOR-60 reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the improved method for calculating the radiation heat generation in the elements of an experimental device located at the periphery of the BOR-60 reactor core results in a significant reduction in the discrepancies between the calculated and the experimental data. This allows us to conclude that the improved method has an advantage over the one used earlier.

Varivtsev, A. V., E-mail: vav3@niiar.ru; Zhemkov, I. Yu. [JSC “SSC RIAR,” Dimitrovgrad-10 (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

Metz, Philip D. (Rocky Point, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

forth through the heat exchangers, thereby phasing the rates at which heat is absorbed and rejected from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conditions Charge Pressure (psia) Firing Rate (KBTUH) Frequency (Hz) Power Piston Stroke (in.) Displacer the earlier analysis; these results are shown in Fig. 4. Working Fluid Charge Pressure (psia) Power Level (k was measured as the total enthalpy gain of the refrigerant across the compres- sor. Table 2 shows the range

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

156

Variation in rectal temperature, respiratory rate, and pulse rate of cattle as related to variations in solar radiation, air temperature, wind velocity, and vapor pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIATION IN RECTAL TEMPERATURE, RESPIRATORY RATE, AND PULSE RATE GF CATTLE AS RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION, AIR TEMPERATURE, WIND VELOCITY, AND VAPOR PRESSURE A Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim Quazi Approved as to style... Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim tyiazi Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1955 Major Subject: Genetics ? ?4...

Quazi, Mohammad Fazlur Rahim

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

App. 1 and 2. Internet supplement to: McCune, B. 2007. Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load using non-parametric regression against  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Heat load) (same as for N hemisphere) Row names in these files follow the convention: Rows for aspects and heat load using non-parametric regression against topographic variables. J. Veg. Sci. 18: 751-754. 1 radiation and heat load for the northern hemisphere presented by McCune & Keon (2002) and supplemental

McCune, Bruce

158

Modeling near-field radiative heat transfer from sharp objects using a general 3d numerical scattering technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the non-equilibrium radiative heat transfer between a plate and finite cylinders and cones, making the first accurate theoretical predictions for the total heat transfer and the spatial heat flux profile for three-dimensional compact objects including corners or tips. We find qualitatively different scaling laws for conical shapes at small separations, and in contrast to a flat/slightly-curved object, a sharp cone exhibits a local \\emph{minimum} in the spatially resolved heat flux directly below the tip. The method we develop, in which a scattering-theory formulation of thermal transfer is combined with a boundary-element method for computing scattering matrices, can be applied to three-dimensional objects of arbitrary shape.

McCauley, Alexander P; Krüger, Matthias; Johnson, Steven G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

MicroShield analysis to calculate external radiation dose rates for several spent fuel casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this MicroShield analysis is to calculate the external radiation, primarily gamma, dose rate for spent fuel casks. The reason for making this calculation is that currently all analyses of transportation risk assume that this external dose rate is the maximum allowed by regulation, 10 mrem/hr at 2 m from the casks, and the risks of incident-free transportation are thus always overestimated to an unknown extent. In order to do this, the program by Grove Software, MicroShield 7.01, was used to model three Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved casks: HI-STAR 100, GA-4, and NAC-STC, loaded with specific source material. Dimensions were obtained from NUREG/CR-6672 and the Certificates of Compliance for each respective cask. Detectors were placed at the axial point at 1 m and 2 m from the outer gamma shielding of the casks. In the April 8, 2004 publication of the Federal Register, a notice of intent to prepare a Supplemental Yucca Mountain Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1) was published by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in order to consider design, construction, operation, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the Yucca Mountain repository [1]. These more accurate estimates of the external dose rates could be used in order to provide a more risk-informed analysis. (authors)

Marincel, M.K. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Weiner, R.F.; Osborn, D.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

Hufnagel, Todd C.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy levels and radiative transition rates for Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fine-structure energies of the 67 levels belonging to the 1s{sup 2}, 1s 2l, 1s3l, 1s4l, 1s5l, and 1s6l configurations of Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII have been calculated using the General-Purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package. In addition, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, transition wavelengths, and line strengths have been calculated for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among these levels. Lifetimes are also presented for all excited levels of these three ions. We have compared our results with the results available in the literature and the accuracy of the data is assessed. We predict new energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities where no other theoretical or experimental results are available, which will form the basis for future experimental work.

Aggarwal, Sunny, E-mail: sunny.du87@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Jha, A.K.S.; Mohan, Man

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

TWO-DIMENSIONAL TRANSIENT RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport is time-dependent radiative transfer equation. The solution of the hyperbolic transient radiative-pulsed laser radiation interaction and transport within biological tissues. INTRODUCTION With the advent of the short-pulsed laser with the duration of the order of femtoseconds, transient laser radiation transport

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

163

Disease-control rates following intensity-modulated radiation therapy for small primary oropharyngeal carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to achieve favorable disease-control rates while minimizing parotid gland doses in patients treated for small primary tumors of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified all patients who received IMRT as treatment for a small (<4 cm) primary tumor of the oropharynx between October 2000 and June 2002. Tumor characteristics, IMRT parameters, and patient outcomes were assessed. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria for our study. All patients had treatment to gross disease with margin (CTV1), and all but 1 had treatment to the bilateral necks. The most common treatment schedule (39 patients) was a once-daily fractionation of prescribed doses of 63-66 Gy to the CTV1 and 54 Gy to subclinical sites, delivered in 30 fractions. Twenty-one patients (40%) had gastrostomy tubes placed during therapy; in 4 patients, the tube remained in place for more than 6 months after completion of IMRT. The median follow-up was 45 months. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, recurrence-free, and overall survival rates were 94%, 88%, and 94%, respectively. Conclusions: These preliminary data suggest that treatment with IMRT results in favorable locoregional control of small primary oropharynx tumors. IMRT did not appear to have a more favorable acute toxicity profile in this group with respect to the use of a feeding tube; however, the mean dose of radiation delivered to the parotid gland by IMRT was decreased, because 95% of patients had a mean dose of <30 Gy to at least one gland.

Garden, Adam S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org; Morrison, William H. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wong, P.-F. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tung, Sam S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong Lei [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mason, Brian M.S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Perkins, George H. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

ARM - PI Product - Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethaneProductsCSSEF ARMBE ARM Data Discovery Browse

165

On the approximation of local and linear radiative damping in the middle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmosphere. In general, this damping is a nonlocal process in which heat is transferred to and from remote form 13 November 2009) ABSTRACT The validity of approximating radiative heating rates in the middle'') is investigated. Using radiative heating rate and temperature output from a chemistry­climate model with realistic

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

166

Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

Roberts Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part I: Maximum Solar Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2004) ABSTRACT The effects of solar heating and infrared cooling on the vapor depositional growth of as much as 45 min. Including infrared cooling as well as solar heating in the LES and microphysical bin Solar Heating CHRISTOPHER M. HARTMAN AND JERRY Y. HARRINGTON Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania

Harrington, Jerry Y.

168

Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A., E-mail: anouar.soufiani@ecp.fr [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire EM2C, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); École Centrale Paris, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France)] [France; Xin, S. [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)] [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Le Quéré, P. [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)] [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

170

Subclinical Cardiotoxicity Detected by Strain Rate Imaging up to 14 months After Breast Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic modality that enables accurate measurement of regional myocardial function. We investigated the role of SRI and troponin I (TnI) in the detection of subclinical radiation therapy (RT)-induced cardiotoxicity in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This study prospectively included 75 women (51 left-sided and 24 right-sided) receiving adjuvant RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Sequential echocardiographs with SRI were obtained before RT, immediately after RT, and 8 and 14 months after RT. TnI levels were measured on the first and last day of RT. Results: Mean heart and left ventricle (LV) doses were both 9 ± 4 Gy for the left-sided patients and 4 ± 4 Gy and 1 ± 0.4 Gy, respectively, for the right-sided patients. A decrease in strain was observed at all post-RT time points for left-sided patients (?17.5% ± 1.9% immediately after RT, ?16.6% ± 1.4% at 8 months, and ?17.7% ± 1.9% at 14 months vs ?19.4% ± 2.4% before RT, P<.01) but not for right-sided patients. When we considered left-sided patients only, the highest mean dose was given to the anterior left ventricular (LV) wall (25 ± 14 Gy) and the lowest to the inferior LV wall (3 ± 3 Gy). Strain of the anterior wall was reduced after RT (?16.6% ± 2.3% immediately after RT, ?16% ± 2.6% at 8 months, and ?16.8% ± 3% at 14 months vs ?19% ± 3.5% before RT, P<.05), whereas strain of the inferior wall showed no significant change. No changes were observed with conventional echocardiography. Furthermore, mean TnI levels for the left-sided patients were significantly elevated after RT compared with before RT, whereas TnI levels of the right-sided patients remained unaffected. Conclusions: In contrast to conventional echocardiography, SRI detected a regional, subclinical decline in cardiac function up to 14 months after breast RT. It remains to be determined whether these changes are related to clinical outcome. In the meantime, we encourage the use of radiation techniques that minimize the exposure of the anterior LV wall in left-sided patients.

Erven, Katrien, E-mail: katrien.erven@uzleuven.be [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Iridium Cancer Network, Antwerp (Belgium); Florian, Anca [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF “Carol Davila,” Bucharest (Romania); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Image Computing (ESAT/PSI), University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Medical Image Computing (ESAT/PSI), University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); IBBT-KU Leuven Future Health Department, Leuven (Belgium); Sweldens, Caroline [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Jurcut, Ruxandra [Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF “Carol Davila,” Bucharest (Romania)] [Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF “Carol Davila,” Bucharest (Romania); Wildiers, Hans [Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Voigt, Jens-Uwe [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Weltens, Caroline [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Heat Transfer Modeling and Use of Distributed Temperature Measurements to Predict Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .......................................... 53 Figure 21 – Rate simulation for the same case as Fig. 20. ............................................... 54 Figure 22 – Buildup charts for the same case as in Fig. 10. ............................................. 54 Figure 23 – Pareto chart... ................................................................................ 10 CHAPTER III MODEL DEVELOPMENT .................................................................... 12 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 12 Steady...

Hashmi, Gibran Mushtaq

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The convergence of an explicit finite difference solution for transient heat transfer in solids with radiation at one boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Interior Point 'n ' 17 8 ? 01 Temperature Resp C 2'( C 1, Wi Constant Tempera x = L, and Havin Transfer to a He Degree Absolute Calculated With Modulus as Per S at x/L = 0. 0 onse th a ture g Ra at S Temp a Mr tabi of Hea at dian ink.... The Fourier equation for one? dimensional heat conduction in solids with constant physical properties is BT K 0 T Qe gC Q~x (3 ? 01) The net radiant heat transfer rate between two gray bodies A and B at absolute temperature T and T will be B according...

Patel, Bhagubhai Desaibhai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

In-Cylinder Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel Reactivity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Improving Fan System PerformanceIn situIn

175

An experimental and theoretical study of radiative and conductive heat transfer in nongray semitransparent media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One dimensional temperature profiles and heat fluxes within a slab of molten glass were measured experimentally. The glass slab was contained in a platinum foil lined ceramic tray inside a high temperature furnace. An ...

Eryou, N. Dennis

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in external galaxies.

Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli, E-mail: tea.temim@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Solar Radiative Heating in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness 1 , K.A. Landman 2 , H.J. Trodahl 3 , A.E. Pantoja 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Radiative Heating in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness 1 , K.A. Landman 2 , H.J. Trodahl 3 ice show daily oscillations consistent with heating by solar radiation. We present and solve a heat for solar power absorption based on Monte Carlo scatter­ ing simulations of penetrating photons. We observe

178

The Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate of Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Purity Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain boundary chromium carbides improve the resistance of nickel based alloys to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, in weld heat affected zones (HAZ's), thermal cycles from fusion welding can solutionize beneficial grain boundary carbides, produce locally high residual stresses and strains, and promote PWSCC. The present research investigates the crack growth rate of an A600 HAZ as a function of test temperature. The A600 HAZ was fabricated by building up a gas-tungsten-arc-weld deposit of EN82H filler metal onto a mill-annealed A600 plate. Fracture mechanics based, stress corrosion crack growth rate testing was performed in high purity water between 600 F and 680 F at an initial stress intensity factor of 40 ksi {radical}in and at a constant electrochemical potential. The HAZ samples exhibited significant SCC, entirely within the HAZ at all temperatures tested. While the HAZ samples showed the same temperature dependence for SCC as the base material (HAZ: 29.8 {+-} 11.2{sub 95%} kcal/mol vs A600 Base: 35.3 {+-} 2.58{sub 95%} kcal/mol), the crack growth rates were {approx} 30X faster than the A600 base material tested at the same conditions. The increased crack growth rates of the HAZ is attributed to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and to increased plastic strain in the HAZ as compared to the unaffected base material.

George A. Young; Nathan Lewis

2003-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of ?-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase activity) were examined after exposure of synchronized G1 cells to 137Cs c rays. DNA-PKcs mutant cells defective in phosphorylation at multiple sites withinthe T2609 cluster or within the PI3K domain displayed extreme radiosensitivity. Cells defective at the S2056 cluster or T2609 single site alone were only mildly radiosensitive, but cells defective at even one site in both the S2056 and T2609 clusters were maximally radiosensitive. Thus a synergism between the capacity for phosphorylation at the S2056 and T2609 clusterswas found to be critical for induction of radiosensitivity.

Bedford, Joel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

L- and M-shell absorption measurements of radiatively heated Fe plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of iron-plasma absorption spectrum over 150-1200 eV photon energy range were reported at temperature T = (72 {+-} 4) eV. The electron temperature was diagnosed with the absorption spectrum of aluminum mixed with iron. The density was not diagnosed directly but obtained from a radiative hydrodynamic simulation with the Multi-1D code. The broad photon energy range enables simultaneous observation of the L-shell and M-shell transitions that dominate the radiation transport at this temperature. The spectrally resolved transmission data were compared to the detailed-configuration-accounting model calculations and reasonable agreement was found.

Zhang Jiyan; Li Hang; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yuan Zheng; Zhang Haiying; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Liu Shenye; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Meng Xujun; Yan Jun [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Analysis of a flexible polymeric film with imbedded micro heat pipes for spacecraft radiators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, radiator capacity varies from 6.0 kW to 12.2 kW for source temperatures from 20° to 50° C. For source temperatures 40° C and higher, capacity meets or exceeds the dissipation requirements of a reference spacecraft design. Methanol is not recommended as a...

McDaniels, Deborah Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fuel-disruption experiments under high-ramp-rate heating conditions. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report presents the preliminary results and analysis of the High Ramp Rate fuel-disruption experiment series. These experiments were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the timing and mode of fuel disruption during the prompt-burst phase of a loss-of-flow accident. High-speed cinematography was used to observe the timing and mode of the fuel disruption in a stack of five fuel pellets. Of the four experiments discussed, one used fresh mixed-oxide fuel, and three used irradiated mixed-oxide fuel. Analysis of the experiments indicates that in all cases, the observed disruption occurred well before fuel-vapor pressure was high enough to cause the disruption. The disruption appeared as a rapid spray-like expansion and occurred near the onset of fuel melting in the irradiated-fuel experiments and near the time of complete fuel melting in the fresh-fuel experiment. This early occurrence of fuel disruption is significant because it can potentially lower the work-energy release resulting from a prompt-burst disassembly accident.

Wright, S.A.; Worledge, D.H.; Cano, G.L.; Mast, P.K.; Briscoe, F.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William (Chevron USA Inc.); Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

What is Wind Chill Temperature? It is the temperature it "feels like" outside and is based on the rate of heat loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is Wind Chill Temperature? It is the temperature it "feels like" outside and is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by the effects of wind and cold. As the wind increases, the body is cooled at a faster rate causing the skin temperature to drop. Wind Chill does not impact

186

Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Understand implications of reduced repetition rate, is it adequate for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Operations · Understand implications of ECRH to improve startup. Heating · ICRF is the base line heating system, compare with NBI and ECRH withstand the anticipated heat loads? Diagnostics · Capability of beam diagnostics for J(r), E(r), etc

187

Evaluation of Reaction Rate Theory and Monte Carlo Methods for Application to Radiation-Induced Microstructural Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory, Monte Carlo, or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales, and timescales from those characteristic of diffusion to long-term microstructural evolution (~?s to years). Although the rate theory and Monte Carlo models can be used simulate the same phenomena, some of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. Models employing the rate theory have been extensively used to describe radiation-induced phenomena such as void swelling and irradiation creep. The primary approximations in such models are time- and spatial averaging of the radiation damage source term, and spatial averaging of the microstructure into an effective medium. Kinetic Monte Carlo models can account for these spatial and temporal correlations; their primary limitation is the computational burden which is related to the size of the simulation cell. A direct comparison of RT and object kinetic MC simulations has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to the evolution (both nucleation and growth) of radiation-induced defect structures. The primary limitations of the OKMC model are related to computational issues. Even with modern computers, the maximum simulation cell size and the maximum dose (typically much less than 1 dpa) that can be simulated are limited. In contrast, even very detailed RT models can simulate microstructural evolution for doses up 100 dpa or greater in clock times that are relatively short. Within the context of the effective medium, essentially any defect density can be simulated. Overall, the agreement between the two methods is best for irradiation conditions which produce a high density of defects (lower temperature and higher displacement rate), and for materials that have a relatively high density of fixed sinks such as dislocations.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Becquart, C. S. [Universite de Lille; Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Clamart, France

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

189

Heat blanketing envelopes and thermal radiation of strongly magnetized neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strong (B >> 10^9 G) and superstrong (B > 10^{14} G) magnetic fields profoundly affect many thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of dense plasmas in neutron star envelopes. In particular, they produce strongly anisotropic thermal conductivity in the neutron star crust and modify the equation of state and radiative opacities in the atmosphere, which are major ingredients of the cooling theory and spectral atmosphere models. As a result, both the radiation spectrum and the thermal luminosity of a neutron star can be affected by the magnetic field. We briefly review these effects and demonstrate the influence of magnetic field strength on the thermal structure of an isolated neutron star, putting emphasis on the differences brought about by the superstrong fields and high temperatures of magnetars. For the latter objects, it is important to take proper account of a combined effect of the magnetic field on thermal conduction and neutrino emission at densities \\rho > 10^{10} g cm^{-3}. We show that the neutrino emission puts a B-dependent upper limit on the effective surface temperature of a cooling neutron star.

A. Y. Potekhin; G. Chabrier; D. G. Yakovlev

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Remote sensing of tropical tropopause layer radiation balance using A-train measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the relevant horizontal and vertical information for assessing TTL solar heating and infrared cooling rates; accepted 8 August 2008; published 12 November 2008. [1] Determining the level of zero net radiative heating the distribution of cloud properties relevant to heating rate analysis. The ability of CloudSat measurements

Liou, K. N.

191

Inclined monochromator for high heat-load synchrotron x-ray radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double crystal monochromator is described including two identical, parallel crystals, each of which is cut such that the normal to the diffraction planes of interest makes an angle less than 90 degrees with the surface normal. Diffraction is symmetric, regardless of whether the crystals are symmetrically or asymmetrically cut, enabling operation of the monochromator with a fixed plane of diffraction. As a result of the inclination of the crystal surface, an incident beam has a footprint area which is elongated both vertically and horizontally when compared to that of the conventional monochromator, reducing the heat flux of the incident beam and enabling more efficient surface cooling. Because after inclination of the crystal only a fraction of thermal distortion lies in the diffraction plane, slope errors and the resultant misorientation of the diffracted beam are reduced. 11 figures.

Khounsary, A.M.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Frequency-Selective Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Photonic Crystal Slabs: A Computational Approach for Arbitrary Geometries and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy from a hot to a cold body is well known to be enhanced (even exceeding the black- body limit) whenFrequency-Selective Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer between Photonic Crystal Slabs of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 Department

Soljaèiæ, Marin

193

Video-rate optical dosimetry and dynamic visualization of IMRT and VMAT treatment plans in water using Cherenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A novel technique for optical dosimetry of dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 (TG-119) C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank doped with the fluorophore quinine sulfate. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac target trigger pulse to reduce background light artifacts, read out for a single radiation pulse, and binned to a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for various regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR), and summed to obtain an overall light intensity distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gamma-index analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in 23.5 frames per second dosimetry videos. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.9% and 96.2% agreement between the experimentally captured Cherenkov light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3%/3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for video-rate optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications.

Glaser, Adam K., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Davis, Scott C. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Fox, Colleen J.; Gladstone, David J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)] [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Impact of an apparent radiation embrittlement rate on the life expectancy of PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ /minus/ 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all LWR vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed for one of the plants indicate best-estimate critical flaw size corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.4 in. It appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size. Thus, presumably such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 19 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

Abbasi, Akbar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

Akbar Abbasi; Mustfa Hassanzadeh

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL. [Core Flow Test Loop; RODCON; HOTTEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium.

Conklin, J.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Low local recurrence rate without postmastectomy radiation in node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors 5 cm and larger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the need for adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with node-negative breast tumors 5 cm or larger. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 2002, a total of 70 patients with node-negative breast cancer and tumors 5 cm or larger were treated with mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapies but without radiotherapy at three institutions. We retrospectively assessed rates and risk factors for locoregional failure (LRF), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) in these patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 85 months, the 5-year actuarial LRF rate was 7.6% (95% confidence interval, 3%-16%). LRF was primarily in the chest wall (4/5 local failures), and lymphatic-vascular invasion (LVI) was statistically significantly associated with LRF risk by the log-rank test (p = 0.017) and in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p 0.038). The 5-year OS and DFS rates were 83% and 86% respectively. LVI was also significantly associated with OS and DFS in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This series demonstrates a low LRF rate of 7.6% among breast cancer patients with node-negative tumors 5 cm and larger after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Our data indicate that further adjuvant radiation therapy to increase local control may not be indicated by tumor size alone in the absence of positive lymph nodes. LVI was significantly associated with LRF in our series, indicating that patients with this risk factor require careful consideration with regard to further local therapy.

Floyd, Scott R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Goldberg, Saveli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Raad, Rita Abi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Oswald, Mary J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sullivan, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Katz, Angela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: ataghian@partners.org

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Spherical collapse with heat flow and without horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a class of solutions for a heat conducting fluid sphere, which radiates energy during collapse without the appearance of horizon at the boundary at any stage of the collapse. A simple model shows that there is no accumulation of energy due to collapse since it radiates out at the same rate as it is being generated.

A. Banerjee; S. Chatterjee; N. Dadhich

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton, J. P. Home, W. M have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated $d^6$ ($t_{2g}^6$) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)$_3$]$^{2+}$ and Ir(ppy)$_3$, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, $T_1$, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of $T_1$ and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-revers...

Powell, B J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated $d^6$ ($t_{2g}^6$) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)$_3$]$^{2+}$ and Ir(ppy)$_3$, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, $T_1$, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of $T_1$ and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

B. J. Powell

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

Investigating the Radiative Impact Clouds Using Retrieved Properties to Classify Cloud Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reading, RG6 6AL, UK Abstract. Active remote sensing allows cloud properties such as ice and liquid water remote sensing, Cloud categorization, Cloud properties, Radiative impact. PACS: 92.60. Vb. INTRODUCTION in a radiation scheme which can simulate the radiation budget and heating rates throughout the atmospheric

Hogan, Robin

204

Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 20-March 19, 1982. Second quarterly report on the effect of rapid heating rate on coal nitrogen and sulfur release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser pyrolysis technique is applied to the investigation of the effects of heating rate on release of coal-bound sulfur and nitrogen. An experimental system characterization and calibration has been completed. A detailed documentation was prepared describing the 3-color pyrometer and the data analysis technique. The coal particle feed system has been calibrated to provide accurate mass flow rate at pre-selected particle velocities. The first batch of samples submitted for chemical analysis will be used for the determination of kinetics parameters at a high heating rate (approximately equal to 10/sup 6/ K/s). The coal used presently is a Montana Rosebud. Two other coals are available; one is ILL No. 6 (through EERC) which will need to be pulverized and the second is a Pitt. hv-A (through KVB). It was confirmed that sieve and drag size distribution of coal differ significantly, and that particle shape effects may be significant in the modelling of particle dynamics.

Gat, N.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

206

Development of a Heat Transfer Model for the Integrated Facade Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat transfer process of facade heating (mullion radiators) in a pilot research project in Pittsburgh, PA. The heat transfer model for facade heating is developed and verified by measured data. The comparison shows that the heat transfer model predicts...

Gong, X.; Archer, D. H.; Claridge, D. E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Intergalactic dust and its photoelectric heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the dust photoelectric heating in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The heating rate in a typical radiation field of the IGM is represented by $\\Gamma_{\\rm pe} = 1.2\\times10^{-34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-3}$ $({\\cal D}/10^{-4})(n_{\\rm H}/10^{-5} {\\rm cm^{-3}})^{4/3} (J_{\\rm L}/10^{-21} {\\rm erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} Hz^{-1} sr^{-1}})^{2/3} (T/10^4 {\\rm K})^{-1/6}$, where ${\\cal D}$ is the dust-to-gas mass ratio, $n_{\\rm H}$ is the hydrogen number density, $J_{\\rm L}$ is the mean intensity at the hydrogen Lyman limit of the background radiation, and $T$ is the gas temperature, if we assume the new X-ray photoelectric yield model by Weingartner et al. (2006) and the dust size distribution in the Milky Way by Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck (1977). This heating rate dominates the HI and HeII photoionization heating rates when the hydrogen number density is less than $\\sim10^{-6}$ cm$^{-3}$ if ${\\cal D}=10^{-4}$ which is 1% of that in the Milky Way, although the heating rate is a factor of 2--4 smaller than that with the old yield model by Weingartner & Draine (2001). The grain size distribution is very important. If only large ($\\ge0.1$ $\\mu$m) grains exist in the IGM, the heating rate is reduced by a factor of $\\simeq5$. Since the dust heating is more efficient in a lower density medium relative to the photoionization heating, it may cause an inverted temperature--density relation in the low density IGM suggested by Bolton et al. (2008). Finally, we have found that the dust heating is not very important in the mean IGM before the cosmic reionization.

Akio K. Inoue; Hideyuki Kamaya

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

Gayle Woloschak

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Richlen, S.L.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impact of subgrid-scale radiative heating variability on the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus transition in climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subgrid-scale interactions between turbulence and radiation are potentially important for accurately reproducing marine low clouds in climate models. To better understand the impact of these interactions, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is configured for large eddy simulation (LES) to study the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus (Sc-to-Cu) transition. Using the GEWEX Atmospheric System Studies (GASS) composite Lagrangian transition case and the Atlantic Trade Wind Experiment (ATEX) case, it is shown that the lack of subgrid-scale turbulence-radiation interaction, as is the case in current generation climate models, accelerates the Sc-to-Cu transition. Our analysis suggests that in cloud-topped boundary layers subgrid-scale turbulence-radiation interactions contribute to stronger production of temperature variance, which in turn leads to stronger buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy and helps to maintain the Sc cover.

Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Wang, Hailong

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Heating 7. 2 user's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

Childs, K.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impact of the Position of a Radiator to Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiant temperature (MRT) determines the radiation heat exchange between the human body and surrounding surfaces. In a typical room, the air temperature and MRT are the only two variables the design engineer may control (Palmer and Chapman [14... Speed V r <40 fpm (<0.2 m/s) 40 to 120 fpm (0.2 to 0.6 m/s) 120 to 200 fpm (0.6 to 1.0 m/s) A 0.5 0.6 0.7 When air speed is small (less than 0.2m/s) or the difference between mean radiant and air temperature is small (less than 4 o C...

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of {gamma}-ray radiation on electrical properties of heat-treated Tb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Se single crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of {gamma}-ray radiation on the electrical properties of heat-treated Tb{sub 0.01}Sn{sub 0.99}Se (sample 1) and Tb{sub 0.05}Sn{sub 0.95}Se (sample 2) samples is studied. It is found that, as a result of irradiation with {gamma}-ray 1.25-MeV photons, the charge-carrier concentration decreases in the temperature range T = 77-200 K by 17 and 6.3% for samples 1 and 2, respectively. It is assumed that, in the course of irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons, terbium impurity atoms are located between sites of the crystal lattice; in addition, Frenkel defects are formed.

Huseynov, J. I., E-mail: cih_58@mail.ru; Jafarov, T. A. [Azerbaijan State Pedagogical University (Azerbaijan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms. 1. The acoustic heating theory Only a few years after Edlen's (1941) discovery that the solar acoustic wave radiation- · b. field acoustic wave Figure 1. Panel a: Acoustic heating in late-type stars: effective temperature TeJ f, gravity g and mixing length parameter fr. Panel b: Acoustic heating in early

Ulmschneider, Peter

219

The effect of non-uniform radiative damping on the zonal-mean dynamics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an imposed forcing or diabatic heating is examined in a zonal-mean model of the middle atmosphere. Attention radiative damping rates are more sensitive in terms of temperature to the remote in uence of the diabatic is the strongly relaxational nature of diabatic heating. It is this feature, for example, which leads to the zonal

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

220

Solar heat receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - as-operated heat loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E424503 E 20102010 88 --rzrz 8.8. Heat pumps, heat pipes,Heat pumps, heat pipes, Summary: heat transfer capacity and rate...

223

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

HEATING 7. 1 user's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATING is a FORTRAN program designed to solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three- dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heating generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-boundary or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General graybody radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING is variably dimensioned and utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution (for one-dimensional or two-dimensional problems), and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method (which for some circumstances allows a time step greater than the CEP stability criterion). The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

Childs, K.W.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative rates for Si-like Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy levels, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p and 3s{sup 2}3p4d configurations of silicon-like ions (Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX) have been calculated using the configuration-interaction code CIV3. The calculations have been carried out in the intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels have also been calculated. -- Highlights: •We have calculated the fine-structure energy levels of Si-like Zn, Ga, Ge and As. •The calculations are performed using the configuration interaction method (CIV3). •We have calculated the oscillator strengths, line strengths and transition rates. •The wavelengths of the transitions are listed in this article. •We also have made comparisons between our data and other calculations.

Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effects of p60 sCo gamma radiation on Sarcina lutea: A comparison of effects at two different exposure rates and a study of the radiosensitizing properties of prodigiosin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res. 48, 40-52 (1971). 8. R. P. Williams, Biosynthesis of Prodigiosin, a Secondary Metabolite of Serratia marcescens, ~A 1. Microbiol. 25, 396-402 (1973). 9. M. M. Matthews, and N. I. Krinsky, The relatioship... Radiation on Sarcina ]utes: A Comparison of Effects at Two Different Exposure Rates and A Study of the Radiosensitizing Properties of. Prodigiosin (August 1973) George W. Blair, Jr. , B. S, , University of Chattanooga Directed by: Dr. R. D. Neff...

Blair, George Washington

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rotating bubble membrane radiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

1988-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geothermal heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

Aureille, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy levels, oscillator strengths, radiative decay rates, and fine-structure collision strengths for the Zn-like ions Nb XII and Mo XIII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy levels, line strengths, oscillator strengths, radiative decay rates, and fine-structure collision strengths are presented for the Zn-like ions Nb XII and Mo XIII. The atomic data are calculated with the AUTOSTRUCTURE code, where relativistic corrections are introduced according to the Breit–Pauli distorted wave approach. We present the calculations of atomic data for 110 fine-structure levels generated from fifteen configurations (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10})4s{sup 2}, 4s4p, 4p{sup 2}, 4s4d, 4s4f, 4s5s, 4p4d, 4s5p, 4s5d, 4p4f, 4p5s, 4d{sup 2}, 4d4f, 4f{sup 2}, and 3d{sup 9}4s{sup 2}4p. Fine-structure collision strengths for transitions from the ground and the first four excited levels are presented at six electron energies (20, 50, 80, 110, 150, and 180 Ryd). Our atomic structure data are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

Liang, Liang, E-mail: liangll501@163.com; Liu, Xu-yang; Zhou, Chao

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/120 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven �bo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering / Värme Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/120 Pic: B�88 �bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/120 5.1 Conductive heat transfer �bo Akademi

Zevenhoven, Ron

233

Relative Biologic Effects of Low-Dose-Rate {alpha}-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Rituximab and {beta}-Emitting {sup 90}Y-Tiuexetan-Ibritumomab Versus External Beam X-Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the relative biologic effects (RBE) of {alpha}-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-rituximab and of {beta}-radiation from {sup 90}Y-tiuexetan-ibritumomab (Zevalin) compared with external beam X-radiation in the Raji lymphoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Radioimmunoconjugates were administered intravenously in nude mice with Raji lymphoma xenografts at different levels of activity. Absorbed dose to tumor was estimated by separate biodistribution experiments for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and Zevalin. Tumor growth was measured two to three times per week after injection or X-radiation. Treatment-induced increase in growth delay to reach tumor volumes of 500 and 1,000 mm{sup 3}, respectively, was used as an end point. Results: The absorbed radiation dose-rate in tumor was slightly more than 0.1 Gy/d for the first week following injection of {sup 227}Th-rituximab, and thereafter gradually decreased to 0.03 Gy/d at 21 days after injection. For treatment with Zevalin the maximum dose-rate in tumor was achieved already 6 h after injection (0.2 Gy/d), and thereafter decreased to 0.01 Gy/d after 7 days. The relative biologic effect was between 2.5 and 7.2 for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and between 1 and 1.3 for Zevalin. Conclusions: Both at low doses and low-dose-rates, the {sup 227}Th-rituximab treatment was more effective per absorbed radiation dose unit than the two other treatments. The considerable effect at low doses suggests that the best way to administer low-dose-rates, {alpha}-emitting radioimmunoconjugates is via multiple injections.

Dahle, Jostein [Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: jostein.dahle@rr-research.no; Bruland, Oyvind S. [University of Oslo and Department of Oncology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway); Larsen, Roy H. [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo (Norway)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Cluster Heating by Viscous Dissipation of Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We simulate the effects of viscous dissipation of waves that are generated by AGN activity in clusters of galaxies. We demonstrate that the amount of viscous heating associated with the dissipation of these waves can offset radiative cooling rates in cooling flow clusters of galaxies. This heating mechanism leads to spatially distributed and approximately symmetrical dissipation. The heating waves reach a given distance from the cluster center on a timescale shorter than the cooling time. This means that this heating mechanism has the potential of quenching cooling flows in a quasi-stable fashion. Moreover, the heating is gentle as no strong shocks are present in the simulations. We first investigated whether a single continuous episode of AGN activity can lead to adequate dissipation to balance cooling rates. These simulations demonstrated that, whereas secondary waves generated by the interaction of the rising bubble with the intracluster medium are clearly present, viscous heating associated with the dissipation of these waves is insufficient to balance radiative cooling. It is only when the central source is intermittent that the viscous dissipation of waves associated with subsequent episodes of activity can offset cooling. This suggests that the ripples observed in the Perseus cluster can be interpreted as being due to the AGN duty cycle, i.e., they trace AGN activity history. The simulations were performed using the PPM adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH in two dimensions.

Mateusz Ruszkowski; Marcus Bruggen; Mitchell C. Begelman

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat...

237

Direct 2-Arm Comparison Shows Benefit of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost vs External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients treated for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer with a single schedule of either external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost or EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: From 2001-2006, 344 patients received EBRT with HDRB boost for definitive treatment of intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. The prescribed EBRT dose was 46 Gy in 23 fractions, with a HDR boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions. This cohort was compared to a contemporaneously treated cohort who received EBRT to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, using a matched pair analysis. Three-dimensional conformal EBRT was used. Matching was performed using a propensity score matching technique. High-risk patients constituted 41% of the matched cohorts. Five-year clinical and biochemical outcomes were analyzed. Results: Initial significant differences in prognostic indicators between the unmatched treatment cohorts were rendered negligible after matching, providing a total of 688 patients. Median biochemical follow-up was 60.5 months. The 5-year freedom from biochemical failure was 79.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74.3%-85.0%) and 70.9% (95% CI, 65.4%-76.0%) for the HDRB and EBRT groups, respectively, equating to a hazard ratio of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.43-0.81, P=.0011). Interaction analyses showed no alteration in HDR efficacy when planned androgen deprivation therapy was administered (P=.95), but a strong trend toward reduced efficacy was shown compared to EBRT in high-risk cases (P=.06). Rates of grade 3 urethral stricture were 0.3% (95% CI, 0%-0.9%) and 11.8% (95% CI, 8.1%-16.5%) for EBRT and HDRB, respectively (P<.0001). No differences in clinical outcomes were observed. Conclusions: This comparison of 2 individual contemporaneously treated HDRB and EBRT approaches showed improved freedom from biochemical progression with the HDR approach. The benefit was more pronounced in intermediate- risk patients but needs to be weighed against an increased risk of urethral toxicity.

Khor, Richard [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia) [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Tai, Keen-Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Chander, Sarat; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Garth, Margaret [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott, E-mail: Scott.Williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)] [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Castor-1C spent fuel storage cask decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Services (GNS) CASTOR-1C cask used in a spent fuel storage demonstration performed at Preussen Elektra's Wurgassen nuclear power plant. The demonstration was performed between March 1982 and January 1984, and resulted in cask and fuel temperature data and cask exterior surface gamma-ray and neutron radiation dose rate measurements. The purpose of the analyses reported here was to evaluate decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding computer codes. The analyses consisted of (1) performing pre-look predictions (predictions performed before the analysts were provided the test data), (2) comparing ORIGEN2 (decay heat), COBRA-SFS and HYDRA (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) results to data, and (3) performing post-test analyses if appropriate. Even though two heat transfer codes were used to predict CASTOR-1C cask test data, no attempt was made to compare the two codes. The codes are being evaluated with other test data (single-assembly data and other cask data), and to compare the codes based on one set of data may be premature and lead to erroneous conclusions.

Rector, D.R.; McCann, R.A.; Jenquin, U.P.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating purposes. BACKGROUND The reduction of heat transfer rates by the use of thermal infraredheating applications should become available on the marketplace. Due to their high reflectivity to thermal infrared

Selkowitz, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A High-Order-Accurate GPU-Based Radiative Transfer Equation Solver for Combustion and Propulsion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative heat flux through the grid element boundary ˆ sstair-case grid. Figure 5 shows the net radiative heat fluxgrid consisted of 6872 tetrahedral elements. The dimensionless radiative heat

He, Xing; Lee, Euntaek; Wilcox, Lucas; Munipalli, Ramakanth; Pilon, Laurent

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 19-23, 2009, San Francisco, CA, USA HT2009-88261 SIMULATION OF FOCUSED RADIATION PROPAGATION AND TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN TURBID-dependent radiation and conduction bio-heat transfer model. Ultrashort pulsed radiation transport in the cylindrical

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

244

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

245

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscopal radiation effects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will introduce the theory of radiative transfer; the second part Summary: to greenhouse effect and solar radiation 6. Radiative heating and cooling a. The Chapman layer b....

247

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Feedback in AGN heating of galaxy clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the challenges that models of AGN heating of the intracluster medium (ICM) face, is the question how the mechanical luminosity of the AGN is tuned to the radiative losses of the ICM. Here we implement a simple 1D model of a feedback mechanism that links the luminosity of the AGN to the accretion rate. We demonstrate how this simple feedback mechanism leads to a quasi-steady state for a broad range of parameters. Moreover, within this feedback model, we investigate the effect of thermal conduction and find that its relative importance depends strongly on the cluster mass.

M. Hoeft; M. Brueggen

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Heat treatment furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced, melt-water, film-boiling heat transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In evaluation of severe-accident sequences for water-cooled nuclear reactors, molten core materials may be postulated to be released into the containment and accumulate on concrete. The heatup and decomposition of concrete is accompanied by the release of water vapor and carbon dioxide gases. Gases flowing through the melt upper surface can influence the rates of heat transfer to water overlying the melt. In particular, the gas flow through the interface can be envisioned to enhance the heat removal from the melt. A mechanistic model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe film-boiling heat transfer between a molten pool and an overlying coolant layer in the presence of sparging gas. The model favorably predicts the lead-Feron 11 data of Greene and Greene et al. for which the calculations indicate that area enhancement in the conduction heat transfer across the film is the predominant mechanism leading to augmentation in the heat flux as the gas velocity increases. Predictions for oxidic corium indicate a rapid increase in film-boiling heat flux as the gas velocity rises. The predominant mode of heat transfer for this case is radiation, and the increase in heat flux with gas velocity is primarily a result of interfacial area enhancement of the radiation component of the overall heat transfer coefficient. The CORQUENCH model has been incorporated into the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code{sup 6} for the analysis of transient spreading in containments.

Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solar heating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Concord, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Improved solar heating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

Johnson, D.C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development and Implementation of Radiation-Hydrodynamics Verification Test Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytic solutions to the radiation-hydrodynamic equations are useful for verifying any large-scale numerical simulation software that solves the same set of equations. The one-dimensional, spherically symmetric Coggeshall No.9 and No.11 analytic solutions, cell-averaged over a uniform-grid have been developed to analyze the corresponding solutions from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Eulerian Applications Project radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE. These Coggeshall solutions have been shown to be independent of heat conduction, providing a unique opportunity for comparison with xRAGE solutions with and without the heat conduction module. Solution convergence was analyzed based on radial step size. Since no shocks are involved in either problem and the solutions are smooth, second-order convergence was expected for both cases. The global L1 errors were used to estimate the convergence rates with and without the heat conduction module implemented.

Marcath, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Matthew Y. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Laser readable thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters and methods for producing thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters for use in laser readable dosimetry systems, and methods of fabricating such thin layer dosimeters are disclosed. The thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters include a thin substrate made from glass or other inorganic materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and high heating rates. A thin layer of a thermoluminescent phosphor material is heat bonded to the substrate using an inorganic binder such as glass. The dosimeters can be mounted in frames and cases for ease in handling. Methods of the invention include mixing a suitable phosphor composition and binder, both being in particulate or granular form. The mixture is then deposited onto a substrate such as by using mask printing techniques. The dosimeters are thereafter heated to fuse and bond the binder and phosphor to the substrate. 34 figs.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Heating 7.2 user`s manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

Childs, K.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df and the tube at a rate m , and the outer surface of the tube is well insulated. Heat generation occurs within. The specific heat of water pc , and the thermal conductivity of the fuel rod fk are constants. The system

Virginia Tech

259

11-14 An ideal vapor-compression refrigeration cycle with refrigerant-134a as the working fluid is considered. The rate of heat removal from the refrigerated space, the power input to the compressor, the rate of heat rejection to the environment,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this air conditioner are to be sketched. The heat absorbed by the refrigerant, the work input of the air conditioner is 689.4 Btu/h3.412 W1 W Btu/h 16 Btu/h3.412 W1 SEERCOPR

Kostic, Milivoje M.

260

Experimental investigations of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and two-phase mixture-level swell under high-pressure low heat-flux conditions. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are reported from a series of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and mixture-level swell tests. Experimental testing was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). The THTF is an electrically heated bundle test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those in a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. The objective of heat transfer testing was to acquire heat transfer coefficients and fluid conditions in a partially uncovered bundle. Testing was performed in a quasi-steady-state mode with the heated core 30 to 40% uncovered. Linear heat rates varied from 0.32 to 2.22 kW/m.rod (0.1 to 0.68 kW/ft.rod). Under these conditions peak clad temperatures in excess of 1050 K (1430/sup 0/F) were observed, and total heat transfer coefficients ranged from 0.0045 to 0.037 W/cm/sup 2/.K (8 to 65 Btu/h.ft/sup 2/./sup 0/F). Spacer grids were observed to enhance heat transfer at, and downstream of, the grid. Radiation heat transfer was calculated to account for as much as 65% of total heat transfer in low-flow tests.

Anklam, T. M.; Miller, R. J.; White, M. D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ME 339 Heat Transfer ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 339­ Heat Transfer Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 339 ­ Heat Transfer Spring 2010 Required convection; radiation; introduction to phase change heat transfer and to heat exchangers. Prerequisite(s): ME, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, 6th ed., Wiley Other Required Material: NA Course Objectives

Ben-Yakar, Adela

262

Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat fluxes, solar radiation, and electric power consumed byheat fluxes, solar radiation, and electric power consumed byheat fluxes, solar radiation, and electric power consumed by

Akbari, Hashem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium at the EMS 2009 Annual Meeting - September 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects.

Morgan, William F.; von Borstel, Robert C.; Brenner,; Redpath, J. Leslie; Erickson, Barbra E.; Brooks,

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

265

About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the batteries found in small electronic devices. Innovative Solar Cells A new process that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate...

266

Micro heat barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in the Br-like ions Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energies and lifetimes are reported for the lowest 375 levels of five Br-like ions, namely Sr~IV, Y~V, Zr~VI, Nb~VII, and Mo~VIII, mostly belonging to the 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4$\\ell$, 4s4p$^6$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$5$\\ell$, 4s$^2$4p$^3$4d$^2$, 4s4p$^5$4$\\ell$, and 4s4p$^5$5$\\ell$ configurations. Extensive configuration interaction has been included and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\\sc grasp}) has been adopted for the calculations. Additionally, radiative rates are listed among these levels for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions. From a comparison with the measurements, the majority of our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 2\\%, although discrepancies between theory and experiment for a few are up to 6\\%. An accuracy assessment of the calculated radiative rates (and lifetimes) is more difficult, because no prior results exist for these ions.

Aggarwal, K M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Heat storage with CREDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle of operation of ETS or Electric Thermal Storage is discussed in this book. As can be seen by the diagram presented, heating elements buried deep within the core are energized during off-peak periods or periods of lower cost energy. These elements charge the core to a per-determined level, then during the on-peak periods when the cost of electricity is higher or demand is higher, the heat is extracted from the core. The author discusses how this technology has progressed to the ETS equipment of today; this being the finer control of charging rates and extraction of heat from the core.

Beal, T. (Fostoria Industries, Fostoria, OH (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

270

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

STUDY OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.5.3 Air Side Heat Transfer Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.5.4 Fluid Side Heat

275

Heat release rate markers for premixed combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

–1075. [21] Report: Hydrogen from Coal Program: Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan for the period 2008 through 2016. U.S. Department of Energy, 2008. [22] Report: Wabash River Coal Gasification re-powering Project: A DOE Assesment. U.S. Department... of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2002. [23] O. Maustard, Report: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, An Overview of Coal based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology, 2005. [24] R...

Nikolaou, Zacharias M.; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004The AtmosphericHomologous

277

Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

Reid, Robert S. [Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

279

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

280

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

282

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

283

A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local therapy.

Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgar.ben-josef@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Metrological tool for the characterization of flame fronts based on the coupling of heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

° flame inclination angle due to wind [ ]th i W theoretical radiative heat flux received by the ith target

Boyer, Edmond

285

A study of contact angles in porous solids using heat pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aviation and Space Conference, 1968, 655-658. 25 Brosens, P. , "Thermionic Converters with Heat Pipe Radiators, " Advances in Energy Conversion Engineering, 1967, 181-187. 33 26 Werner, R. W. , and G. A. Carlson, "Heat Pipe Radiator for Space Power... heat from a nuclear source to a thermionic generator (~29 , since thermionic generators are sensitive to high levels of radiation. Heat pipes have been suggested for controlling cryogenic boiloff in space (~30 . An investigation of using heat pipes...

Collins, Richard Clark

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

Mehrdad Massoudi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Heating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heating system utilizing solar panels and buried ground conduits to collect and store heat which is delivered to a heatpump heat exchanger. A heat-distribution fluid continuously circulates through a ground circuit to transfer heat from the ground to the heat exchanger. The ground circuit includes a length of buried ground conduit, a pump, a check valve and the heat exchanger. A solar circuit, including a solar panel and a second pump, is connected in parallel with the check valve so that the distribution fluid transfers solar heat to the heat exchanger for utilization and to the ground conduit for storage when the second pump is energized. A thermostatically instrumented control system energizes the second pump only when the temperature differential between the solar panel inlet and outlet temperatures exceeds a predetermined value and the ground temperature is less than a predetermined value. Consequently, the distribution fluid flows through the solar panel only when the panel is capable of supplying significant heat to the remainder of the system without causing excessive drying of the ground.

Nishman, P.J.

1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

A FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVERADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER EQUATIONS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer. This system of equations­Brakhage algorithm. Key words. conductive­radiative heat transfer, multilevel algorithm, compact fixed point problems integro­differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer

289

The Economics of Steam Vs. Electric Pipe Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To properly design a pipe heating system, the basic principles of heat transfer from an insulated pipe must be understood. The three methods of heat flow are conduction, convection (both forced and natural) and radiation. The total heat loss from a...

Schilling, R. E.

290

Application Study of a Single House Horizontal Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is imperative to get new heating systems into the market and implement rate structures with heat meters for the purpose of energy conservation and environmental protection. Based on analysis of current heating technology, this paper analyzes...

Hang, Y.; Ying, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

RADIATION AND CLOUD MONITORING STATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

how they affect the energy balance between incoming solar radiation and heat re-radiated from Earth, and moisture content; area cloud coverage; solar and terrestrial radia- tion; and standard meteorological region and the North Slope of Alaska. ARCS sites are a component of the Department of Energy

Reeves, Geoffrey D.

292

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

AndreiG.Fedorov Title: George W. Woodruff Professorship in Heat Transfer, Combustion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AndreiG.Fedorov Title: George W. Woodruff Professorship in Heat Transfer, Combustion and Energy Research Areas of Interest Heat Transfer, combustion, and energy systems Bioengineering, lab ionization and imaging for bioanalytical mass spectrometry Thermal radiation heat transfer Thermal

Garmestani, Hamid

294

ME 544 Advanced Heat Transfer Spring 2013 Time: 2pm-3pm MWF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ME 544 Advanced Heat Transfer Spring 2013 Time: 2pm-3pm MWF Location: B4 Instructor: Dr. Allan and engineering applications of heat transfer including conduction, convection, and radiation. Course Learning, convection, and radiation heat transfer modes. 2. Determine the dominant modes of heat transfer, and apply

295

Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Freshwater flux Latent heat flux Longwave radiation Satellite remote sensing Sea surface flux estimation Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat

Yu, Lisan

296

Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chondrule Formation: Prevention of Isotopic Fractionation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chondrules are considered to have much information on dust particles and processes in the solar nebula. It is naturally expected that protoplanetary disks observed in present star forming regions have similar dust particles and processes, so study of chondrule formation may provide us great information on the formation of the planetary systems. Evaporation during chondrule melting may have resulted in depletion of volatile elements in chondrules. However, no evidence for a large degree of heavy-isotope enrichment has been reported in chondrules. In order to meet this observed constraint, the rapid heating rate at temperatures below the silicate solidus is required to suppress the isotopic fractionation. We have developed a new shock-wave heating model taking into account the radiative transfer of the dust thermal continuum emission and the line emission of gas molecules and calculated the thermal history of chondrules. We have found that optically-thin shock waves for the thermal continuum emission from dust particles can meet the rapid heating constraint, because the dust thermal emission does not keep the dust particles high temperature for a long time in the pre-shock region and dust particles are abruptly heated by the gas drag heating in the post-shock region. We have also derived the upper limit of optical depth of the pre-shock region using the radiative diffusion approximation, above which the rapid heating constraint is not satisfied. It is about 1 - 10.

Hitoshi Miura; Taishi Nakamoto

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Group, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heat loss from an open cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a...

Gaskill, Travis

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Heat collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Heat collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Rate Schedules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

306

Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (q{sub peak} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 15 MW/m{sup 2}), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D{sub 2} or CD{sub 4} gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20-30 MW/m{sup 2}, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic 'security' monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States); Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Problems with Linear Velocity Profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an extension of the works of Coggeshall and Ramsey, a class of analytic solutions to the radiation hydrodynamics equations is derived for code verification purposes. These solutions are valid under assumptions including diffusive radiation transport, a polytropic gas equation of state, constant conductivity, separable flow velocity proportional to the curvilinear radial coordinate, and divergence-free heat flux. In accordance with these assumptions, the derived solution class is mathematically invariant with respect to the presence of radiative heat conduction, and thus represents a solution to the compressible flow (Euler) equations with or without conduction terms included. With this solution class, a quantitative code verification study (using spatial convergence rates) is performed for the cell-centered, finite volume, Eulerian compressible flow code xRAGE developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulation results show near second order spatial convergence in all physical variables when using the hydrodynamics solver only, consistent with that solver's underlying order of accuracy. However, contrary to the mathematical properties of the solution class, when heat conduction algorithms are enabled the calculation does not converge to the analytic solution.

Hendon, Raymond C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Visual Simulation of Heat Shimmering and Mirage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the surrounding air. The temperature distribution on the objects can be calculated from radiators (e.g., the sun) or defined by the user with other physical or nonphysical methods. Such temperature distribution is applied environment, which includes conduction, convection, and radiation. The heat distribution of the objects

Mueller, Klaus

310

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

AGN Heating through Cavities and Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak shocks in M87 are used to argue that they can plausibly prevent gas close to the AGN from cooling. As the most significant heating mechanism at work closest to the AGN, shock heating probably plays a critical role in the feedback mechanism. Third, results are presented from a survey of AGN heating rates in nearby giant elliptical galaxies. With inactive systems included, the overall AGN heating rate is reasonably well matched to the total cooling rate for the sample. Thus, intermittent AGN outbursts are energetically capable of preventing the hot atmospheres of these galaxies from cooling and forming stars.

P. E. J. Nulsen; C. Jones; W. R. Forman; L. P. David; B. R. McNamara; D. A. Rafferty; L. Birzan; M. W. Wise

2006-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effervescent heating: constraints from nearby cooling flow clusters observed with XMM-Newton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used deprojected radial density and temperature profiles of a sample of 16 nearby CF clusters observed with XMM-Newton to test whether the effervescent heating model can satisfactorily explain the dynamics of CF clusters. For each cluster we derived the required extra heating as a function of cluster-centric distance for various values of the unknown parameters $\\dot M$ (mass deposition rate) and $f_c$ (conduction efficiency). We fitted the extra heating curve using the AGN effervescent heating function and derived the AGN parameters $L$ (the time-averaged luminosity) and $r_0$ (the scale radius where the bubbles start rising in the ICM). While we do not find any solution with the effervescent heating model for only one object, we do show that AGN and conduction heating are not cooperating effectively for half of the objects in our sample. For most of the clusters we find that, when a comparison is possible, the derived AGN scale radius $r_0$ and the observed AGN jet extension have the same order of magnitude. The AGN luminosities required to balance radiative losses are substantially lowered if the fact that the AGN deposits energy within a finite volume is taken into account. For the Virgo cluster, we find that the AGN power derived from the effervescent heating model is in good agreement with the observed jet power.

Rocco Piffaretti; Jelle Kaastra

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Numerical investigation of electric heating impacts on solid/liquid glass flow patterns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A typical glass furnace consists of a combustion space and a melter. Intense heat is generated from the combustion of fuel and air/oxygen in the combustion space. This heat is transferred mainly by radiation to the melter in order to melt sand and cullet (scrap glass) eventually creating glass products. Many furnaces use electric boosters to enhance glass melting and increase productivity. The coupled electric/combustion heat transfer patterns are key to the glass making processes. The understanding of the processes can lead to the improvement of glass quality and furnace efficiency. The effects of electrical boosting on the flow patterns and heat transfer in a glass melter are investigated using a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with addition of an electrical boosting model. The results indicate that the locations and spacing of the electrodes have large impacts on the velocity and temperature distributions in the glass melter. With the same total heat input, the batch shape (which is determined by the overall heat transfer and the batch melting rate) is kept almost the same. This indicates that electric boosting can be used to replace part of heat by combustion. Therefore, temperature is lower in the combustion space and the life of the furnace can be prolonged. The electric booster can also be used to increase productivity without increasing the furnace size.

Chang, S. L.; Zhou, C. Q.; Golchert, B.

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

315

FRAGMENTATION AND EVOLUTION OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE EFFECT OF DUST HEATING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of heating by luminosity sources in a simulation of clustered star formation. Our heating method involves a simplified continuum radiative transfer method that calculates the dust temperature. The gas temperature is set by the dust temperature. We present the results of four simulations; two simulations assume an isothermal equation of state and the two other simulations include dust heating. We investigate two mass regimes, i.e., 84 M{sub sun} and 671 M{sub sun}, using these two different energetics algorithms. The mass functions for the isothermal simulations and simulations that include dust heating are drastically different. In the isothermal simulation, we do not form any objects with masses above 1 M{sub sun}. However, the simulation with dust heating, while missing some of the low-mass objects, forms high-mass objects ({approx}20 M{sub sun}) which have a distribution similar to the Salpeter initial mass function. The envelope density profiles around the stars formed in our simulation match observed values around isolated, low-mass star-forming cores. We find the accretion rates to be highly variable and, on average, increasing with final stellar mass. By including radiative feedback from stars in a cluster-scale simulation, we have determined that it is a very important effect which drastically affects the mass function and yields important insights into the formation of massive stars.

Urban, Andrea; Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Martel, Hugo [Departement de Physique, genie physique et optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Heat exchanger for power generation equipment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger for a turbine is provided wherein the heat exchanger comprises a heat transfer cell comprising a sheet of material having two opposed ends and two opposed sides. In addition, a plurality of concavities are disposed on a surface portion of the sheet of material so as to cause hydrodynamic interactions and affect a heat transfer rate of the turbine between a fluid and the concavities when the fluid is disposed over the concavities.

Nirmalan, Nirm Velumylm; Bowman, Michael John

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

aerosol radiative effects: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

space-borne sensors use information from the ultraviolet (UV) to the visible and thermal infrared Christopher, Sundar A. 25 Black carbon radiative heating effects on cloud...

318

Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 98 (2006) 220237  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discontinuities associated with the propagation of a radiation front in transient radiation transport. r 2005 q heat flux s geometric path length S source term in the radiative transfer equation t time tc timeJournal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 98 (2006) 220­237 Modified method

Pilon, Laurent

319

Energy Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

Wilson, David Gordon (Winchester, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

Wilson, David Gordon

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices. 11 figures.

Wilson, D.G.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Near-field heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a rough surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we focus on the surface roughness correction to the near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a material with a rough surface utilizing a direct perturbation theory up to second order in the surface profile. We discuss the different distance regimes for the local density of states above the rough material and the heat flux analytically and numerically. We show that the heat transfer rate is larger than that corresponding to a flat surface at short distances. At larger distances it can become smaller due to surface polariton scattering by the rough surface. For distances much smaller than the correlation length of the surface profile, we show that the results converge to a proximity approximation, whereas in the opposite limit the rough surface can be replaced by an equivalent surface layer.

Svend-Age Biehs; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin �������¢���������������� Madison under Dr. Turner�������¢����������������s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

HEATING AND COOLING PROTOSTELLAR DISKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine heating and cooling in protostellar disks using three-dimensional radiation-MHD calculations of a patch of the Solar nebula at 1 AU, employing the shearing-box and flux-limited radiation diffusion approximations. The disk atmosphere is ionized by stellar X-rays, well coupled to magnetic fields, and sustains a turbulent accretion flow driven by magnetorotational instability, while the interior is resistive and magnetically dead. The turbulent layers are heated by absorbing the light from the central star and by dissipating the magnetic fields. They are optically thin to their own radiation and cool inefficiently. The optically thick interior in contrast is heated only weakly, by re-emission from the atmosphere. The interior is colder than a classical viscous model and isothermal. The magnetic fields support an extended atmosphere that absorbs the starlight 1.5 times higher than the hydrostatic viscous model. The disk thickness thus measures not the internal temperature, but the magnetic field strength. Fluctuations in the fields move the starlight-absorbing surface up and down. The height ranges between 13% and 24% of the radius over timescales of several orbits, with implications for infrared variability. The fields are buoyant, so the accretion heating occurs higher in the atmosphere than the stresses. The heating is localized around current sheets, caused by magnetorotational instability at lower elevations and by Parker instability at higher elevations. Gas in the sheets is heated above the stellar irradiation temperature, even though accretion is much less than irradiation power when volume averaged. The hot optically thin current sheets might be detectable through their line emission.

Hirose, S. [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showamachi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Turner, N. J., E-mail: shirose@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Minimal universal quantum heat machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally-separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistently with the second-law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed.

David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Robert Alicki; Gershon Kurizki

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

330

JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER Vol. 14, No. 4, OctoberDecember 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER Vol. 14, No. 4, October­December 2000 Multidimensional are optical tomographyof tissue, remote sensing of oceansand atmospheres, laser material processing radiative heat transfer in participat- ing media in recent years. However, the analysis of radiative heat

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

331

EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS OF SOLUTIONS OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVERADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the equations as described in [5], [9], and [8]. The radiative transport equation is ¯ @/ @x (x; ¯) + /(x of nonlinear integro­ differential equations that model steady­state combined radiative­conductive heat for coupled radiative­conductive heat transport are discussed. These models can be expressed as nonlinear

332

Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd [Environmental Effects Branch, EM50, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Spherical collapse of a heat conducting fluid in higher dimensions without horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a scenario where the interior spacetime,described by a heat conducting fluid sphere is matched to a Vaidya metric in higher dimensions.Interestingly we get a class of solutions, where following heat radiation the boundary surface collapses without the appearance of an event horizon at any stage and this happens with reasonable properties of matter field.The non-occurrence of a horizon is due to the fact that the rate of mass loss exactly counterbalanced by the fall of boundary radius.Evidently this poses a counter example to the so-called cosmic censorship hypothesis.Two explicit examples of this class of solutions are also given and it is observed that the rate of collapse is delayed with the introduction of extra dimensions.The work extends to higher dimensions our previous investigation in 4D.

A. banerjee; S. Chatterjee

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and less surface solar radiation in China from 1955 to 2000,2001 in China, and meanwhile, both surface solar radiationsolar heating greatly decreases RH in the lower troposphere for both China and

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Proceedings of HT'03 2003 Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of HT'03 2003 Summer Heat Transfer Conference July 21­23, 2003, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA HT2003-47016 A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR HEAT FLUX DETERMINATION D.G. Walker Department of Mechanical@vt.edu ABSTRACT A new method for estimating heat fluxes from heating rate measurements and an approach to measure

Walker, D. Greg

336

Modelling of radiative divertor operation towards detachment in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to actively control power load on the divertor target plates and study the effect of radiative divertor on plasma parameters in divertor plasmas and heat fluxes to the targets, dedicated experiments with Ar impurity seeding have been performed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak in typical L-mode discharge with single null divertor configuration, ohmic heating power of 0.5 MW, and lower hybrid wave heating power of 1.0 MW. Ar is puffed into the divertor plasma at the outer target plate near the separatrix strike point with the puffing rate 1.26 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} s{sup -1}. The radiative divertor is formed during the Ar puffing. The SOL/divertor plasma in the L-mode discharge with radiative divertor has been modelled by using SOLPS5.2 code package [V. Rozhansky et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 025007 (2009)]. The modelling shows the cooling of the divertor plasma due to Ar seeding and is compared with the experimental measurement. The changes of peak electron temperature and heat fluxes at the targets with the shot time from the modelling results are similar to the experimental measurement before and during the Ar impurity seeding, but there is a major difference in time scales when Ar affects the plasma in between experiment and modelling.

Chen Yiping; Wang, F. Q.; Hu, L. Q.; Guo, H. Y.; Wu, Z. W.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Zha, X. J. [Department of Applied Physics, College of Sciences, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor: Report on Safety System Design for Decay Heat Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radiotoxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. This report addresses/discusses the decay heat removal options available to the GFR, and the current solutions. While it is possible to design a GFR with complete passive safety (i.e., reliance solely on conductive and radiative heat transfer for decay heat removal), it has been shown that the low power density results in unacceptable fuel cycle costs for the GFR. However, increasing power density results in higher decay heat rates, and the attendant temperature increase in the fuel and core. Use of active movers, or blowers/fans, is possible during accident conditions, which only requires 3% of nominal flow to remove the decay heat. Unfortunately, this requires reliance on active systems. In order to incorporate passive systems, innovative designs have been studied, and a mix of passive and active systems appears to meet the requirements for decay heat removal during accident conditions.

K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Y. C. Wei; E. E. Feldman; M. J. Driscoll; H. Ludewig

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NBSBR 84-2867 Test Procedures for Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NBSBR 84-2867 Test Procedures for Rating Residential Heating and Cooling Absorption Equipment U the heating mode. Both air-source and ground water source absorption heat pumps are considered, as well as air for estimating the heating and cooling seasonal performance and cost of operation of residential water chillers

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

339

Efficiency Ratings for the Daiken AC (Americas), Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Ratings for the Daiken AC (Americas), Inc. Altherma Air-to-Water Source Heat Pump System is used to provide water heating, the EF for that separate water heater shall be used for performance Description Model No. Capacity (tons) Space Heating Space Cooling SEER Water Heating Efficiency

340

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Entanglement from thermal black body radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two non--interacting quantum systems which couple to a common environment with many degrees of freedom initially in thermal equilibrium can become entangled due to the indirect interaction mediated through this heat bath. I examine here the dynamics of reservoir induced entanglement for a heat bath consisting of a thermal electro--magnetic radiation field, such as black body radiation or the cosmic microwave background, and show how the effect can be understood as result of an effective induced interaction.

Daniel Braun

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Water and Space Heating Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other domestic water heating systems. Domestic water is generally provided through...

Kessler, A. F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Process and apparatus for indirect-fired heating and drying  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for heating flat or curved surfaces comprising injecting fuel and oxidant along the length, width or longitudinal side of a combustion space formed between two flat or curved plates, transferring heat from the combustion products via convection and radiation to the surface being heated on to the material being dried/heated, and recirculating at least 20% of the combustion products to the root of the flame.

Abbasi, Hamid Ali; Chudnovsky, Yaroslav

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Heat Integration and Heat Recovery at a Large Chemical Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the hydrogenation process. The hydrogenation process uses a catalyst to react the purified phenol with hydrogen, forming a mixture of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. The reaction is exothermic and is cooled with water to control the rate of reaction... Process Heat Recovery The process heat recovery opportunity was identified in the hydrogenation process. The hydrogenation process contains an exothermic reaction which is cooled with water to control the rate of reaction. The heated water...

Togna, K .A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits.

Im, Kwan H. (Naperville, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Burr Ridge, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace is described having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits. 7 figs.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

Polcyn, Adam D

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Infrared Emission from Interstellar Dust. I. Stochastic Heating of Small Grains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method for calculating the infrared emission from a population of dust grains heated by starlight, including very small grains for which stochastic heating by starlight photons results in high temperature transients. Because state-to-state transition rates are generally unavailable for complex molecules, we consider model PAH, graphitic, and silicate grains with realistic vibrational mode spectra and realistic radiative properties. The vibrational density of states is used in a statistical-mechanical description of the emission process. Unlike previous treatments, our approach fully incorporates multiphoton heating effects, important for large grains or strong radiation fields. We discuss how the "temperature" of the grain is related to its vibrational energy. By comparing with an "exact" statistical calculation of the emission process, we determine the conditions under which the "thermal" and the "continuous cooling" approximations can be used to calculate the emission spectrum. We present results for the infrared emission spectra of PAH grains of various sizes heated by starlight. We show how the relative strengths of the 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3um features depend on grain size, starlight spectrum and intensity, and grain charging conditions. We show results for grains in the "cold neutral medium", "warm ionized medium", and representative conditions in photodissociation regions. Our model results are compared to observed ratios of emission features for reflection nebulae and photodissociation regions, the Milky Way, normal spiral galaxies, and starburst galaxies.

B. T. Draine; Aigen Li

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

358

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, P.J.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Heat Transfer between Graphene and Amorphous SiO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the heat transfer between graphene and amorphous SiO2. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and between the surfaces in the non-contact region. We consider the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies, and the heat transfer by the gas in the non-contact region. We find that the dominant contribution to the heat transfer result from the area of real contact, and the calculated value of the heat transfer coefficient is in good agreement with the value deduced from experimental data.

B. N. J. Persson; H. Ueba

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Practical Analysis of a New Type Radiant Heating Technology in a Large Space Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Heating technologies fo r energy efficiency Vol.III-3-4 Practical Analysis of a New Type Radiant Heating Technology in a Large Space Building Guohui Feng Guangyu Cao Li Gang Ph.D. Ph... achieve above 95%. Since not heating up indoor air, it is specially suited for heating of factory buildings where the conditions of heat preservation and sealing are poor and their gates are opened frequently. The off-on of radiation heating system...

Feng, G.; Cao, G.; Gang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Heat flux solarimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solarimeter presented in this work is easy to assemble. It is calibrated and its performance is validated by means of Hottel's method. Finally, the curves obtained with this solarimeter are compared to the ones obtained with a commercial solarimeter. This device is based on the evaluation of the heat flow in a metal rod. In consequence, measurements are not affected by ambient temperature variations. On the other hand, there is a linear relationship between the temperatures measured at the rod ends and the incident radiation, as can be concluded both from the theory of its operation and the calibration lines obtained. The results obtained from the global irradiance measurements in the area of Los Polvorines (Buenos Aires Province), together with a preliminary evaluation of the solarimeter's response time, are presented in this work. (author)

Sartarelli, A.; Vera, S.; Cyrulies, E. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Echarri, R. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Samson, I. [INTEC (Instituto Tecnologico Santo Domingo), Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Simulation of plasmaneutral dynamics for radiation cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat flux effectively for future power plants. That is, radiation due to impurities will lower and increase the required pumping speed con- siderably in a power plant. In principle, the plasma energySimulation of plasma­neutral dynamics for radiation cooling Bong Ju Lee , F. Najmabadi Fusion

Najmabadi, Farrokh

364

FALL 2011 EMEC 326 DR. RUHUL AMIN HEAT TRANSFER 201 C Roberts Hall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2011 EMEC 326 DR. RUHUL AMIN HEAT TRANSFER 201 C Roberts Hall Phone: 994-6295 POLICY STATEMENT, convection, and radiation formulations. Introduction to heat transfer equipment. Course credit: 4

Dyer, Bill

365

Performance Test and Energy Saving Analysis of a Heat Pipe Dehumidifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat pipe technology applied to ventilation, dryness, and cooling and heating radiator in a building is introduced in this paper. A new kind of heat pipe dehumidifier is designed and tested. The energy-saving ratio with the heat pipe dehumidifier...

Zhao, X.; Li, Q.; Yun, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of a compensation chamber for use in a multiple condenser loop heat pipe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of many electronic devices is presently limited by heat dissipation rates. One potential solution lies in high-performance air-cooled heat exchangers like PHUMP, the multiple condenser loop heat pipe presented ...

Roche, Nicholas Albert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum physics has revolutionized the classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. It modernized our society with many advances such as lasers and transistors. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to the quantum regimes. Inevitably, development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires investigations of thermodynamical principles from quantum mechanical perspective, and motivates the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate on whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative that quantum coherence can be a catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work capability of the QHE becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up a QHE, our results reveal a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

Ali Ü. C. Hardal; Özgür E. Müstecapl?oglu

2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Plasma Diagnostics of Active Region Evolution and Implications for Coronal Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed study is presented of the decaying solar active region NOAA 10103 observed with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Electron density maps formed using Si X (356.03A/347.41A) show that the density varies from ~10^10 cm^-3 in the active region core, to ~7x10^8 cm^-3 at the region boundaries. Over the five days of observations, the average electron density fell by ~30%. Temperature maps formed using Fe XVI(335.41A)/Fe XIV(334.18A) show electron temperatures of \\~2.34x10^6 K in the active region core, and ~2.10x10^6 K at the region boundaries. Similarly to the electron density, there was a small decrease in the average electron temperature over the five day period. The radiative, conductive, and mass flow losses were calculated and used to determine the resultant heating rate (P_H). Radiative losses were found to dominate the active region cooling process. As the region decayed, the heating rate decreased by almost a factor of five between the first and last day of observations. The heating rate was then compared to the total unsigned magnetic flux (Phi_tot), yielding a power-law of the form P_H ~ Phi_tot^(0.81 +/- 0.32). This result suggests that waves rather than nanoflares may be the dominant heating mechanism in this active region.

R. O. Milligan; P. T. Gallagher; M. Mathioudakis; F. P. Keenan; D. S. Bloomfield

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Multiple source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVERADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER EQUATIONS IN TWO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12; The isotropic, monoenergetic, radiative transport equation is [10], [25], [34], \\Omega \\Delta r r­ differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer in two spaceA FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVE­RADIATIVE HEAT

373

Estimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-independent estimate of the total heat output of Cenozoic seafloor is 18.6 to 20.5 TW, which leads to a global output: Oceanic heat flow; Global heat budget; Subsidence rate 1. Introduction The total heat output of the EarthEstimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data Meng Wei , David

Sandwell, David T.

374

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, B.T.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

James Binney

2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

Camarda, C.J.; Basiulis, A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Heat Pump for High School Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heat pump system used for recycling and reusing waste heat in s high school bathroom was minutely analyzed in its coefficient of performance, onetime utilization ratio of energy, economic property and so on. The results showed that this system...

Huang, K.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION HEATING IN TURBULENT SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature of the gas in molecular clouds is a key determinant of the characteristic mass of star formation. Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is considered one of the most important heating mechanisms in weakly ionized molecular clouds. In this work, we study the AD heating rate using two-fluid turbulence simulations and compare it with the overall heating rate due to turbulent dissipation. We find that for observed molecular clouds, which typically have Alfven Mach numbers of {approx}1 and AD Reynolds numbers of {approx}20, about 70% of the total turbulent dissipation is in the form of AD heating. AD has an important effect on the length scale where energy is dissipated: when AD heating is strong, most of the energy in the cascade is removed by ion-neutral drift, with a comparatively small amount of energy making it down to small scales. We derive a relation for the AD heating rate that describes the results of our simulations to within a factor of two. Turbulent dissipation, including AD heating, is generally less important than cosmic-ray heating in molecular clouds, although there is substantial scatter in both.

Li, Pak Shing [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Myers, Andrew [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: psli@astron.berkeley.edu, E-mail: atmyers@berkeley.edu, E-mail: cmckee@berkeley.edu [Physics Department and Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

384

Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants...

385

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low...

386

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kethcum District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

387

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midland District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Midland District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Midland,...

388

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Bernardino District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating...

389

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Philip District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

390

The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the Solar Wind C02101 (2010)], we have incorporated in the heating model the energy cascade rate based on Iroshnikov scale. Since in steady state, the heating rate is essentially the same as the energy cascade rate

Ng, Chung-Sang

391

Integrating fiber optic radiation dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research effort was to determine the feasibility of forming a radiation sensor coupled to an optical fiber capable of measuring gamma photon, x-ray, and beta particle dose rates and integrated dose, and to construct a prototype dosimeter read-out system utilizing the fiber optic sensor. The key component of the prototype dosimeter system is a newly developed radiation sensitive storage phosphor. When this phosphor is excited by energetic radiation, a proportionate population of electron-hole pairs are created which become trapped at specific impurities within the phosphor. Trapped electrons can subsequently be stimulated optically with near-infrared at approximately 1 micrometer wavelength; the electrons can recombine with holes at luminescent centers to produce a luminescence which is directly proportional to the trapped electron population, and thus to the radiation exposure. By attaching the phosphor to the end of an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit both the IR optical stimulation and the characteristic phosphor luminescence through the fiber to and from the read-out instrument, which can be located far (e.g., kilometers) from the radiation field. This document reports on the specific design of the prototype system and its operating characteristics, including its sensitivity to various radiation dose rates and energies, its dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio at various radiation intensities, and other system characteristics. Additionally, the radiation hardness of the phosphor and fiber are evaluated. 17 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs.

Soltani, P.K.; Wrigley, C.Y.; Storti, G.M.; Creager, R.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, G.

1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

393

Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

Waterland, A. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

396

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

In Situ Heating of the 2007 May 19 CME Ejecta Detected by STEREO/PLASTIC and ACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ measurements of ion charge states can provide unique insight into the heating and evolution of coronal mass ejections when tested against realistic non-equilibrium ionization modeling. In this work we investigate the representation of the CME magnetic field as an expanding spheromak configuration, where the plasma heating is prescribed by the choice of anomalous resistivity and the spheromak dynamics. We chose as a test case, the 19 May 2007 CME observed by STEREO and ACE. The spheromak is an appealing physical model, because the location and degree of heating is fixed by the choice of anomalous resistivity and the spheromak expansion rate which we constrain with observations. This model can provide the heating required between 1.1$R_{\\sun}$ and earth orbit to produce charge states observed in the CME flux rope. However this source of heating in the spheromak alone has difficulty accounting for the rapid heating to Fe$^{8 - 11+}$ at lower heights, as observed in STEREO EUVI due to the rapid radiative ...

Rakowski, Cara E; Lyutikov, Maxim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Galaxies that Shine: radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of disk galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation feedback is typically implemented using subgrid recipes in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. Very little work has so far been performed using radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD), and there is no consensus on the importance of radiation feedback in galaxy evolution. We present RHD simulations of isolated galaxy disks of different masses with a resolution of 18 pc. Besides accounting for supernova feedback, our simulations are the first galaxy-scale simulations to include RHD treatments of photo-ionisation heating and radiation pressure, from both direct optical/UV radiation and multi-scattered, re-processed infrared (IR) radiation. Photo-heating smooths and thickens the disks and suppresses star formation about as much as the inclusion of ("thermal dump") supernova feedback does. These effects decrease with galaxy mass and are mainly due to the prevention of the formation of dense clouds, as opposed to their destruction. Radiation pressure, whether from direct or IR radiation, has little effect, but ...

Rosdahl, Joakim; Teyssier, Romain; Agertz, Oscar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

402

Towards Intelligent District Heating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A district heating system consists of one or more production units supplying energy in the form of heated water through a distribution pipe network to… (more)

Johansson, Christian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Winter Heating Fuels Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heating Fuels Update For: Congressional Briefings October 20, 2014 | Washington, DC By U.S. Energy Information Administration Winter Heating Fuels Update October 20, 2014 |...

404

Thermophoretic interaction of heat releasing particles Yu. Dolinskya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermophoretic interaction of heat releasing particles Yu. Dolinskya) and T. Elperinb) Department investigates thermophoretic force acting at heat releasing absorbing particles near the interface between two of the thermophoretic force is proportional to the rate of heat release absorption by the particle, and its direction

Elperin, Tov

405

IntroductiontoProcessEngineering(PTG) 5. Heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#5/6 IntroductiontoProcessEngineering(PTG) VST rz13 1/114 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven Ã?boProcessEngineering(PTG) VST rz13 Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/114 Pic: BÃ?88 #12;#5/6 IntroductiontoProcessEngineering(PTG) VST rz13 3/114 5.1 Conductive heat transfer #5/6 Introductionto

Zevenhoven, Ron

406

Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A spatially resolved study of photoelectric heating and [CII] cooling in the LMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abridged) We study photoelectric heating throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud. We quantify the importance of the [CII] cooling line and the photoelectric heating process of various environments in the LMC and investigate which parameters control the extent of photoelectric heating. We use the BICE [CII] map and the Spitzer/SAGE infrared maps. We examine the spatial variations in the efficiency of photoelectric heating: photoelectric heating rate over power absorbed by grains. We correlate the photoelectric heating efficiency and the emission from various dust constituents and study the variations as a function of H\\alpha emission, dust temperatures, and the total infrared luminosity. From this we estimate radiation field, gas temperature, and electron density. We find systematic variations in photoelectric efficiency. The highest efficiencies are found in the diffuse medium, while the lowest coincide with bright star-forming regions (~1.4 times lower). The [CII] line emission constitutes 1.32% of the far infrared luminosity across the whole of the LMC. We find correlations between the [CII] emission and ratios of the mid infrared and far infrared bands, which comprise various dust constituents. The correlations are interpreted in light of the spatial variations of the dust abundance and by the local environmental conditions that affect the dust emission properties. As a function of the total infrared surface brightness, S_{TIR}, the [CII] surface brightness can be described as: S_{[CII]}=1.25 S_{TIR}^{0.69} [10^{-3} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} sr^{-1}]. The [CII] emission is well-correlation with the 8 micrometer emission, suggesting that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons play a dominant role in the photoelectric heating process.

D. Rubin; S. Hony; S. C. Madden; A. G. G. M Tielens; M. Meixner; R. Indebetouw; W. Reach; A. Ginsburg; S. Kim; K. Mochizuki; B. Babler; M. Block; S. B Bracker; C. W. Engelbracht; B. -Q. For; K. Gordon; J. L. Hora; C. Leitherer; M. Meade; K. Misselt; M. Sewilo; U. Vijh; B. Whitney

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

409

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

410

Cab Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

Damman, Dennis

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

COSMIC RAY HEATING OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of line ratios in the Milky Way's warm ionized medium suggest that photoionization is not the only heating mechanism present. For the additional heating to explain the discrepancy, it would have to have a weaker dependence on the gas density than the cooling rate, {Lambda}n{sub e}{sup 2}. Reynolds et al. suggested turbulent dissipation or magnetic field reconnection as possible heating sources. We investigate here the viability of MHD-wave mediated cosmic ray heating as a supplemental heating source. This heating rate depends on the gas density only through its linear dependence on the Alfven speed, which goes as n{sub e}{sup -1/2}. We show that, scaled to appropriate values of cosmic ray energy density, cosmic ray heating can be significant. Furthermore, this heating is stable to perturbations. These results should also apply to warm ionized gas in other galaxies.

Wiener, Joshua; Peng Oh, S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Zweibel, Ellen G. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion.

Blink, J.A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

Kirol, L.D.

1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building...

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Direct fired heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

Kirol, Lance D. (Shelly, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions between the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very effective in removing decay heat. By removing the limit on the decay heat removal capability due to the limited available surface area as in a RVACS, the reactor power and power density can be significantly increased, without losing the passive heat removal feature. This paper will introduce the concept of using DRACS to enhance VHTR passive safety and economics. Three design options will be discussed, depending on the cooling pipe locations. Analysis results from a lumped volume based model and CFD simulations will be presented.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Constructal multi-scale package of vertical channels with natural convection and maximal heat transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW STRUCTURES-scale structures in natural convection with the objective of maximizing the heat transfer density, or the heat transfer rate per unit of volume§ . The flow volume is filled with vertical equidistant heated blades

Kihm, IconKenneth David

419

Quantum Optomechanical Heat Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate theoretically a quantum optomechanical realization of a heat engine. In a generic optomechanical arrangement the optomechanical coupling between the cavity field and the oscillating end-mirror results in polariton normal mode excitations whose character depends on the pump detuning and the coupling strength. By varying that detuning it is possible to transform their character from phonon-like to photon-like, so that they are predominantly coupled to the thermal reservoir of phonons or photons, respectively. We exploit the fact that the effective temperatures of these two reservoirs are different to produce a Otto cycle along one of the polariton branches. We discuss the basic properties of the system in two different regimes: in the optical domain it is possible to extract work from the thermal energy of a mechanical resonator at finite temperature, while in the microwave range one can in principle exploit the cycle to extract work from the blackbody radiation background coupled to an ultra-cold atomic ensemble.

Keye Zhang; Francesco Bariani; Pierre Meystre

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Heat Treating Apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Thermoelectric heat exchange element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

Callas, James J. (Peoria, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

422

Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to room temperature'' and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

Miller, S.D.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

11th International Conference of Radiation Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

NONE

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Heat Integrate Heat Engines in Process Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of forcing a good fit between a heat engine and process T', H profiles extends the ideas of appropriate and inappropriate placement to give bet ter overall integration schemes [7] . The new 'and powerful representations of the thermodynamics of a process... HEAT INTEGRATE HEAT ENGINES IN PROCESS PLANTS E. Hindmarsh, D. Boland and D.W. Townsend TENSA Technology, Houston, Texas Shorter Version Appeared in Chemical Engineering Copyright McGraw Hill, 1985 ABSTRACT This paper presents a novel method...

Hindmarsh, E.; Boland, D.; Townsend, D. W.

425

A heat-driven monochromatic light source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigates theoretically the efficiency with which heat may be converted into resonance radiation in a cesium thermionic diode. An analytical model of a thermionic converter is employed which combines the coupled effects of line radiation transport, excited-state kinetics, and plasma diffusion. Operating regimes are established for various degrees of optical density in the plasma. The results indicate that monochromatic radiation can be produced with efficiencies on the order of 30 percent provided there is an adequate voltage drop across the plasma. In this study, a drop of one volt was used since it can be maintained without any electrical power input to the device. It is found that high efficiencies come by virtue of the higher interelectrode distances which the solutions will accommodate, and that radiation can be generated efficiently, even with optically dense gases.

Stefani, F.; Lawless, J.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q? can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing ?. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q? and ? when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between ? and q? of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q? computed from a function of ? and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q? (0.84 and 0.89). This research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

Garrett, A.; Kurzeja, R.; Villa-Aleman, E.; Bollinger, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Coronal heating by stochastic magnetic pumping. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observational data cast serious doubt on the widely held view that the sun's corona is heated by traveling waves (acoustic or magnetohydrodynamic). It is here proposed that the energy responsible for heating the corona is derived from the free energy of the coronal magnetic field derived from motion of the 'feet' of magnetic field lines in the photosphere. Stochastic motion of the feet of magnetic field lines leads, on the average, to a linear increase of magnetic free energy with time. This rate of energy input is calculated for a simple model of a single thin flux tube. The model appears to agree well with observational data if the magnetic flux originates in small regions of high magnetic field strength as proposed by Tarbell, Title and Schoolman. On combining this energy input with estimates of energy loss by radiation and of energy redistribution by thermal conduction, we obtain scaling laws for density and temperature in terms of length and coronal magnetic field strength.

Sturrock, P.A.; Uchida, Y.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

High-heat-flux removal by phase-change fluid and particulate flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept based on particulate flow in which either or both the particulates and the fluid could undergo phase changes is proposed. The presence of particulates provides not only a mechanism for additional heat removal through phase change but also the potential for increasing the rate of heat transfer by enhancing convection through surface region/bulk [open quotes]mixing[close quotes], by enhancing radiation, particularly for high-temperature cases; and for the case of multiphase fluid, by enhancing the boiling process. One particularly interesting coolant system based on this concept is [open quotes]subcooled boiling water-ice particulate[close quotes] flow. A preliminary analysis of this coolant system is presented, the results of which indicate that such a coolant system is better applied for cooling of relatively small surface areas with high local heat fluxes, where a conventional cooling system would come short of providing the required heat removal at acceptable coolant pressure levels. 14 refs., 8 figs.

Gorbis, Z.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Cost of Heat Exchanger Fouling in the U. S. Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other industries. The 1982 U.S. sales of all industrial heat exchangers, excepting boilers and automotive radiators, was about 285,000 units amounting to about $1.6 billion. The total heat duty of all the heat exchangers in industrial operation...

Rebello, W. J.; Richlen, S. L.; Childs, F.

430

HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

Boyer, Edmond

431

Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer in Window Frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer Arasteh and Dragan Curcija ABSTRACT Accurately analyzing heat transfer in window frame cavities radiation heat-transfer effects.) We examine three representative complex cavity cross-section profiles

432

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1 Modeling of Terahertz Heating Effects in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments involving biological tissues. Index Terms--Far infrared, Terahertz Heating, Breast and BrainIEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS 1 Modeling of Terahertz Heating Effects in real tissues causes heating as with any other electromagnetic radiation propagation. A finite element

Ganesan, Sashikumaar

433

Multi-Dimensional Broadband IR Radiative Forcing of Marine Stratocumulus in a Large Eddy Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to address the interactive and evolutionary nature of the cloud-radiation interaction, we have coupled to a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model the sophisticated multi-dimensional radiative transfer (MDRT) scheme of Evans (Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method; 1998). Because of computational expense, we are at this time only able to run 2D experiments. Preliminary runs consider only the broadband longwave component, in large part because IR cloud top cooling is the significant forcing mechanism for marine stratocumulus. Little difference is noted in the evolution of unbroken stratocumulus between three-hour runs using MDRT and independent pixel approximation (IPA) for 2D domains of 50 km in the horizontal and 1.5 km in the vertical. Local heating rates differ slightly near undulating regions of cloud top, and a slight bias in mean heating rate from 1 to 3 h is present, yet the differences are never strong enough to result in a pronounced evolutionary bias in typical boundary layer metrics (e.g. inversion height, vertical velocity variance, TKE). Longer integration times may eventually produce a physical response to the bias in radiative cooling rates. A low-CCN case, designed to produce significant drizzle and induce cloud breakup does show subtle differences between MDRT and IPA. Over the course of the 6 hour simulations, entrainment is slightly less in the MDRT case, and the transition to the surface-based trade cumulus regime is delayed. Mean cooling rates appear systematically weaker in the MDRT case, indicative of a less energetic PBL and reflected in profiles of vertical velocity variance and TKE.

Mechem, David B.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Kogan, Y. L.; Davis, Anthony B; Cahalan, Robert F.; Takara, Ezra E.; Ellingson, Robert G.

2002-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation of a neutral polarizable particle moving uniformly through a thermal radiation field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the properties of thermal electromagnetic radiation produced by a neutral polarizable nanoparticle moving with an arbitrary relativistic velocity in a heated vacuum background with a fixed temperature. We show that the particle in its own rest frame acquires the radiation temperature of vacuum, multiplied by a velocity-dependent factor, and then emits thermal photons predominantly in the forward direction. The intensity of radiation proves to be much higher than for the particle at rest. For metal particles with high energy, the ratio of emitted and absorbed radiation power is proportional to the Lorentz-factor squared.

G. V. Dedkov; A. A. Kyasov

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Control system for fluid heated steam generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Dynamics of heat transfer between nano systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a dynamical theory of heat transfer between two nano systems. In particular, we consider the resonant heat transfer between two nanoparticles due to the coupling of localized surface modes having a finite spectral width. We model the coupled nanosystem by two coupled quantum mechanical oscillators, each interacting with its own heat bath, and obtain a master equation for the dynamics of heat transfer. The damping rates in the master equation are related to the lifetimes of localized plasmons in the nanoparticles. We study the dynamics towards the steady state and establish connection with the standard theory of heat transfer in steady state. For strongly coupled nano particles we predict Rabi oscillations in the mean occupation number of surface plasmons in each nano particle.

Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

440

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

445

Electroweak Hall Effect of Neutrino and Coronal Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The inversion of temperature at the solar corona is hard to understand from classical physics, and the coronal heating mechanism remains unclear. The heating in the quiet region seems contradicting with the thermodynamics and is a keen problem for physicists. A new mechanism for the coronal heating based on the neutrino radiative transition unique in the corona region is studied. The probability is enormously amplified by an electroweak Chern-Simons form and overlapping waves, and the sufficient energy is transfered. Thus the coronal heating is understood from the quantum effects of the solar neutrino.

Ishikawa, Kenzo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Surface-induced heating of cold polar molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the rotational and vibrational heating of diatomic molecules placed near a surface at finite temperature on the basis of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The internal molecular evolution is governed by transition rates that depend on both temperature and position. Analytical and numerical methods are used to investigate the heating of several relevant molecules near various surfaces. We determine the critical distances at which the surface itself becomes the dominant source of heating and we investigate the transition between the long-range and short-range behaviour of the heating rates. A simple formula is presented that can be used to estimate the surface-induced heating rates of other molecules of interest. We also consider how the heating depends on the thickness and composition of the surface.

Stefan Yoshi Buhmann; M. R. Tarbutt; Stefan Scheel; E. A. Hinds

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation. This is a powerful tool for the implementation of quantum operations, where long-wavelength radiation instead of lasers is used for motional quantum state engineering. We measure a mean phonon number of $\\overline{n} = 0.13(4)$ after sideband cooling, corresponding to a ground-state occupation probability of 88(7)\\%. After preparing in the vibrational Fock state $\\left|n=0\\right\\rangle$, we implement sideband Rabi oscillations which last for more than 10 ms, demonstrating the long coherence time of our system. We also use the ability to ground-state cool to accurately measure the motional heating rate and report a reduction by almost two orders of magnitude compared to our previously measured result, which we attribute to carefully eliminating sources of electrical noise in the system.

Weidt, S; Webster, S C; Standing, E D; Rodriguez, A; Webb, A E; Lekitsch, B; Hensinger, W K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using long-wavelength radiation. This is a powerful tool for the implementation of quantum operations, where long-wavelength radiation instead of lasers is used for motional quantum state engineering. We measure a mean phonon number of $\\overline{n} = 0.13(4)$ after sideband cooling, corresponding to a ground-state occupation probability of 88(7)\\%. After preparing in the vibrational Fock state $\\left|n=0\\right\\rangle$, we implement sideband Rabi oscillations which last for more than 10 ms, demonstrating the long coherence time of our system. We also use the ability to ground-state cool to accurately measure the motional heating rate and report a reduction by almost two orders of magnitude compared to our previously measured result, which we attribute to carefully eliminating sources of electrical noise in the system.

S. Weidt; J. Randall; S. C. Webster; E. D. Standing; A. Rodriguez; A. E. Webb; B. Lekitsch; W. K. Hensinger

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Consolidated Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump and Water Heating Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Consolidated Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential customers who install electric water heaters, dual-fuel heating system or geothermal heat pumps. A dual-fuel heating systems...

451

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

Lenert, Andrej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A STUDY OF ALFVÉN WAVE PROPAGATION AND HEATING THE CHROMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfvén wave propagation, reflection, and heating of the chromosphere are studied for a one-dimensional solar atmosphere by self-consistently solving plasma, neutral fluid, and Maxwell's equations with incorporation of the Hall effect and strong electron-neutral, electron-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. We have developed a numerical model based on an implicit backward difference formula of second-order accuracy both in time and space to solve stiff governing equations resulting from strong inter-species collisions. A non-reflecting boundary condition is applied to the top boundary so that the wave reflection within the simulation domain can be unambiguously determined. It is shown that due to the density gradient the Alfvén waves are partially reflected throughout the chromosphere and more strongly at higher altitudes with the strongest reflection at the transition region. The waves are damped in the lower chromosphere dominantly through Joule dissipation, producing heating strong enough to balance the radiative loss for the quiet chromosphere without invoking anomalous processes or turbulences. The heating rates are larger for weaker background magnetic fields below ?500 km with higher-frequency waves subject to heavier damping. There is an upper cutoff frequency, depending on the background magnetic field, above which the waves are completely damped. At the frequencies below which the waves are not strongly damped, the interaction of reflected waves with the upward propagating waves produces power at their double frequencies, which leads to more damping. The wave energy flux transmitted to the corona is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the driving source.

Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul [Physics Department and Center for Atmospheric Research, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

455

MA HEAT Loan Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents information on the success of Massachusetts's HEAT loan offerings and how the financing tool is funded.

456

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, D.M.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

The heating of the cooling flow (The feedback effervescent heating model)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard cooling flow model has predicted a large amount of cool gas in the clusters of galaxies. The failure of the Chandra and XXM-Newton telescopes to detect cooling gas (below 1-2 keV) in clusters of galaxies has suggested that some heating process must work to suppress the cooling. The most likely heating source is the heating by AGNs. There are many heating mechanisms, but we will adopt the effervescent heating model which is a result of the interaction of the bubbles inflated by AGN with the intra-cluster medium(ICM). Using the FLASH code, we have carried out time dependent simulations to investigate the effect of the heating on the suppression of the cooling in cooling flow clusters. We have found that the effervescent heating model can not balance the radiative cooling and it is an artificial model. Furthermore, the effervescent heating is a function of the ICM pressure gradient but the cooling is proportional to the gas density square and square root of the gas temperature.

Nasser Mohamed Ahmed

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

458

Gravitational Radiation in Noncommutative Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational radiation power of a binary system in a noncommutative space is derived and it's rate of the period decrease is calculated to first order in noncommutativity parameter. By comparing the theoretical results with the observational data of the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, we find a bound on the noncommutativity parameter.

A. Jahan; N. Sadeghnezhad

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Kennewick, WA)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiative heating rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ammoniated salt heat pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat.

Haas, W.R.; Jaeger, F.J.; Giordano, T.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Heat Transfer Guest Editorial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

463

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Pioneering Heat Pump Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: To install and monitor an innovative WaterFurnace geothermal system that is technologically advanced and evolving; To generate hot water heating from a heat pump that uses non-ozone depleting refrigerant CO2. To demonstrate the energy efficiency of this system ground source heat pump system.

465

Heat transfer rates in fixed bed catalytic reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the flare was properly made. The vent line was made from one-half inch pipe and extended several feet through a laboratory window. Pipe was permissible here since no pressure existed in the line. Gas Purifiers The construction of a gas purifier is shown... ........................................................................ 118 LIST OF FIGURES Pap1. FLOW SYSTEM............................................................. ............... 28 2. GAS PURIFIER.............................................................................. 32 3. DIFFERENTIAL REACTOR...

Levelton, Bruce Harding

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) ARM

467

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatchingState ofDr.

468

Measurements and modeling of soot formation and radiation in microgravity jet diffusion flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. On modeling, the authors have coupled flame structure and soot formation m