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1

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91­100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Bystander effects; Genomic instability; Ionizing radiation 1. Introduction Exposure

2

Radiation Induced Instability Patrick Hagerty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Induced Instability Patrick Hagerty #3; Department of Mathematics University of Michigan of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 abloch@math.lsa.umich.edu Michael I. Weinstein z Fundamental Mathematics a central rigid body which can radiate energy through exible components such as solar panels and antennae

Bloch, Anthony

3

Mutation Research 568 (2004) 4148 Detection of chromosomal instability in -irradiated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the progeny at subsequent generations (genomic instability) and in non-irradiated neighbors of irradiated the link between the radiation-induced phenomena of genomic instability and the bystander effect. © 2004

4

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2009-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation Eric J Hall*,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation Eric J Hall*,1 and Tom K. There is a progressive increase in genomic instability, determined either by gene amplification or allelic imbalance

7

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells remember radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy iron particle radiation on large scale sequence rearrangements and we have discovered tissue specific differences in sensitivity to homologous recombination. DOE support has given rise to critical new knowledge about the biological impact of low dose rate radiation and about the underlying mechanisms that govern genomic stability in response to radiation exposure. This work has spurred interest in radiation among MIT scientists, and has fostered ongoing research projects that will continue to contribute toward our understanding of the biological effects of low dose radiation exposure.

Engelward, Bevin P

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

Wang, Chen [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)] [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Lees-Miller, Susan P., E-mail: leesmill@ucalgary.ca [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

Morgan, William F.; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Schr, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

Jacks, Tyler E.

12

Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas todiverse environments of their insect and plant hosts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phytoplasmas (Candidatus Phytoplasma, Class Mollicutes) cause disease in hundreds of economically important plants, and are obligately transmitted by sap-feeding insects of the order Hemiptera, mainly leafhoppers and psyllids. The 706,569-bp chromosome and four plasmids of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches broom (AY-WB) were sequenced and compared to the onion yellows phytoplasma strain M (OY-M) genome. The phytoplasmas have small repeat-rich genomes. The repeated DNAs are organized into large clusters, potential mobile units (PMUs), which contain tra5 insertion sequences (ISs), and specialized sigma factors and membrane proteins. So far, PMUs are unique to phytoplasmas. Compared to mycoplasmas, phytoplasmas lack several recombination and DNA modification functions, and therefore phytoplasmas probably use different mechanisms of recombination, likely involving PMUs, for the creation of variability, allowing phytoplasmas to adjust to the diverse environments of plants and insects. The irregular GC skews and presence of ISs and large repeated sequences in the AY-WB and OY-M genomes are indicative of high genomic plasticity. Nevertheless, segments of {approx}250 kb, located between genes lplA and glnQ are syntenic between the two phytoplasmas, contain the majority of the metabolic genes and no ISs. AY-WB is further along in the reductive evolution process than OY-M. The AY-WB genome is {approx}154 kb smaller than the OY-M genome, primarily as a result of fewer multicopy sequences, including PMUs. Further, AY-WB lacks genes that are truncated and are part of incomplete pathways in OY-M. This is the first comparative phytoplasma genome analysis and report of the existence of PMUs in phytoplasma genomes.

Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Ewing, Adam; Miller, Sally A.; Radek, Agnes; Shevchenko, Dimitriy; Tsukerman, Kiryl; Walunas, Theresa; Lapidus, Alla; Campbell, John W.; Hogenhout Saskia A.

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates murine radiation-induced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation-induced Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: attenuates murine radiation-induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RADIATION...

14

Radiation induced strand breakage analyzed by tunel technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION INDUCED STRAND BREAKAGE ANALYZED BY TUNEL TECHNIQUE A Thesis MAtuSSA DAWN REYNOLDS Submitted to the 015ce of Graduate Studies of Texas Ad. M University in partial fu1611ment of the requirements for the dree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 2003 Major Subject: Health Physics RADIATION INDUCED STRAND BREAKAGE ANALYZED BY TUNEL TECHNIQUE A Thesis MAtuSSA DAWN REYNOLDS Submitted to Texas %%:M University in partial fulfillmen of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Reynolds, Marissa Dawn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Modeling radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. It provides original contributions on the fundamental mechanisms of radiation-induced ...

Zhang, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Radiative acceleration and transient, radiation-induced electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiative acceleration of particles and the electrostatic potential fields that arise in low density plasmas hit by radiation produced by a transient, compact source are investigated. We calculate the dynamical evolution and asymptotic energy of the charged particles accelerated by the photons and the radiation-induced electric double layer in the full relativistic, Klein-Nishina regime. For fluxes in excess of $10^{27}$ ${\\rm erg} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$, the radiative force on a diluted plasma ($n\\la 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$) is so strong that electrons are accelerated rapidly to relativistic speeds while ions lag behind owing to their larger inertia. The ions are later effectively accelerated by the strong radiation-induced double layer electric field up to Lorentz factors $\\approx 100$, attainable in the case of negligible Compton drag. The asymptotic energies achieved by both ions and electrons are larger by a factor 2--4 with respect to what one could naively expect assuming that the electron-ion assembly is a rigidly coupled system. The regime we investigate may be relevant within the framework of giant flares from soft gamma-repeaters.

L. Zampieri; R. Turolla; L. Foschini; A. Treves

2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nature of Radiation-Induced Defects in Quartz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although quartz ($\\rm \\alpha$-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage have not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si--O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si--O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on $E^{\\prime}$ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependenc...

Wang, Bu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav N; Bauchy, Mathieu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiation-induced solitary waves in hot plasmas of accretion disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the existence of radiation-induced solitary waves in hot plasmas of accretion disks depends on the radial temperature profile.

Fedor V. Prigara

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates ionizing radiation-induced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

silica optical Summary: measurements and the so-called radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) measured in dBm. TSL measurements have been... measurements. Connections between...

20

Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pan, Charlie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amarnath, Sudha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ensminger, William D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates radiation-induced lung Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ameliorates radiation-induced lung Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 doi:10.1016j.ijrobp.2003.12.010 BIOLOGY...

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormalities radiation-induced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

induced cataracts appeared earlier... . In the example given above, about 60% of the low- dose radiation-induced breast cancers comes from a very small... -type animals. 1.3....

23

Irradiated Esophageal Cells are Protected from Radiation-Induced Recombination by MnSOD Gene Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene ...

Niu, Yunyun

24

Time dependent annealing of radiation - induced leakage currents in MOS devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented showing the radiation response of several unhardened commercial 1.25-{mu}m bulk CMOS processes using LOCOS isolation technology. In all cases studied radiation-induced failure is caused by effects in the field oxide, and the radiation-induced {delta}V{sub T} in the channel region is usually small at the failure dose. Time dependent leakage current data for the field oxides are presented and discussed.

Terrell, J.M. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc. Bethesda, MD (US)); Olkham, T.R.; Lelis, A.J.; Benedetto, J.M. (Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (US))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis: Mechanistically Based Differences between Gamma-Rays and Neutrons, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis: Mechanistically Based Differences between Gamma-Rays and Neutrons of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, United States of America Abstract Different types of ionizing radiation produce different dependences of cancer risk on radiation

Brenner, David Jonathan

27

Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation Feng Qin,1 accuracy. © 2011 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 350.5610, 290.6815, 280.6780, 280.5475. Trivalent, and optical amplifiers in fiber optics. [1,2]. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest

Cao, Wenwu

28

Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they showComparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from of Optics and Photonics/CREOL 4000 Central Florida Blvd. Orlando, FL 32816-2700, USA d SCK·CEN Belgian

Glebov, Leon

29

Radiation induced by charged particles in optical fibers Xavier Artru and Cedric Ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation induced by charged particles in optical fibers Xavier Artru and C´edric Ray Universit, 4, 5]. Let us mention two other uses of optical fibers as particle detectors : (i) as dosimeters, through the effect of darkening by irradiation [6]; (ii) in scintillating glass fibers for particle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics, Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT Exposure of collector mirrors facing the hot, dense pinch plasma in plasma region of the lamp are known to induce serious damage to nearby collector mirrors. Candidate collector

Harilal, S. S.

31

A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ?40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Torus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections, unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow coronal mass ejections.

B. Kliem; T. Toeroek

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60{sub rectum}, rectal mean dose and NTCP{sub rectum} with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

Azuddin, A. Yusof [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 53000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahman, I. Abdul; Mohamed, F. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Siah, N. J. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 53000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saadc, M. [Department of Oncology, University Malaya Medical Center, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ismail, F. [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sorafenib Enhances Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting STAT3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal human malignancies. Lack of efficient therapy for advanced HCC is a pressing problem worldwide. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and mechanism of combined sorafenib and radiation therapy treatment for HCC. Methods and Materials: HCC cell lines (PLC5, Huh-7, Sk-Hep1, and Hep3B) were treated with sorafenib, radiation, or both, and apoptosis and signal transduction were analyzed. Results: All 4 HCC cell lines showed resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis; however, this resistance could be reversed in the presence of sorafenib. Inhibition of phospho-STAT3 was found in cells treated with sorafenib or sorafenib plus radiation and subsequently reduced the expression levels of STAT3-related proteins, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, and survivin. Silencing STAT3 by RNA interference overcame apoptotic resistance to radiation in HCC cells, and the ectopic expression of STAT3 in HCC cells abolished the radiosensitizing effect of sorafenib. Moreover, sorafenib plus radiation significantly suppressed PLC5 xenograft tumor growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that sorafenib sensitizes resistant HCC cells to radiation-induced apoptosis via downregulating phosphorylation of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo.

Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chen-Si [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tai, Wei-Tien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Chung-Wai [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuen-Feng, E-mail: kfchen1970@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cancer Vulnerabilities Unveiled by Genomic Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to genome instability, most cancers exhibit loss of regions containing tumor suppressor genes and collateral loss of other genes. To identify cancer-specific vulnerabilities that are the result of copy number losses, ...

Nijhawan, Deepak

36

Gamma radiation-induced refractive index change in Ge- and N-doped silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measured the change of the refractive index over a wide wavelength range in Ge- and N-doped high purity (fiber optics grade) silica glasses subjected to gamma irradiation. The radiation-induced change of the refractive index tends to be greater in the infrared part of the spectrum compare to the values measured in the UV-visible part of the spectrum. By means of the Kramers-Kronig relations, we estimate that a weak broadening of the optical vibration band of the silica network adds to this effect. The paper also discusses the difference observed in the spectral behavior of the induced refractive index change for both types of doped glass.

Brichard, Benoit [SCK-CEN-Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Butov, Oleg V.; Golant, Konstantin M. [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Street 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fernandez Fernandez, Alberto [Masterminds Ltd., rue du Temple 40, CH-2800 Delemont (Switzerland)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radiation-Induced Segregation and Phase Stability in Candidate Alloys for the Advanced Burner Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major accomplishments of this project were the following: 1) Radiation induced depletion of Cr occurs in alloy D9, in agreement with that observed in austenitic alloys. 2) In F-M alloys, Cr enriches at PAG grain boundaries at low dose (<7 dpa) and at intermediate temperature (400C) and the magnitude of the enrichment decreases with temperature. 3) Cr enrichment decreases with dose, remaining enriched in alloy T91 up to 10 dpa, but changing to depletion above 3 dpa in HT9 and HCM12A. 4) Cr has a higher diffusivity than Fe by a vacancy mechanism and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is larger than Fe in the opposite direction to the vacancy flux. 5) Cr concentration at grain boundaries decreases as a result of vacancy transport during electron or proton irradiation, consistent with Inverse Kirkendall models. 6) Inclusion of other point defect sinks into the KLMC simulation of vacancy-mediated diffusion only influences the results in the low temperature, recombination dominated regime, but does not change the conclusion that Cr depletes as a result of vacancy transport to the sink. 7) Cr segregation behavior is independent of Frenkel pair versus cascade production, as simulated for electron versus proton irradiation conditions, for the temperatures investigated. 8) The amount of Cr depletion at a simulated planar boundary with vacancy-mediated diffusion reaches an apparent saturation value by about 1 dpa, with the precise saturation concentration dependent on the ratio of Cr to Fe diffusivity. 9) Cr diffuses faster than Fe by an interstitial transport mechanism, and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is much larger than Fe in the same direction as the interstitial flux. 10) Observed experimental and computational results show that the radiation induced segregation behavior of Cr is consistent with an Inverse Kirkendall mechanism.

Gary S. Was; Brian D. Wirth

2011-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

38

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mutation rate in the post-chernobyl families from ukraine.mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident. Nature 380, 683-fallout following the Chernobyl accident (Dubrova et al. ,

Marchetti, Francesco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effect of solvents on the radiation-induced polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of solvents on the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers (EVE and IPVE, respectively) was investigated. EVE and IPVE polymerizations were carried out in bulk and in solution under superdry conditions in which polar impurities, especially water, have been reduced to negligible levels. This was accomplished by means of a sodium mirror technique using joint free baked out glass equipment and high vacuum. Plots of the monomer conversions and irradiation times were obtained for EVE and IPVE polymerizations in bulk and in benzene solution at constant monomer concentrations. The monomer concentration dependence of the polymerization rate was studied for EVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene, diethlyl ether, diglyme and methylene chloride, and for IPVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene. Solvent effect on the estimated propagating rate constants was examined for EVE and IPVE polymerization in bulk and in solution. The effect of temperature on the polymerization rate was also investigated for EVE polymerization in bulk ad in benzene, diethyl and diisopropyl ethers, methylene chloride and nitromethane, and for IPVE ploymerization in bulk and in benzene.

Hsieh, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zheng, Junying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Boerma, Marjan, E-mail: mboerma@uams.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

Liu Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xiong Mai [Department of Cardiac Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Deng Ling [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lin Yuehao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Rong Tiehua [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: esophagus2003@yahoo.com.cn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ?2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

Wang, Jingbo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cao, Jianzhong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yuan, Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ji, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Arenberg, Douglas [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dai, Jianrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang, Luhua, E-mail: wlhwq@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academic Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan/Ann Arbor Veterans Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiation hardening and radiation-induced chromium depletion effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available data on neutron-irradiated materials have been analyzed and correlations developed between fluence, yield strength, grain boundary chromium concentration and cracking susceptibility in high-temperature water environments. Large heat-to-heat differences in critical fluence (0.2 to 2.5 n/cm[sup 2]) for IGSCC are documented.In many cases, this variability is consistent with yield strength differences among irradiated materials. IGSCC correlated better to yield strength than to fluence for most heats suggesting a possible role of the radiation-induced hardening (and microstructure) on cracking. However, isolatedheats reveal a wide range of yield strengths from 450 to 800 MPa necessary to promote IGSCC which cannot be understood by strength effects alone. Grain boundary Cr depletion explain differences in IGSCC susceptibility for irradiated stainless steels. Cr contents versus SCC shows that all materials showing IG cracking have some grain boundary depletion ([ge]2%). Grain boundary Cr concentrations for cracking (below [approximately]16 wt %) are in good agreement with similar SCC tests on unirradiated 304 SS with controlled depletion profiles. Heats that prompt variability in the yield strength correlation, are accounted for bydifferences in their interfacial Cr contents. Certain stainless steels are more resistant to cracking even though they have significant radiation-induced Cr depletion. It is proposed that Cr depletion is required for IASCC, but observed susceptibility is modified by other microchemical and microstructural components.

Bruemmer, S.M.; Simonen, E.P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Radiation hardening and radiation-induced chromium depletion effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available data on neutron-irradiated materials have been analyzed and correlations developed between fluence, yield strength, grain boundary chromium concentration and cracking susceptibility in high-temperature water environments. Large heat-to-heat differences in critical fluence (0.2 to 2.5 n/cm{sup 2}) for IGSCC are documented.In many cases, this variability is consistent with yield strength differences among irradiated materials. IGSCC correlated better to yield strength than to fluence for most heats suggesting a possible role of the radiation-induced hardening (and microstructure) on cracking. However, isolatedheats reveal a wide range of yield strengths from 450 to 800 MPa necessary to promote IGSCC which cannot be understood by strength effects alone. Grain boundary Cr depletion explain differences in IGSCC susceptibility for irradiated stainless steels. Cr contents versus SCC shows that all materials showing IG cracking have some grain boundary depletion ({ge}2%). Grain boundary Cr concentrations for cracking (below {approximately}16 wt %) are in good agreement with similar SCC tests on unirradiated 304 SS with controlled depletion profiles. Heats that prompt variability in the yield strength correlation, are accounted for bydifferences in their interfacial Cr contents. Certain stainless steels are more resistant to cracking even though they have significant radiation-induced Cr depletion. It is proposed that Cr depletion is required for IASCC, but observed susceptibility is modified by other microchemical and microstructural components.

Bruemmer, S.M.; Simonen, E.P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

The susceptibility of silicon-ion implanted gate insulators to x-ray radiation-induced defect generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the x-ray susceptibility of silicon-ion implanted gate insulators of insulated gate-field effect transistors (IGFETs). It is found that silicon-ion implanted gate insulators appear to be much more susceptible to x-ray radiation induced defect generation than unimplanted devices. The residual defect density in silicon-implanted devices, following x-ray radiation, and subsequent postmetal annealing for up to 60 min is found to be greater than that in unimplanted devices. The results with silicon ions indicate that if the insulator is damaged by such a species during processing, as might occur due to knock-on from the gate electrode during source/drain formation, unannealable defects will form which would also tend to make the device structure more susceptible to radiation damage in a hostile environment, or to large hot- electron drift in conventional use.

Reisman, A.; Sune, C.T.; Williams, C.K. (MCNC, Research Triangle Park, NC (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A physical model of the photo- and radiation-induced degradation of ytterbium-doped silica optical fibres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a model to describe the photo- or/and the radiation-induced darkening of ytterbium-doped silica optical fibers. This model accounts for the well-established experimental features of photo-darkening. Degradation behaviors predicted for fibers pumped in harsh environments are also fully confirmed by experimental data reported in the work by Duchez et al. (this proceeding), which gives a detailed characterization of the interplay between the effects of the pump and those of a superimposed ionizing irradiation (actual operation conditions in space-based applications for instance). In particular, dependences of the darkening build-up on the pump power, the total ionizing dose and the dose rate are all correctly reproduced. The presented model is a sufficient one, including the minimal physical ingredients required to reproduce experimental features. Refinements could be proposed to improve, e.g., quantitative kinetics.

Mady, Franck, E-mail: franck.mady@unice.fr; Duchez, Jean-Bernard, E-mail: franck.mady@unice.fr; Mebrouk, Yasmine, E-mail: franck.mady@unice.fr; Benabdesselam, Mourad, E-mail: franck.mady@unice.fr [University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matire Condense (LPMC), CNRS UMR 7336, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

Reproductive Status at First Diagnosis Influences Risk of Radiation-Induced Second Primary Contralateral Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Our study examined whether reproductive and hormonal factors before, at the time of, or after radiation treatment for a first primary breast cancer modify the risk of radiation-induced second primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The Women's Environmental, Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study is a multicenter, population-based study of 708 women (cases) with asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and 1399 women (controls) with unilateral breast cancer. Radiotherapy (RT) records, coupled with anthropomorphic phantom simulations, were used to estimate quadrant-specific radiation dose to the contralateral breast for each patient. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to assess the relationship between reproductive factors and risk of CBC. Results: Women who were nulliparous at diagnosis and exposed to {>=}1 Gy to the contralateral breast had a greater risk for CBC than did matched unexposed nulliparous women (RR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0). No increased risk was seen in RT-exposed parous women (RR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.4). Women treated with RT who later became pregnant (8 cases and 9 controls) had a greater risk for CBC (RR = 6.0; 95% CI, 1.3-28.4) than unexposed women (4 cases and 7 controls) who also became pregnant. The association of radiation with risk of CBC did not vary by number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, or menopausal status at the time of first breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusion: Nulliparous women treated with RT were at an increased risk for CBC. Although based on small numbers, women who become pregnant after first diagnosis also seem to be at an increased risk for radiation-induced CBC.

Brooks, Jennifer D., E-mail: brooksj@mskcc.org [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Boice, John D. [International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD and Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD and Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Reiner, Anne S. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bernstein, Leslie [Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States)] [Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States); John, Esther M. [Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, and Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, and Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA (United States); Lynch, Charles F. [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Mellemkjaer, Lene [Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knight, Julia A. [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto and Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto and Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Jonine L. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, NY (United States) [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, NY (United States); Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Evaluation of Reaction Rate Theory and Monte Carlo Methods for Application to Radiation-Induced Microstructural Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory, Monte Carlo, or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales, and timescales from those characteristic of diffusion to long-term microstructural evolution (~?s to years). Although the rate theory and Monte Carlo models can be used simulate the same phenomena, some of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. Models employing the rate theory have been extensively used to describe radiation-induced phenomena such as void swelling and irradiation creep. The primary approximations in such models are time- and spatial averaging of the radiation damage source term, and spatial averaging of the microstructure into an effective medium. Kinetic Monte Carlo models can account for these spatial and temporal correlations; their primary limitation is the computational burden which is related to the size of the simulation cell. A direct comparison of RT and object kinetic MC simulations has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to the evolution (both nucleation and growth) of radiation-induced defect structures. The primary limitations of the OKMC model are related to computational issues. Even with modern computers, the maximum simulation cell size and the maximum dose (typically much less than 1 dpa) that can be simulated are limited. In contrast, even very detailed RT models can simulate microstructural evolution for doses up 100 dpa or greater in clock times that are relatively short. Within the context of the effective medium, essentially any defect density can be simulated. Overall, the agreement between the two methods is best for irradiation conditions which produce a high density of defects (lower temperature and higher displacement rate), and for materials that have a relatively high density of fixed sinks such as dislocations.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Becquart, C. S. [Universite de Lille; Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Clamart, France

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hydrodynamic instability in strong media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics open publications on hydrodynamic instability in strong media.

Bakhrakh, S.M.; Drennov, O.B.; Kovalev, N.P. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)] [and others

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

The torus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs), unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow CMEs.

Kliem, B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Genomics and Systems Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

55

Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

59179 Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics W. Brian Simison andBoore Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics W. Brian Simison andL. Boore Evolutionary Genomics Department, DOE Joint Genome

Simison, W. Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Genome Engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dan Voytas, University of Minnesota, at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Voytas, Dan [University of Minnesota

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Molecular analysis of radiation-induced albino (c)-locus mutations that cause death at preimplantation stages of development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deletion mutations at the albino (c) locus have been useful for continuing the development of fine-structure physical and functional maps of the Fes-Hbb region of mouse chromosome 7. This report describes the molecular analysis of a number of radiation-induced c deletions that, when homozygous, cause death of the embryo during preimplantation stages. The distal extent of these deletions defines a locus, pid, (preimplantation development) genetically associated with this phenotype. The proximal breakpoints of eight of these deletions were mapped with respect to the Tyr (tyrosinase; albino) gene as well as to anonymous loci within the Fah-Tyr region that are defined by the Pmv-31 viral integration site and by chromosome-microdissection clones. Rearrangements corresponding to the proximal breakpoints of two of these deletions were detected by Southern blot analysis, and a size-altered restriction fragment carrying the breakpoint of one of them was cloned. A probe derived from this deletion fusion fragment defines a locus, D7Rn6, which maps within (or distal to) the pid region, and which discriminates among the distal extents of deletions eliciting the pid phenotype. Extension of physical maps from D7Rn6 should provide access both to the pid region and to loci mapping distal to pid that are defined by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced lethal mutations. 36 refs., 10 figs.

Rinchik, E.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Toenjes, R.R.; Paul, D. (Fraunhofer-Instituet fuer Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung, Hannover (Germany)); Potter, M.D. (Univ. of Tenn.-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

6. Instabilities 6.1 Surface tension driven instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6. Instabilities Apple® #12;6.1 Surface tension driven instabilities ? ? Es min, but slow Es · · #P1 a b Pb Pa #P2 - + viscous stress $ unstable surface tension $ stable (at the onset ! non linear;dynamics: viscous forces or inertia? viscous flow: Ohnesorge number inertia: ! inertia! viscous 6.1 Surface

Bico,José

59

Instability characteristics of fluidelastic instability of tube rows in crossflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study is reported to investigate the jump phenomenon in critical flow velocities for tube rows with different pitch-to-diameter ratios and the excited and intrinsic instabilities for a tube row with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.75. The experimental data provide additional insights into the instability phenomena of tube arrays in crossflow. 9 refs., 10 figs.

Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Libing [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghua@nic.bmi.ac.c [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Lisheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a ??Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Instabilities of Advection-Dominated Accretion Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accretion disk instabilities are briefly reviewed. Some details are given to the short-wavelength thermal instabilities and the convective instabilities. Time-dependent calculations of two-dimensional advection-dominated accretion flows are presented.

Xingming Chen

1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

View Supports functional genomics, user data deposition andJGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 DOE Jointof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: Igor

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 Lawrenceof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: IgorJGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi,

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

the Adaptive Response, Genetic Haplo-Insufficiency and Genomic Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis is the driving force in the establishment of radiation protection standards. However, the scientific basis for linearity has been brought into question, particularly due to the concerns about induced radiation resistance as it pertains to oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated the observation that tumor hypoxia is associated with malignant progression, increased metastases, chemo- and radioresistance and poor prognosis. Experiments were conducted with non-malignant 3T3/NIH cells and normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) that were subjected to ?-irradiation under the levels of oxygen resembling those in growing tumors, and related our data to the concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), which is a better indicator of the amounts of residual oxygen inside the cells cultured in the hypoxic or anoxic atmosphere. We found that at DO levels about 0.5 mg/L cells subjected to both short-term (17 hours) and prolonged (48-72 hours) hypoxia continued to proliferate, and that apoptotic events were decreased at the early hours of hypoxic treatment. We showed that the short-term hypoxia up-regulated p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and resulted in facilitated 53BP1 nuclear foci formation and disappearance, thus indicating the higher efficiency of DNA double strand breaks repair processes. The latter was confirmed by the lower micronuclei incidence in irradiated hypoxic cells.

Geard, Charles R.

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Final Technical Report - Mechanisms and pathways controlling genomic instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project used model organisms, the zebrafish and the Japanese medaka fish to investigate the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on the vertebrate embryo. Endpoints measured included apoptotic cell death, aging, and oxidative stress.

Dynan, William S. [Georgia Regents University] [Georgia Regents University

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Origin of black string instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is argued that many nonextremal black branes exhibit a classical Gregory-Laflamme (GL) instability. Why does the universal instability exist? To find an answer to this question and explore other possible instabilities, we study stability of black strings for all possible types of gravitational perturbation. The perturbations are classified into tensor-, vector-, and scalar-types, according to their behavior on the spherical section of the background metric. The vector and scalar perturbations have exceptional multipole moments, and we have paid particular attention to them. It is shown that for each type of perturbations there is no normalizable negative (unstable) modes, apart from the exceptional mode known as s-wave perturbation which is exactly the GL mode. We discuss the origin of instability and comment on the implication for the correlated-stability conjecture.

Kudoh, Hideaki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Control of Motorcycle Steering Instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Motorcycle Steering Instabilities SIMOS EVANGELOU, DAVID J.N. LIMEBEER, ROBIN S. SHARP-performance motorcycles often employ a steering damper producing a moment that opposes the angular velocity

Cambridge, University of

71

Nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamics instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Explosive phenomena such as internal disruptions in toroidal discharges and solar flares are difficult to explain in terms of linear instabilities. A plasma approaching a linear stability limit can, however, become nonlinearly and explosively unstable, with noninfinitesimal perturbations even before the marginal state is reached. For such investigations, a nonlinear extension of the usual MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) energy principle is helpful. (This was obtained by Merkel and Schlueter, Sitzungsberichted. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Munich, 1976, No. 7, for Cartesian coordinate systems.) A coordinate system independent Eulerian formulation for the Lagrangian allowing for equilibria with flow and with built-in conservation laws for mass, magnetic flux, and entropy is developed in this paper which is similar to Newcomb's Lagrangian method of 1962 [Nucl. Fusion, Suppl., Pt. II, 452 (1962)]. For static equilibria nonlinear stability is completely determined by the potential energy. For a potential energy which contains second- and [ital n]th order or some more general contributions only, it is shown in full generality that linearly unstable and marginally stable systems are explosively unstable even for infinitesimal perturbations; linearly absolutely stable systems require finite initial perturbations. For equilibria with Abelian symmetries symmetry breaking initial perturbations are needed, which should be observed in numerical simulations. Nonlinear stability is proved for two simple examples, [ital m]=0 perturbations of a Bennet Z-pinch and [ital z]-independent perturbations of a [theta] pinch. The algebra for treating these cases reduces considerably if symmetries are taken into account from the outset, as suggested by M. N. Rosenbluth (private communication, 1992).

Pfirsch, D. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-8046 Garching (Germany)); Sudan, R.N. (Laboratory of Plasma Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Vortex driven flame dynamics and combustion instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion instability in premixed combustors mostly arises due to the coupling between heat release rate dynamics and system acoustics. It is crucial to understand the instability mechanisms to design reliable, high ...

Altay, Hurrem Murat

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Genomics and Systems Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team...

74

Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Transverse instability at the recycler ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides et d and absolute instabilities in Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow Benoît PIER Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides flow type often disrupt oil-well drilling By implementing a detailed instability analysis, the dynamics

Shyamasundar, R.K.

77

Multifragmentation: Surface instabilities or statistical decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space.

Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine, & YOU Carrie Iwema, PhD, MLS 21st May 2012 AAAS/Science Translational Medicine panel discussion; MLA 2012 #12;Timeline: Human Genome Sequence HSLS, U.Pitt 1995 2014 2000 2003 2007 2007 2010 Human Genome Draft Sequence Complete Human Reference Genome Individual Human

Napp, Nils

79

INTRODUCTION TO GENOMIC MEDICINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION TO GENOMIC MEDICINE Genomics play a role in 21st century research and clinical related to genomic medicine. Tentative Schedule: WHEN: WHERE: WHO CAN ATTEND? INTRODUCTION January 31 Implications of Genomics in Clinical Medicine February 7 Molecular Biology/Genetics Refresher - 1 February 14

80

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

82

Genomics and the human genome project: implications for psychiatry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and psychosis: a convergent functional genomics approach.Physiology & Genomics, 4, 8391. O LIPHANT , A. , B ARKER ,2004), 16(4), 294300 Genomics and the Human Genome Project:

Kelsoe, J R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Coherent instabilities in random lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical study is presented of random lasers as a function of the pumping rate above the threshold for lasing. Depending on the leakiness of the system resonances, which is typically larger in random lasers compared to conventional lasers, we observe that the stationary lasing regime becomes unstable above a second threshold. Coherent instabilities are observed as self pulsation at a single frequency of the output intensity, population inversion, as well as the atomic polarization. We find these Rabi oscillations have the same frequency everywhere in the random laser despite the fact that the field intensity strongly depends on the spatial location.

Andreasen, Jonathan; Sebbah, Patrick; Vanneste, Christian [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS UMR 6622, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06108, Nice Cedex 02 (France)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ergoregion instability: The hydrodynamic vortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes with an ergoregion but no horizon have been shown to be linearly unstable against a superradiant-triggered mechanism. This result has wide implications in the search for astrophysically viable alternatives to black holes, but also in the understanding of black holes and Hawking evaporation. Here we investigate this instability in detail for a particular setup which can be realized in the laboratory: the {\\it hydrodynamic vortex}, an effective geometry for sound waves, with ergoregion and without an event horizon.

Leandro A. Oliveira; Vitor Cardoso; Lus C. B. Crispino

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Capillary instability in nanowire geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism has been applied extensively as a framework for growing single-crystal semiconductor nanowires for applications spanning optoelectronic, sensor and energy-related technologies. Recent experiments have demonstrated that subtle changes in VLS growth conditions produce a diversity of nanowire morphologies, and result in intricate kinked structures that may yield novel properties. These observations have motivated modeling studies that have linked kinking phenomena to processes at the triple line between vapor, liquid and solid phases that cause spontaneous "tilting" of the growth direction. Here we present atomistic simulations and theoretical analyses that reveal a tilting instability that is intrinsic to nanowire geometries, even in the absence of pronounced anisotropies in solid-liquid interface properties. The analysis produces a very simple conclusion: the transition between axisymmetric and tilted triple lines is shown to occur when the triple line geometry satisfies Young's force-balance condition. The intrinsic nature of the instability may have broad implications for the design of experimental strategies for controlled growth of crystalline nanowires with complex geometries.

T. Frolov; W. C. Carter; M. Asta

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

Magnetorotational instability in electrically driven fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The linear stability of electrically driven flow of liquid metal in circular channel in the presence of vertical magnetic field is studied. It is shown that the instability threshold of such flow is determined by magnetorotational instability of non-axisymmetric modes ($m\

I. V. Khalzov; A. I. Smolyakov; V. I. Ilgisonis

2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Aeroelastic stability analysis and passive instability suppression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for passive instability suppression with the increasing wind turbine size. This can be related to low Introduction Known and new aeroelastic instability mechanisms for wind turbines are investigated in this paper]. Tower modes of stall-regulated turbines may also have low, or nega- tive damping because the blades

89

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nonlinear Dynamics of Single Bunch Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonlinear equation is derived that governs the evolution of the amplitude of unstable oscillations with account of quantum diffusion effects due to the synchrotron radiation. Numerical solutions to this equation predict a variety of possible scenarios of nonlinear evolution of the instability some of which are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Microwave single bunch instability in circular accelerators has been observed in many machines. The instability usually arises when the number of particles in the bunch exceeds some critical value, Nc, which varies depending on the parameters of the accelerating regime. Recent observations on the SLC damping rings at SLAC with a new low-impedance vacuum chamber revealed new interesting features of the instability. In some cases, after initial exponential growth, the instability eventually saturated at a level that remained constant through the accumulation cycle. In other regimes, relaxation-type oscillations were measured in nonlinear phase of the instability. In many cases, the instability was characterized by a frequency close to the second harmonic of the synchrotron oscillations. Several attempts have been made to address the nonlinear stage of the instability based on either computer simulations or some specific assumptions regarding the structure of the unstable mode. An attempt of a more general consideration of the problem is carried out in this paper. We adopt an approach recently developed in plasma physics for analysis of nonlinear behavior of weakly unstable modes in dynamic systems. Assuming that the growth rate of the instability is much smaller than its frequency, we find a time dependent solution to Vlasov equation and derive an equation for the complex amplitude of the oscillations valid in the nonlinear regime. Numerical solutions to this equation predict a variety of possible scenarios of nonlinear evolution of the instability some of which are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.S.; /Texas U.

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

SNP in TXNRD2 Associated With Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: A Study of Genetic Variation in Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism and Signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of the study was to identify noninvasive markers of treatment-induced side effects. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated after irradiation, and genetic variation in genes related to ROS metabolism might influence the level of radiation-induced adverse effects (AEs). Methods and Materials: 92 breast cancer (BC) survivors previously treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy were assessed for the AEs subcutaneous atrophy and fibrosis, costal fractures, lung fibrosis, pleural thickening, and telangiectasias (median follow-up time 17.1 years). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 genes were analyzed for association to AE grade. SNPs associated with subcutaneous fibrosis were validated in an independent BC survivor material (n=283). The influence of the studied genetic variation on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression level of 18 genes previously associated with fibrosis was assessed in fibroblast cell lines from BC patients. Results: Subcutaneous fibrosis and atrophy had the highest correlation (r=0.76) of all assessed AEs. The nonsynonymous SNP rs1139793 in TXNRD2 was associated with grade of subcutaneous fibrosis, the reference T-allele being more prevalent in the group experiencing severe levels of fibrosis. This was confirmed in another sample cohort of 283 BC survivors, and rs1139793 was found significantly associated with mRNA expression level of TXNRD2 in blood. Genetic variation in 24 ROS-related genes, including EGFR, CENPE, APEX1, and GSTP1, was associated with mRNA expression of 14 genes previously linked to fibrosis (P?.005). Conclusion: Development of subcutaneous fibrosis can be associated with genetic variation in the mitochondrial enzyme TXNRD2, critically involved in removal of ROS, and maintenance of the intracellular redox balance.

Edvardsen, Hege, E-mail: hege.edvardsen@rr-research.no [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway) [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Landmark-Hyvik, Hege [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway) [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Reinertsen, Kristin V. [National Resource Centre for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway)] [National Resource Centre for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Zhao, Xi [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway) [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Grenaker-Alns, Grethe Irene; Nebdal, Daniel [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Syvnen, Ann-Christine [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Rdningen, Olaug [Department of Medical Genetics, OUS Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Medical Genetics, OUS Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway); Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Ahus University Hospital (Norway)] [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Ahus University Hospital (Norway); Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway) [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Foss, Sophie D. [K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway) [K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); National Resource Centre for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Kristensen, Vessela N. [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway) [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Department of Clinical Molecular Biology (EpiGen), Division of Medicine, Ahus University Hospital (Norway)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Post Treatment With an FGF Chimeric Growth Factor Enhances Epithelial Cell Proliferation to Improve Recovery From Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1-FGF2 chimera (FGFC) was created previously and showed greater structural stability than FGF1. This chimera was capable of stimulating epithelial cell proliferation much more strongly than FGF1 or FGF2 even without heparin. Therefore FGFC was expected to have greater biologic activity in vivo. This study evaluated and compared the protective activity of FGFC and FGF1 against radiation-induced intestinal injuries. Methods and Materials: We administered FGFC and FGF1 intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice 24 h before or after total-body irradiation (TBI). The numbers of surviving crypts were determined 3.5 days after TBI with gamma rays at doses ranging from 8 to 12 Gy. Results: The effect of FGFC was equal to or slightly superior to FGF1 with heparin. However, FGFC was significantly more effective in promoting crypt survival than FGF1 (p < 0.01) when 10 {mu}g of each FGF was administered without heparin before irradiation. In addition, FGFC was significantly more effective at promoting crypt survival (p < 0.05) than FGF1 even when administered without heparin at 24 h after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. We found that FGFC post treatment significantly promoted 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into crypts and increased crypt depth, resulting in more epithelial differentiation. However, the number of apoptotic cells in FGFC-treated mice decreased to almost the same level as that in FGF1-treated mice. Conclusions: These findings suggest that FGFC strongly enhanced radioprotection with the induction of epithelial proliferation without exogenous heparin after irradiation and is useful in clinical applications for both the prevention and post treatment of radiation injuries.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.j [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Hagiwara, Akiko; Umeda, Sachiko [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Goto, Megumi; Oki, Junko; Suzuki, Masashi; Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Akashi, Makoto [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at alpha/beta = 3 gray equivalent (GyE{sub 3}). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE{sub 3}) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

Demizu, Yusuke, E-mail: y_demizu@nifty.co [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Akagi, Takashi [Department of Accelerator Managing, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Terashima, Kazuki [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Suga, Daisaku [Department of Radiation Technology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Kamae, Isao [Division of Medical Statistics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Hishikawa, Yoshio [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mechanical instability at finite temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many physical systems including lattices near structural phase transitions, glasses, jammed solids, and bio-polymer gels have coordination numbers that place them at the edge of mechanical instability. Their properties are determined by an interplay between soft mechanical modes and thermal fluctuations. In this paper we investigate a simple square-lattice model with a $\\phi^4$ potential between next-nearest-neighbor sites whose quadratic coefficient $\\kappa$ can be tuned from positive negative. We show that its zero-temperature ground state for $\\kappa power-law behavior of the shear modulus as a function of temperature. We expect our study to provide a general framework for the study of finite-temperature mechanical and phase behavior of other systems with a large number of floppy modes.

Xiaoming Mao; Anton Souslov; Carlos I. Mendoza; T. C. Lubensky

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

Jacquet, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie de Museum (LMCM), CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France); Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radiation-induced lung injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Webinar: Materials Genome Initative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

99

Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation B. R. Sutherland Dept. Mathematical of internal waves in the atmosphere and ocean, but the evolution of the shear layer itself is significantly

Sutherland, Bruce

100

Torsional instability of chiral carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the presence of a torsional instability in single-wall carbon nanotubes which causes small diameter chiral carbon nanotubes to show natural torsion. To obtain insight into the nature of this ...

Dresselhaus, Mildred

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Gradient Theory of Hydrodynamic Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new universal theory for flow instability and turbulent transition is proposed in this study. Flow instability and turbulence transition have been challenging subjects for fluid dynamics for a century. The critical condition of turbulent transition from theory and experiments differs largely from each other for Poiseuille flows. In this paper, a new mechanism of flow instability and turbulence transition is presented for parallel shear flows and the energy gradient theory of hydrodynamic instability is proposed. It is stated that the total energy gradient in the transverse direction and that in the streamwise direction of the main flow dominate the disturbance amplification or decay. A new dimensionless parameter K for characterizing flow instability is proposed for wall bounded shear flows, which is expressed as the ratio of the energy gradients in the two directions. It is thought that flow instability should first occur at the position of Kmax which may be the most dangerous position. This speculation is confirmed by Nishioka et al's experimental data. Comparison with experimental data for plane Poiseuille flow and pipe Poiseuille flow indicates that the proposed idea is really valid. It is found that the turbulence transition takes place at a critical value of Kmax of about 385 for both plane Poiseuille flow and pipe Poiseuille flow, below which no turbulence will occur regardless the disturbance. More studies show that the theory is also valid for plane Couette flows and Taylor-Couette flows between concentric rotating cylinders.

Hua-Shu Dou

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study Research Areas Students Applying Correspondence Graduate Genomics. Students receive training in the biological, physical and computational sciences through of primary institutional affiliation. The Functional Genomics program is administered through the Graduate

Thomas, Andrew

103

Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through Comparative Genomics Axel Visel, James Bristow andWalnut Creek, CA 94598 USA. Genomics Division, MS 84-171,Len A. Pennacchio, Genomics Division, One Cyclotron Road, MS

Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Future of Microbial Genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Automated Microbial Genome Annotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miriam Land of the DOE Joint Genome Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk on the current state and future challenges of moving toward automated microbial genome annotation at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Land, Miriam [DOE Joint Genome Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evolutionary Genomics of Salmonella enterica Subspecies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. 2013. Evolutionary genomics of Salmonella entericaEvolutionary Genomics of Salmonella enterica Subspecies

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology GENOMICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology GENOMICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY A multidisciplinary organization, the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology is a composed of faculty members representing projects at the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology include the development of transgenic plants

109

Comparative and Functional Genomics Comp Funct Genom 2003; 4: 239245.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative and Functional Genomics Comp Funct Genom 2003; 4: 239­245. Published online 1 April://www.botany.iastate.edu/mash/metnetex/metabolicnetex.html) is pub- licly available software in development for analysis of genome-wide RNA, protein and metabolite in the post-genome era is to understand how interactions among molecules in a cell determine its form

Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

110

Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie of genomic information that is being used to help researchers understand the gene content of organisms, how the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting

111

Comparative and Functional Genomics Comp Funct Genom 2003; 4: 3136.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative and Functional Genomics Comp Funct Genom 2003; 4: 31­36. Published online in Wiley and mitochondria contain genomes John F. Allen* Plant Biochemistry, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering that the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes would provide the answer has proved unfounded

Allen, John F.

112

Eukaryotic Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

From the JGI webportal users can choose Eukaryotic genomes from a photo list, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go directly to a website specific to that one genome. The individual sites include direct access to download sequence files, BLAST, search, view and navigate the genomic annotations.

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute parametric instability Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: 15 Chapter 2 Investigation of the Instability Ingredient in Mid-latitude Cyclones Instability... , 1999; SS). However, precipita- tion events modulated by instability...

114

Comparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48 Sinorhizobium strains comprising five genospecies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annotation and comparative genomics. Database (Oxford) 2009,et al. : Comparative genomics of the core and accessoryComparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Human Genome Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Center for integrative genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Center for integrative genomics Report 2005­2006 #12;Presentation Director's message 4 Scientific advisory committee 6 Organigram of the CIG 7 research The structure and function of genomes and their evolution alexandrereymond ­ Genome structure and expression 10 henrikKaessmann ­ Evolutionary genomics 12

Kaessmann, Henrik

117

Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability.

Carr, J. Jr. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States) [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Department of Physics, Texas Lutheran University, Seguin, Texas 78155 (United States); Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States) [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); TriAlpha Energy, Inc., Foothill Ranch, California 92610 (United States); Reynolds, E. [Department of Physics and Engineering, West Virginia Wesleyan, Buckhannon, West Virginia 26201 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Engineering, West Virginia Wesleyan, Buckhannon, West Virginia 26201 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Rayleigh-B\\'enard Instability in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the observation that electrons in graphene, in the hydrodynamic regime of transport, can be treated as a two-dimensional ultra-relativistic gas with very low shear viscosity, we examine the existence of the Rayleigh-B\\'enard instability in a massless electron-hole plasma. Firstly, we perform a linear stability analysis, derive the leading contributions to the relativistic Rayleigh number, and calculate the critical value above which the instability develops. By replacing typical values for graphene, such as thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, temperature, and sample sizes, we find that the instability might be experimentally observed in the near future. Additionally, we have performed simulations for vanishing reduced chemical potential and compare the measured critical Rayleigh number with the theoretical prediction, finding good agreement.

Furtmaier, Oliver; Karlin, Ilya; Succi, Sauro; Herrmann, Hans Jrgen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Understanding magnetic instability in gapless superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic instability in gapless superconductors still remains as a puzzle. In this article, we point out that the instability might be caused by using BCS theory in mean-field approximation, where the phase fluctuation has been neglected. The mean-field BCS theory describes very well the strongly coherent or rigid superconducting state. With the increase of mismatch between the Fermi surfaces of pairing fermions, the phase fluctuation plays more and more important role, and "soften" the superconductor. The strong phase fluctuation will eventually quantum disorder the superconducting state, and turn the system into a phase-decoherent pseudogap state.

Mei Huang

2005-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pulsational instability domain of Delta Scuti variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An updated theoretical instability domain of the Delta Scuti star models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, in the log g - log Teff diagram and in diagrams for dereddened uvby-beta photometric indices is presented. The sensitivity of both the position of the evolutionary tracks and the Blue Edge of the instability domain to changes in the chemical composition parameters (X, Z) and to changes in the convection theory parameters (mixing-length in the stellar envelope, the extent of the overshooting from the convective core) is discussed.

A. A. Pamyatnykh

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Genomic library construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and methods for amplifying nucleic acid sequences from a single cell are provided. Compositions and methods for constructing a genomic library from a single cell are also provided.

Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Zhang, Kun (San Diego, CA)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Genomics, Gene Expression and Other Studies in Soybean Rust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Genome Institute Genomics, Gene Expression and otherRust Martha Luca Posada-Buitrago Ph.D Genomics DivisionEvolutionary Genomics DOE- Joint Genome Institute Lawrence

Posada-Buitrago, Martha Lucia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability of Viscoelastic Poiseuille Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability generic route to melt fracture via a weakly nonlinear subcritical instability of viscoelastic Poiseuille ``subcritical'') instability due to normal stress effects; this instability appears to make melt fracture

van Saarloos, Wim

125

Interaction of Turing and flow-induced chemical instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction between the Turing instability and the instability induced by a differential flow is studied in the Selkov model. Both instabilities give rise to the formation of spatial patterns, and for a range of parameter values, these patterns can compete. The effect of anisotropic diffusion on the pattern formation process is investigated. Stripes with different orientations that travel with time and the suppression of patterns due to a competition of both instabilities are observed.

Dawson, S.P. (Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Lawniczak, A. (Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada) Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Kapral, R. (Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thinWetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical of partially wetting threads in planar microchannels of height h=100 or 250 m fluids: ethanol, mineral oils

Cubaud, Thomas

127

NEGATIVE COUPLING INSTABILITY AND GRANDUNIFIED BARYOGENESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oscillations, which is typically many orders of magnitude faster than the perturbative decay rate 3 orders of magnitude greater than the expansion time t H ¸ 1=H ¸ 1=! OE . a Daniel Boyanovsky presented is the frequency squared of ? k . The instability chart of the Mathieu equation is depicted in figure 1. The ¯ = 0

128

Convective Instability of a Boundary Layer with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proportional to the integral over the depth of the lithosphere of the 19 #12;ratio of thermal buoyancy. Such instabilities are driven by the negative thermal buoyancy of the cold lithosphere and retarded largely for driving convective downwelling. For non-Newtonian viscosity with power law exponent n and temperature

Conrad, Clint

129

Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

Boyer, Edmond

131

Magnetic instabilities in Nb3Sn strands and cables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a model for calculation of magnetic instabilities in superconducting wires with transport current and reports results of instability simulations in Nb{sub 3}Sn strands from different manufactures. The effect of magnetic instabilities on the strand and cable performance is presented and a criterion for the maximum effective sub-element size of strands for high field magnets is formulated.

Kashikhim, Vadim V.; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

Chuang Ren

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet Fall 2010 #12;Contents Course Requirements Bioinformatics and Genomics Curriculum -------------------------------------------------------8 General #12;Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

dePamphilis, Claude

134

Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JW. 2010. China's fungal genomics initiative: a whitepaper.and Saccharomycotina. BMC Genomics. 8, 325. Bailly J,Harnessing ectomycorrhizal genomics for ecological insights.

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools for comparative genomics Kelly A. Frazer 1 , LiorBerkeley, CA, 94720 Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeleymultiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with

Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Investigation of plasma instabilities relevant toInvestigation of plasma instabilities relevant to inertial confinement fusioninertial confinement fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At sufficiently high temperatures a propagating fusion burn wave is ignited, releasing ~70 times the energy it is hoped that their effects can be minimized allowing fusion power to be harnessed to help combat the world's energy crisis. Plasmas InstabilitiesInertial Confinement Instabilities Small instabilities in a plasma

Strathclyde, University of

137

Computational genomics : mapping, comparison, and annotation of genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The field of genomics provides many challenges to computer scientists and mathematicians. The area of computational genomics has been expanding recently, and the timely application of computer science in this field is ...

Batzoglou, Serafim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microbial Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

As of March 2008, The Joint Genome Institute has released 296 Prokaryotic microbial sites, with 216 in finished status.

139

The acoustic instabilities in magnetized collisional dusty plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work investigates the wave propagation in collisional dusty plasmas in the presence of electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the dust ion-acoustic waves may become unstable to the reactive instability whereas dust-acoustic waves may suffer from both reactive and dissipative instabilities. If the wave phase speed is smaller than the plasma drift speed, the instability is of reactive type whereas in the opposite case, the instability becomes dissipative in nature. Plasma in the vicinity of dust may also become unstable to reactive instability with the instability sensitive to the dust material: dielectric dust may considerably quench this instability. This has implications for the dust charging and the use of dust as a probe in the plasma sheath.

Pandey, B. P., E-mail: birendra.pandey@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V., E-mail: s.vladimirov@physics.usyd.edu.au [Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Dwivedi, C. B., E-mail: jagatpurdwivedi@gmail.com [VedVijnanam Pravartanam Samitihi, Pratapgarh (Awadh), Jagatpur, Bharat (India)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Genome Science/Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals.Genome Genome

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Clinical Microfluidics for Neutrophil Genomics and Proteomics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clinical Microfluidics for Neutrophil Genomics and Proteomics. Clinical Microfluidics for Neutrophil Genomics and Proteomics. Abstract: Neutrophils play critical roles in...

143

Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

Cotrell, D; Cook, A

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Beam hosing instability in overdense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transverse stability of the drive beam is critical to plasma wakefield accelerators. A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to beam envelope modulation and hosing (centroid displacement) instabilities. Coupled equations for the beam centroid and envelope are derived. The growth rate for beam hosing is examined including return current effects (where the beam radius is of order the plasma skin depth) in the long-beam, strongly-coupled, overdense regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Gruener, F. J.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nonabelian plasma instabilities in Bjorken expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma instabilities are parametrically the dominant nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. In recent years the time evolution of the corresponding collective colour fields has been studied in stationary anisotropic situations. Here I report on recent numerical results on the time evolution of the most unstable modes in a longitudinally expanding plasma as they grow from small rapidity fluctuations to amplitudes where non-Abelian self-interactions become important.

Anton Rebhan

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Poverty, Armed Conflict and Financial Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flows. Armed conflict does not always contribute to financial instability. Magnusson and Wydick (2001) discuss efficiency of markets in 8 largest African stock markets in comparison with emerging stock markets in South East Asia and Latin America... of strategies is is determined by the relative benefits and costs of reversion to conflict (Collier and Hoeffler, 2004, pp. 8-10). High levels of military spending are associated with increased risk of renewed conflict. 3 POVERTY, CONFLICT AND FINANCIAL...

Baddeley, Michelle

147

SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing P Beldade1 , WO McMillan2 and A Papanicolaou3 1 Section to an explosion of genomic data and the emergence of new research avenues. Evolutionary and ecological functional genomics, with its focus on the genes that affect ecological success and adaptation in natural populations

Beldade, Patrícia

148

International milk genomics consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA c University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA d University of Colorado. The general goals of the Milk Genomics Consortium are to link the scientific community through milk and geno value of milk's components is known (German, Dillard, & Ward, 2002). The scientific challenge, therefore

Rocke, David M.

149

Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics of coral symbiosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coral Reef Genomics: Developing toolsfor functional genomics of coral symbiosis Jodi SCHWARZ 1 ,symbiosis functional genomics cDNA microarray ABSTRACT

Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

GIS: a web-based genomics information system for efficiently manipulating and accessing genome physical maps.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biological science has entered the genome era. Global genome integrative physical and genetic mapping promises to revolutionize modern genomics research. To facilitate manipulation and applications (more)

Chen, Huaming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Navigating protected genomics data with UCSC Genome Browser in a Box.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. et al. (2013) Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV):High-performance genomics data visualization andbrowsers for comparative genomics. Bioinformatics. In press.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A high-throughput in vivo micronucleus assay for genome instability screening in mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? pH meter (e.g. Meter Toledo MP220) 275 ? Biological safety cabinet (e.g. Fisher Scientific, #12372419) ? Reciprocating shaker (e.g. Stuart SSL2) ? Aluminum foil (e.g. Terinex) ? Single-use 0.22 m filters (e.g. Corning, #430521) ? 10 ml...

Balmus, Gabriel; Karp, Natasha A; Ng, Bee Ling; Jackson, Stephen P; Adams, David J; McIntyre, Rebecca E

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sasaki, M.S. , Sonoda, E. , Fukushima, T. , Morrison, C. ,M.S. , Tachiiri, S. , Fukushima, T. , Sonoda, E. , Schild,

Schild, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Parallel-Flow-Shear Driven Low-Frequency Plasma Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full three dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed in order to investigate effects of field-aligned (parallel) ion flow shears on low-frequency plasma instabilities. It is shown that the parallel ion flow velocity shear can induce the ion-acoustic instability, even when the ion flow velocity is so small that the instability can not take place. Simulation results are consistent with the analysis based on the local theory.

Ishiguro, Seiji [Theory and Computer Simulation Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Matsumoto, Noriaki; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo [Department of Electronic Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ion-beam-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results of numerical simulations on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by the ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. For the beam speed exceeding the thermal speed of background ions and the beam temperature much lower than the background ion temperature, it is found that the instability results in strong perpendicular heating and slowing down of parallel drift of the beam ions, leading to the saturation of the instability. Applications to plasma heating and space plasma physics are discussed.

Miura, A.; Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Feedback Enhanced Sensitivity in Optomechanics: Surpassing the Parametric Instability Barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intracavity power, and hence sensitivity, of optomechanical sensors is commonly limited by parametric instability. Here we characterize the parametric instability induced sensitivity degradation in a micron scale cavity optomechanical system. Feedback via optomechanical transduction and electrical gradient force actuation is applied to suppress the parametric instability. As a result a 5.4 fold increase in mechanical motion transduction sensitivity is achieved to a final value of $1.9\\times 10^{-18}\\rm m Hz^{-1/2}$.

Glen I. Harris; Ulrik L. Andersen; Joachim Knittel; Warwick P. Bowen

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an equal mass plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an inhomogeneous pair-ion plasma has been analyzed. Considering two fluid model for two species of ions (positive and negative), we obtain the possibility of the existence of RT instability. The growth rate of the RT instability as usual depends on gravity and density gradient scale length. The results are discussed in context of pair-ion plasma experiments.

Adak, Ashish, E-mail: ashish-adak@yahoo.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ghosh, Samiran, E-mail: sran-g@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.chakrabarti@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fast transverse instability in the NSNS Accumulator Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of investigation of possible fast transverse instabilities in the NSNS Accumulator Ring. The instability may be caused by the presence of stripline devices like kicker magnets, the active damper system, and by the RF cavities, and the sharp steps of the vacuum pipe. The instability can be overcome by adopting aluminum as the material of the vacuum pipe.Still the growth time of the instability remains short especially for the mode in proximity of the betatron tune.

Ruggiero, A.G.; Blaskiewicz, M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

Qin, Hong [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C. [PPPL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Movement Control And Cortical Activation In Functional Ankle Instability.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Background: Functional ankle instability (FI) is a common development following first-time lateral ankle sprain, resulting in functional limitations. Local tissue damage has not been a (more)

Anderson, Kathleen Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

QCD plasma instability and thermalisation at heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under suitable non-equilibrium conditions QCD plasma can develop plasma instabilities, where some modes of the plasma grow exponentially. It has been argued that these instabilities can play a significant role in the thermalisation of the plasma in heavy-ion collision experiments. We study the instability in SU(2) plasmas using the hard thermal loop effective lattice theory, which is suitable for studying real-time evolution of long wavelength modes in the plasma. We observe that under suitable conditions the plasma can indeed develop an instability which can grow to a very large magnitude, necessary for the rapid thermalisation in heavy-ion collisions.

Dietrich Bodeker; Kari Rummukainen

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hagedorn Instability in Dimensionally Reduced Large-N Gauge Theories as Gregory-Laflamme and Rayleigh-Plateau Instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is expected that the Gregory-Laflamme (GL) instability in the black string in gravity is related to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability in fluid mechanics. Especially, the orders of the phase transitions associated with these instabilities depend on the number of the transverse space dimensions, and they are of first and second order below and above the critical dimension. Through the gauge-gravity correspondence, the GL instability is conjectured to be thermodynamically related to the Hagedorn instability in large-N gauge theories, and it leads to a prediction that the order of the confinement-deconfinement transition associated with the Hagedorn instability may depend on the transverse dimension. We test this conjecture in the D-dimensional bosonic D0-brane model using numerical simulation and the 1/D expansion, and confirm the expected D dependence.

Takehiro Azuma; Takeshi Morita; Shingo Takeuchi

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Erosion waves: transverse instabilities and fingering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two laboratory scale experiments of dry and under-water avalanches of non-cohesive granular materials are investigated. We trigger solitary waves and study the conditions under which the front is transversally stable. We show the existence of a linear instability followed by a coarsening dynamics and finally the onset of a fingering pattern. Due to the different operating conditions, both experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales involved. Nevertheless, the quantitative agreement between the stability diagram, the wavelengths selected and the avalanche morphology reveals a common scenario for an erosion/deposition process.

F. Malloggi; J. Lanuza; B. Andreotti; E. Clment

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Instabilities in the Nuclear Energy Density Functional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the field of Energy Density Functionals (EDF) used in nuclear structure and dynamics, one of the unsolved issues is the stability of the functional. Numerical issues aside, some EDFs are unstable with respect to particular perturbations of the nuclear ground-state density. The aim of this contribution is to raise questions about the origin and nature of these instabilities, the techniques used to diagnose and prevent them, and the domain of density functions in which one should expect a nuclear EDF to be stable.

M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Physical simulation study of dynamic voltage instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a physical simulation of the dynamic behavior of voltage instability in an interconnected multimachine environment. The dynamic evolving process leading to eventual voltage collapse, the scenario of the progressive reactive support reduction resulting from the MXL protection relays, the OLTC operation, and the effect of switched-in capacitor banks are examined using physical facilities in the laboratory. The physical simulation results are also compared with digital simulation results. This physical investigation provides a reliable foundation for the effective development of assessment approaches and countermeasures.

Tso, S.K.; Zhu, T.X. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zeng, Q.Y. [Electric Power Research Inst., Beijing (China); Lo, K.L. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electrical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Instability of Quantum de Sitter Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantized fields (e.g., the graviton itself) in de Sitter (dS) spacetime lead to particle production: specifically, we consider a thermal spectrum resulting from the dS (horizon) temperature. The energy required to excite these particles reduces slightly the rate of expansion and eventually modifies the semiclassical spacetime geometry. The resulting manifold no longer has constant curvature nor time reversal invariance, and back-reaction renders the classical dS background unstable to perturbations. In the case of AdS, there exists a global static vacuum state; in this state there is no particle production and the analogous instability does not arise.

Ho, Chiu Man

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Plasma planar filament instability and Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhomogeneous plasmas filaments instabilities are investigated by using the techniques of classical differential geometry of curves where Frenet torsion and curvature describe completely the motion of curves. In our case the Frenet frame changes in time and also depends upon the other coordinates taking into account the inhomogeneity of the plasma. The exponential perturbation method so commonly used to describe cosmological perturbatons is applied to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma equations to find longitudinal modes describing Alfven waves propagation modes describing plasma waves in the medium. Stability is investigated in the imaginary axis of the spectra of complex frequencies ${\\omega}$ or $Im(\\omega)\

Garcia de Andrade

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Salt Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: An integrated genomics approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002. Integrating cancer genomics and proteomics in theWeb site for comparative genomics. Genome Res 15:1015-22.Hildenborough: An integrated genomics approach. Aindrila

Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Computational methods and analyses in comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

promise of comparative genomics in mammals. Science, 286,homology relationships. Genomics, Dehal, P. and Boore, J.to plant comparative genomics. Genome Research, 13(5), 999

Peng, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

acanthamoeba castellanii genome: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine Websites Summary: Prokaryotic Genomes Eurkaryotic Genomes Chapter 6. Genomics and Gene Identification Weigang Qiu Weigang Qiu Chapter 6. Genomics and Gene...

171

aeromonas caviae genomic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine Websites Summary: Prokaryotic Genomes Eurkaryotic Genomes Chapter 6. Genomics and Gene Identification Weigang Qiu Weigang Qiu Chapter 6. Genomics and Gene...

172

Population genomics: Whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence in Drosophila simulans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLoS BIOLOGY Population Genomics: Whole-Genome Analysis ofwww.plosbiology.org Population Genomics of D. simulans Table11 | e310 Population Genomics of D. simulans Table S15. GO

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes The research group Genome Evolution and Speciation (Team) to work on the analysis of genome and transcriptome sequence data (generated using 454 Roche

Rennes, Université de

174

GIS: a web-based genomics information system for efficiently manipulating and accessing genome physical maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological science has entered the genome era. Global genome integrative physical and genetic mapping promises to revolutionize modern genomics research. To facilitate manipulation and applications of the results from genomics research, many...

Chen, Huaming

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electrohydrodynamic instabilities in thin liquid trilayer films  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Experiments by Dickey et al. [Langmuir, 22, 4315 (2006)] and Leach et al. [Chaos, 15, 047506 (2005)] show that novel pillar shapes can be generated from electrohydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of thin polymer/polymer/air trilayer films. In this paper, we use linear stability analysis to investigate the effect of free charge and ac electric fields on the stability of trilayer systems. Our work is also motivated by our recent theoretical study [J. Fluid Mech., 631, 255 (2009)] which demonstrates how ac electric fields can be used to increase control over the pillar formation process in thin liquid bilayer films. For perfect dielectric films, the effect of an AC electric field can be understood by considering an equivalent DC field. Leaky dielectric films yield pillar configurations that are drastically different from perfect dielectric films, and AC fields can be used to control the location of free charge within the trilayer system. This can alter the pillar instability modes and generate smaller diameter pillars when conductivities are mismatched. The results presented here may be of interest for the creation of complex topographical patterns on polymer coatings and in microelectronics.

Roberts, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kumar, Satish [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Beam Dynamics and Instabilities in ELIC Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the first study of beam related instabilities in lepton ring of the proposed electron-ion collider beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson lab. The design parameters are consistent with PEP-II. Present studies reveal that coupled bunch and two stream instabilities are important issues and we need feedback system. The Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab has been envisioned as future high energy particle accelerator beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF. The MEIC will consist of the existing polarized electron source complex with 12 GeV upgrade and a new ion complex with polarized and unpolarized light to medium ions. The conceptual layout is shown in Fig. 1 and the basic parameters in comparison with the similar machines are discussed in Table 1. The maximum permissible collision frequency at 1.5 GHz is dictated by the existing electron machine, allowing the relatively small charge per bunch and large crossing angle resulting in the increased beam stability and high luminosity. In this paper, we present the preliminary study of collective effects for e-ring.

S. Ahmed,B. Yunn,G. Krafft

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics database for Neisseria meningitidis Lee S, septicemia and in some cases pneumonia. Genomic studies hold great promise for N. meningitidis research genomics database and genome browser that houses and displays publicly available N. meningitidis genomes

Jordan, King

178

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics & Annotation Transfer Alban MANCHERON Raluca URICARU Eric is genome comparison good for?" Genome comparison is crucial for genome annotation, regulatory motifs identification, and vaccine design aims at finding genomic regions either specific to or in one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

179

Evolutionary Genomics of Prokaryotic Viruses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Evolutionary history of biological entities is recorded within their nucleic acid sequences and can (sometimes) be deciphered by thorough genomic analysis. In this study we (more)

Krupovic, Mart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Computational genomics on the grid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The post-genomic era is characterized by large amount of data available from sequencing projects. The large size of biological datasets, inherent complexity of biological problems (more)

Chen, Chunxi.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparative genomics of arabidopsis thaliana.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The highly sel?ng Arabidopsis thaliana differs from its closest relative, the obligate outcrosser A. lyrata, both in genome size and organization. During approximately 5 million (more)

Hu, Tina T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Industry Motivated Advancements of Current Combustion Instability Model: The Conversion of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTABILITY CHARACTERISTICS IN GAS TURBINES ...................- 5 - 1.5. COMBUSTION INSTABILITYIndustry Motivated Advancements of Current Combustion Instability Model: The Conversion of Volume to thank Dr. Flandro. His eternal knowledge of Combustion Instability has resonated in this work and his

Flandro, Gary A.

183

The Nonlinear Downstream Development of Baroclinic Instability Joseph Pedlosky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nonlinear Downstream Development of Baroclinic Instability Joseph Pedlosky Woods Hole The downstream development in both space and time of baroclinic instability is studied in a nonlinear channel as a conceptual model for the development of fluctuations in currents like the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio downstream

Pedlosky, Joseph

184

An Instability Leading to Failure of Polyethylene in Uniaxial Creep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Instability Leading to Failure of Polyethylene in Uniaxial Creep L. J. ZAPAS and J. M. CRISSMAN model, a point of instability is pre- dicted for the uniaxial creep of high density polyethylene. From dead load experiments it has been found that the instabil- ity occurs for linear -polyethylene

185

Electrostatic Interchange Instabilities of a Rotating, High-Temperature Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrostatic Interchange Instabilities of a Rotating, High-Temperature Plasma Confined by a Dipole #2 Mach Probe #1 Mach Probe #2 High-field, 0.2 MA-turn Water-cooled Magnet #12;Interchange Modes-sized/global... Fast hot electron interchange instability: drift-resonant transport; Gryokinetics; phase-space holes

Mauel, Michael E.

186

Atomic scale mixing for inertial confinement fusion associated hydro instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic scale mixing for inertial confinement fusion associated hydro instabilities J. Melvina, , P Alamos, NM 87545, USA Abstract Hydro instabilities have been identified as a potential cause- able. We find numerical convergence for this important quantity, in a purely hydro study, with only

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

187

Short communication Localized structures generated by subcritical instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1829 Short communication Localized structures generated by subcritical instabilities O. Thual(1 cases the possible ori- gin of localized structures lies in the existence of a subcritical instability.1051/jphys:0198800490110182900 #12;1830 structure in the vicinity of a subcritical instabi- lity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights Kevin Viner1 and breaks subcritical critical Nh/U = 0.5 Nh/U = 0.8 #12;Subcritical Instability: An Example three peaks · Nh/U = 0.6 · U/NL = 0.1 · nonrotating · Time-dependent model initialized with subcritical steady wave

189

Detection of instabilities and transition in milling operation using wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and undesirable due to their detrimental effects. Chatter is one such type of instability and is characterized by the violent relative vibration between the workpiece and tool. The objective of this research is to detect the onset of instabilities in milling...

Khurjekar, Parag Padmakar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Genomics Division Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals.Genomefor Genomics DanPIs Mark

192

Genomics and Systems Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals.Genomefor Genomics DanPIs

193

Integrative Genomics Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-Infected MacaquesIntegration ofIntegrative Genomics

194

Approaching Pomeranchuk Instabilities from Ordered Phase: A Crossing-symmetric Equation Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore features of a 3D Fermi liquid near generalized Pomeranchuk instabilities using a tractable crossing symmetric equation method. We approach the instabilities from the ordered ferromagnetic phase. We find quantum multi-criticality as approach to the ferromagnetic instability drives instability in other channel(s). It is found that a charge nematic instability precedes and is driven by Pomeranchuk instabilities in both the l = 0 spin and density channels.

Kelly Reidy; Khandker Quader; Kevin Bedell

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

Yeast Genomic Library Genomic DNA Sau3AI partial digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yeast Genomic Library Concept: Genomic DNA Sau3AI partial digestion Vector DNA BamHI full digestion partial Ligate and transform above products Vector Information: use centromeric plasmid to avoid of the mcs Preparing Vector: 1) digest 3-4ug of library vector with BamHI for 2-4hrs in a total volume of 20

Odorizzi, Greg

196

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrdinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a fungal prey. BMC Genomics 10, 567 (2009). This studythe TrichoEST functional genomics approach. Curr. Genet. 51,in Hypocrea jecorina. BMC Genomics. 9, 430 (2008) Mukherjee,

Druzhinina, Irina S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evolutionary Genomics of Salmonella enterica Subspecies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. 2002. Evolutionary genomics of Salmonella: genesubsystems technology. BMC Genomics 9:75. 23. Ochman H,Salmonella enterica. BMC Genomics 12:425. PubMed. 29. Falush

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tissue sampling and standards for vertebrate genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and standards for vertebrate genomics. GigaScience 2012 1:8.transition to conservation genomics. TIG 2010, 26:177187.Siemens DH: Ecological genomicschanging perspectives on

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Human Genome Program Image Gallery (from genomics.energy.gov)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This collection contains approximately 240 images from the genome programs of DOE's Office of Science. The images are divided into galleries related to biofuels research, systems biology, and basic genomics. Each image has a title, a basic citation, and a credit or source. Most of the images are original graphics created by the Genome Management Information System (GMIS). GMIS images are recognizable by their credit line. Permission to use these graphics is not needed, but please credit the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs and provide the website http://genomics.energy.gov. Other images were provided by third parties and not created by the U.S. Department of Energy. Users must contact the person listed in the credit line before using those images. The high-resolution images can be downloaded.

202

A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - ablative-like rayleigh-taylor instabilities...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 7 6. Instabilities 6.1 Surface tension driven instabilities Summary: ;6.2 Applied field: Gravity Rayleigh-Taylor...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy-driven weibel instability Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Survey of collective instabilities and beamplasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams Summary: detailed infor- mation. 2. Anisotropy-driven collective instabilities in...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy instability thresholds Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar... - retical thresholds for pressure anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here we use...

206

Electron-ion hybrid instability experiment upgrades to the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Auburn Linear EXperiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) is a laboratory plasma physics experiment used to study spatially inhomogeneous flows in a magnetized cylindrical plasma column that are driven by crossed electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields. ALEXIS was recently upgraded to include a small, secondary plasma source for a new dual source, interpenetrating plasma experiment. Using two plasma sources allows for highly localized electric fields to be made at the boundary of the two plasmas, inducing strong E Multiplication-Sign B velocity shear in the plasma, which can give rise to a regime of instabilities that have not previously been studied in ALEXIS. The dual plasma configuration makes it possible to have independent control over the velocity shear and the density gradient. This paper discusses the recent addition of the secondary plasma source to ALEXIS, as well as the plasma diagnostics used to measure electric fields and electron densities.

DuBois, A. M.; Arnold, I.; Thomas, E. Jr. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Tejero, E.; Amatucci, W. E. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gravitational instability of slowly rotating isothermal spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the statistical mechanics of rotating self-gravitating systems by allowing properly for the conservation of angular momentum. We study analytically the case of slowly rotating isothermal spheres by expanding the solutions of the Boltzmann-Poisson equation in a series of Legendre polynomials, adapting the procedure introduced by Chandrasekhar (1933) for distorted polytropes. We show how the classical spiral of Lynden-Bell & Wood (1967) in the temperature-energy plane is deformed by rotation. We find that gravitational instability occurs sooner in the microcanonical ensemble and later in the canonical ensemble. According to standard turning point arguments, the onset of the collapse coincides with the minimum energy or minimum temperature state in the series of equilibria. Interestingly, it happens to be close to the point of maximum flattening. We determine analytically the generalization of the singular isothermal solution to the case of a slowly rotating configuration. We also consider slowly ...

Chavanis, P H

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Planetesimal Capture in the Disk Instability Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We follow the contraction and evolution of a typical Jupiter-mass clump created by the disk instability mechanism, and compute the rate of planetesimal capture during this evolution. We show that such a clump has a slow contraction phase lasting ~3x10^5 years. By following the trajectories of planetesimals as they pass through the envelope of the protoplanet, we compute the cross-section for planetesimal capture at all stages of the protoplanet's evolution. We show that the protoplanet can capture a large fraction of the solid material in its feeding zone, which will lead to an enrichment of the protoplanet in heavy elements. The exact amount of this enrichment depends upon, but is not very sensitive to the size and random speed of the planetesimals.

Ravit Helled; Morris Podolak; Attay Kovetz

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Indeterminacy and instability in Petschek reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explain two puzzling aspects of Petschek's model for fast reconnection. One is its failure to occur in plasma simulations with uniform resistivity. The other is its inability to provide anything more than an upper limit for the reconnection rate. We have found that previously published analytical solutions based on Petschek's model are structurally unstable if the electrical resistivity is uniform. The structural instability is associated with the presence of an essential singularity at the X-line that is unphysical. By requiring that such a singularity does not exist, we obtain a formula that predicts a specific rate of reconnection. For uniform resistivity, reconnection can only occur at the slow, Sweet-Parker rate. For nonuniform resistivity, reconnection can occur at a much faster rate provided that the resistivity profile is not too flat near the X-line. If this condition is satisfied, then the scale length of the nonuniformity determines the reconnection rate.

Forbes, Terry G. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)] [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Priest, Eric R. [Institute of Mathematics, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Mathematics, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom); Seaton, Daniel B. [SIDC-Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium)] [SIDC-Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium); Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P.O. 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)] [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P.O. 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Gravitational Instability of Yang-Mills Cosmologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational instability of Yang-Mills cosmologies is numerically studied with the hamiltonian formulation of the spherically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills equations with SU(2) gauge group. On the short term, the expansion dilutes the energy densities of the Yang-Mills fluctuations due to their conformal invariance. In this early regime, the gauge potentials appear oscillating quietly in an interaction potential quite similar to the one of the homogeneous case. However, on the long term, the expansion finally becomes significantly inhomogeneous and no more mimics a conformal transformation of the metric. Thereafter, the Yang-Mills fluctuations enter a complex non-linear regime, accompanied by diffusion, while their associated energy contrasts grow.

A. Fuzfa

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Infrared instability from nonlinear QCD evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation as an explicit example, we show that nonlinear QCD evolution leads to an instability in the propagation toward the infrared of the gluon transverse momentum distribution, if one starts with a state with an infrared cut-off. This effect takes the mathematical form of rapidly moving traveling wave solutions of the BK equation, which we investigate by numerical simulations. These traveling wave solutions are different from those governing the transition to saturation, which propagate towards the ultraviolet. The infrared wave speed, formally infinite for the leading order QCD kernel, is determined by higher order corrections. This mechanism could play a role in the rapid decrease of the mean free path in the Color Glass Condensate scenario for heavy ion collisions.

R. Enberg; R. Peschanski

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fueling Future with Algal Genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

RADIATION RESEARCH 155, 263267 (2001) 0033-7587/01 $5.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability

215

Comparative genomics of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The study of microbial evolution has been recently accelerated by the advent of comparative genomics, an approach enabling investigation of organisms at the whole-genome level. (more)

Mostowy, Serge.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Q-ball Instability due to U(1) Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q-ball is a non-topological soliton whose stability is ensured by global U(1) symmetry. We study a Q-ball which arises in the Affleck-Dine mechanism for baryogenesis and consider its possible instability due to U(1) breaking term ($A$-term) indispensable for successful baryogenesis. It is found that the instability destroys the Q-ball if its growth rate exceeds inverse of the typical relaxation time scale of the Q-ball. However, the instability is not so strong as it obstructs the cosmological formation of the Q-balls.

Masahiro Kawasaki; Kenichiro Konya; Fuminobu Takahashi

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Prediction of core saturation instability at an HVDC converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core saturation instability has occurred on several HVDC schemes resulting from interactions between second harmonic and dc quantities (voltages and currents) on the ac side of the converter and fundamental frequency quantities on the dc side of the converter. The instability can be reinforced by unbalanced saturation of the converter transformers. The paper presents an analytical method which can be used to quickly screen ac and dc system operating conditions to predict where core saturation instability is likely to occur. Analytical results have been confirmed using the digital transients simulation program PSCAD/EMTDC.

Burton, R.S. [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Fuchshuber, C.F. [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Woodford, D.A. [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Gole, A.M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

On Higuchi Ghosts and Gradient Instabilities in Bimetric Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the conditions to satisfy the Higuchi bound and to avoid gradient instabilities in the scalar sector for cosmological solutions in singly coupled bimetric gravity theories. We find that in expanding universes the ratio of the scale factors of the reference and observable metric has to increase at all times. This automatically implies a ghost-free helicity-2 sector and enforces a phantom Dark Energy. Furthermore, the condition for the absence of gradient instabilities in the scalar sector will be analyzed. Finally, we discuss whether cosmological solutions, including exotic evolutions like bouncing cosmologies, can exist, in which both the Higuchi ghost and scalar instabilities are absent at all times.

Knnig, Frank

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

Kaufman, Glennis A.

223

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Comparative and Functional Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Comparative and Functional Genomics Volume 2007, Article ID 47304, 7 pages doi:10.1155/2007/47304 Meeting Report eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA 3 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

224

A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics Rose Hoberman May 2007 CMU-CS-07, or the U.S. Government. #12;Keywords: spatial comparative genomics, comparative genomics, gene clusters, max-gap clusters, gene teams, whole genome duplication, paralogons, synteny, ortholog detection #12

225

Genomics and ornithology Scott V. Edwards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Genomics and ornithology Scott V. Edwards Received: 23 September 2007 / Accepted: 27 Genomics is revolutionizing ornithology in the same ways it is reinvigorating other biological disciplines. In this review, I will highlight applications of genomics and genomics technologies to the study of the ecology

Edwards, Scott

226

Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery@mit.edu, nickp@genome.wi.mit.edu, bwb@genome.wi.mit.edu, bab@mit.edu, lander@wi.mit.edu (1) MIT/Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, 320 Charles St., Cambridge MA 02139 (2) MIT Computer Science

Kellis, Manolis

228

Extreme Genomics By Scouring the Genomes of 50 HIV-Resistant People, Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme Genomics By Scouring the Genomes of 50 HIV-Resistant People, Study Takes Aim at Rare Gene Genome Variation, and his colleagues think that the complete genome sequences of those fortunate few against the viral strain that usually infects humans. That's because the CCR5 protein is Extreme Genomics

Dolbow, John

229

Magnetorotational instability in plasmas with mobile dust grains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetorotational instability of dusty plasmas is investigated using the multi-fluid model and the general dispersion relation is derived based on local approximation. The dust grains are found to play an important role in the dispersion relation in the low-frequency mode and exhibit destabilizing effects on the plasma. Both the instability criterion and growth rate are affected significantly by the dust and when the dust is heavy enough to be unperturbed, the reduced dispersion relations are obtained. The instability criteria show that the dust grains have stabilizing effects on the instability when the rotation frequency decreases outwards and conversely lead to destabilizing effects when the rotation frequency increases outwards. The results are relevant to accession and protoplanetary disks.

Ren Haijun [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cao Jintao [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li Ding [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Instability, intermixing and electronic structure at theepitaxialLaAl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

intermixing and electronic structure at the epitaxialLaAlO3SrTiO3(001) heterojunction. Instability, intermixing and electronic structure at the epitaxialLaAlO3...

231

On the ordinary mode instability for low beta plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability, first discussed by Davidson and Wu [Phys. Fluids 13, 1407 (1970)], has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. In a series of papers, Ibscher, Schlickeiser, and their colleagues [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072116 (2012); ibid. 20, 012103 (2013); ibid. 20, 042121 (2013); ibid. 21, 022110 (2014)] revisited the O mode instability and extended it to the low-beta plasma regime by considering a counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian model. However, the O-mode instability is, thus, far discussed only on the basis of the marginal stability condition rather than actual numerical solutions of the dispersion relation. The present paper revisits the O-mode instability by considering the actual complex roots. The marginal stability condition as a function of the (electron) temperature anisotropy and beta naturally emerges in such a scheme.

Hadi, F.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Bashir, M. F. [Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2431 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Schlickeiser, R. [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- and Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitt, Bochum (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Microturbulence in DIII-D tokamak pedestal. I. Electrostatic instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic driftwave instabilities in a tokamak edge have been carried out to study the turbulent transport in the pedestal of an H-mode plasma. The simulations use annulus geometry and focus on two radial regions of a DIII-D experiment: the pedestal top with a mild pressure gradient and the middle of the pedestal with a steep pressure gradient. A reactive trapped electron instability with a typical ballooning mode structure is excited by trapped electrons in the pedestal top. In the middle of the pedestal, the electrostatic instability exhibits an unusual mode structure, which peaks at the poloidal angle ?=?/2. The simulations find that this unusual mode structure is due to the steep pressure gradients in the pedestal but not due to the particular DIII-D magnetic geometry. Realistic DIII-D geometry appears to have a stabilizing effect on the instability when compared to a simple circular tokamak geometry.

Fulton, D. P.; Holod, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Lin, Z., E-mail: zhihongl@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiao, Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Activation of conductive pathways via deformation-induced instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the pattern transformation of periodic elastomeric cellular structures, the purpose of this work is to exploit this unique ability to activate conductive via deformation-induced instabilities. Two microstructural ...

Ni, Xinchen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Negative-mass Instability in Nonlinear Plasma Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative-mass instability (NMI), previously found in ion traps, appears as a distinct regime of the sideband instability in nonlinear plasma waves with trapped particles. As the bounce frequency of these particles decreases with the bounce action, bunching can occur if the action distribution is inverted in trapping islands. In contrast to existing theories that also infer instabilities from the anharmonicity of bounce oscillations, spatial periodicity of the islands turns out to be unimportant, and the particle distribution can be unstable even if it is at at the resonance. An analytical model is proposed which describes both single traps and periodic nonlinear waves and concisely generalizes the conventional description of the sideband instability in plasma waves. The theoretical results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations carried out for a regime accentuating the NMI effect.

I.Y. Dodin, P.F. Schmit, J. Rocks and N.J. Fisch

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Re-defining the Empirical ZZ Ceti Instability Strip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the new ZZ Ceti stars (hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf variables; DAVs) discovered within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Mukadam et al. 2004) to re-define the empirical ZZ Ceti instability strip. This is the first time since the discovery of white dwarf variables in 1968 that we have a homogeneous set of spectra acquired using the same instrument on the same telescope, and with consistent data reductions, for a statistically significant sample of ZZ Ceti stars. The homogeneity of the spectra reduces the scatter in the spectroscopic temperatures and we find a narrow instability strip of width ~950K, from 10850--11800K. We question the purity of the DAV instability strip as we find several non-variables within. We present our best fit for the red edge and our constraint for the blue edge of the instability strip, determined using a statistical approach.

Anjum S. Mukadam; D. E. Winget; Ted von Hippel; M. H. Montgomery; S. O. Kepler; A. F. M. Costa

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Radiation Induced Nanocrystal Formation in Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The irradiation of metallic glasses to induce nanocrystallization was studied in two metallic glass compositions, Cu50Zr45Ti5 and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5. Atomic mobility was described using a model based on localized excess free volume due to displace...

Carter, Jesse

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Gravitational instability of slowly rotating isothermal spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the statistical mechanics of rotating self-gravitating systems by allowing properly for the conservation of angular momentum. We study analytically the case of slowly rotating isothermal spheres by expanding the solutions of the Boltzmann-Poisson equation in a series of Legendre polynomials, adapting the procedure introduced by Chandrasekhar (1933) for distorted polytropes. We show how the classical spiral of Lynden-Bell & Wood (1967) in the temperature-energy plane is deformed by rotation. We find that gravitational instability occurs sooner in the microcanonical ensemble and later in the canonical ensemble. According to standard turning point arguments, the onset of the collapse coincides with the minimum energy or minimum temperature state in the series of equilibria. Interestingly, it happens to be close to the point of maximum flattening. We determine analytically the generalization of the singular isothermal solution to the case of a slowly rotating configuration. We also consider slowly rotating configurations of the self-gravitating Fermi gas at non zero temperature.

P. -H. Chavanis

2002-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

The (In)Stability of Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of numerical simulations which examine the dynamical stability of known planetary systems, a star with two or more planets. First we vary the initial conditions of each system based on observational data. We then determine regions of phase space which produce stable planetary configurations. For each system we perform 1000 ~1 million year integrations. We examine upsilon And, HD83443, GJ876, HD82943, 47UMa, HD168443, and the solar system (SS). We find that the resonant systems, 2 planets in a first order mean motion resonance, (HD82943 and GJ876) have very narrow zones of stability. The interacting systems, not in first order resonance, but able to perturb each other (upsilon And, 47UMa, and SS) have broad regions of stability. The separated systems, 2 planets beyond 10:1 resonance, (we only examine HD83443 and HD168443) are fully stable. Furthermore we find that the best fits to the interacting and resonant systems place them very close to unstable regions. The boundary in phase space between stability and instability depends strongly on the eccentricities, and (if applicable) the proximity of the system to perfect resonance. In addition to million year integrations, we also examined stability on ~100 million year timescales. For each system we ran ~10 long term simulations, and find that the Keplerian fits to these systems all contain configurations which may be regular on this timescale.

Rory Barnes; Thomas Quinn

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Black Hole Instabilities and Exponential Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, a general analysis has been given of the stability with respect to axisymmetric perturbations of stationary-axisymmetric black holes and black branes in vacuum general relativity in arbitrary dimensions. It was shown that positivity of canonical energy on an appropriate space of perturbations is necessary and sufficient for stability. However, the notions of both "stability" and "instability" in this result are significantly weaker than one would like to obtain. In this paper, we prove that if a perturbation of the form $\\pounds_t \\delta g$---with $\\delta g$ a solution to the linearized Einstein equation---has negative canonical energy, then that perturbation must, in fact, grow exponentially in time. The key idea is to make use of the $t$- or ($t$-$\\phi$)-reflection isometry, $i$, of the background spacetime and decompose the initial data for perturbations into their odd and even parts under $i$. We then write the canonical energy as $\\mathscr E\\ = \\mathscr K + \\mathscr U$, where $\\mathscr K$ and $...

Prabhu, Kartik

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Instability issues for the ESS linac and rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comments are made on beam instability issues in the ESS linac and rings. The topics of interest in the linac are halo generation in the absence and presence of machine imperfections, and also the stability of the momentum ramping of the output beam. In the case of the rings, the main concern is for fast coherent transverse instabilities due to the combined effect of coupled electron-proton oscillations and interaction with the wall impedances.

Rees, G. H. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, CLRC (United Kingdom)

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effect of shrink fits on threshold speeds of rotordynamic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CHAPTER IV TEST APPARATUS . . . . 13 CHAPTER V RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . . . 17 17 30 42 42 47 5. 1 Rap Test. . 5. 2 Running Test 5. 3 Modeling and the Prcdiction of Threshold Speed of Instability.... . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 5. 3. 1 Matching the Base Case. 5. 3. 2 Gunter's Prediction Using C, q 5. 3. 3 Modeling and Prediction of the Threshold Speed Using the XLTRC Code. . . . 51 5. 4 Prediction of the Onset Speed of Instability for a Tight Inteiference Fit...

Mir, MD. Mofazzal Hossain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

Mendona, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade de So Paulo, 05508-090 So Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The systematic lack of convergence of self-consistent mean-field calculations with certain parameterizations of the Skyrme energy density functional has been attributed to the appearance of finite-size instabilities. In this contribution, we investigate what happens at the instability associated with the C{sub 0}{sup {Delta}s}s{sub 0} Dot-Operator {Delta}s{sub 0} term in a high-spin state of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg.

Hellemans, V.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, PNTPM, CP229, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France) and CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Suppression of Rayleigh Taylor instability in strongly coupled plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rayleigh Taylor instability in a strongly coupled plasma medium has been investigated using the equations of generalized hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the visco-elasticity of the strongly coupled medium due to strong inter particle correlations leads to a suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability unless certain threshold conditions are met. The relevance of these results to experiments on laser compression of matter to high densities including those related to inertial confinement fusion using lasers has also been shown.

Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Kelvin Helmholtz Instability in Strongly Coupled Yukawa Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 'first principles' molecular dynamics simulations Kelvin Helmholtz instability has been observed for the first time at the particle level in two-dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. At a given coupling strength {Gamma} a subsonic shear profile is superposed on an equilibrated Yukawa liquid and instability is observed. Linear growth rates computed directly from MD simulations are seen to increase with strong coupling. Vortex-roll formation in the nonlinear regime is reported.

Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Synthetic Genomics: Options for Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gene and genome synthesis, that is, constructing long stretches of DNA from constituent chemicals, provides scientists with new and unparalleled capabilities both for understanding biology and for using it for beneficial ...

Garfinkel, Michele

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyses genomes comparison Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

genomes comparison Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics Summary: is genome comparison good for?" Genome comparison is crucial for genome...

249

Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SK, Bonanno JB. Structural genomics. Methods Biochem AnalMizuguchi K. Structural genomics: an overview. Prog BiophysSE. A tour of structural genomics. Nat Rev Genet 2001;2(10):

Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Transforming Growth Factor ?-1 (TGF-?1) Is a Serum Biomarker of Radiation Induced Fibrosis in Patients Treated With Intracavitary Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor ? -1 (TGF-?1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R and D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-?1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-?1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. Results: The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-?1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 5016 pg/mL, P<.0001); and women with moderate to severe RIF (34,462 4713 pg/mL, P<0.0001). Patients with moderate to severe RIF had significantly elevated TGF-?1 levels when compared with those with none to mild RIF before surgery (P=.0014) during IBAPBI (P?0001), and the elevation persisted at 6 months (P?.001), 12 months (P?.001), 18 months (P?.001), and 24 months (P=.12). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TGF-?1 values predicting moderate to severe RIF was generated with an area under the curve (AUC){sub ROC} of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-?1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusions: TGF-?1 levels correlate with the development of moderate to severe RIF. The pre-IBAPBI mean TGF-?1 levels can serve as an early biomarker for the development of moderate to severe RIF after IBAPBI.

Boothe, Dustin L. [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Coplowitz, Shana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Greenwood, Eleni [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Christos, Paul J. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K. S. Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9008@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dissection of Plant Defense Mechanisms Using Chemical and Molecular Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of auxins by a chemical genomics approach." Journal ofadvances in chemical genomics." Current Medicinal Chemistrymolecular and chemical genomics." Phytopathology 97(7): S58-

Rodriguez-Salus, Melinda Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comparative genomics reveals diversity among xanthomonads infecting tomato and pepper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potnis et al. : Comparative genomics reveals diversity amongtomato and pepper. BMC Genomics Submit your next manuscriptpv. syringae Potnis et al. BMC Genomics 2011, 12:146 http://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the Life Sciences Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page Incorporating Genomics and Bioinformatics across the2007) Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics,2003) Public access for teaching genomics, proteomics, and

Ditty, Jayna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

TOPSAN: a collaborative annotation environment for structural genomics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment for structural genomics Dana Weekes 1 , S Srihigh-throughput structural genomics centers, despite theirbeing determined by structural genomics centers and high-

Weekes, Dana; Krishna, S; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Wilson, Ian A; Godzik, Adam; Wooley, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Genomics of emerging infectious disease: A PLoS collection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-originan Infectious Diseases Genomics Project predict and preventRavel J (2009) The role of genomics in the identification,

Eisen, Jonathan A; MacCallum, Catriona J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

Segal, Mark R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

Arkin, Adam P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

MicrobesOnline: an integrated portal for comparative functional genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparative functional genomics Marcin P. Joachimiak 1,2 ,for comparative functional genomics of bacteria and archaea.publicly avail- able functional genomics data from published

Joachimiak, Marcin P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Microbes Online: an integrated portal for comparative functional genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparative functional genomics of bacteria, archaea, fungifor comparative functional genomics Paramvir S. Dehal 1,2* (and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

Arkin, Adam P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

GOLD: The Genomes Online Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

  • Gold Stamp ID
  • Organism name
  • Domain
  • Links to information sources
  • Size and link to a map, when available
  • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
  • A link for downloading the actual genome data
  • Institution that did the sequencing
  • Funding source
  • Database where information resides
  • Publication status and information

(Specialized Interface)

Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Addressing the Omics Data Explosion: a Comprehensive Reference Genome Representation and the Democratization of Comparative Genomics and Immunogenomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hubs: Web Accessible Browsers for Compar- ative Genomics 3.1Comparative Genomics Analyses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .browsers for comparative genomics B.1 E. coli KO11FL 162099

Nguyen, Ngan Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

LOCAL RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INSTABILITIES IN MAGNETICALLY STRATIFIED MEDIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study local radiation magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in static, optically thick, vertically stratified media with constant flux mean opacity. We include the effects of vertical gradients in a horizontal background magnetic field. Assuming rapid radiative diffusion, we use the zero gas pressure limit as an entry point for investigating the coupling between the photon bubble instability and the Parker instability. Apart from factors that depend on wavenumber orientation, the Parker instability exists for wavelengths longer than a characteristic wavelength {lambda}{sub tran}, while photon bubbles exist for wavelengths shorter than {lambda}{sub tran}. The growth rate in the Parker regime is independent of the orientation of the horizontal component of the wavenumber when radiative diffusion is rapid, but the range of Parker-like wavenumbers is extended if there exists strong horizontal shear between field lines (i.e., horizontal wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field). Finite gas pressure introduces an additional short-wavelength limit to the Parker-like behavior, and also limits the growth rate of the photon bubble instability to a constant value at short wavelengths. We also consider the effects of differential rotation with accretion disk applications in mind. Our results may explain why photon bubbles have not yet been observed in recent stratified shearing box accretion disk simulations. Photon bubbles may physically exist in simulations with high radiation to gas pressure ratios, but higher spatial resolution will be needed to resolve the asymptotically growing unstable wavelengths.

Tao, Ted; Blaes, Omer [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Human Genome Education Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Instability localized at the inner surface of an imploding spherical shell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that in an imploding spherical shell the surface instabilities are of two different types. The first, which occurs at the outer surfaces, is the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The second instability occurs at the inner surface. This latter instability is not as disruptive as R-T modes, but it has three basic properties which differ considerably from those of the R-T instability: (1) it is oscillatory at early times; (2) it grows faster in the long wavelength modes; (3) it depends on the equation of state. It is further shown that this new instability is driven by amplified sound waves in the shell.

Han, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Stability of sunspots to convective motions. I. Adiabatic instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For determining the adiabatic stability of a uniform vertical field in an arbitrary stratification it is sufficient to consider the limit of infinitesimal horizontal wavelength. It is shown how the behavior of the instability can be estimated qualitatively from the dependence of the equipartition field strength on depth. Modes are calculated numerically for analytic stratification models and for a detailed sunspot stratification, including the effects of partial ionization. It is concluded that for the observed field strengths of umbrae the stratification is indeed unstable, with a growth time of about 18 minutes. The unstable eigenfunctions have a maximum at about 2300 km below the surface of the umbra and are about 3900 km deep. Deeper layers may also be unstable depending on unknown details of the stratification. A connection between fluting instability and convective instability is noted. 37 refs.

Moreno-Insertis, F.; Spruit, H.C. (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, La Laguna (Spain); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Instabilities simulations with wideband feedback systems: CMAD, HEADTAIL, WARP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transverse mode coupling (TMCI) and electron cloud instabilities (ECI) pose fundamental limitations on the acceptable beam intensities in the SPS at CERN. This in turn limits the ultimate achievable luminosity in the LHC. Therefore, future luminosity upgrades foresee methods for evading TMCI as well as ECI. Proposed approaches within the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project include new optics with reduced transition energy as well as vacuum chamber coating techniques. As a complementary option, high bandwidth feedback systems may provide instability mitigation by actively damping the intra-bunch motion of unstable modes. In an effort to evaluate the potentials and limitations of such feedback systems and to characterise some of the specifications, a numerical model of a realistic feedback system has been developed and integrated into available instabilities simulation codes. Together with the implementation of this new feedback system model, CMAD and HEADTAIL have been used to investigate the impact of differen...

Li, Kevin; Fox, J D; Pivi, M; Rivetta, C; Rumolo, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Genome Engineering with TAL Effector Nucleases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genome Engineering with TAL Effector Nucleases Print Genome engineering (GE), an emerging discipline in which a DNA sequence is altered at a single position, has a wide variety of...

269

GWIDD: Genome-wide protein docking database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural information on interacting proteins is important for understanding life processes at the molecular level. Genome-wide docking database is an integrated resource for structural studies of proteinprotein interactions on the genome scale...

Kundrotas, Petras J.; Zhu, Zhengwei; Vasker, Ilya A.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

Genome Size Varaiation in D. melanogaster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in genome size may account for some of the missing heritability. We measured female genome sizes for 34 Drosophila melanogaster inbred strains that derived from isofemale lines established from a natural population in Raleigh, NC, in addition to a group...

Alfrejd, Benjamin

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Unlocking the Secrets of the Genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary objective of the Human Genome Project was to produce high-quality sequences not just for the human genome but also for those of the chief model organisms: Escherichia coli, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), ...

Celniker, Susan E.

272

From genomics to chemical genomics: new developments in KEGG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing amount of genomic and molecular information is the basis for understanding higherorder biological systems, such as the cell and the 15 organism, and their interactions with the environment, as well as for medical, industrial and other practical applications. The KEGG resource

Minoru Kanehisa; Susumu Goto; Masahiro Hattori; Kiyoko F. Aoki-kinoshita; Masumi Itoh; Shuichi Kawashima; Toshiaki Katayama; Michihiro Araki; Mika Hirakawa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Status of Plasma Electron Hose Instability Studies in FACET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the FACET plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment a dense 23 GeV electron beam will interact with lithium and cesium plasmas, leading to plasma ion-channel formation. The interaction between the electron beam and the plasma sheath-electrons may lead to a fast growing electron hose instability. By using optics dispersion knobs to induce a controlled z-x tilt along the beam entering the plasma, we investigate the transverse behavior of the beam in the plasma as function of the tilt. We seek to quantify limits on the instability in order to further explore potential limitations on future plasma wakefield accelerators due to the electron hose instability. The FACET plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC will study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. A dense 23 GeV electron beam will interact with lithium or cesium plasma, leading to plasma ion-channel formation. The interaction between the electron beam and the plasma sheath-electrons drives the electron hose instability, as first studied by Whittum. While Ref. [2] indicates the possibility of a large instability growth rate for typical beam and plasma parameters, other studies including have shown that several physical effects may mitigate the hosing growth rate substantially. So far there has been no quantitative benchmarking of experimentally observed hosing in previous experiments. At FACET we aim to perform such benchmarking by for example inducing a controlled z-x tilt along the beamentering the plasma, and observing the transverse behavior of the beam in the plasma as function. The long-term objective of these studies is to quantify potential limitations on future plasma wakefield accelerators due to the electron hose instability.

Adli, Erik; /U. Oslo; England, Robert Joel; Frederico, Joel; Hogan, Mark; Li, Selina Zhao; Litos, Michael Dennis; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC; An, Weiming; Mori, Warren; /UCLA

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Genome of the Epsilonproteobacterial Chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas dentrificans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 , Jrg Simon 11 , and the USF Genomics Class 2, ? Biologyof coverage at the Production Genomics Facility of the Joint

Sievert, Stefan M.; USF Genomics Class

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The International Aphid Genomics Consortium we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Population genomics20-02-2009 Antnio Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics 1 António Rodrigues (PDBC 2008) Bruno Santos (PDBC 2008) #12;Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Contents 2 2 1000 genome project 1 Motivation and Introduction New generation sequencing

Goldschmidt, Christina

277

Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Genome Institutes Automation Approach and Historythroughput environment; automation does not necessarilyissues Islands of Automation modular instruments with

Roberts, Simon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Universality of the Plastic Instability in Strained Amorphous Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By comparing the response to external strains in metallic glasses and in Lenard-Jones glasses we find a quantitative universality of the fundamental plastic instabilities in the athermal, quasistatic limit. Microscopically these two types of glasses are as different as one can imagine, the latter being determined by binary interactions, whereas the former by multiple interactions due to the effect of the electron gas that cannot be disregarded. In spite of this enormous difference the plastic instability is the same saddle-node bifurcation. As a result the statistics of stress and energy drops in the elasto-plastic steady state are universal, sharing the same system-size exponents.

Ratul Dasgupta; Smarajit Karmakar; Itamar Procaccia

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F. [CNRS, University of Limoges, SPTCS UMR6638, 123 Avenue A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France)

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

Instability and Evolution of Nonlinearly Interacting Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the modulational instability of nonlinearly interacting two-dimensional waves in deep water, which are described by a pair of two-dimensional coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. We derive a nonlinear dispersion relation. The latter is numerically analyzed to obtain the regions and the associated growth rates of the modulational instability. Furthermore, we follow the long term evolution of the latter by means of computer simulations of the governing nonlinear equations and demonstrate the formation of localized coherent wave envelopes. Our results should be useful for understanding the formation and nonlinear propagation characteristics of large amplitude freak waves in deep water.

P. K. Shukla; I. Kourakis; B. Eliasson; M. Marklund; L. Stenflo

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

282

Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

Pringle, Anne

283

Leading Edge Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leading Edge Review Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution David M. Raskin,1 Rekha Seshadri,2 Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA 2 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive.02.002 The availability of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences has altered the study of bacte- rial pathogenesis

Mekalanos, John

284

One day seminar: Genetics and Genomics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE One day seminar: Genetics and Genomics of Infectious Diseases Malaria and TB 14th June 2013 University of St Andrews - School of Medicine Pathogen genome research allows exquisite to understanding disease progression. Pathogen genome sequencing is accessible to most. Outputs have broad

Brierley, Andrew

285

INVITED: Comparative Microbial Genomics Giri Narasimhan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVITED: Comparative Microbial Genomics Giri Narasimhan Bioinformatics Research Group (Bio, comparative genomics holds the keys to decipher and mine this wealth of information. We discuss the diverse ways in which the availability of comparative genomics data allows us to answer more questions

Narasimhan, Giri

286

Bioinformatics The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioinformatics The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database. The Community Resource for Access 500113260 (T.E.S.) The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MaizeGDB) serves the maize (Zea mays data types available through MaizeGDB. MISSION AND SCOPE The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database

Brendel, Volker

287

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

Arnold, Jonathan

288

Microfluidic Devices for Genomic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the puzzle of interactions between proteins is far more complicated than deciphering genomes, due to the lack, and industry. Fractionation of biological molecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, plays a central role of proteins' equivalent of amplification, fractionation and sequencing techniques. Micro- and nano

289

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

Corces, Victor G.

290

Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel July 2008 Keywords: Boiling Microchannels Visualisation Flow boiling instabilities Heat transfer a b intensification heat removal. Flow boiling heat transfer in microchannel geometry and the associated flow

Aussillous, Pascale

291

Scales, Growth Rates, and Spectral Fluxes of Baroclinic Instability in the Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An observational, modeling, and theoretical study of the scales, growth rates, and spectral fluxes of baroclinic instability in the ocean is presented, permitting a discussion of the relation between the local instability ...

Tulloch, Ross

292

Transforming Wave Propagation in Layered Media via Instability-Induced Interfacial Wrinkling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to control wave propagation in highly deformable layered media with elastic instability-induced wrinkling of interfacial layers is presented. The onset of a wrinkling instability in initially straight interfacial ...

Rudykh, Stephan

293

Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kltz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

295

RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

Melrose, Don

296

Effects of ionization on the collisional streaming instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of inelastic collisions on the collisional streaming instability is studied. The dispersion equation of the system is derived in the regime of strongly magnetized electrons and magnetized ions. The linear stability of the system is investigated. The numerical results are applied to a laboratory argon plasma.

Petrovic, D.; Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S. [Center for Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit (KU) Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3000 Leuven (Belgium) and Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Center for Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit (KU) Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Kinematics of Nonlinearly Interacting MHD Instabilities in a Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmas play host to a wide variety of instabilities. For example, tearing instabilities use finite plasma resistivity to exploit the free energy provided by plasma currents parallel to the magnetic field to alter the magnetic topology of the plasma through a process known as reconnection. These instabilities frequently make themselves known in magnetic confinement experiments such as tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). In RFP plasmas, in fact, several tearing instabilities (modes) are simultaneously active, and are of large amplitude. Theory predicts that in addition to interacting linearly with magnetic perturbations from outside the plasma, such as field errors or as resistive wall, the modes in the RFP can interact nonlinearly with each other through a three-wave interaction. In the current work investigations of both the linear (external) and nonlinear contributions to the kinematics of the tearing modes in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP are reported Theory predicts that tearing modes will respond only to magnetic perturbations that are spatially resonant with them, and was supported by experimental work done on tokamak devices. The results in this work verified that the theory is still applicable to the RFP, in spite of its more complicated magnetic mode structure, involving perturbations of a single poloidal mode number.

Hansen, Alexander K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Three dimensional axisymmetric simulations of fluid instabilities in curved geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refracts through the interface between two materials. Such an instability was predicted theoretically + g1 (6) 2 #12;( E)t +( Ev0)r +( Ev1)z +(pv0)r +(pv1)z = ; 1 r Ev0 ; 1 rpv0 + (g0v0 +g1v1): (7

Zhang, Yongmin

299

Prediction of Thermoacoustic Instabilities: Numerical Study of Mach number Effects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montpellier , France This paper presents a method for the prediction of combustion instability in gas turbine in the frequency domain as an eigenvalue problem. Flame-acoustic interaction is considered using an n - -model is applicable to complex geometries. The appearance and convection of entropy waves and as well

Nicoud, Franck

300

Effect of shrink fits on threshold speeds of rotordynamic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to study the effect of shrink fits on the threshold speeds of rotor instability. Shrink or press fit components in built-up rotors are known sources of internal friction damping. The internal friction damping increases...

Al-Baz, Khalid A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Adverse Tunnelling Conditions Arising from Slope Instabilities A Case History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Hindustan-Tibet-Highway by a rock fall (LEFT). Rock slide at the dam site blocking the Satluj River (RIGHT) has been under con- struction. The project includes a 60.5 m high concrete gravity dam, an underground-side slopes. SURFACE INSTABILITIES Due to foliation parallel sliding planes and cross cutting orthogonal joint

302

High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability E.E. Ortiz, M.E. Mauel, D observed in high-beta plasma created in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). We have previously of anisotropic high beta equilibrium · Measuring Electrostatic Fluctuations · Hot Electron Interchange (HEI

303

Controlling Plasma Instabilities: A Multidisciplinary Approach Bedros Afeyan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of Maryland, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at UC Davis, Livermore. His work has e2 me e2 c 1 137 A NIF Hohlraum is a Laser-Plasma Instability (LPI) Candy Store Non of the plasma conditions or interaction modalities that are dominant on the NIF were ever accessed on Nova or Omega. Its

Levi, Anthony F. J.

304

Electrical charging during the sharkskin instability of a metallocene melt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow instabilities are widely studied because of their economical and theoretical interest, however few results have been published about the polymer electrification during the extrusion. Nevertheless the generation of the electrical charges is characteristic of the interaction between the polymer melt and the die walls. In our study, the capillary extrusion of a metallocene polyethylene (mPE) through a tungsten carbide die is characterized through accurate electrical measurements thanks a Faraday pail. No significant charges are observed since the extrudate surface remains smooth. However, as soon as the sharkskin distortion appears, measurable charges are collected (around 5 10-8 C/m2). Higher level of charges are measured during the spurt or the gross-melt fracture (g.m.f) defects. This work is focused on the electrical charging during the sharkskin instability. The variation of the electrical charges versus the apparent wall shear stress is investigated for different die geometries. This curve exhibits a linear increase, followed by a sudden growth just before the onset of the spurt instability. This abrupt charging corresponds also to the end of the sharkskin instability. It is also well-known that wall slip appears just at the same time, with smaller velocity values than during spurt flow. Our results indicate that electrification could be a signature of the wall slip. We show also that the electrification curves can be shifted according to the time-temperature superposition principle, leading to the conclusion that molecular features of the polymer are also involved in this process.

S. Tonon; A. Lavernhe-Gerbier; F. Flores; A. Allal; C. Guerret-Picourt

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

305

Development/Plasticity/Repair Oculomotor Instabilities in Zebrafish Mutant belladonna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Both OKR reversal and SO depend on vision and are contrast sensitive. We built a quantitative model optokinetic response; congenital nystagmus; oculomotor instability; achiasmatic; retinal ganglion cell axons by injecting li- pophilic tracer dyes revealed that all larvae with reversed OKR were achiasmatic (Rick et al

Liu, Shih-Chii

306

LBL-35528/CBP-074 CHAPTER 12: BEAM INSTABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can influence the beam dynamics, and hence the machine performance, significantly. Some of the particles in the accelerator in given external electric and magnetic fields. As the particles traverse machines such as damping rings and e+-e­ colliders. At the core of any discussion on instabilities

Furman, Miguel

307

ACTIVE INSTABILITY CONTROL EFFECTIVENESS IN A LIQUID FUELED COMBUSTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACTIVE INSTABILITY CONTROL EFFECTIVENESS IN A LIQUID FUELED COMBUSTOR ADAM COKER YEDIDIA NEUMEIER-fueled combustor that were performed to improve understanding of the factors limiting control performance. A set varied. They show that the combustor's nominal dynamics (i.e., without Received 23 March 2005; accepted 7

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

308

Aliveness: Perceived Instability from a Passive Haptic Texture Rendering System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aliveness: Perceived Instability from a Passive Haptic Texture Rendering System Seungmoon Choi interacting with virtual textures rendered with a force-feedback haptic interface. Our work is aimed during our previous psychophysical experiments performed using a popular texture rendering method (spring

Tan, Hong Z.

309

FARLEY-BUNEMAN INSTABILITY IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Farley-Buneman instability (FBI) is studied in the partially ionized plasma of the solar chromosphere taking into account the finite magnetization of the ions and Coulomb collisions. We obtain the threshold value for the relative velocity between ions and electrons necessary for the instability to develop. It is shown that Coulomb collisions play a destabilizing role in the sense that they enable the instability even in the regions where the ion magnetization is larger than unity. By applying these results to chromospheric conditions, we show that the FBI cannot be responsible for the quasi-steady heating of the solar chromosphere. However, we do not exclude the instability development locally in the presence of strong cross-field currents and/or strong small-scale magnetic fields. In such cases, FBI should produce locally small-scale, approx0.1-3 m, density irregularities in the solar chromosphere. These irregularities can cause scintillations of radio waves with similar wave lengths and provide a tool for remote chromospheric sensing.

Gogoberidze, G.; Voitenko, Y.; Poedts, S.; Goossens, M. [CPA/K.U.Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

FLUCTUATIONS NEAR THE CONVECTIVE INSTABILITY IN A CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For sufficiently strong heating, it is pos- sible for the buoyancy force to overcome the vis- cous shear forces convective pour une certaine valeur critique. A cause du couplage de modes induit par la force extrieure, la, drives the system into convective instability. It is found that, because of the mode coupling induced

Boyer, Edmond

311

Modulational instability and solitons in nonlocal media with competing nonlinearities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate analytically and numerically propagation and spatial localization of light in nonlocal media with competing nonlinearities. In particular, we discuss conditions for the modulational instability of plane waves and formation of spatial solitons. We show that the competing focusing and defocusing nonlinearities enable coexistence of dark or bright spatial solitons in the same medium by varying the intensity of the beam.

Esbensen, B. K.; Bache, M.; Bang, O. [DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wlotzka, A. [Department of Physics, Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, University of Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Krolikowski, W. [Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Interacting viscous instabilities in microfluidic systems Thomas Cubaud*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interacting viscous instabilities in microfluidic systems Thomas Cubaud*a and Thomas G. Mason, evolution, and stability of microfluidic flows involving two or more miscible fluids that have different viscosities. When two liquids that have widely different viscosities are injected into a rigid microfluidic

Cubaud, Thomas

314

Jumping solitary waves in an autonomous reactiondiffusion system with subcritical wave instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jumping solitary waves in an autonomous reaction­diffusion system with subcritical wave instability as solutions to a reaction­diffusion system with a subcritical short-wavelength instability. We demonstrate systems with a subcritical oscillatory instability.17 Here we present a new type of solitary traveling

Epstein, Irving R.

315

Rayleigh-Taylor instability and resulting failure modes of ablatively imploded inertial-fusion targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a theory of these instabilities and potential modes of failure caused by them. Discussions are given for the following: small amplitude growth of the outside surface instability; and modes of failure resulting from nonlinear development of the inside surface instability.

Montierth, L.; Morse, R.

1983-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

10. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

Meisler, M.H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the JGI has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

Grimwood, Jane: Schmutz, Jeremy, J.: Myers, Richard, M.

2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial genome model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomes: Choices to Make The first sequenced genome of a plant, Summary: in plant genomics re- search. Many of the obvious candidates for genome sequencing, model species......

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying whole-genome studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Lec 19) Picture Copyright: AccessExcellence @ the National Museum of Health Summary: Genomics Comparison of whole genomes. - Whole genome sequencing - Whole genome annotation &...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive responses genomic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selected Topics in Molecular Biology Summary: genome variation - cancer genomes Genomics of the adaptive immune system Ancient genomes Synthetic... MOLECULAR BIOLOGY...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cassava Genomics: can genomic technology benefit smallholder farmers in Africa? (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steve Rounsley of the University of Arizona speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Rounsley, Steve [University of Arizona

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Turing Instabilities and Patterns Near a Hopf Bifurcation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a necessary and sufficient condition for Turing instabilities to occur in two-component systems of reaction-diffusion equations with Neumann boundary conditions. We apply this condition to reaction-diffusion systems built from vector fields with one fixed point and a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. For the Brusselator and the Ginzburg-Landau reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the bifurcation diagrams associated with the transition between time periodic solutions and asymptotically stable solutions (Turing patterns). In two-component systems of reaction-diffusion equations, we show that the existence of Turing instabilities is neither necessary nor sufficient for the existence of Turing pattern type solutions. Turing patterns can exist on both sides of the Hopf bifurcation associated to the local vector field, and, depending on the initial conditions, time periodic and stable solutions can coexist.

Rui Dilao

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with chromaticity and space charge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transverse mode coupling instability is considered in the paper at different bunch and wake shapes. Exact solution for hollow bunch is arrived at and used to develop a proper technique for more realistic distributions. The three-modes approach is proposed for arbitrary bunch with chromaticity included. It is shown that the TMCI threshold and rate depend only slightly on the bunch model used being rather sensitive to the wake shape. Resistive wall wake is considered in detail, and a comparison of the TMCI and collective mode instability with this wake is performed. Space charge tune shift of arbitrary value is included in the consideration providing a firm bridge between the known cases of absent and dominating space charge

Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Critical confinement and elastic instability in thin solid films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a flexible plate is peeled off a thin and soft elastic film bonded to a rigid support, uniformly spaced fingering patterns develop along their line of contact. While, the wavelength of these patterns depends only on the thickness of the film, their amplitude varies with all material and geometric properties of the film and that of the adhering plate. Here we have analyzed this instability by the regular perturbation technique to obtain the excess deformations of the film over and above the base quantities. Furthermore, by calculating the excess energy of the system we have shown that these excess deformations, associated with the instability, occur for films which are critically confined. We have presented two different experiments for controlling the degree of confinement: by pre-stretching the film and by adjusting the contact width between the film and the plate.

Animangsu Ghatak; Manoj K. Chaudhury

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

Meijssen, T.E.M.

1981-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lipid membrane instability and poration driven by capacitive charging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new model for the interaction of an electric pulse with a lipid membrane is proposed. Using this model we show that when a DC electric pulse is applied to an insulating lipid membrane separating fluids with different conductivities, the capacitive charging current through the membrane drives electrohydrodynamic flow that destabilizes the membrane. The instability is transient and decays as the membrane charges. The bulk conductivity mismatch plays an essential role in this instability because it results in a different rate of charge accumulation on the membrane's physical surfaces. Shearing stresses created by the electric field acting on its own induced free charge are non-zero as long as the charge imbalance exists. Accordingly, the most unstable mode is related to the ratio of membrane charging time and the electrohydrodynamic time.

Jonathan T. Schwalbe; Petia M. Vlahovska; Michael J. Miksis

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

327

Spacing of Kepler Planets: Sculpting by Dynamical Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the orbital architecture of multi-planet systems detected by the \\Kepler transit mission using N-body simulations, focussing on the orbital spacing between adjacent planets in systems showing four or more transiting planets. We find that the observed spacings are tightly clustered around $12$ mutual Hill radii, when transit geometry and sensitivity limits are accounted for. In comparison, dynamical integrations reveal that the minimum spacing required for systems of similar masses to survive dynamical instability for as long as a billion years is, $\\sim 10$ if all orbits are circular and coplanar, and $\\sim 12$ if planetary orbits have eccentricities $\\sim 0.02$ (a value suggested by studies of planet transit-time-variations). This apparent coincidence, between the observed spacing and the theoretical stability threshold, leads us to propose that typical planetary systems were formed with even tighter spacing, but most, except for the widest ones, have undergone dynamical instability, and are pared d...

Pu, Bonan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

Rose, Harvey Arnold [New Mexico Consortium; Lushnikov, Pavel [University of New Mexico

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Secular stability and instability in stellar systems surrounding massive objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the stability of a low-mass stellar system surrounding a massive central object. Examples of such systems include the centers of galaxies or star clusters containing a massive black hole, and the Oort comet cloud. If the self-gravity of the stellar system is the dominant non-Keplerian force, such systems may be subject to slowly growing (secular) lopsided instabilities. Stability to secular modes is largely determined by the dependence of the distribution function F on angular momentum J. If dF/dJ 0, as is expected if there is a loss cone at low angular momentum, all spherical systems in which F=0 at J=0 (an empty loss cone) are only neutrally stable, and flattened, non-rotating systems are generally unstable. These results suggest that secular instabilities may dominate the structure and evolution of the stellar systems in the centers of galaxies.

Scott Tremaine

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Numerical simulation of the Tayler instability in liquid metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electrical current through an incompressible, viscous and resistive liquid conductor produces an azimuthal magnetic field that becomes unstable when the corresponding Hartmann number exceeds a critical value in the order of 20. This Tayler instability, which is not only discussed as a key ingredient of a non-linear stellar dynamo model (Tayler-Spruit dynamo), but also as a limiting factor for the maximum size of large liquid metal batteries, was recently observed experimentally in a column of a liquid metal (Seilmayer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 244501, 2012}. On the basis of an integro-differential equation approach, we have developed a fully three-dimensional numerical code, and have utilized it for the simulation of the Tayler instability at typical viscosities and resistivities of liquid metals. The resulting growth rates are in good agreement with the experimental data. We illustrate the capabilities of the code for the detailed simulation of liquid metal battery problems in realistic geometries.

Weber, Norbert; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom; Wondrak, Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Possibility of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in Solar Spicules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transversal oscillations of spicules axes may be related to the propagation of magnetohydrodynamic waves along them. These waves may become unstable and the instability can be of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type. We use the dispersion relation of kink mode derived from linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations. The input parameters of the derived dispersion equation, namely, spicules and their ambient medium densities ratios as well as their corresponding magnetic fields ratios, are considered to be within the range $0-1$. By solving the dispersion equation numerically, we show that for higher densities and lower magnetic fields ratios within the range mentioned, the KHI onset in type II spicules conditions is possible. This possibility decreases with an increase in Alfven velocity inside spicules. A rough criterion for appearing of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is obtained. We also drive a more reliable and exact criterion for KHI onset of kink waves.

Ajabshirizadeh, A; Vekalati, R E; Molaverdikhani, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and density profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.

Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Delettrez, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Criterion for extensional necking instability in polymeric fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the linear instability with respect to necking of a filament of polymeric fluid undergoing uniaxial extension. Contrary to the widely discussed Considere criterion, we find the onset of instability to relate closely to the onset of downward curvature in the time (and so strain) evolution of the zz component of the molecular strain, for extension along the z axis. In establishing this result numerically across five of the most widely used models of polymer rheology, and by analytical calculation, we argue it to apply generically. Particularly emphasized is the importance of polymer chain stretching in partially mitigating necking. We comment finally on the relationship between necking and the shape of the underlying steady state constitutive curve for homogeneous extension.

Suzanne M. Fielding

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

334

Excitation of flow instabilities due to nonlinear scale invariance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel route to instabilities and turbulence in fluid and plasma flows is presented in kinetic Vlasov-Maxwell model. New kind of flow instabilities is shown to arise due to the availability of new kinetic energy sources which are absent in conventional treatments. The present approach is based on a scale invariant nonlinear analytic formalism developed to address irregular motions on a chaotic attractor or in turbulence in a more coherent manner. We have studied two specific applications of this turbulence generating mechanism. The warm plasma Langmuir wave dispersion relation is shown to become unstable in the presence of these multifractal measures. In the second application, these multifractal measures are shown to induce naturally non-Gaussian, i.e., a stretched, Gaussian distribution and anomalous transport for tracer particles from the turbulent advection-diffusion transport equation in a Vlasov plasma flow.

Prasad Datta, Dhurjati, E-mail: dp-datta@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, University of North Bengal, Siliguri, West Bengal 734013 (India); Sen, Sudip [National Institute of Aerospace (NASA-LaRC), 100 Exploration Way, Hampton, Virginia 23666 (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Superconducting instabilities of R-charged black branes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore superconducting instabilities of black branes in SO(6) gauged supergravity at finite temperature and finite R-charge densities. We compute the critical temperatures for homogeneous neutral and superconducting instabilities in a truncation of 20 scalars and 15 gauge fields as a function of the chemical potentials conjugate to the three U(1) charges in SO(6). We find that despite the imbalance provided by multiple chemical potentials there is always at least one superconducting black brane branch, emerging at a temperature where the normal phase is locally thermodynamically stable. We emphasise that the three-equal charge solution, Reissner-Nordstrom, is subdominant to a thermodynamically unstable black brane at sufficiently low temperatures --- a feature which is hidden in an equal charge truncation.

Simon A. Gentle; Benjamin Withers

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supercritical Coulomb center and excitonic instability in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that there are resonant states with complex energy for the supercritical Coulomb impurity in graphene. We show that opening of a quasiparticle gap decreases the imaginary part of energy, |ImE|, of these states and stabilizes the system. For gapless quasiparticles with strong Coulomb interaction in graphene, we solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron - hole bound state and show that it has a tachyonic solution for strong enough coupling \\alpha=e^2/\\kappa\\hbar v_F leading to instability of the system. In the random-phase approximation, the critical coupling is estimated to be \\alpha_c =1.62 and is an analogue of the critical charge in the Coulomb center problem. We argue that the excitonic instability should be resolved through the formation of an excitonic condensate and gap generation in the quasiparticle spectrum.

O. V. Gamayun; E. V. Gorbar; V. P. Gusynin

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Stabilization of beam-weibel instability by equilibrium density ripples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an approach to achieve suppression/complete stabilization of the transverse electromagnetic beam Weibel instability in counter streaming electron beams by modifying the background plasma with an equilibrium density ripple, shorter than the skin depth; this weakening is more pronounced when thermal effects are included. On the basis of a linear two stream fluid model, it is shown that the growth rate of transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be reduced to zero value provided certain threshold values for ripple parameters are exceeded. We point out the relevance of the work to recent experimental investigations on sustained (long length) collimation of fast electron beams and integral beam transport for laser induced fast ignition schemes, where beam divergence is suppressed with the assistance of carbon nano-tubes.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@gmail.com; Kaw, Predhiman; Das, A.; Sengupta, S. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Ravindra Kumar, G. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)] [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nonsnaking doubly diffusive convectons and the twist instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doubly diffusive convection in a three-dimensional horizontally extended domain with a square cross section in the vertical is considered. The fluid motion is driven by horizontal temperature and concentration differences in the transverse direction. When the buoyancy ratio N = ?1 and the Rayleigh number is increased the conduction state loses stability to a subcritical, almost two-dimensional roll structure localized in the longitudinal direction. This structure exhibits abrupt growth in length near a particular value of the Rayleigh number but does not snake. Prior to this filling transition the structure becomes unstable to a secondary twist instability generating a pair of stationary, spatially localized zigzag states. In contrast to the primary branch these states snake as they grow in extent and eventually fill the whole domain. The origin of the twist instability and the properties of the resulting localized structures are investigated for both periodic and no-slip boundary conditions in the extended direction.

Beaume, Cdric, E-mail: ced.beaume@gmail.com; Knobloch, Edgar, E-mail: knobloch@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bergeon, Alain, E-mail: alain.bergeon@imft.fr [Universit de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mcanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Alle Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, France and CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)] [Universit de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mcanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Alle Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, France and CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Instabilities of uniform filtration flows with phase transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New mechanisms of instability are described for vertical flows with phase transition through horizontally extended two-dimensional regions of a porous medium. A plane surface of phase transition becomes unstable at an infinitely large wavenumber and at zero wavenumber. In the latter case, the unstable flow undergoes reversible subcritical bifurcations leading to the development of secondary flows (which may not be horizontally uniform). The evolution of subcritical modes near the instability threshold is governed by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation. Two examples of flow through a porous medium are considered. One is the unstable flow across a water-bearing layer above a layer that carries a vapor-air mixture under isothermal conditions in the presence of capillary forces at the phase transition interface. The other is the vertical flow with phase transition in a high-temperature geothermal reservoir consisting of two high-permeability regions separated by a low-permeability stratum.

Il'ichev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Steklov Institute of Mathematics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ilichev@mi.ras.ru; Tsypkin, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Keynote Presentation: Genome Beat (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carl Zimmer, a reporter for the New York Times, speaks on "The Genome Beat," the opening keynote presentation at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Zimmer, Carl [New York Times] [New York Times

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Keynote Presentation: Genome Beat (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Carl Zimmer, a reporter for the New York Times, speaks on "The Genome Beat," the opening keynote presentation at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Zimmer, Carl [New York Times

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Genome Announcement1 Draft genome sequence of the electricity producing3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Genome Announcement1 2 Draft genome sequence of the electricity producing3 Thermincola potens of insoluble electron acceptors by model Gram-negative64 bacteria such as Geobacter or Shewanella species (4

Hazen, Terry

343

The effect of internal magnetic structure on the fishbone instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmas exhibiting the ``fishbone`` instability studied on the PBX-M tokamak show a distinct relationship between the plasma shape, the internal magnetic structure, and the presence or absence of fast ion losses associated with the fishbone mode. We have, for the first time, carried out measurements of the magnetic safety factor profile in fishbone-unstable plasmas, and used the knowledge of the associated experimental equilibria to compare the stability and fast ion loss properties of these plasmas with experimental observations.

Roberts, D.W.; Powell, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kaita, R.; Bell, R.; Chance, M.; Hatcher, R.; Holland, A.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Pomphrey, N.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; White, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Levinton, F. [Fusion Physics and Technologies, Torrance, CA (United States); Asakura, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Duperrex, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gammel, G. [Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The effect of internal magnetic structure on the fishbone instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmas exhibiting the fishbone'' instability studied on the PBX-M tokamak show a distinct relationship between the plasma shape, the internal magnetic structure, and the presence or absence of fast ion losses associated with the fishbone mode. We have, for the first time, carried out measurements of the magnetic safety factor profile in fishbone-unstable plasmas, and used the knowledge of the associated experimental equilibria to compare the stability and fast ion loss properties of these plasmas with experimental observations.

Roberts, D.W.; Powell, E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Kaita, R.; Bell, R.; Chance, M.; Hatcher, R.; Holland, A.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Pomphrey, N.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; White, R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Levinton, F. (Fusion Physics and Technologies, Torrance, CA (Uni

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Geometric Phase in Vacuum Instability:APPLICATIONS in Quantum Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three different methods viz. i) a perturbative analysis of the Schr\\"odinger equation ii) abstract differential geometric method and iii) a semiclassical reduction of the Wheeler-Dewitt equation, relating Pancharatnam phase to vacuum instability are discussed. An improved semiclassical reduction is also shown to yield the correct zeroth order semicalssical Einstein equations with backreaction. This constitutes an extension of our earlier discussions on the topic

D. P. Datta

1993-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gradient instabilities of electromagnetic waves in Hall thruster plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a linear analysis of gradient plasma instabilities in Hall thrusters. The study obtains and analyzes the dispersion equation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves based on the two-fluid model of a cold plasma. The regions of parameters corresponding to unstable high frequency modes are determined and the dependence of the increments and intrinsic frequencies on plasma parameters is obtained. The obtained results agree with those of previously published studies.

Tomilin, Dmitry [Department of Electrophysics, Keldysh Research Centre, Moscow 125438 (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Three dimensional electromagnetic wavepackets in a plasma: Spatiotemporal modulational instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear interaction of an intense electromagnetic beam with relativistic collisionless unmagnetized plasma is investigated by invoking the reductive perturbation technique, resting on the model of three-dimensional nonlinear Schrdinger (NLS) equation with cubic nonlinearity which incorporates the effects of self-focusing, self-phase modulation, and diffraction on wave propagation. Relying on the derived NLS equation, the occurrence of spatiotemporal modulational instability is investigated in detail.

Borhanian, J.; Hosseini Faradonbe, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P. O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P. O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Comparative Mapping of the Alpaca Genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for low coverage (2X) whole genome sequencing, together with 21 other mammalian species. This was done primarily to use comparative genomic information to improve the annotation...; https://bacpac.chori.org/library.php?id=448) (Figure 5). Figure 5. Nyala's Accoyo Empress Carlotta. The first round of genome sequencing (VicPac1.0; http://www.ncbi.nlm. nih.gov/genome/905) was generated at the Broad Institute by whole...

Fagundes De Avila, Felipe

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Diatom Genomics (2009 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ginger Armbrust from the University of Washington spoke about diatom genomics on March 26, 2009 at the DOE JGI User Meeting

Ambrust, Ginger

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Generalized genetical genomics : advanced methods and applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Generalized genetical genomics (GGG) is a systems genetics approach that combines the analysis of genetic variation with population-wide assessment of variation in molecular traits in (more)

Li, Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

On the interface instability during rapid evaporation in microgravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid evaporation of a superheated liquid (vapor explosion) under microgravity conditions is studied by direct numerical simulation. The time-dependent Navier-Stokes and energy equations coupled to the interface dynamics are solved using a two-dimensional finite-difference/front-tracking method. Large interface deformations, topology change, latent heat, surface tension and unequal material properties between the liquid and vapor phases are included in the simulations. A comparison of numerical results to the exact solution of a one-dimensional test problem shows excellent agreement. For the two-dimensional rapid evaporation problem, the vapor volume growth rate and unstable interface dynamics are studied for increasing levels of initial liquid superheat. As the superheat is increased the liquid-vapor interface experiences increasingly unstable energetic growth. These results indicate that heat transfer plays a very important role in the instability mechanism leading to vapor explosions. It is suggested that the Mullins-Sekerka instability could play a role in the instability initiation mechanism.

Juric, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Roadmap to the morphological instabilities of a stretched twisted ribbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the mechanics of an elastic ribbon subjected to twist and tensile load. Motivated by the classical work of Green and a recent experiment that discovered a plethora of morphological instabilities, we introduce a comprehensive theoretical framework through which we construct a 4D phase diagram of this basic system, spanned by the exerted twist and tension, as well as the thickness and length of the ribbon. Different types of instabilities appear in various "corners" of this 4D parameter space, and are addressed through distinct types of asymptotic methods. Our theory employs three instruments, whose concerted implementation is necessary to provide an exhaustive study of the various parameter regimes: (i) a covariant form of the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an (cFvK) equations to the helicoidal state - necessary to account for the large deflection of the highly-symmetric helicoidal shape from planarity, and the buckling instability of the ribbon in the transverse direction; (ii) a far from threshold (FT) analysis - which describes a state in which a longitudinally-wrinkled zone expands throughout the ribbon and allows it to retain a helicoidal shape with negligible compression; (iii) finally, we introduce an asymptotic isometry equation that characterizes the energetic competition between various types of states through which a twisted ribbon becomes strainless in the singular limit of zero thickness and no tension.

Julien Chopin; Vincent Dmery; Benny Davidovitch

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Instability of single-phase natural circulation under multiple loops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural circulation loop passively conveys heat from heat sources to heat sinks without mechanical pump. Various plants have natural circulation systems, e.g., solar heaters, Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). The core of LMFBR is cooled by forced convection of single-phase liquid sodium in normal operation. After the accident, the decay heat of the core is designed to be cooled by the natural circulation of the liquid sodium. The natural circulation cooling is very important from a viewpoint of passive safety concept. Here, the natural circulation in single loop system had been studied by many researchers. In a multiple loop system, the instability of natural circulation was more complicated because of the interaction between the loops. In this study, the effects of the multiple loop on the natural circulation instability were investigated numerically. The multiple loops system with one heating tube and two cooling tubes were evaluated. The one-dimensional energy and momentum equations were solved using Finite Difference Method. The flow regimes of the instability were evaluated with varying the heat flux. In multiple loop system, the observed flow was classified into five regimes including chaotic regime. The flow regimes were qualitatively explained by the stability of the attractor in the phase space.

Satoh, A.; Okamoto, K.; Madarame, H. [Univ. of Tokyo, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Weibel instability in a strongly coupled plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the growth rate of the Weibel instability is calculated for an energetic relativistic electron beam penetrated into a strongly coupled plasma, where the collision effects of background electron-ion scattering play an important role in equations. In order to calculate the growth rate of the Weibel instability, two different models of anisotropic distribution function are used. First, the distribution of the plasma and beam electrons considered as similar forms of bi-Maxwellian distribution. Second, the distribution functions of the plasma electrons and the beam electrons follows bi-Maxwellian and delta-like distributions, respectively. The obtained results show that the collision effect decreases the growth rate in two models. When the distribution function of electrons beam is in bi-Maxwellian form, the instability growth rate is greater than where the distribution function of beam electrons is in delta-like form, because, the anisotropic temperature for bi-Maxwellian distribution function in velocity space is greater than the delta-like distribution function.

Mahdavi, M., E-mail: m.mahdavi@umz.ac.ir; Khanzadeh, H. [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas to diverse environments of their insect and plant hosts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pI), CP000063 (plasmid AYWB-pII), CP000064 (plasmid AYWB-the other two plasmids (AYWB-pII and AYWB-pIV) were uniquebetween pII03 and ssb of AYWB-pII is similar to genes pI04,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Update on the Maize Genome Sequencing Project The Maize Genome Sequencing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on the Maize Genome Sequencing Project The Maize Genome Sequencing Project Vicki L. Chandler Genome Sequencing Project. The momentum for this endeavor has been building within the maize (Zea mays- sion. This Update reviews the project goals and the expected deliverables deriving from the two funded

Brendel, Volker

357

GENOMIC RESOURCES NOTE Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 201331 March  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENOMIC RESOURCES NOTE Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 201331 March 2013 GENOMIC RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM,1 MATTHEW G. KING,2 SE BASTIEN RENAUT,3 LOREN H. RIESEBERG2,4 and HEATHER C. ROWE3 1 Molecular Ecology Resources Editorial Office, 6270 University Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Rieseberg, Loren

358

Genomic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals.Genome

359

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Comparative genomics of two newly isolated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Comparative genomics of two newly isolated Dehalococcoides strains of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA Comparative genomics of Dehalococcoides strains and an enrichment were performed using a microarray targeting genes from all available sequenced genomes

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

360

UV Decontamination of MDA Reagents for Single Cell Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reagents for Single Cell Genomics Janey Lee 1* , Damon TigheReagents for Single Cell Genomics Janey Lee 1 , Damon TigheAbstract Single cell genomics, the amplification and

Lee, Janey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recombinant proteins. J. Struct. Funct. Genomics 5:69-74.proteins. J. Struct. Funct. Genomics 5:69-74. Oganesyan,Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and

Kim, Sung-Hou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine adaptation in Salinispora species.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orcutt B, et al: Ecological genomics of marine roseobacters.1037-1042. Penn and Jensen BMC Genomics 2012, 13:86 http://and Jensen: Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine

Penn, Kevin; Jensen, Paul R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Evolutionary Genomics of Life in (and from) the Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

291: 1304-1351. Table 1. Genomics information on the webLBNL-59356 Evolutionary Genomics of Life in (and from) thean engine for comparative genomics. The six largest centers

Boore, Jeffrey L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Phytozome: A Comparative Platform for Green Plant Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a growing plant comparative genomics resource. Nucleic AcidsL.A. (2011) The Sol Genomics Network (solgenomics.net):for comparative plant genomics. Nucleic Acids Res, 36, D959-

Goodstein, David M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Defining Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patrick Chain of the DOE Joint Genome Institute gives a talk on behalf of the International Genome Sequencing Standards Consortium on the need for intermediate genome classifications between "draft" and "finished"

Chain, Patrick [DOE-JGI

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution Rat Genome Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality `draft' covering over 90% of the genome

Pachter, Lior

367

Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gene-set concept. Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet 2000;1:99-116.SE. A tour of structural genomics. Nat Rev Genet 2001;2(10):M, Wang LK. Structural genomics: a pipeline for providing

Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The common ground of genomics and systems biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8/S2. Authors details Genomics of Gene Expression Lab,systems biology. Annu Rev. Genomics Hum. Genet 2001, 2:343-projection strategies. Genomics 2008, 92(6):373-83. 31.

Conesa, Ana; Mortazavi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Impact of Structural Genomics: Expectations and Outcomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Choi et al. , J Struct Funct Genomics 4, 31-4 (2003). H. M.Center for Structural Genomics, sequence families of unknownMCSG) Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Novel folds

Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Evolution of the Anopheles 16 Genomes Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the imminent completion of a set of reference genome assemblies for 16 species of Anopheles mosquitoes. In addition to providing a generally useful resource for comparative genomic analyses, these genome sequences ...

Waterhouse, Robert

371

Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Genome Biology 2004, 5:343 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://genomebiology.com/2004/5/9/343 © 2004 BioMed Central Ltd A report on the Keystone Symposium `Structural Genomics', held-dollar-plus folly? Two concurrent Keystone Symposia, `Structural Genomics' and `Frontiers in Structural Biology set up an auto- mated pipeline to annotate proteins of known structure but unknown function. The push

373

Genome of Geobacter sulfurreducens: Metal Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in the generation of electricity. G. sulfurreducens, a member of the - Proteobacteria and of the family GeobacterGenome of Geobacter sulfurreducens: Metal Reduction in Subsurface Environments B. A. Methe´,1 * K. Utterback,1 S. E. Van Aken,1 D. R. Lovley,2 C. M. Fraser1 The complete genome sequence of Geobacter

Lovley, Derek

374

The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop JGI Genomics and Bioinformatics for Undergraduate Educators Workshop March 23, 2013 7:00PM EDT to March 26,...

376

DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 2  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Miranda Harmon-Smith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Seattle Structure Genomics Center for Infectious Disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Seattle Structure Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The Seattle Structure Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). Abstract: The NIAID-funded Seattle...

378

Combining Functional and Structural Genomics to Sample the Essential...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Functional and Structural Genomics to Sample the Essential Burkholderia Structome. Combining Functional and Structural Genomics to Sample the Essential Burkholderia Structome....

379

Comparative Omics-Driven Genome Annotation Refinement: Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: Genome sequencing continues to be a rapidly evolving technology, yet most downstream aspects of genome annotation pipelines remain relatively stable or are even being...

380

Stories of Discovery & Innovation: From Human Genome to Materials...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stories of Discovery & Innovation: From Human Genome to Materials "Genome" Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SciTech Connect: Multiplex automated genome engineering  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Multiplex automated genome engineering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiplex automated genome engineering You are accessing a document from the Department of...

382

aspergillus genome database: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and avoid outdated data. Heiko Mller 11 Integrative database analysis in structural genomics CiteSeer Summary: Abstract (2 sentences) An important aspect of structural genomics...

383

DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 3  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Miranda Harmon-Smith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Functional Genomics of Nervous System Development and Disease .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The goal of functional genomics is to elucidate the relationship between an organism's genotype and phenotype. A key characteristic of functional genomics is the use (more)

Miller, Michael Ryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Miranda Harmon-Smith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in the context of strongly coupled dusty plasma medium has been investigated. In particular, the role of transverse shear and the compressional acoustic modes in both the linear and nonlinear regimes of the KH instability has been studied. It is observed that in addition to the conventional nonlocal KH instability, there exists a local instability in the strong coupling case. The interplay of the KH mode with this local instability shows up in the simulations as an interesting phenomenon of recurrence in the nonlinear regime. Thus, a cyclic KH instability process is observed to occur. These cyclic events are associated with bursts of activity in terms of transverse and compressional wave generation in the medium.

Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Das, Amita; Patel, Bhavesh G. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India); Angom, Dilip [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India); Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Comparative genomics analysis of Liberibacter species to elucidate pathogenesis and culturability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 1 (2014) Comparative genomics analysis of Liberibacterof citrus, comparative genomics of this strain with other

Leonard, Michael T.; Fagen, Jennie R.; McCullough, Connor M.; Davis-Richardson, Austin G.; Davis, Michael J.; Triplett, Eric W.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

389

Experimental Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability on Inclined Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for his help with LATEX. 3 NOMENCLATURE RMI Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability KHI Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability ICF Inertial Confinement Fusion RTI Raleigh-Taylor Instability 2D Two Dimensional 3D Three Dimensional STAML Shock Tube & Advanced Mixing Lab... phenomena like supernovae, where inclusion of RMI models has been shown to be necessary to accurate modeling of these phenomena [5]. The area where most RMI research is currently being directed toward is inertial confinement fusion (ICF). To further our...

McDonald, Christopher Michael

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

Muchero, Wellington [ORNL] [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL] [ORNL; Priya, Ranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University, Morgantown] [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Violent Crime, Residential Instability and Mobility: Does the Relationship Differ in Minority Neighborhoods?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAPER Violent Crime, Residential Instability and Mobility:violent crime and residential stability in neighborhoods. Wea traditional index of residential stability and a novel

Boggess, Lyndsay N.; Hipp, John R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Instability Analysis of Cylindrical Stellar Object in Brans-Dicke Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates instability ranges of a cylindrically symmetric collapsing stellar object in Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. For this purpose, we use perturbation approach in the modified field equations as well as dynamical equations and construct a collapse equation. The collapse equation with adiabatic index ($\\Gamma$) is used to explore the instability ranges of both isotropic as well as anisotropic fluid in Newtonian and post-Newtonian approximations. It turns out that the instability ranges depend on the dynamical variables of collapsing fluid. We conclude that the system always remains unstable for $01$ provides instability only for the special case.

Sharif, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chronic instability of the anterior syndesmosis of the ankle: Biomechanical, kinematical, radiological and clinical aspects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??abstractThis thesis is concerned with chronic anterior instability of the tibiofibular syndesmosis of the ankle. The ankle plays a fundamental role in locomotion. It consists (more)

A. Beumer (Annechien)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - accretion shock instability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of California at Santa Barbara Collection: Physics 31 Shock Waves in Out ows from Young Stars Patrick Hartigan Summary: numerical codes, and learn what kinds of instabilities...

395

Mechanical Instability and Ideal Shear Strength of Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ideal shear strength of transition metal carbides and nitrides is calculated with the use of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. The microscopic mechanism that limits the ideal strength is studied using full atomic and structural relaxation and the results of electronic structure calculations. It is shown that plasticity in perfect crystals can be triggered by electronic instabilities at finite strains. Our study explicitly demonstrates that the ideal strength in these materials is limited by the elastic instability which is in turn initiated by electronic instabilities. The potential application of alloy hardening due to the onset of instabilities at different strains is also discussed.

Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Morris, J. W.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

396

An acoustic energy framework for predicting combustion- driven acoustic instabilities in premixed gas-turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During Premix Gas Turbine Combustion," Journal ofApplication to Gas-Turbine Combustion Instability Analysis,"Clavin, P. , " Premixed Combustion and Gas Dynamics," Annual

Ibrahim, Zuhair M. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute instabilities Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 32 Convective instability in inhomogeneous media: Impulse response in the subcritical cylinder wake Summary: further, we first recall the standard distinction be-...

398

An acoustic energy framework for predicting combustion- driven acoustic instabilities in premixed gas-turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instabilities in A Model Gas Turbine Combustor," Journal ofModel of Acoustic Response of Turbulent Premixed Flame and Its Application to Gas-Turbine

Ibrahim, Zuhair M. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Proteogenomics : applications of mass spectrometry at the interface of genomics and proteomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of proteomics and genomics to unravel the specificities ofetry and comparative genomics to analyze multiple genomes,genome, Comp. Funct. Genomics, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 244253,

Castellana, Natalie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Characterising the Gravitational Instability in Cooling Accretion Discs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform numerical analyses of the structure induced by gravitational instabilities in cooling gaseous accretion discs. For low enough cooling rates a quasi-steady configuration is reached, with the instability saturating at a finite amplitude in a marginally stable disc. We find that the saturation amplitude scales with the inverse square root of the cooling parameter beta = t_cool / t_dyn, which indicates that the heating rate induced by the instability is proportional to the energy density of the induced density waves. We find that at saturation the energy dissipated per dynamical time by weak shocks due is of the order of 20 per cent of the wave energy. From Fourier analysis of the disc structure we find that while the azimuthal wavenumber is roughly constant with radius, the mean radial wavenumber increases with radius, with the dominant mode corresponding to the locally most unstable wavelength. We demonstrate that the density waves excited in relatively low mass discs are always close to co-rotation, deviating from it by approximately 10 per cent. This can be understood in terms of the flow Doppler-shifted phase Mach number -- the pattern speed self-adjusts so that the flow into spiral arms is always sonic. This has profound effects on the degree to which transport through self-gravity can be modelled as a viscous process. Our results thus provide (a) a detailed description of how the self-regulation mechanism is established for low cooling rates, (b) a clarification of the conditions required for describing the transport induced by self-gravity through an effective viscosity, (c) an estimate of the maximum amplitude of the density perturbation before fragmentation occurs, and (d) a simple recipe to estimate the density perturbation in different thermal regimes.

Peter Cossins; Giuseppe Lodato; Cathie Clarke

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A classical instability for black strings and p-branes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the evolution of small perturbations around black of strings and branes which are low energy solutions of string theory. For simplicity we focus attention on the zero charge case and show that there are unstable modes for a range of time frequency and wavelength in the extra 10 - D dimensions. These perturbations can be stabilized if the extra dimensions are compactified to a scale smaller than the minimum wavelength for which instability occurs and thus will not affect large astrophysical black holes in four dimensions. We comment on the implications of this result for the Cosmic Censorship Hypothesis

Gregory, R. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.); Laflamme, R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A classical instability for black strings and p-branes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the evolution of small perturbations around black of strings and branes which are low energy solutions of string theory. For simplicity we focus attention on the zero charge case and show that there are unstable modes for a range of time frequency and wavelength in the extra 10 - D dimensions. These perturbations can be stabilized if the extra dimensions are compactified to a scale smaller than the minimum wavelength for which instability occurs and thus will not affect large astrophysical black holes in four dimensions. We comment on the implications of this result for the Cosmic Censorship Hypothesis

Gregory, R. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Laflamme, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Rayleigh-Taylor instability in quantum magnetized viscous plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum effects on Rayleigh-Taylor instability of stratified viscous plasmas layer under the influence of vertical magnetic field are investigated. By linearly solving the viscous QMHD equations into normal mode, a forth-order ordinary differential equation is obtained to describe the velocity perturbation. Then the growth rate is derived for the case where a plasma with exponential density distribution is confined between two rigid planes. The results show that, the presence of vertical magnetic field beside the quantum effect will bring about more stability on the growth rate of unstable configuration for viscous plasma, which is greater than that of inviscous plasma.

Hoshoudy, G. A., E-mail: g_hoshoudy@yahoo.com [South Valley University, Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE VISHNIAC INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vishniac instability is thought to explain the complex structure of radiative supernova remnants in their Pressure-Driven Thin Shell (PDTS) phase after a blast wave (BW) has propagated from a central explosion. In this paper, the propagation of the BW and the evolution of the PDTS stage are studied numerically with the two-dimensional (2D) code HYDRO-MUSCL for a finite-thickness shell expanding in the interstellar medium (ISM). Special attention is paid to the adiabatic index, {gamma}, and three distinct values are taken for the cavity ({gamma}{sub 1}), the shell ({gamma}{sub 2}), and the ISM ({gamma}{sub 3}) with the condition {gamma}{sub 2} < {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 3}. This low value of {gamma}{sub 2} accounts for the high density in the shell achieved by a strong radiative cooling. Once the spherical background flow is obtained, the evolution of a 2D-axisymmetric perturbation is computed from the linear to the nonlinear regime. The overstable mechanism, previously demonstrated theoretically by E. T. Vishniac in 1983, is recovered numerically in the linear stage and is expected to produce and enhance anisotropies and clumps on the shock front, leading to the disruption of the shell in the nonlinear phase. The period of the increasing oscillations and the growth rate of the instability are derived from several points of view (the position of the perturbed shock front, mass fluxes along the shell, and density maps), and the most unstable mode differing from the value given by Vishniac is computed. In addition, the influence of several parameters (the Mach number, amplitude and wavelength of the perturbation, and adiabatic index) is examined and for wavelengths that are large enough compared to the shell thickness, the same conclusion arises: in the late stage of the evolution of the radiative supernova remnant, the instability is dampened and the angular initial deformation of the shock front is smoothed while the mass density becomes uniform with the angle. As a result, our model shows that the supernova remnant returns to a stable evolution and the Vishniac instability does not lead to the fragmentation of the shock as predicted by the theory.

Michaut, C.; Cavet, C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Roy, F.; Nguyen, H. C., E-mail: claire.michaut@obspm.fr [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris-Diderot, F-92190 Meudon (France)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Magic angles and cross-hatching instability in hydrogel fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The full 2D analysis of roughness profiles of fracture surfaces resulting from quasi-static crack propagation in gelatin gels reveals an original behavior characterized by (i) strong anisotropy with maximum roughness at $V$-independent symmetry-preserving angles, (ii) a sub-critical instability leading, below a critical velocity, to a cross-hatched regime due to straight macrosteps drifting at the same magic angles and nucleated on crack-pinning network inhomogeneities. Step height values are determined by the width of the strain-hardened zone, governed by the elastic crack blunting characteristic of soft solids with breaking stresses much larger that low strain moduli.

Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli; David Martina; Olivier Ronsin

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

407

Beam excited acoustic instability in semiconductor quantum plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The instability of hole-Acoustic waves due to electron beam in semiconductor quantum plasmas is examined using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered including Bohm potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange potential of the semiconductor quantum plasma species. Our model is applied to nano-sized GaAs semiconductor plasmas. The variation of the growth rate of the unstable mode is obtained over a wide range of system parameters. It is found that the thermal effects of semiconductor species have significance over the hole-Acoustic waves.

Rasheed, A.; Siddique, M.; Huda, F. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jung, Y.-D. [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

Max Karasik

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Electronic Instability of Isolated SO42- and its Solvation Stabilization .  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles as Selective SorbentsEMSL| EMSL Instability of

410

Genome-Wide siRNA-Based Functional Genomics of Pigmentation Identifies Novel Genes and Pathways That Impact Melanogenesis in Human Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

siRNA-Based Functional Genomics of Pigmentation Identifiespoorly understood. Functional genomics based on RNA-mediatedof RNAi-based functional genomics to identify novel genes,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

Automatic annotation of organellar genomes with DOGMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dual Organellar GenoMe Annotator (DOGMA) automates the annotation of extra-nuclear organellar (chloroplast and animal mitochondrial) genomes. It is a web-based package that allows the use of comparative BLAST searches to identify and annotate genes in a genome. DOGMA presents a list of putative genes to the user in a graphical format for viewing and editing. Annotations are stored on our password-protected server. Complete annotations can be extracted for direct submission to GenBank. Furthermore, intergenic regions of specified length can be extracted, as well the nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences of the genes.

Wyman, Stacia; Jansen, Robert K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Genome Engineering with TAL Effector Nucleases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals. |GenericGenomeGenomeGenome

414

A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

Ivanov, K. N.

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

415

FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. I. PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first stars are the key to the formation of primitive galaxies, early cosmological reionization and chemical enrichment, and the origin of supermassive black holes. Unfortunately, in spite of their extreme luminosities, individual Population III (Pop III) stars will likely remain beyond the reach of direct observation for decades to come. However, their properties could be revealed by their supernova explosions, which may soon be detected by a new generation of near-IR (NIR) observatories such as JWST and WFIRST. We present light curves and spectra for Pop III pair-instability supernovae calculated with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. Our numerical simulations account for the interaction of the blast with realistic circumstellar envelopes, the opacity of the envelope, and Lyman absorption by the neutral intergalactic medium at high redshift, all of which are crucial to computing the NIR signatures of the first cosmic explosions. We find that JWST will detect pair-instability supernovae out to z ?> 30, WFIRST will detect them in all-sky surveys out to z ? 15-20, and LSST and Pan-STARRS will find them at z ?< 7-8. The discovery of these ancient explosions will probe the first stellar populations and reveal the existence of primitive galaxies that might not otherwise have been detected.

Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Lovekin, C. C. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Frey, Lucille H. [HPC-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L.; Hungerford, Aimee L. [XTD-6, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Magnetic instability in a dilute circular rarefaction wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of magnetic fields in the density gradient of a rarefaction wave has been observed in simulations and in laboratory experiments. The thermal anisotropy of the electrons, which gives rise to the magnetic instability, is maintained by the ambipolar electric field. This simple mechanism could be important for the magnetic field amplification in astrophysical jets or in the interstellar medium ahead of supernova remnant shocks. The acceleration of protons and the generation of a magnetic field by the rarefaction wave, which is fed by an expanding circular plasma cloud, is examined here in form of a 2D particle-in-cell simulation. The core of the plasma cloud is modeled by immobile charges, and the mobile protons form a small ring close to the cloud's surface. The number density of mobile protons is thus less than that of the electrons. The protons of the rarefaction wave are accelerated to 1/10 of the electron thermal speed, and the acceleration results in a thermal anisotropy of the electron distribution in the entire plasma cloud. The instability in the rarefaction wave is outrun by a TM wave, which grows in the dense core distribution, and its magnetic field expands into the rarefaction wave. This expansion drives a secondary TE wave.

Dieckmann, M. E. [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linkoping University, 60174 Norrkoping (Sweden); Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

The diocotron instability in a pulsar cylindrical electrosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physics of the pulsar inner magnetosphere remains poorly constrained by observations. Although about 2000 pulsars have been discovered to date, little is known about their emission mechanism. Large vacuum gaps probably exist and a non-neutral plasma made of electrons in some regions and of positrons in some other regions fills space to form an electrosphere. The purpose of this work is to study the stability properties of the differentially rotating equatorial disk in the pulsar's electrosphere for which the magnetic field is assumed to be dipolar. In contrast to previous studies, the magnetic field is not restricted to be uniform. A pseudo-spectral Galerkin method using Tchebyshev polynomials expansion is developed to compute the spectrum of the diocotron instability in a non-neutral plasma column confined between two cylindrically conducting walls. Moreover, the inner wall carries a given charge per unit length in order to account for the presence of a charged neutron star at the centre of the electrosphere. We show several eigenfunctions and eigenspectra obtained for different initial density profiles and electromagnetic field configurations useful for laboratory plasmas. The algorithm is very efficient in computing the fastest growing modes. Applications to a cylindrical electrosphere are also shown for several differential rotation profiles. It is found that the growth rates of the diocotron instability are of the same order of magnitude as the rotation rate.

J. Petri

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Plasma Instability Theory of Gamma-Ray Burst Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A plasma instability theory is presented for the prompt radiation from gamma-ray bursts. In the theory, a highly relativistic shell interacts with the interstellar medium through the filamentation and the two-stream instabilities to convert bulk kinetic energy into electron thermal energy and magnetic field energy. The processes are not efficient enough to satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions, so a shock cannot form through this mechanism. Instead, the interstellar medium passes through the shell, with the electrons radiating during this passage. Gamma-rays are produced by synchrotron self-Compton emission. Prompt optical emission is also produced through this mechanism, while prompt radio emission is produced through synchrotron emission. The model timescales are consistent with the shortest burst timescales. To emit gamma-rays, the shell's bulk Lorentz factor must be greater than approximately 1000. For the radiative processes to be efficient, the interstellar medium density must satisfy a lower limit that is a function of the bulk Lorentz factor. Because the limits operate as selection effects, bursts that violate them constitute new classes. In particular, a class of optical and ultraviolet bursts with no gamma-ray emission should exist. The lower limit on the density of the interstellar medium is consistent with the requirements of the Compton attenuation theory, providing an explanation for why all burst spectra appear to be attenuated. Several tests of the theory are discussed, as are the next theoretical investigations that should be conducted.

J. J. Brainerd

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of plasma {beta} on the plasmoid instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the initial upstream plasma {beta} on the plasmoid instability are studied via two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For cases with nonuniform {beta} dependent initial plasma mass density and uniform temperature, our numerical results indicate that the critical Lundquist number for onset of the plasmoid instability depends on the initial plasma {beta}. The critical Lundquist number is approximately 2000-3000 for {beta}=50 and is 8000-10 000 for {beta}=0.2. The higher the {beta}, the smaller the critical Lundquist number is. Similar to previous studies of high-{beta} systems, the average reconnection rate in low {beta} systems is found to become weakly dependent on the Lundquist number in the plasmoid-unstable regime. However, the average reconnection rate, normalized to the asymptotic value of upstream BV{sub A}, is lower in a low {beta} system than that in a high {beta} system. The magnetic energy spectral index, which characterizes fragmentation of the reconnection layer, is approximately two and is insensitive to {beta} in the high-Lunquist number regime. It is also found that the magnetic reconnection rate becomes similar for different {beta} cases, if the initial force-balance is provided by temperature gradient instead of density gradient. Therefore, it is concluded that the {beta}-dependence mentioned above may be largely attributed to the density variation.

Ni Lei [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ziegler, Udo [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam, DE 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Huang Yimin [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Lin Jun; Mei Zhixing [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Waves and instabilities in dissipative rotating superfluid neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss wave propagation in rotating superfluid neutron star cores, taking into account the vortex mediated mutual friction force. For models where the two fluids co-rotate in the unperturbed state, our analysis clarifies the role of chemical coupling and entrainment for sound and inertial waves. We also investigate the mutual friction damping, providing results that demonstrate the well-known fact that sound waves propagating along a vortex array are undamped. We show that the same is not true for inertial waves, which are damped by the mutual friction regardless of the propagation direction. We then include the vortex tension, which arises due to local vortex curvature. Focussing on purely transverse inertial waves, we derive the small correction that the tension induces in the wave frequency. Finally, we allow for a relative linear flow in the background (along the rotation axis). In this case we show how the mutual friction coupling may induce a dynamical instability in the inertial waves. We discuss the critical flow required for the instability to be present, its physical interpretation and the possible relevance it may have for neutron star physics.

T. Sidery; N. Andersson; G. L. Comer

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticles of alkali-doped tungsten bronzes are an excellent near-infrared shielding material, but exhibit slight chromatic instabilities typically upon applications of strong ultra-violet light or heating in humid environment, which acts detrimentally to long-life commercial applications. Origin of the chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze has been investigated, and it has been found that the coloration and bleaching processes comprised electronic exchanges which accelerate or depress the polaron excitation and the localized surface plasmon resonance. Coloration on UV illumination is evidenced by electron diffraction as due to the formation of H{sub x}WO{sub 3}, which is considered to take place in the surface Cs-deficient WO{sub 3} region via the double charge injection mechanism. On the other hand, bleaching on heating in air and in humid environment is shown to accompany the extraction of Cs and electrons from Cs{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and is concluded to be an oxidation of Cs{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} on the particle surface.

Adachi, Kenji, E-mail: kenji-adachi@ni.smm.co.jp; Ota, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okada, Mika; Oshimura, Nobumitsu; Tofuku, Atsushi [Ichikawa Research Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Mining Co., Ltd., Ichikawa 272-8588 (Japan)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low-density instability of multicomponent matter with trapped neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of neutrino trapping on the longitudinal dielectric function at low densities has been investigated by using different relativistic mean-field models. Parameter sets G2 of Furnstahl-Serot-Tang and Z271 of Horowitz-Piekarewicz, along with the adjusted parameter sets of both models, have been used in this study. The role of the isovector adjustment and the effect of the Coulomb interaction have also been studied. The effect of the isovector adjustment is found to be more significant in the Horowitz-Piekarewicz model, not only in neutrinoless matter but also in matter with neutrino trapping. Although almost independent to the variation of the leptonic fraction, the instability region of matter with neutrino trapping is found to be larger. The presence of more protons and electrons compared to the neutrinoless case is the reason behind this finding. For parameter sets with soft equations of state at low density, the appearance of a large and negative {epsilon}{sub L}(q,q{sub 0}=0) in some parts of the edge of the instability region in matter with neutrino trapping is understood as a consequence of the fact that the Coulomb interaction produced by electron and proton interaction is larger than the repulsive isovector interaction created by the asymmetry between the proton and neutron numbers.

Mart, T.; Sulaksono, A. [Departemen Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Simulations and model of the nonlinear RichtmyerMeshkov instability  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The nonlinear evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is investigated using numerical simulations with the FLASH code in two-dimensions (2D). The purpose of the simulations is to develop an empiricial nonlinear model of the RM instability that is applicable to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and ejecta formation, namely, at large Atwood number A and scaled initial amplitude kho (k ? wavenumber) of the perturbation. The FLASH code is first validated with a variety of RM experiments that evolve well into the nonlinear regime. They reveal that bubbles stagnate when they grow by an increment of 2/k and that spikes accelerate for A > 0.5 due to higher harmonics that focus them. These results are then compared with a variety of nonlinear models that are based on potential flow. We find that the models agree with simulations for moderate values of A oo. Our hope is that such empirical models concisely capture the RM simulations and inspire more rigorous solutions.

None

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Study on the Mechanical Instability of MICE Coupling Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is one of the key equipment in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The coil has an inner radius of 750 mm, length of 281 mm and thickness of 104 mm at room temperature. The peak induction in the coil is about 7.3 T with a full current of 210 A. The mechanical disturbances which might cause the instability of the impregnated superconducting magnet involve the frictional motion between conductors and the cracking of impregnated materials. In this paper, the mechanical instability of the superconducting coupling magnet was studied. This paper presents the numerical calculation results of the minimum quench energy (MQE) of the coupling magnet, as well as the dissipated strain energy in the stress concentration region when the epoxy cracks and the frictional energy caused by 'stick-slip' of the conductor based on the bending theory of beam happens. Slip planes are used in the coupling coil and the frictional energy due to 'slow slip' at the interface of the slip planes was also investigated. The dissipated energy was compared with MQE, and the results show that the cracking of epoxy resin in the region of shear stress concentration is the main factor for premature quench of the coil.

Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Gou, Xing Long; Wu, Hong; Zheng, Shi Xian; Green, Michael A

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

APPLIED GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.agtc.med.wayne.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.agtc.med.wayne.edu CURRENT SERVICES CONTACT INFORMATION Dr. Susan J. Land, Ph.D. Laboratory Director ABOUT THE FACILITY The Applied Genomics Technology Center (AGTC-of-the-art, fee-for-service genomics center that provides a wide range of genomic technologies to the medical

Berdichevsky, Victor

426

Functional Genomics: It's All How You Read It  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional Genomics: It's All How You Read It Philip Hieter and Mark Boguski "Functional genomics to functional genomics? An informal poll of colleagues indicates that the term is widely used, but has many genomics websites that have sprung up over the last 12 months clearly demonstrates that interpretations

Boguski, Mark S.

427

THE CAMPAIGN FOR UC SANTA CRUZ THE GENOMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CAMPAIGN FOR UC SANTA CRUZ THE GENOMICS INSTITUTE #12;OVERVIEW The UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute provides the framework for the next great leap in the science of genomics. ensured it would genomic science and speed the benefits of discoveries that improve and save lives. Cancer, autoimmune

California at Santa Cruz, University of

428

Phylogenetics of modern birds in the era of genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Phylogenetics of modern birds in the era of genomics Scott V. Edwards*, W. Bryan Jennings and maturation of the genomics era, the completion of the chicken genome and a suite of technologies that promise genomics strategies, including adoption of objective quality scores for sequence data, analysis

Edwards, Scott

429

Target selection and current status of structural genomics for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

33 Target selection and current status of structural genomics for the completed microbial genomes 3.2 Structural status of completed microbial genomes in the PDB................ 3.3 Metabolic pathways as targets for structural genomics.......................... 3.3.1 Glycolytic pathway

Babu, M. Madan

430

An Integrated Program in Microbial Genome Sequencing and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this award, numerous genome sequences were generated, analyzed, published and made publicly available.

Claire M. Fraser, Ph.D.; J.E. Eisen, Ph.D.; W. Nierman, Ph.D.; K. Nelson, Ph.D.; H. Tettelin, Ph.D.; J. Heidelberg, Ph.D.; O. White, Ph.D.; B. Methe, Ph.D.; N. El-Sayed, Ph.D.; S. Gill, Ph.D.; S. Peterson, Ph.D.; J. Quackenbush, Ph.D.; T. Read, Ph.D.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Letter to the Editor Toward Sequencing Cotton (Gossypium) Genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letter to the Editor Toward Sequencing Cotton (Gossypium) Genomes Despite rapidly decreasing costs complex ge- nomes de novo. The cotton (Gossypium spp.) genomes represent a challenging case. To this end, a coalition of cotton genome scientists has developed a strategy for sequencing the cotton genomes, which

Chee, Peng W.

432

Quenching oscillations in combustion instabilities using model-based closed-loop multiplicative control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Bogoliubov method. I. INTRODUCTION Thermo-acoustic combustion instabilities are dynamic phenomena that manifest, pollution performance in combustion turboma- chinery systems such as gas turbine powerplants and jet engines. These instabilities occur in lean premixed com- bustion and effectively dispel the low-pollution properties

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

Effect of the disruptive instability on the flux of charge-exchange atoms in a tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been carried out on the spatial distribution of the flux of neutral charge-exchange atoms from a tokamak plasma and on the time evolution of this distribution during a disruptive instability. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of the model of the tearing-mode instability.

Alabyad, A.M.; Ivanov, N.V.; Khudoleev, A.V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Feedback Control of MHD kink instabilities on the HBT-EP tokamak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feedback Control of MHD kink instabilities on the HBT-EP tokamak David A. Maurer American Physical instabilities on the HBT-EP tokamak J. Bialek1 , J. Bodeo2 , A. H. Boozer1 , C. Cates1 , L. Chousal2 , R modes · HBT-EP passive and active control systems · Passive and active HBT-EP control experiments

435

Instability of condensate lm and capillary blocking in small-diameter-thermosyphon condensers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instability of condensate ®lm and capillary blocking in small-diameter-thermosyphon condensers H 1998 Abstract Instability of the condensate ®lm in a small-diameter-tube condenser was investigated- namic force or surface tension, the inner surface of the annular condensate ®lm is inherently unstable

Zhao, Tianshou

436

Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines D of observations of such shell type distributions having positive slope in velocity space at low energies, about 10´cre´au (2006), Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines

California at Berkeley, University of

437

Instability of non-constant harmonic maps for the 1 + 2-dimensional equivariant wave map system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy har- monic map Q (a stationary solution), and show that when it exists, Q is instable in the energy space. Our result applies in particular to the case of wave maps to the sphere S2Instability of non-constant harmonic maps for the 1 + 2-dimensional equivariant wave map system

Cte, Raphal

438

Investigation of local BWR instabilities with a four heated-channel Reduced Order Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden b Technical University Dresden fluctuations in- duced by a Density Wave Oscillation (DWO) (Lahey, 1992), which is a possible instability the channel instability event that took place at the Forsmark-1 BWR at P = 63.3% of the nominal power and F

Demazière, Christophe

439

Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion Dagfinn at suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities. As a first step towards achieving the same for oxy-fuel combustion, we develop a control relevant model of oxy-fuel combustion. In oxy-fuel combustion CO2 is used

Foss, Bjarne A.

440

On interfacial instability as a cause of transverse subcritical bed Jeremy G. Venditti,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On interfacial instability as a cause of transverse subcritical bed forms Jeremy G. Venditti,1. J. Bennett (2006), On interfacial instability as a cause of transverse subcritical bed forms, Water, 1997]. Ideas about the initiation of the dominant subcritical flow-transverse bed forms (ripples, dunes

Venditti, Jeremy G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SUBCRITICAL INSTABILITIES IN PLANE COUETTE FLOW OF VISCO-ELASTIC FLUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBCRITICAL INSTABILITIES IN PLANE COUETTE FLOW OF VISCO-ELASTIC FLUIDS Alexander N. Morozov of an eigenfunction of the linearized equations of motion becomes subcritically unstable, and the threshold value, subcritical instabilities, amplitude equation Introduction In the last decades, stability of flows of polymers

van Saarloos, Wim

442

Subcritical wave instability in reaction-diffusion systems Vladimir K. Vanag and Irving R. Epstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subcritical wave instability in reaction-diffusion systems Vladimir K. Vanag and Irving R. Epstein, Massachusetts 02454-9110 Received 12 March 2004; accepted 20 April 2004 We report an example of subcritical wave can be either super- critical or subcritical.9­11 A subcritical Turing instability, which requires

Epstein, Irving R.

443

Small scale turbulence and instabilities observed simultaneously by radiosondes and the MU radar.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small scale turbulence and instabilities observed simultaneously by radiosondes and the MU radar. R-French field campaign devoted to study small-scale turbulence and instabilities in the lower atmosphere for retrieving small-scale turbulence parameters from ST radars. However, the dominant sources

444

Analysis of a tractable model for combustion instability: the effect of delay and low pass filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as jet engines and gas turbine powerplants, when operating in lean premixed com- bustion, whichAnalysis of a tractable model for combustion instability: the effect of delay and low pass tractable model for combustion instability is proposed. The model is based on two coupled resonators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

445

Predicting instabilities in gas-lifted wells simulation Laure Sin`egre, Nicolas Petit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of instabilities occurring in practical applications of gas-lifted oil wells. The model underlying our analysis the drilling pipe (casing, point B) and the production pipe (tubing, point D) where it enters. Oil produced explained. The best identified instability is the "casing-heading". It consists of a succession of pressure

446

Accelerating Biofuel Feedstock Crop Improvement with Miscanthus Genomics (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kankshita Swaminathan of the Energy Biosciences Institute speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Swaminathan, Kankshita [Energy Biosciences Institute

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Application of comparative genomics for detection of genomic features and transcriptional regulatory elements.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the wake of advanced DNA sequencing technology, a large number of bacterial, animal, and plant genomes have now been completely sequenced and deposited into (more)

Lu, Hong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOEs Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

449

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. [eds.] [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Justice and the Human Genome Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Performance Comparison of Two Genome Partitioning Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jon Armstrong from the Genome Center at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine speaks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Armstrong, Joe [Genome Center at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

452

Computational regulatory genomics : motifs, networks, and dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gene regulation, the process responsible for taking a static genome and producing the diversity and complexity of life, is largely mediated through the sequence specific binding of regulators. The short, degenerate nature ...

Kheradpour, Pouya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Next-generation information systems for genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is transforming biology by enabling individual researchers to sequence the genomes of individual organisms or cells on a massive scale. In order to realize the ...

Mungall, Christopher

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

Prokaryotic Genomes from Microbes Online Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

To describe the potential functions of genes, MicrobesOnline includes protein family analyses (from InterPro and COG), metabolic maps (from KEGG), links to research papers (from UniProt and PubMed), and operon predictions for every genome. To examine each gene's evolutionary history, MicrobesOnline includes precomputed phylogenetic trees for all the gene families. It displays gene trees with genomic context or it compares the gene tree to the species tree. The tools provided with MicrobesOnline allow users to: compute customized motifs, sequence alignments, and phylogenetic trees change expression patterns in metabolic maps annotate genes in various ways The database contains more than 430 genomes. A browse tree tool and a genome browser are available, along with specialized search capabilities. (Specialized Interface)

Alm, Eric J.; Huang, Katherine H.; Price, Morgan N.; Koche, Richard P.; Keller, Keith; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

455

Comparative genomics and bioenergetics Jose Castresana *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Comparative genomics and bioenergetics Jose Castresana * European Molecular Biology conclusions about the phylogenetic distribution and evolution of bioenergetic pathways to be drawn conservation used by prokaryotes. In addition, a thorough phylogenetic analysis of other bioenergetic protein

Castresana, Jose

456

Genomic aggregation effects and Simpson's paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic studies have become commonplace, with thousands of gene expressions typically collected on single or multiple platforms and analyzed. Unaccounted time-ordered or epigenetic aspects of genetic expression may lead ...

Brimacombe, Michael

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomics of cellulosic biofuels. Nature, 454 (7206):841-845,2008 Termite Bellies and Biofuels (Published in Smithsonian,in the quest for viable biofuels. An estimated 10,000 marine

Gilbert, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

1st Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Comparative Genomics" April 24th 2003 in the Medawar Building in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Comparative Genomics" April 24th 2003 in the Medawar Building. There is a need, however, for researchers interested in genomics and bioinformatics to meet, so Jotun Hein, Richard Mott and Chris Ponting have organised the first Genomics/Bioinformatics day. It is our intention

Goldschmidt, Christina

459

The Plant Genome [A Supplement to Crop Science] March 2008 No. 1 S-27 Genomic Origins of Potato  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plant Genome [A Supplement to Crop Science] March 2008 No. 1 S-27 Genomic Origins of Potato., and Shelley H. Jansky Abstract Chromosome pairing relationships within cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum we reexamine potato genome hypotheses with the first phylogenetic analysis of all major genomes

Spooner, David

460

Cheminformatics for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.15 Problematic tetrahedral stereocentres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 6.16 Corrupting stereochemistry depiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 6.17 Variable CIP descriptors of myo-inositol using JChem . . . . . . . . . . . 193 6... of Biological Interest CIP Cahn-Ingold-Prelog EC Enzyme Commission GEM Genome-scale metabolic model GPR Gene-Protein-Reaction InChI IUPAC International Chemical Identifier KEGG Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes MIRIAM Minimum Information Required...

May, John W.

2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in theCERN SPS by J-L.Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS* J. -L.simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with,

Vay, J-L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Self-Consistant Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven Instability of a bunch Train in the CERN SPS by J-L.Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS* J. -L.simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with,

Vay, J-L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

On the marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Here, an analytical marginal instability condition is derived for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions. The derived marginal instability condition as a function of the temperature anisotropy and plasma beta agrees remarkably well with the numerically determined instability condition. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed with the leading A??{sub ?}{sup ?1}-dependence, if the counter-stream parameter P{sub e} exceeds a critical value. At small plasma beta values at large enough counter-stream parameter, the O-mode also operates for temperature anisotropies A?=?T{sub ?}/T{sub ?}?>?1 even larger than unity, as the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

Schlickeiser, R. [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- and Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitt, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, 20742 Maryland (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

Rapson, Christopher, E-mail: chris.rapson@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Institut fr Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitt, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)] [Institut fr Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitt, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Klinger, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Institut fr Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitt, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Multibunch Instability Investigations for a Tau-Charm Factory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design of high-luminosity colliders for high-energy physics, it has become clear that multibunch instabilities will be one of the primary effects that limit beam intensity, and hence luminosity. This paper reports on a series of calculations of multibunch growth rates, using the LBL accelerator physics code ZAP, that illustrate the seriousness of the effect for typical design parameters of a Tau-Charm Factory. A common feature of high-luminosity machines is the requirement of a small beta function at the interaction point. To maintain the advantages of a low beta function, however, requires that the rms bunch length, {sigma}{sub {ell}}, be smaller than {beta}*. This leads, in general, to several inconvenient aspects: (1) The requirement for short bunches leads to the need for a substantial amount of RF hardware-introducing just the narrow-band (high-Q) impedance that generates multibunch instabilities in the first place. (2) The need for short bunches means that bunch lengthening from the longitudinal microwave instability must be avoided. Since the longitudinal impedance Z{sub {parallel}}/n cannot be reduced indefinitely, there is a clear benefit to using many bunches, with lower current per bunch. (3) The short bunches have a Fourier spectrum extending up to very high frequencies, thus effectively sampling impedances in this regime that would be essentially invisible to longer bunches. This aspect can be seen in the exponential cutoff factor, proportional to ({sigma}{sub {ell}/R}){sup 2}, in the expressions for the effective impedance given. In practice, it is difficult to achieve a high luminosity without having a high average beam current in the rings. Because the multibunch growth rates scale linearly with average current, the resulting-rates tend to be very high. It might be imagined that, for sufficient bunch separation and low enough Q values for the higher-order cavity modes, the wake fields have time to die away between successive bunches, thus reducing the bunch-to-bunch coupling. For most cases of interest, however, it is hard to reduce the Q values sufficiently to achieve this condition. Because the details of higher-order modes of the RF cavities are only a guess at present, the results contained herein should not be interpreted quantitatively. However, experience has shown that the magnitudes of multibunch growth rates estimated as is done here are in reasonable agreement with observed growth rates under comparable conditions. Thus, although the particular modes that grow will depend on details of the impedance that are not well known at this time, the predicted growth rates are expected to reflect the requirements of a feedback system with good accuracy.

Zisman, Michael S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Vlasov-Maxwell Solver to Study Microbunching Instability in the FERMI@ELETTRA First Bunch Compressor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Vlasov-Maxwell Solver to Study Microbunching Instability in the FERMI@ELETTRA First Bunch Compressor System

Bassi, G; Ellison, J A; Heinemann, K A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Measurement Of Transverse Instability Thresholds In Low And high Emittance optics At The Photon Factory Storage Ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement Of Transverse Instability Thresholds In Low And high Emittance optics At The Photon Factory Storage Ring

Sakanaka, S; Kamiya, Yu; Katoh, M; Kobayakawa, H

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Turbulent patterns in wall-bounded flows: a Turing instability?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In their way to/from turbulence, plane wall-bounded flows display an interesting transitional regime where laminar and turbulent oblique bands alternate, the origin of which is still mysterious. In line with Barkley's recent work about the pipe flow transition involving reaction-diffusion concepts, we consider plane Couette flow in the same perspective and transform Waleffe's classical four-variable model of self-sustaining process into a reaction-diffusion model. We show that, upon fulfillment of a condition on the relative diffusivities of its variables, the featureless turbulent regime becomes unstable against patterning as the result of a Turing instability. A reduced two-variable model helps us to delineate the appropriate region of parameter space. An {\\it intrinsic} status is therefore given to the pattern's wavelength for the first time. Virtues and limitations of the model are discussed, calling for a microscopic support of the phenomenological approach.

Manneville, Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Instability of black hole formation in gravitational collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider here the classic scenario given by Oppenheimer, Snyder, and Datt, for the gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud, and examine its stability under the introduction of small tangential stresses. We show, by offering an explicit class of physically valid tangential stress perturbations, that an introduction of tangential pressure, however small, can qualitatively change the final fate of collapse from a black hole final state to a naked singularity. This shows instability of black hole formation in collapse and sheds important light on the nature of cosmic censorship hypothesis and its possible formulations. The key effect of these perturbations is to alter the trapped surface formation pattern within the collapsing cloud and the apparent horizon structure. This allows the singularity to be visible, and implications are discussed.

Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

COMPRESSIBLE STREAMING INSTABILITIES IN ROTATING THERMAL VISCOUS OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study electromagnetic streaming instabilities in thermal viscous regions of rotating astrophysical objects, such as protostellar and protoplanetary magnetized accretion disks, molecular clouds, their cores, and elephant trunks. The obtained results can also be applied to any regions of interstellar medium, where different equilibrium velocities between charged species can arise. We consider a weakly and highly ionized three-component plasma consisting of neutrals and magnetized electrons and ions. The vertical perturbations along the background magnetic field are investigated. The effect of perturbation of collisional frequencies due to density perturbations of species is taken into account. The growth rates of perturbations are found in a wide region of wave number spectrum for media, where the thermal pressure is larger than the magnetic pressure. It is shown that in cases of strong collisional coupling of neutrals with ions the contribution of the viscosity is negligible.

Nekrasov, A. K., E-mail: anatoli.nekrassov@t-online.d [Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences, 123995 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron stars life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

Kokkotas, Kostas D. [Theoretical Astrophysics, IAAT, Eberhard Karls University of Tbingen, Tbingen 72076 (Germany)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

The theoretical instability strip of M dwarf stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overstability of the fundamental radial mode in M dwarf models was theoretically predicted by Rodr\\'iguez-L\\'opez et al. (2012). The periods were found to be in the ranges ~25-40 min and ~4-8 h, depending on stellar age and excitation mechanism. We have extended our initial M dwarf model grid in mass, metallicity, and mixing length parameter. We have also considered models with boundary conditions from PHOENIX NextGen atmospheres to test their influence on the pulsation spectra. We find instability of non-radial modes with radial orders up to k=3, degree l=0-3, including p and g modes, with the period range extending from 20 min up to 11 h. Furthermore, we find theoretical evidence of the potential of M dwarfs as solar-like oscillators.

Rodrguez-Lpez, C; Amado, P J; Moya, A; Mullan, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Twenty-Seventh Symposium (International) on Combustion/The Combustion Institute, 1998/pp. 28152820 FINGERING INSTABILITY IN SOLID FUEL COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2815 Twenty-Seventh Symposium (International) on Combustion/The Combustion Institute, 1998/pp. 2815­2820 FINGERING INSTABILITY IN SOLID FUEL COMBUSTION: THE CHARACTERISTIC SCALES OF THE DEVELOPED STATE ORY ZIK, Israel We present new results on the fingering instability in solid fuel combustion. The instability

Moses, Elisha

475

MULTI-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF ROTATING PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effects of rotation on the dynamics, energetics, and {sup 56}Ni production of pair instability supernova (PISN) explosions by performing rotating two-dimensional ({sup 2}.5D{sup )} hydrodynamics simulations. We calculate the evolution of eight low-metallicity (Z = 10{sup 3}, 10{sup 4} Z{sub ?}) massive (135-245 M{sub ?}) PISN progenitors with initial surface rotational velocities of 50% of the critical Keplerian value using the stellar evolution code MESA. We allow for both the inclusion and the omission of the effects of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport and in chemical mixing, resulting in slowly rotating and rapidly rotating final carbon-oxygen cores, respectively. Increased rotation for carbon-oxygen cores of the same mass and chemical stratification leads to less energetic PISN explosions that produce smaller amounts of {sup 56}Ni due to the effect of the angular momentum barrier that develops and slows the dynamical collapse. We find a non-monotonic dependence of {sup 56}Ni production on rotational velocity in situations when smoother composition gradients form at the outer edge of the rotating cores. In these cases, the PISN energetics are determined by the competition of two factors: the extent of chemical mixing in the outer layers of the core due to the effects of rotation in the progenitor evolution and the development of angular momentum support against collapse. Our 2.5D PISN simulations with rotation are the first presented in the literature. They reveal hydrodynamic instabilities in several regions of the exploding star and increased explosion asymmetries with higher core rotational velocity.

Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. Craig [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Couch, Sean M., E-mail: manolis@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) System from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system is a data management, analysis and annotation platform for all publicly available genomes. IMG contains both draft and complete JGI microbial genomes integrated with all other publicly available genomes from all three domains of life, together with a large number of plasmids and viruses. IMG provides tools and viewers for analyzing and annotating genomes, genes and functions, individually or in a comparative context. Since its first release in 2005, IMG's data content and analytical capabilities have been constantly expanded through quarterly releases. IMG is provided by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and is available from http://img.jgi.doe.gov. [Abstract from The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system in 2007: data content and analysis tool extensions; Victor M. Markowitz, Ernest Szeto, Krishna Palaniappan, Yuri Grechkin, Ken Chu, I-Min A. Chen, Inna Dubchak, Iain Anderson, Athanasios Lykidis, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Natalia N. Ivanova and Nikos C. Kyrpides; Nucleic Acids Research, 2008, Vol. 36. (Database Issue) See also the companion system, Integrated Microbial Genomes with Microbiome Samples.

477

Applications of the pipeline environment for visual informatics and genomics computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for visual informatics and genomics computations. BMCfor visual informatics and genomics computations Ivo D DinovContemporary informatics and genomics research require

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Genomics-based breeding in forest trees: are we there yet?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESENTATION Open Access Genomics-based breeding in forestEfforts to realize genomics-based breeding in conifer treeUSDA. The Conifer Translational Genomics Network Coordinated

Neale, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A Novel Candidate Vaccine for Cytauxzoonosis Inferred from Comparative Apicomplexan Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Comparative Apicomplexan Genomics Jaime L. Tarigo 1 ,the use of comparative genomics to computationally andthe use of comparative genomics as an accelerated path to

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

From Benefit Sharing to Power Sharing: Partnership Governance in Population Genomics Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. Greely, Iceland's Plan for Genomics Research: Facts andMike Fortun, Promising Genomics: Iceland and deCODE Geneticsabout commercialization in genomics research. 18 In this

Winickoff, David E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. (2009) Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogensComparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhancedapplications. BMC Genomics Wisselink HW, Toirkens MJ, Wu Q,

Wohlbach, Dana J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Metabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterial symbiosis of sharpshooters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metabolic Complementarity and Genomics of the Dual BacterialMetabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterialthe other. ) Comparative genomics. The predicted proteomes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

RegPredict: an integrated system for regulon inference in prokaryotes by comparative genomics approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motifs by comparative genomics. Nucleic Acids Res. , 28,M.S. (2009) Comparative genomics of regulation of fatty acidcomparative and functional genomics. Nucleic Acids Res. ,

Novichkov, Pavel S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - acyrthosiphon pisum genome Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 6 Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium" Summary: Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The...

485

Protein interaction network topology uncovers melanogenesis regulatory network components within functional genomics datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

components within functional genomics datasets BMC SystemssiRNA-based functional genomics of pigmentation identifiesrelated functional genomics data. J R Soc Interface Motulsky

Ho, Hsiang; Milenkovic, Tijana; Memisevic, Vesna; Aruri, Jayavani; Przulj, Natasa; Ganesan, Anand K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - array identifies genomic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20102011 Titre du projet DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERACTIVE GENOME BROWSER, Summary: of genomics data (such as filtering, smoothing, selection and crossing of genomic data) (iii)...

487

Reference set of regulons in Desulfovibrionales inferred by comparative genomics approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inferred by comparative genomics approach 1 Lawrenceout large-scale comparative genomics analysis of regulatoryEnvironmental Research, Genomics:GTL Foundational Science

Kazakov, A.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Evolutionary genomics of divergence and adaptation within the model fungi Neurospora crassa and Neurospora tetrasperma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taylor JW. 2011. Population genomics and local adaptation inpromise of population genomics: from genotyping to genomeera. Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics 11:265-89.

Ellison, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Discovery of Fungal Cell Wall Components Using Evolutionary and Functional Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profiling and comparative genomics approaches." Eukaryotcerevisiae." Comp Funct Genomics 2(3): 124-42. Dinsdale, E.profiling and comparative genomics approaches." Eukaryot

Sain, Divya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Applications of the Pipeline Environment for Visual Informatics and Genomics Computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for visual informatics and genomics computations. BMCfor visual informatics and genomics computations Ivo D DinovContemporary informatics and genomics research require

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

Chivian, Dylan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphid genome absence Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium" Summary: Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The...

493

MicrobesOnline: an integrated portal for comparative and functional genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for comparative and functional genomics Paramvir S. DehalUS Department of Energy Genomics: GTL program (grant DE-approach to comparative genomics, including a tree-based

Dehal, Paramvir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Pigeonpea genomics initiative (PGI): an international effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9327-2 Pigeonpea genomics initiative (PGI): anIndia R. K. Varshney (&) Genomics Towards Gene Discoverycrop legume. To enable genomics-assisted breeding in this

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RH, Breaker RR: Comparative genomics reveals 104 candidateof transporters. BMC Genomics 2008, 9:330. 16. Green NJ,in proteobacteria: comparative genomics analysis. FEMS

Sun, Eric I; Leyn, Semen A; Kazanov, Marat D; Saier, Milton H; Novichkov, Pavel S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

E-Print Network 3.0 - accessing integrated genomic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer Cytogenomics Microarray Consortium August 5th, 2010 UCSC Genome and Cancer... Genomics Browsers 12;UCSC Genome Browser ... Source: Goldman, Steven A. - Division of Cell...

497

Discovering and validating biological hypotheses from coherent patterns in functional genomics data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns in functional genomics data Marcin P. Joachimiakpatterns in functional genomics data Marcin P. Joachimiakand Environmental Research, Genomics Program:GTL through

Joachimiak, Marcin Pawel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Target selection and annotation for the structural genomics of the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J Struct Funct Genomics (2009) 10:107125 DOIannotation for the structural genomics of the amidohydrolaseCenter for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) that aims to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

The development and application of an integrated functional genomics platform in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integrated functional genomics data will be used to build aan integrated functional genomics platform in Desulfovibrioand Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

Deutschbauer, Adam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Discovering and validating biological hypotheses from coherent patterns in functional genomics data using associative biclustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns in functional genomics data using associativeand Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program throughof Energy Functional genomics confronts researchers with a

Joachimiak, Marcin P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z