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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Hydrogen peroxide significantly contributes to radiation-induced genomic instability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- induced genomic instability Disha Dayal 1 , Sean M. Martin 1 , Sujatha Venkataraman 1 , Charles L. Limoli 2 , Douglas R Spitz 1 . 1 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA- 52246, 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of California, Irvine, CA-92697 Chronic metabolic oxidative stress is associated with genomic instability following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Mitochondria have long been known to be a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing oxidative stress. We hypothesized that radiation damages mitochondria, leading to oxidative stress and eventually genomic instability. This hypothesis is based on preliminary studies in parental

2

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91­100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Bystander effects; Genomic instability; Ionizing radiation 1. Introduction Exposure

3

Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Non-Protein Thiols and Vitamin E.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Non-Protein Thiols and Vitamin E. J.S. Murley 1 , Y. Kataoka 1 , W.F. Morgan 2 , and D.J. Grdina 1 . The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 1 , The University of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, MD 2 Induced or delayed radioprotection is a novel phenomenon that shares many similarities with the low dose radiation-induced radiobiological phenomenon referred to as the adaptive response. Induced or delayed radioprotection is defined as an enhancement in the radiation resistance of cells at long times following their exposure to non-protein thiols (NPT) such as WR1065, the free thiol form of amifostine. This effect is the result of the induction of a cascade of intracellular

4

Effect of silver nanoparticle and glycyrrhizic acid (SN-GLY) complex on repair of whole body radiation-induced cellular DNA damage and genomic instability in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silver nanoparticles (SN) were redispersed in aqueous solution of Pluronic F127 and complexed with the phytoceutical, glycyrrhizic acid (GLY) to obtain SN-GLY complex. The ability of the SN-GLY complex to offer protection against ionising radiation in post-irradiation scenarios was evaluated in ex vivo and in vivo models using Swiss albino mice. Treatment of mouse blood leucocytes with SN-GLY immediately after 4 Gy gamma radiation exposure, ex vivo, enhanced the rate of repair of cellular DNA damages as revealed by comet assay. Exposure of mice to 4 Gy whole body gamma radiation induced formation of strand breaks in cellular DNA and the unrepaired double strand breaks eventually caused the formation of micronuclei. The post-irradiation administration of SN-GLY resulted in a faster decrease in the comet parameters indicating enhanced cellular DNA repair process and reduction in micronucleus formation. Thus the studies showed effective radiation protection by SN-GLY in post-irradiation conditions.

Dhanya K. Chandrasekharan; Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan Nair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Susan M. Bailey, Eli S. Williams and Robert L. Ullrich The mechanistic role of radiation-induced genomic instability in radiation carcinogenesis is an attractive hypothesis that remains to be rigorously tested. There are few in vivo studies on which to base judgments, but work in our laboratory with mouse models of radiogenic mammary neoplasia provided the first indications that certain inductive forms of genetically predisposed genomic instability may contribute to tumor development. The central goal of this research project is to more firmly establish the mechanistic basis of this radiation-associated genomic instability and, from this, to assess whether such induced instability might play a major role in tumorigenesis at low doses of low LET radiation. In the case of

6

Development of stable lines of transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) to investigate genomic instability  

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stable lines of transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) to stable lines of transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) to investigate genomic instability Lahcen Jaafar 1 , Wendy W. Kuhne 2 , Xiayang Xie 3 , Xuan Zheng 1,4 , Jeffrey S. Mumm 3 , and William S. Dynan 1 1 Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Georgia 30912, USA, 2 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC 29808, 3 Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Georgia Health Sciences University, Georgia 30912, USA, 4 Genetic Diagnosis Center, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China The goal of our project is to investigate low-dose radiation induced-genomic instability. We describe the development of a whole-vertebrate model bearing a reporter transgene that is designed to indicate the presence of genome instability by somatic homologous

7

Saturation of radiation-induced parametric instabilities by excitation of Langmuir turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in the last few years in the calculation of the saturation spectra of parametric instabilities which involve Langmuir daughter waves will be reviewed. These instabilities include the ion acoustic decay instability, the two plasmon decay instability (TPDI), and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In particular I will emphasize spectral signatures which can be directly compared with experiment. The calculations are based on reduced models of driven Laugmuir turbulence. Thomson scattering from hf-induced Langmuir turbulence in the unpreconditioned ionosphere has resulted in detailed agreement between theory and experiment at early times. Strong turbulence signatures dominate in this regime where the weak turbulence approximation fails completely. Recent experimental studies of the TPDI have measured the Fourier spectra of Langmuir waves as well as the angular and frequency, spectra of light emitted near 3/2 of the pump frequency again permitting some detailed comparisons with theory. The experiments on SRS are less detailed but by Thomson scattering the secondary decay of the daughter Langmuir wave has been observed. Scaling laws derived from a local model of SRS saturation are compared with full simulations and recent Nova experiments.

Dubois, D.F.; Rose, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Russell, D. [Lodestar Research Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mutation Research 568 (2004) 4148 Detection of chromosomal instability in -irradiated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the progeny at subsequent generations (genomic instability) and in non-irradiated neighbors of irradiated the link between the radiation-induced phenomena of genomic instability and the bystander effect. © 2004

9

A Role for Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Perpetuating Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrogen peroxide production to total cellular hydrogen peroxide generation...mitochondrial ROS production are not due to varying...7-9). Chronic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2...RIGI. Materials and Methods Cell culture. Chinese...

Grace J. Kim; Gary M. Fiskum; and William F. Morgan

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation Eric J Hall*,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation Eric J Hall*,1 and Tom K. There is a progressive increase in genomic instability, determined either by gene amplification or allelic imbalance

11

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging William Dynan Medical College of Georgia Abstract There is considerable overlap between cellular and molecular changes that occur in response to low doses of ionizing radiation and those that occur during aging. Both processes are characterized by accumulation of persistent DNA damage ("wear and tear" on the genome), accumulation of protein and lipid oxidation products, loss of regenerative capacity at the cellular and tissue level, and increased incidence of cancer. These observations support a hypothesis that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation accelerates normal, aging-related tissue changes. We have investigated this hypothesis using a genetically tractable model organism, the Japanese medaka fish. The medaka is a whole-animal vertebrate

12

Radiation Induced Instability Patrick Hagerty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an oscillator coupled to a string describes the free vibrations of a nucleus in an extended medium. The oscillator transfers energy to the string by generating waves as it moves; see also [12]. A model

Bloch, Anthony

13

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

14

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

15

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure Julio C. Morales 1 , Amy Rommel 1 , Konstantin Leskov 2 , Walter M. Hittelman 3 , David A. Boothman 1# 1 Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. 3 Department of Experimental Therapeutics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. # To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: David.Boothman@utsouthwestern.edu Eukaryotic cells can respond to DNA double strand breaks created by low doses of IR by activating homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end- joining (NHEJ) pathways to repair DNA. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Ku70 as

16

No evidence for in vivo induction of genomic instability in bone marrow cells collected from mice exposed to low-dose 137Cs γ rays:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rithidech et al, 2006 1 Rithidech et al, 2006 1 No evidence for in vivo induction of genomic instability in bone marrow cells collected from mice exposed to low-dose 137 Cs γ rays: Kanokporn Noy Rithidech 1 , Chatchanok Loetchutinat 1 , Louise Honikel 1 , and Elbert B. Whorton 2 1 Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 2 Molecular Epidemiology Research Program, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77555-1153 Assessment of potential health risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still a challenging public health issue. It is therefore important to improve our understanding of potential induction of genomic instability in vivo by this low-dose range because it has been widely suggested that elevation of genomic instability also elevates cancer

17

Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

Jacks, Tyler E.

18

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5{prime} to 3{prime} direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation.

Fuciarelli, A.F.; Sisk, E.C.; Miller, J.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zimbrick, J.D. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

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Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

20

Developmental defects and genomic instability after x-irradiation of wild-type and genetically modified mouse pre-implantation and early post-implantation embryos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results obtained from the end of the 1950s suggested that ionizing radiation could induce foetal malformations in some mouse strains when administered during early pre-implantation stages. Starting in 1989, data obtained in Germany also showed that radiation exposure during that period could lead to a genomic instability in the surviving foetuses. Furthermore, the same group reported that both malformations and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation foetuses after exposure of zygotes to relatively high doses of radiation. As such results were of concern for radiation protection, we investigated this in more detail during recent years, using mice with varying genetic backgrounds including mice heterozygous for mutations involved in important cellular processes like DNA repair, cell cycle regulation or apoptosis. The main parameters which were investigated included morphological development, genomic instability and gene expression in the irradiated embryos or their own progeny. The aim of this review is to critically reassess the results obtained in that field in the different laboratories and to try to draw general conclusions on the risks of developmental defects and genomic instability from an exposure of early embryos to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. Altogether and in the range of doses normally used in diagnostic radiology, the risk of induction of embryonic death and of congenital malformation following the irradiation of a newly fertilised egg is certainly very low when compared to the 'spontaneous' risks for such effects. Similarly, the risk of radiation induction of a genomic instability under such circumstances seems to be very small. However, this is not a reason to not apply some precaution principles when possible. One way of doing this is to restrict the use of higher dose examinations on all potentially pregnant women to the first ten days of their menstrual cycle when conception is very unlikely to have occurred (the so-called ten-day rule), as already recommended by the Health Protection Agency. Such a precautionary attitude would also be supported by the uncertainties associated with later changes in gene expression which might result from irradiation or early embryos with moderate doses.

P Jacquet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Solar radiation induces sublethal injury in Escherichia coli in seawater.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...after cells were exposed to solar radiation. Injury was detected...030670-05$02.00/0 Solar Radiation Induces Sublethal...Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 Sublethal injury was...after cells were exposed to solar radiation. Injury was detected...

R B Kapuscinski; R Mitchell

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Radiation induced by relativistic beams passing over a diffraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

August 2000 FEL 2000 1 Radiation Induced by Relativistic Beams Passing Over a Diffraction Grating J.H. Brownell, J. Walsh, J. Swartz, S. Trotz Dept. of Physics and Astronomy,...

24

Radiation induced strand breakage analyzed by tunel technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION INDUCED STRAND BREAKAGE ANALYZED BY TUNEL TECHNIQUE A Thesis MAtuSSA DAWN REYNOLDS Submitted to the 015ce of Graduate Studies of Texas Ad. M University in partial fu1611ment of the requirements for the dree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 2003 Major Subject: Health Physics RADIATION INDUCED STRAND BREAKAGE ANALYZED BY TUNEL TECHNIQUE A Thesis MAtuSSA DAWN REYNOLDS Submitted to Texas %%:M University in partial fulfillmen of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Reynolds, Marissa Dawn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability.

Hitomi, Toshiaki [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H. [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osafune, Kenji [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Morito, Daisuke [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto (Japan); Miyamoto, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakao, Kazuwa [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Koizumi, Akio, E-mail: koizumi.akio.5v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

27

Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......subsyndrome [5, 6]. Other radiation-countermeasure drugs...gamma-tocotrienol, a naturally occurring vitamin E analog, protected mice from radiation-induced pancytopenia...that protect against radiation-induced hematopoietic...30] in mouse model. Naturally occurring vitamin E......

Sanchita P. Ghosh; Shilpa Kulkarni; Michael W. Perkins; Kevin Hieber; Roli L. Pessu; Kristen Gambles; Manoj Maniar; Tzu-Cheg Kao; Thomas M. Seed; K. Sree Kumar

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modeling radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. It provides original contributions on the fundamental mechanisms of radiation-induced ...

Zhang, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ionizing Radiation Induces Delayed Hyperrecombination in Mammalian Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...instability is critical to radiation risk assessment and for determining...the many delayed effects of radiation, chromosomal instability is...detrimental effects over a range of doses of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, a rapid and...

Lei Huang; Suzanne Grim; Leslie E. Smith; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; Olga G. Goloubeva; William F. Morgan

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Low dose ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in stress-induced premature senescent fibroblasts David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Recent evidence suggest that the causes of cancer development are not limited to mutations within cancer cells, but also involve in alterations of cancer microenvironment. Senescent cells are irreversibly growth arrested, but remain metabolically active. Senescent cells, especially senescent fibroblasts in the stroma may provide a beneficial environment for tumor growth through secretion of certain factors. Accumulation of senescent cells in the stroma of patients repeatedly exposed to low doses of IR or low dose rates of IR, could be an important factor, causing alteration of the microenvironment that ultimately benefits tumor

31

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates ionizing radiation-induced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

silica optical Summary: measurements and the so-called radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) measured in dBm. TSL measurements have been... measurements. Connections between...

33

Inactivation of 14-3-3? Influences Telomere Behavior and Ionizing Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...per dish was chosen to ensure that about 50 colonies would survive a particular radiation dose treatment. Cells were exposed to ionizing radiation in the dose range of 0 to 8 Gy at room temperature using a 137Cs ray at a dose rate of 1.1 Gy...

Sonu Dhar; Jeremy A. Squire; M. Prakash Hande; Raymund J. Wellinger; Tej K. Pandita

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Use of radiation-induced polymers as friction reducing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drag reduction of fluids containing a water phase, e.g. hydrocarbon-in-water mixture, flowing through a conduit, is reduced by incorporating within the water phase a polymer obtained by radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, alkali metal salts thereof, or mixtures thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10-60% aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The mixture of monomers, before radiation, preferably contains 25-99% acrylamide and 75-1% sodium acrylate. The polymer preferably shows viscoelastic effects at high concentrations in a solvent. Concentrations of about 1-10,000 ppm of the polymer in the water phase is desired. Examples of fluids useful with this invention include hydrocarbon-in-water and water -in-hydrocarbon slurries, the hydrocarbon is preferably comminuted oil shale or coal, congealed particles of crude oil and/or wax, viscous crude oil, etc.

Gogarty, W.B.; Knight, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

35

Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hypothesized that the relative radiation sensitivity of hippocampal...therapies to reduce radiation-induced normal tissue...cells has potential safety concerns such as teratoma...could safely attenuate radiation-induced cognitive...employing Ethovision XT software (v5.0; Noldus Information...

Munjal M. Acharya; Lori-Ann Christie; Mary L. Lan; Erich Giedzinski; John R. Fike; Susanna Rosi; and Charles L. Limoli

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Investigation of Radiation-Induced Free Radicals and Luminescence Properties in Fresh Pomegranate Fruits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation-induced free radicals and luminescence properties were investigated in ?-irradiated (03 kGy) pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) analysis showed limited applicability, and only 3 kGy-irradiated ...

Hafiz M. Shahbaz; Kashif Akram; Jae-Jun Ahn; Joong-Ho Kwon

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

Review of research on use of radiation-induced mutations in crop breeding in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Japan, the research on radiation-induced mutation has been conducted as one...32P, we now have various kinds of radiation facilities available for mutation breeding. The fundamental...

Takane Matsuo; Hikoyuki Yamaguchi

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

PP2A regulates ionizing radiationinduced apoptosis through Ser46 phosphorylation of p53  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles PP2A regulates ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis through Ser46...virginia.edu 1 Department of Radiation Oncology and 2 Center for Cell...and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan). Radiation Treatment Cell cultures were irradiated...

Jun Mi; Elzbieta Bolesta; David L. Brautigan; and James M. Larner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

An Extract of Phyllanthus amarus Protects Mouse Chromosomes and Intestine from Radiation Induced Damages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......using Graphpad Instat 3 Software (San Diego, USA...Effect of P.amarus on radiation induced changes in the...Mr. M. Muthuvel, Radiation safety Officer, Amala Cancer...Withers, H. R. (1999) Radiation biology and treatment......

Kuzhuvelil Bhaskaran Nair Harikumar; Ramadasan Kuttan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Identification of radiation-induced microRNA transcriptome by next-generation massively parallel sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......induction of DNA damage and repair, cell cycle perturbation...performed using Illumina processing pipeline software (version 1.5...homologous recombination-mediated repair, and renders cells hypersensitive...Chaudhry MA . Base excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced......

M. Ahmad Chaudhry; Romaica A. Omaruddin; Christopher D. Brumbaugh; Muhammad A. Tariq; Nader Pourmand

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Marianne B. Sowa, Claere von Neubeck, R. Joe Robinson, Paula M. Koehler, Norman J. Karin, Xihai Wang, Katrina M. Waters and Harish Shankaran Ionizing radiation exposure triggers a cell signaling program which includes proliferation, the DNA damage response, and tissue remodeling. The activated signaling pathways lead to the induction of both protective effects as well as adverse consequences. A fundamental question is whether signaling cascades initiated by low doses are fundamentally different than those initiated by high doses. To address this question we have applied a systems biology approach to examine the radiation induced temporal responses of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model. Using microarray-

43

Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage. Therefore, Q40P/S47I/H93G is pharmacologically one of the most promising candidates for clinical applications for radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland)] [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ?40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

An investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human keratinocyte cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Biology 64: Cell Death Regulators...investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human...Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland...basal and squamous cell carcinomas) accounting...radiation from non-solar type UV lamp sources...

Alanna Maguire; James Walsh; and Fiona M. Lyng

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Solar simulated radiation induced cell death depends on spectral distribution and irradiance but not output delivery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Papers Solar simulated radiation induced cell death depends...Dublin Institute of Technology, 13 Camden Row...with a second solar simulator and...Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8, Ireland...S. Gov't | Cell Death Cells...effects Photobiology Solar Energy Ultraviolet......

Alanna Maguire; Fiona M. Lyng; James E. Walsh

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brenner* Abstract--There is strong evidence that ionizing radiation increases cancer risks at high doses. There exists a range of high radiation doses which demonstra- bly increase cancer risks, and a lower dose rangePaper EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES David J

Brenner, David Jonathan

48

Interleukin-12 Deficiency Is Permissive for Angiogenesis in UV Radiation-Induced Skin Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...WTs. The proliferative capacity of tumor cells of the...angiogenesis| Introduction Solar UV radiation, particularly...and the proliferative capacity of the tumor cells using...higher proliferative capacity than cells obtained from...prevention and treatment of solar UV radiation-induced...

Syed M. Meeran; Suchitra Katiyar; Craig A. Elmets; and Santosh K. Katiyar

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Torus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections, unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow coronal mass ejections.

B. Kliem; T. Toeroek

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Torus Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections, unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow coronal mass ejections.

B. Kliem and T. Trk

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

52

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

53

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

54

LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES Daila S. Gridley 1,2 , Asma Rizvi 2 , Xian Luo 1 , Adeola Y. Makinde 2 , Steve Rightnar 1 , Jian Tian 1 , Melba L. Andres 1 , James M. Slater 1 , and Michael J. Pecaut 1,2 Departments of 1 Radiation Medicine and 2 Biochemistry & Microbiology Loma Linda University and Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 USA Health risks due to protracted low dose irradiation remain unclear. This project investigates T helper (Th) lymphocyte function and the cellular milieu in which they reside under conditions of low dose, low- linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure. The Th cells are important because they secrete cytokines essential for generating optimal immune defenses against tumor, virus-infected, and other

55

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Authors: B.E. Lehnert, R. Cary, D. Gadbois, and G. Gupta. Institutions: Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The scientific literature presents a confusing picture concerning health risks due to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), e.g., <1-10 cGy. Some effects of LDIR such as enhanced rates of cell proliferation and the induction of radioadaptation may be benign under some circumstances. Other evidence suggests LDIR can be hazardous and that a threshold for potentially detrimental responses, e.g., increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), alterations in gene or protein expression profiles, and increased

56

Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LS-290 LS-290 Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory R.C. Martin, C.M. Simmons, and G.D. Owen Californium User Facility for Neutron Science Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory J. Puhl Ionizing Radiation Division National Institute of Standards and Technology November 2000 work sponsored by U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research 1 Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory R.C. Martin, C.M. Simmons, and G. D. Owen Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

57

Assessment of Low Linear Energy Transfer RadiationInduced Bystander Mutagenesis in a Three-Dimensional Culture Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Energy cleanup operations...mutation was a measurement of changes...with low-energy protons (28...Puck TT. Measurement of mutagenesis...on Radiation Units and Measurements; 1984. 23...low linear energy transfer radiation-induced...

Rudranath Persaud; Hongning Zhou; Sarah E. Baker; Tom K. Hei; and Eric J. Hall

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Terahertz photovoltaic detection of cyclotron resonance in the regime of radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine and compare the diagonal magnetoresistance, Rxx, and the photovoltage induced by microwave (42?f<300 GHz) and terahertz (f?300 GHz) photoexcitation in the high mobility quasi-two-dimensional GaAs/AlGaAs system. The data demonstrate strong radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in Rxx to 360 GHz. In addition, cyclotron resonance is observed in the photovoltage to 725 GHz. These results show that our high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system (2DES) specimens remain photoactive in magnetotransport into the terahertz band.

R. G. Mani, A. N. Ramanayaka, Tianyu Ye, M. S. Heimbeck, H. O. Everitt, and W. Wegscheider

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8Gy/min and 4Gy/min, showed 89 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution.

Chitra Seetharam Misra; Rita Mukhopadhyaya; Shree Kumar Apte

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sorafenib Enhances Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting STAT3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal human malignancies. Lack of efficient therapy for advanced HCC is a pressing problem worldwide. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and mechanism of combined sorafenib and radiation therapy treatment for HCC. Methods and Materials: HCC cell lines (PLC5, Huh-7, Sk-Hep1, and Hep3B) were treated with sorafenib, radiation, or both, and apoptosis and signal transduction were analyzed. Results: All 4 HCC cell lines showed resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis; however, this resistance could be reversed in the presence of sorafenib. Inhibition of phospho-STAT3 was found in cells treated with sorafenib or sorafenib plus radiation and subsequently reduced the expression levels of STAT3-related proteins, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, and survivin. Silencing STAT3 by RNA interference overcame apoptotic resistance to radiation in HCC cells, and the ectopic expression of STAT3 in HCC cells abolished the radiosensitizing effect of sorafenib. Moreover, sorafenib plus radiation significantly suppressed PLC5 xenograft tumor growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that sorafenib sensitizes resistant HCC cells to radiation-induced apoptosis via downregulating phosphorylation of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo.

Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chen-Si [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tai, Wei-Tien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Chung-Wai [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuen-Feng, E-mail: kfchen1970@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 612 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

Etsuyo Ogo; Ritsuko Komaki; Kiminori Fujimoto; Masafumi Uchida; Toshi Abe; Katsumasa Nakamura; Michihide Mitsumori; Kenji Sekiguchi; Yuko Kaneyasu; Naofumi Hayabuchi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Radiation Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2 Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2 Cells: Roles of Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining Joel Bedford Colorado State University Abstract There has been considerable discussion, with some data reported, addressing the question of the relative contributions of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR) on the repair or rejoining of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks, especially in relation to their operation during the cell cycle. Reports have included studies on chromosomal aberration induction in G1/G0 cells defective in NHEJ or A-T cells, for example, but relatively little on S/G2 cells and especially on mutants defective in HRR. The broad biological importance of

63

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mutation rate in the post-chernobyl families from ukraine.mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident. Nature 380, 683-fallout following the Chernobyl accident (Dubrova et al. ,

Marchetti, Francesco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ECOLOGY Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane...to solar UV-B and UV-A radiation (Y. Xue and W. L. Nicholson...monitoring studies at Tokyo, Japan. . N. Munakata Biologically...effective dose of solar ultraviolet radiation estimated by spore dosimetry...

Tony A. Slieman; Wayne L. Nicholson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

66

Effect of solvents on the radiation-induced polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of solvents on the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers (EVE and IPVE, respectively) was investigated. EVE and IPVE polymerizations were carried out in bulk and in solution under superdry conditions in which polar impurities, especially water, have been reduced to negligible levels. This was accomplished by means of a sodium mirror technique using joint free baked out glass equipment and high vacuum. Plots of the monomer conversions and irradiation times were obtained for EVE and IPVE polymerizations in bulk and in benzene solution at constant monomer concentrations. The monomer concentration dependence of the polymerization rate was studied for EVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene, diethlyl ether, diglyme and methylene chloride, and for IPVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene. Solvent effect on the estimated propagating rate constants was examined for EVE and IPVE polymerization in bulk and in solution. The effect of temperature on the polymerization rate was also investigated for EVE polymerization in bulk ad in benzene, diethyl and diisopropyl ethers, methylene chloride and nitromethane, and for IPVE ploymerization in bulk and in benzene.

Hsieh, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

[Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Structural Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural Genomics ... Structural genomics is the field of science focused on the systematic determination of the three-dimensional structure of the proteins encoded into genomes. ... Structural genomics is spreading the philosophy of high throughput in all fields of science and making available new tools to speed up research procedures. ...

Ivano Bertini

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zheng, Junying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Boerma, Marjan, E-mail: mboerma@uams.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

Liu Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xiong Mai [Department of Cardiac Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Deng Ling [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lin Yuehao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Rong Tiehua [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: esophagus2003@yahoo.com.cn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nonlocal magnetorotational instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical theory of the nonlocal magnetorotational instability (MRI) is developed for the simplest astrophysical plasma model. It is assumed that the rotation frequency profile has a steplike character, so that there are two regions in which it has constant different values, separated by a narrow transition layer. The surface wave approach is employed to investigate the MRI in this configuration. It is shown that the main regularities of the nonlocal MRI are similar to those of the local instability and that driving the nonaxisymmetric MRI is less effective than the axisymmetric one, also for the case of the nonlocal instability. The existence of nonlocal instabilities in nonmagnetized plasma is predicted.

Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Erokhin, N. N. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Lominadze, J. G. [Kharadze Abastumani National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a, Kazbegi Ave., Tbilisi 0160 (Georgia); Galvao, R. M. O. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brazilian Center for Research in Physics, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22290180 (Brazil); Churikov, A. P. [Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University, 45, Sovetskaya Str., Syzran, Samara Region 446001 (Russian Federation); Kharshiladze, O. A. [Nodia Institute of Geophysics, 1, Aleksidze Str., Tbilisi 0193 (Georgia); Amador, C. H. S. [Brazilian Center for Research in Physics, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22290180 (Brazil)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

State Instability and Terrorism .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I explore the relationship between political instability and terrorism in this dissertation, using the Global Terrorism Database (GTD), which contains both domestic and transnational terrorism. (more)

Fahey, Susan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Abstract 2511: Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...kinase 3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway Dinesh Kumar Thotala 1 Dennis E. Hallahan 1 Eugenia M. Yazlovitskaya 2 1Washington Univ. School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO...

Dinesh Kumar Thotala; Dennis E. Hallahan; and Eugenia M. Yazlovitskaya

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

75

Abstract #2293: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...kinase-3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway Dinesh Kumar Thotala Dennis Hallahan Eugenia Yazlovitskaya Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN 100th AACR Annual Meeting-- Apr 18-22...

Dinesh Kumar Thotala; Dennis Hallahan; and Eugenia Yazlovitskaya

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ancient genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2015 review-article PART IV: ANCIENT GENOMICS 1001 70 198 Discussion meeting issue...author and source are credited. Ancient genomics Clio Der Sarkissian Morten E. Allentoft...field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Genome duplications (polyploidy) / ancientGenome duplications (polyploidy) / ancient genome duplications (genome duplications (paleopolyploidypaleopolyploidy))  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome duplications (polyploidy) / ancientGenome duplications (polyploidy) / ancient genome duplications (genome duplications (paleopolyploidypaleopolyploidy)) Mechanism? e.g. a diploid cell undergoes;Paramecium genome duplicationsParamecium genome duplications #12;Comparison of two scaffolds originating from

Utrecht, Universiteit

79

Topographic Instability: Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theories of topographic instability predict growth of perturbations of mean flow and wave modes due to their interaction with mountains under favorable conditions. Mountain torques form an important part of this interaction. It has been suggested ...

Joseph Egger; Klaus-Peter Hoinka

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Quantification of radiation induced crosslinking in a commercial, toughened silicone rubber, TR-55, by 1H MQ-NMR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation induced degradation in a commercial, filled silicone composite has been studied by SPME/GC-MS, DMA, DSC, swelling, and Multiple Quantum NMR. Analysis of volatile and semivolatile species indicates degradation via decomposition of the peroxide curing catalyst and radiation induced backbiting reactions. DMA, swelling, and spin-echo NMR analysis indicate a increase in crosslink density of near 100% upon exposure to a cumulative dose of 250 kGray. Analysis of the sol-fraction via Charlseby-Pinner analysis indicates a ratio of chain scission to crosslinking yields of 0.38, consistent with the dominance of the crosslinking observed by DMA, swelling and spin-echo NMR and the chain scissioning reactions observed by MS analysis. Multiple Quantum NMR has revealed a bimodal distribution of residual dipolar couplings near 1 krad/sec and 5 krad/sec in an approximately 90:10 ratio, consistent with bulk network chains and chains associated with the filler surface. Upon exposure to radiation, the mean {Omega}{sub d} for both domains and the width of both domains both increased. The MQ NMR analysis provided increase insight into the effects of ionizing radiation on the network structure of silicone polymers.

Maxwell, R; Chinn, S; Alviso, C; Harvey, C A; Giuliani, J; Wilson, T; Cohenour, R

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System Yanrong Su, Jarah Meador and Adayabalam S. Balajee Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West, 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) inflicts a wide variety of lesions in the genomic DNA. Among them, DNA double strand break (DSB) is considered to be the critical lesion for most of the deleterious radiation effects including carcinogenesis. Much of our knowledge on induction and repair kinetics of DSB has come from studies in two dimensional cell culture systems. However, the damage signaling and repair responses to DSB in tissue microenvironment are largely unknown. Knowledge of tissue responses to

82

Genome Engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dan Voytas, University of Minnesota, at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Voytas, Dan [University of Minnesota

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comparative genomics and genome evolution in yeasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sternberg and Janet Thornton Comparative genomics and genome evolution in yeasts Kenneth...powerful model system for comparative genomics research. The availability of multiple...cerevisiae |evolution|bioinformatics|genomics| 1. Introduction The rationale put...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response Aris Alexandrou and Jian Jian Li Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of California Davis, Sacramento, California, 95817 The initiation of the circadian rhythm field occurred when the Takahashi group defined a mutation in the mouse gene "Clock" and cloned the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) in the mid- 1990's (1-3). Currently more than a dozen clock genes have been identified (3-4). Disruptions in the circadian rhythm via changes in environmental conditions, such as, diet, temperature, and night/day hours lead to the pathogenesis of a multitude of diseases, such as, cancer, diabetes mellitus,

85

CXC Receptor 1 and 2 and Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors Alter Radiation-induced Lung Disease in the Mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We previously reported increased numbers of neutrophils to be associated with the development of the radiation-induced lung responses of alveolitis (pneumonitis) and fibrosis in mice. In the present study we investigated whether CXC receptor 1 and 2 antagonism with DF2156A, a small molecule inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, or the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat decreases the lung response to irradiation. Methods and Materials: KK/HIJ mice received 14 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of them received drug treatment 3 times per week from the day of irradiation until they were killed because of respiratory distress symptoms. Results: Irradiated mice receiving sivelestat survived 18% longer than did mice receiving radiation alone (73 vs 60 days for female mice, 91 vs 79 days for male mice), whereas postirradiation survival times did not differ between the group of mice receiving DF2156A and the radiation-only group. The numbers of neutrophils in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not differ among groups of irradiated mice, but they significantly exceeded the levels in unirradiated control mice. The extent of alveolitis, assessed histologically, did not differ between irradiated mice treated with either drug and those receiving radiation alone, when assessed at the end of the experiment, but it was significantly reduced, as were the neutrophil measures, in sivelestat-treated mice at the common kill time of 60 days after irradiation. Mice treated with radiation and DF2156A developed significantly less fibrosis than did mice receiving radiation alone, and this difference was associated with decreased expression of interleukin-13 in lung tissue. Conclusions: We conclude that neutrophil elastase inhibition affects alveolitis and prolongs survival, whereas CXCR1/2 antagonism reduces radiation-induced fibrotic lung disease in mice without affecting the onset of distress.

Fox, Jessica [Department of Medicine and the Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Medicine and the Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haston, Christina K., E-mail: christina.haston@mcgill.ca [Department of Medicine and the Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiation-induced ICAM-1 Expression via TGF-?1 Pathway on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells; Comparison between X-ray and Carbon-ion Beam Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......expression in cells irradiated with car- bon-ion beam and the same...HUVE cells at 48 hours after car- bon beam irradiation. ICAM-1...human lymphoblasts and mice are defective in radiation- induced apoptosis...endothelial growth factor in lung car- cinoma cells. Int J Radiat......

Hiroki Kiyohara; Yasuki Ishizaki; Yoshiyuki Suzuki; Hiroyuki Katoh; Nobuyuki Hamada; Tatsuya Ohno; Takeo Takahashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

arXiv:cond-mat/0301569v325Aug2003 Radiation-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in a 2D Electron Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at = c due to heating at the cyclotron resonance. Interest in this phenomenon was heightened when, using on the ratio of radiation frequency to cyclotron frequency. We perform a diagrammatic calculation and find, µ, to the cyclotron frequency, c, these radiation-induced oscillations are controlled by the ratio

88

The torus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion instability of a toroidal current ring in low-beta magnetized plasma is investigated. Qualitative agreement is obtained with experiments on spheromak expansion and with essential properties of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs), unifying the two apparently disparate classes of fast and slow CMEs.

Kliem, B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

INSTABILITIES IN THE SNS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will have a D.C. beam current of 40 A at extraction, making it one of the worlds most intense accelerators. Coherent instabilities are a major concern and efforts to predict beam behavior are described.

BLASKIEWICZ,M.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range 75-150 MBq for Tc-99m sestamibi and 35 MBq-70 MBq for F-18 FDG in order to obtain benefit/risk ratios comparable to those of mammography in these age groups. These dose ranges should be achievable with enhancements to current technology while maintaining a reasonable examination time. Conclusions: The results of the dose estimates in this study clearly indicate that if molecular imaging techniques are to be of value in screening for breast cancer, then the administered doses need to be substantially reduced to better match the effective doses of mammography.

O'Connor, Michael K.; Li Hua; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Clancy, Conor B.; Vetter, Richard J. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, St. James's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Radiation Safety, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NMR and Structural Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NMR and Structural Genomics ... The role of NMR in structural genomics is outlined, with particular emphasis on using protein domains as targets. ... Targets in Structural Genomics ...

David Staunton; Jo Owen; Iain D. Campbell

2002-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Instability characteristics of fluidelastic instability of tube rows in crossflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study is reported to investigate the jump phenomenon in critical flow velocities for tube rows with different pitch-to-diameter ratios and the excited and intrinsic instabilities for a tube row with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.75. The experimental data provide additional insights into the instability phenomena of tube arrays in crossflow. 9 refs., 10 figs.

Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

6. Instabilities 6.1 Surface tension driven instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6. Instabilities Apple® #12;6.1 Surface tension driven instabilities ? ? Es min, but slow Es · · #P1 a b Pb Pa #P2 - + viscous stress $ unstable surface tension $ stable (at the onset ! non linear;dynamics: viscous forces or inertia? viscous flow: Ohnesorge number inertia: ! inertia! viscous 6.1 Surface

Bico,José

95

Genomic (In)stability of the Breast Tumor Microenvironment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tumor biology, response to treatment...as long-term storage. Formalin causes...with a higher frequency of mutation artifacts...cancer using energy-transfer primers...et alA high frequency of sequence alterations...AI event, the frequency of AI in the...paraffin-embedding and tissue storage. Furthermore...

Seth Rummel; Allyson L. Valente; Jennifer L. Kane; Craig D. Shriver; and Rachel E. Ellsworth

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Final Technical Report - Mechanisms and pathways controlling genomic instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project used model organisms, the zebrafish and the Japanese medaka fish to investigate the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on the vertebrate embryo. Endpoints measured included apoptotic cell death, aging, and oxidative stress.

Dynan, William S. [Georgia Regents University] [Georgia Regents University

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Libing [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghua@nic.bmi.ac.c [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Lisheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

Elting, Linda S. [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D. [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a ??Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Radiation Induced Mammary Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Induced Mammary Cancer R.L. Ullrich * R.J. Preston # * Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77550 # Biology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A Over the last......

R.L. Ullrich; R.J. Preston

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

Sandia National Laboratories: Fusion Instabilities Lessened by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

instabilities that grow on a liner's surface without a secondary magnetic field. This "bubble-and-spike" structure is caused by the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which...

102

UCSC cancer genomics browser.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chicago, IL Abstract 5087: UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser 2.0 Jingchun Zhu 1 Brian Craft...and analyze that data. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer...enhances the interpretability of the cancer genomics information. UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser...

J Zhu; JZ Sanborn; T Wang; F Hsu; S Benz; C Szeto; L Esserman; D Haussler

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfven cyclotron instability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Instabilities (Gary, Vinas, Hellinger, Marsch) Firehose Mirror, Cyclotron Cyclotron-resonant heating 2 3... Instability Mirror Instability Firehose Instability...

106

Landscape evolutionary genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1001 60 70 129 Landscape evolutionary genomics David B. Lowry * * davidbryantlowry...com University Program in Genetics and Genomics, , Box 3565 Duke University Medical...genetics|adaptation|landscape ecology|genomics|natural selection|GIS| 1. Introduction...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Retrospective Cohort Study of Bronchial Doses and Radiation-Induced Atelectasis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors Located Close to the Bronchial Tree  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the doseresponse relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 2.0 cm{sup 3}]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Results: Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 0.1cm3}) was used for further analysis. The median value of D{sub 0.1cm3} (?/? = 3 Gy) was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 147 Gy{sub 3} (range, 20-293 Gy{sub 3}). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 210 Gy{sub 3}, and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 105 Gy{sub 3}. Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). Conclusion: In this retrospective study a significant doseresponse relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown.

Karlsson, Kristin, E-mail: kristin.karlsson@karolinska.se [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Nyman, Jan [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Baumann, Pia; Wersll, Peter [Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Drugge, Ninni [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gagliardi, Giovanna [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Persson, Jan-Olov [Statistical Research Group, Mathematical Statistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rutkowska, Eva [Physics Department, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral (United Kingdom); Tullgren, Owe [Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Lax, Ingmar [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Human Genome From human genome to other  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genome to health Structural Genomics initiative #12;What is the Human Genome Project? · U.S. govtThe Human Genome Project From human genome to other genomes and to gene function June 2000 From that arise from genome research #12;The Human Genome Project Project began in 1990 as a $3 billion, 15-year

Linial, Michal

109

Control of Motorcycle Steering Instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Motorcycle Steering Instabilities SIMOS EVANGELOU, DAVID J.N. LIMEBEER, ROBIN S. SHARP-performance motorcycles often employ a steering damper producing a moment that opposes the angular velocity

Cambridge, University of

110

Chapter 15 - Genomics of Colorectal Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women, particularly in Western and developed nations. The high mortality rate has been attributed to the fact that colon cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage. Three primary subtypes of CRC have been described based on their molecular pathology and their underlying genetics: chromosomal instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island hypermethylation. Over the last 30 years, molecular and genetic studies have determined a number of key genetic pathways that are subverted in CRC, including those involving APC, KRAS, and the p53 tumor suppressor. More recently, high-throughput, genome-wide studies have begun to characterize the broader genomic features of CRC. These high-throughput studies provide an ever expanding, and increasingly complex view of the molecular underpinnings of CRC. The chief goal of these studies being the identification of new therapeutic targets, as well as the definition of prognostic and diagnostic biological markers of CRC. Here, we highlight the key genetic and molecular pathways underlying CRC, as well as more recent insights into this disease uncovered by genomic studies.

Daniel Gaston; Carman Giacomantonio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal Genomics, Personalized Medicine, & YOU Carrie Iwema, PhD, MLS 21st May 2012 AAAS/Science Translational Medicine panel discussion; MLA 2012 #12;Timeline: Human Genome Sequence HSLS, U.Pitt 1995 2014 2000 2003 2007 2007 2010 Human Genome Draft Sequence Complete Human Reference Genome Individual Human

Napp, Nils

112

Vortex driven flame dynamics and combustion instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion instability in premixed combustors mostly arises due to the coupling between heat release rate dynamics and system acoustics. It is crucial to understand the instability mechanisms to design reliable, high ...

Altay, Hurrem Murat

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Magnetic Curvature-Drift Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new fluid instability has been discovered which arises from the coupling of the drifttearing mode at the diamagnetic frequency with a mode with a velocity just below the curvature drift velocity. This mode, which can also be destabilized by cross-field transport, is unstable over a wide range of conditions and mode numbers for reversed-field pinches or spheromaks.

John M. Finn and J. F. Drake

1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Synthesis and characterization of superabsorbent polymer prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylamide onto carboxymethyl cellulose for controlled release of agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Superabsorbent polymer (SAP) was synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of acrylamide (AM) onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in the presence of a crosslinking agent, N,N?-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). The effects of various parameters, such as dose, the amount of CMC, AM, MBA and ionic strength on the swelling ratio were investigated. In order to evaluate its controlled release potential, SAP was loaded with potassium nitrate (KNO3) as an agrochemical model and its potential for controlled release of KNO3 was studied. The amount of released KNO3 was analyzed by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The results from controlled release experiment agreed very well with the results from swelling experiment. The synthesized SAP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The obtained SAP exhibited a swelling ratio of 190g/g of dry gel.

Kasinee Hemvichian; Auraruk Chanthawong; Phiriyatorn Suwanmala

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Multifragmentation: Surface instabilities or statistical decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space.

Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effect of pressure anisotropy on magnetorotational instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that two new instabilities of hybrid type can occur in a rotating magnetized plasma with anisotropic pressure, i.e., the rotational firehose instability and the rotational mirror instability. In the case of {beta}{sub parallel} > {beta}{sub perpendicular}, where {beta}{sub parallel} and {beta}{sub -perpendicular} are the ratios of the parallel and perpendicular plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure, the pressure anisotropy tends to suppress both new instabilities; in the case {beta}{sub perpendicular} > {beta}{sub parallel}, it leads to their strengthening. In the latter case, the perturbations considered can be unstable even if the Velikhov instability criterion is not satisfied.

Mikhailovskii, A. B. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Nuclear Fusion (Russian Federation); Lominadze, J. G. [Georgian National Astrophysical Observatory (United States)], E-mail: j.lominadze@astro-ge.org; Churikov, A. P. [Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University (Russian Federation); Erokhin, N. N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Nuclear Fusion (Russian Federation); Erokhin, N. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation); Tsypin, V. S

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

The genomics of adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...introduction Special feature 1001 70 197 198 The genomics of adaptation Jacek Radwan 1 * Wieslaw...One contribution to a Special Feature Genomics of adaptation. The amount and nature...aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Genomics of human longevity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the original work is properly cited. Genomics of human longevity P. E. Slagboom 1...progress. human longevity|longevity genomics|epigenetics and ageing| 1. Introduction...Innovation Oriented Research Programme on Genomics (SenterNovem; IGE01014 and IGE5007...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Climate Instability and Public Health  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Feedback control of resistive instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Instability of colliding metastable strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The breaking of $U(1)_R$ symmetry plays a crucial role in modeling the breaking of supersymmetry (SUSY). In the models that possess both SUSY preserving and SUSY breaking vacua, tube-like cosmic strings called R-tubes, whose surfaces are constituted by domain walls interpolating a false and a true vacuum with some winding numbers, can exist. Their (in)stability can strongly constrain SUSY breaking models theirselves. In the present study, we investigate the dynamical (in)stability of two colliding metastable tube-like strings by field-theoretic simulations. From them, we find that the strings become unstable, depending on the relative collision angle and speed of two strings, and the false vacuum is eventually filled out by the true vacuum owing to rapid expansion of the strings or unstable bubbles created as remnants of the collision.

Takashi Hiramatsu; Minoru Eto; Kohei Kamada; Tatsuo Kobayashi; Yutaka Ookouchi

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Why This Project This research will be to investigate the condition known as genomic instability. This can be defined as a state in which genetic alterations, including chromosome aberrations and gene mutations, occur at rates that are much higher than normal. In fact, genomic instability is what allows a normal cell to accumulate the multiple genetic alterations that are required to convert it into a cancer cell. The chromosomes of human cells have structures at their ends called telomeres. Telomeres normally function to prevent chromosomes from fusing together end-to-end. An important

124

Modes of storage ring coherent instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Longitudinal impedance in a beam and various modes of longitudinal coherent instabilities are discussed. The coasting beam coherent instability, microwave instability, and single-bunch longitudinal coherent instabilities are considered. The Vlasov equation is formulated, and a method of solving it is developed. The synchrotron modes are treated, which take the possible bunch shape distortion fully into consideration. A method of treating the synchrotron mode coupling in the case of a small bunch is discussed which takes advantage of the fact that only a few of the synchrotron modes can contribute in such a case. The effect of many bunches on the coherent motion of the beam and the longitudinal symmetric coupled bunch modes are discussed. The transverse impedance is then introduced, and the transverse coasting beam instability is discussed. Various bunched beam instabilities are discussed, including both single bunch instabilities and coupled bunch instabilities. The Vlasov equation for transverse as well as longitudinal motion of particles is introduced as well as a method of solving it within a linear approximation. Head-tail modes and short bunch instabilities and strong coupling instabilities in the long bunch case are covered. (LEW)

Wang, J.M.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly lowered for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.

Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.M.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Observations of the PSR transverse instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fast instability with beam loss is observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) when the injected beam current exceeds thresholds, with both bunched and unbunched beams. Large coherent transverse oscillations occur before and during beam loss. Recent observations of the instability indicate that it is an e-p''-type instability, driven by coupled oscillations due to electrons trapped within the proton beam. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Colton, E. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Fitzgerald, D.; Hardek, T.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.; Wang, T.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Neuffer, D. (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Buckling instability in monolayer network structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A buckling instability has been discovered in monolayer network structures. The instability, which can be seen by fluorescence microscopy, occurs when a network formed in the gasliquid-expanded (LE) two-phase region is heated. It is interepreted as an Euler instability that arises because of constraints on the monolayer imposed by the network and by the interactions between domains of the LE phase. An analysis in terms of a Langevin equation with a Ginzburg-Landau free energy shows how the instability is related to the equilibrium and transport properties of the monolayer.

Keith J. Stine; Charles M. Knobler; Rashmi C. Desai

1990-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoeitic tissue to low dose-low LET radiation Munira Kadhim Oxford Brookes University Abstract Radiation-induced responses at the cellular and whole body levels are influenced by genetic predisposition, with implications for environmental and potentially, diagnostic exposures. Currently, the extent to which genetic background play a role in the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in radiation-induced delayed Genomic Instability (GI) is not fully understood. In previous studies, our results have shown that the CBA/H and C57BL/6 mouse strains, have differing sensitivities in the induction of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) in terms of chromosomal instability, following exposure to high dose-high LET and high dose-low LET

130

Genomics and Systems Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work cover diverse fields such as energy, agriculture, and environmental cleanup. Get Expertise Babetta Marrone Biofuels Program Manager Email Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Chris Detter Emerging Threats Program Manager: Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email "We were asked to build a rocket ship," said developer Joel Berendzen, "but instead we built a 10,000 mph motorcycle." - Sequedex team LANL leads the world in computational finishing of microbial genomes Protein research Read caption + In 2013, Los Alamos scientist Richard Sayre and his team genetically

131

Querying genomic databases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Phylogenetic Inference Using Whole Genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phylogenetic Inference Using Whole Genomes Bruce Rannala1 and Ziheng Yang2 1 Genome Center.yang@ucl.ac.uk Annu. Rev. Genomics Hum. Genet. 2008. 9:217­31 First published online as a Review in Advance on June 3, 2008 The Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics is online at genom.annualreviews.org This article

133

Genome Science/Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science & Innovation » Science & Innovation » Science & Engineering Capabilities » Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health » Environmental Microbiology » Genome Genome Science/Technologies Los Alamos using cutting-edge sequencing, finishing, and analysis, impact valuable genomic data. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Momchilo Vuyisich Bioenergy and Biomedical Sciences Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email State-of-the art technology and extensive genomics expertise Protein research Read caption + Los Alamos National Laboratory graduate student, Patricia Langan, changes the properties of a green fluorescent protein in order to create new fluorescent protein variants.

134

Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

135

Webinar: Materials Genome Initative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

136

Capillary instability in nanowire geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism has been applied extensively as a framework for growing single-crystal semiconductor nanowires for applications spanning optoelectronic, sensor and energy-related technologies. Recent experiments have demonstrated that subtle changes in VLS growth conditions produce a diversity of nanowire morphologies, and result in intricate kinked structures that may yield novel properties. These observations have motivated modeling studies that have linked kinking phenomena to processes at the triple line between vapor, liquid and solid phases that cause spontaneous "tilting" of the growth direction. Here we present atomistic simulations and theoretical analyses that reveal a tilting instability that is intrinsic to nanowire geometries, even in the absence of pronounced anisotropies in solid-liquid interface properties. The analysis produces a very simple conclusion: the transition between axisymmetric and tilted triple lines is shown to occur when the triple line geometry satisfies Young's force-balance condition. The intrinsic nature of the instability may have broad implications for the design of experimental strategies for controlled growth of crystalline nanowires with complex geometries.

T. Frolov; W. C. Carter; M. Asta

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Abstract IA37: Clinical genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research. 15 October 2014 meeting-abstract Clinical Genomics Clinical Genomics: Oral Presentations - Invited Abstracts Abstracts...2013; San Diego, CA Abstract IA37: Clinical genomics Katherine A. Janeway Dana-Farber Cancer Institute...

Katherine A. Janeway

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Genomics of isolation in hybrids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...edited by Patrik Nosil and Jeffrey L. Feder Genomics of isolation in hybrids Zachariah Gompert...limitations to the study of the speciation genomics. Further progress in understanding the genomics of speciation will require large-scale...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Program of Study Research Areas Students Applying Correspondence Graduate Genomics. Students receive training in the biological, physical and computational sciences through of primary institutional affiliation. The Functional Genomics program is administered through the Graduate

Thomas, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Experimental control of the spheromak tilting instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) tilting instability of the spheromak configuration has been experimentally investigated by recording the time evolution of the magnetic field with small magnetic probes. Passive coil systems such as the figure?eight and saddle coils have been proven experimentally effective against this instability.

C. Munson; A. Janos; F. Wysocki; M. Yamada

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Beam Dynamics and Instabilities in MEIC Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the narrow and broadband impedance calculations and various instabilities generated by single and multiple bunches. We study the physical phenomena such as intra-beam scattering, touschek scattering, beam-gas scattering, ion trapping and fast beam-ion instability, etc. Details will be discussed in the paper.

S. Ahmed, G.A. Krafft, B.C. Yunn

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Parametric instability: An elementary demonstration and discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple easy to construct system which exhibits parametric instability is presented. The two lowest?order resonances are described and analyzed in detail. The analysis stresses the physical and intuitive aspects of the problem. The purpose of the paper is to give the reader some familiarity with parametric oscillators and parametric instability.

William Case

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Effect of pressure anisotropy on magnetorotational instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that two new instabilities of hybrid type can occur in a rotating magnetized plasma with anisotropic pressure, i.e., the rotational firehose instability and the rotational mirror instability. In the case of {beta}{sub Parallel-To} > {beta}{sub Up-Tack }, where {beta}{sub Parallel-To} and {beta}{sub Up-Tack} are the ratios of the parallel and perpendicular plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure, the pressure anisotropy tends to suppress both new instabilities; in the case {beta}{sub Up-Tack} > {beta}{sub Parallel-To }, it leads to their strengthening. In the latter case, the perturbations considered can be unstable even if the Velikhov instability criterion is not satisfied.

Mikhailovskii, A. B. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Nuclear Fusion (Russian Federation); Lominadze, J. G., E-mail: j.lominadze@astro-ge.org [Georgian National Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Churikov, A. P. [Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University (Russian Federation); Erokhin, N. N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Nuclear Fusion (Russian Federation); Erokhin, N. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation); Tsypin, V. S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an analytical model for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that allows for an approximate but still very accurate and appealing description of the instability physics in the linear regime. The model is based on the second law of Newton and it has been developed with the aim of dealing with the instability of accelerated elastic solids. It yields the asymptotic instability growth rate but also describes the initial transient phase determined by the initial conditions. We have applied the model to solid/solid and solid/fluid interfaces with arbitrary Atwood numbers. The results are in excellent agreement with previous models that yield exact solutions but which are of more limited validity. Our model allows for including more complex physics. In particular, the present approach is expected to lead to a more general theory of the instability that would allow for describing the transition to the plastic regime.

A. R. Piriz, J. J. Lpez Cela, O. D. Cortzar, N. A. Tahir, and D. H. H. Hoffmann

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Communicating Genomics:GTL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute User Meeting Sponsored By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science March 29-April 1, 2006 Embassy Suites Hotel and DOE Joint Genome Institute Walnut Creek, California iii Contents Agenda .................................................................................................................. iv Speaker Presentations . .........................................................................................1 Abtracts in order of presentation according to agenda (p. iv) Poster Presentations ..............................................................................................9 Posters alphabetical by first author. *Presenting author. Attendees...............................................................................................................75

148

Nonlinear Dynamics of Single Bunch Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nonlinear equation is derived that governs the evolution of the amplitude of unstable oscillations with account of quantum diffusion effects due to the synchrotron radiation. Numerical solutions to this equation predict a variety of possible scenarios of nonlinear evolution of the instability some of which are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Microwave single bunch instability in circular accelerators has been observed in many machines. The instability usually arises when the number of particles in the bunch exceeds some critical value, Nc, which varies depending on the parameters of the accelerating regime. Recent observations on the SLC damping rings at SLAC with a new low-impedance vacuum chamber revealed new interesting features of the instability. In some cases, after initial exponential growth, the instability eventually saturated at a level that remained constant through the accumulation cycle. In other regimes, relaxation-type oscillations were measured in nonlinear phase of the instability. In many cases, the instability was characterized by a frequency close to the second harmonic of the synchrotron oscillations. Several attempts have been made to address the nonlinear stage of the instability based on either computer simulations or some specific assumptions regarding the structure of the unstable mode. An attempt of a more general consideration of the problem is carried out in this paper. We adopt an approach recently developed in plasma physics for analysis of nonlinear behavior of weakly unstable modes in dynamic systems. Assuming that the growth rate of the instability is much smaller than its frequency, we find a time dependent solution to Vlasov equation and derive an equation for the complex amplitude of the oscillations valid in the nonlinear regime. Numerical solutions to this equation predict a variety of possible scenarios of nonlinear evolution of the instability some of which are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.S.; /Texas U.

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Taylor Instability of Incompressible Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

\ UNCLASSIFIED ' ;c ,. ' UNCLASSIFIED AECU-29'79 Subject Category: PHYSICS UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION TAYLOR INSTABILITY OF INCOMPRESSIBLE LIQUIDS BY Enrico Fermi John von Neumann , _ November 1955 [ TIS Issuance D.a&?] Los Alamos Scientific Labqratqry Los Alamos, New Mexico Technical Information Service, Ooic Ridge, Tennessee DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available document. original I , The date for Part 1 is September 4, 1951. The date for Part 2 is August 19, 1953. Work performed under Contract PTo. W-7405-Eng-36. The Atomic Energy Commission makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy or usefulness of the lnformatlon or statements contained

150

Radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems, and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g.\\ at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H \\textsc{ii} region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick "adiabatic" regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved,for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state, and we derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability conditi...

Jacquet, Emmanuel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

Niazi, Tamim M. [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Azoulay, Laurant [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Marijnen, Corrie [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bujko, Kryzstof [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Nasr, Elie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon); Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fuzzy Genome Sequence Assembly for Single and Environmental Genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuzzy Genome Sequence Assembly for Single and Environmental Genomes Sara Nasser, Adrienne Breland. Traditional methods obtain a microorganism's DNA by culturing it in- dividually. Recent advances in genomics microbial commu- nities are often very complex with tens and hundreds of species. Assembling these genomes

Nicolescu, Monica

153

COMPUTATIONAL GENOMICS: MAPPING, COMPARISON, AND ANNOTATION OF GENOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

address key issues in the different stages of genome research: planning of a genome sequencing project areas: (1) In relation to the early stages of a genome project, we address physical mapping, and we structure and sequence analysis of orthologous human and mouse genomic regions, and develop ROSETTA

Batzoglou, Serafim

154

Eukaryotic Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

From the JGI webportal users can choose Eukaryotic genomes from a photo list, access the JGI FTP directories to download data files, use the Tree of Life navigation tool, or choose a genome and go directly to a website specific to that one genome. The individual sites include direct access to download sequence files, BLAST, search, view and navigate the genomic annotations.

155

Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology GENOMICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology GENOMICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY A multidisciplinary organization, the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology is a composed of faculty members representing projects at the Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology include the development of transgenic plants

156

Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on Genomic Studies of Algae Paths toward Algal Genomics Arthur R. Grossman* The Carnegie of genomic information that is being used to help researchers understand the gene content of organisms, how the expression of genes. In this introductory manuscript, I discuss select algae and how genomics is impacting

157

Human Genome Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Genomics and Malaria Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...-targeted and human-targeted approaches but in reality, malaria results from three intimately interacting organisms (Figure 1). Fortunately, genomics-based approaches to malaria offer the strategic advantage of considering all three participants through integrative data sets, allowing us to identify... The genomic sequences of the malarial vector, parasite, and host the three components of the malarial transmission system have been known for at least two years. It may be possible to counter the disease by harnessing this genomic information to launch a strategic attack on the parasite during vulnerable stages of its life cycle.

Vernick K.D.; Waters A.P.

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Center for integrative genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Center for integrative genomics Report 2005­2006 #12;Presentation Director's message 4 Scientific advisory committee 6 Organigram of the CIG 7 research The structure and function of genomes and their evolution alexandrereymond ­ Genome structure and expression 10 henrikKaessmann ­ Evolutionary genomics 12

Kaessmann, Henrik

160

Sequencing the Rice Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University of Delhi and Nagendra Singh of the Indian Agricultural Research Institute) and...representing a single contig. On this point, Sasaki presented evidence from the RGP...ncgr.ac.cn/index.html Indian Rice Genome Program (University of Delhi...

Nancy A. Eckardt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Genome mining for methanobactins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methanotrophic bacteria have potential as a biological methane sink, and methanobactins are a set of peptides important in regulating this activity. A genome mining study highlights genes involved in methanobactin production, but also suggests that not all methanotrophs have them.

Grace E Kenney; Amy C Rosenzweig

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

Annotating individual human genomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants.

Ali Torkamani; Ashley A. Scott-Van Zeeland; Eric J. Topol; Nicholas J. Schork

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Genomic library construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compositions and methods for amplifying nucleic acid sequences from a single cell are provided. Compositions and methods for constructing a genomic library from a single cell are also provided.

Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Zhang, Kun (San Diego, CA)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Torsional instability of chiral carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the presence of a torsional instability in single-wall carbon nanotubes which causes small diameter chiral carbon nanotubes to show natural torsion. To obtain insight into the nature of this ...

Dresselhaus, Mildred

165

Instabilities in particle-laden flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particles are present in many industrial processes and in nature. Dry granular flows and suspensions have been well studied and present a broad range of problems in terms of rheology and instabilities. In both cases, new ...

Dupuy, Benjamin, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thermal instability in planar solar coronal structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prominentes and filaments are thought to arise as a consequence of a magnetized plasma undergoing thermal instability. Therefore the thermal stability of a magnetized plasma is investigated under coronal condi...

R. A. M. Van der Linden; M. Goossens

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nucleomorph genomes: structure, function, origin and evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nucleomorph genomes: structure, function, origin and evolution John M. Archibald Summary and four genomes--two nuclear genomes, an endosymbiont- derived plastid genome and a mitochondrial genome derived from the host cell. Like mitochondrial and plastid genomes, the genome of the endosymbiont nucleus

Archibald, John

168

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet Fall 2010 #12;Contents Course Requirements Bioinformatics and Genomics Curriculum -------------------------------------------------------8 General #12;Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

dePamphilis, Claude

169

DNA damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic instability David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Secretory clusterin (sCLU) is a glycoprotein secreted from cells following exposure to genotoxic stress, and sCLU expression is elevated in many different disease states. sCLU is a pro-survival protein that acts as a molecular chaperone to remove cell debris caused by trauma to cells and tissues in vivo. sCLU expression is extremely sensitive to oxidative stress and DNA damage and can be induced by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), as low as 2 cGy. We previously demonstrated that sCLU was induced after LDIR by activation of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF-1R), and downstream stimulation of Src/MAPK/Erk-1/2 to promote binding of the Egr-1

170

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

171

Genomics and plant cells: application of genomics strategies to Arabidopsis cell biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

29 June 2002 research-article Genomics and plant cells: application of genomics strategies to Arabidopsis cell biology Michael...the way we conduct plant science. Arabidopsis Genomics Functional Genomics Cell Biology| Genomics and...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

JGI - Structural Genomics Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structural Genomics Program Structural Genomics Program The structural characterization of proteins of unknown function can be described as structural genomics, an approach in which structure determination by X-ray crystallography supplies key functional information. This is exemplified by studies of the carboxysome. The structures of the first carboxysome shell proteins (Kerfeld et al., Science 2005) confirmed earlier hypotheses that they are indeed the basic building blocks of the carboxysome shell; the quaternary structure and the higher order assemblies of the proteins in the crystals provided insight into how they assemble into shell facets. Likewise, our structure of the carboxysome component CsoS3 revealed that it was a member of the beta-carbonic family, despite having no detectable sequence homology at the level of primary structure

173

Genomics of cellulolytic bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heterogeneous plant biomass is efficiently decomposed by the interplay of a great number of different enzymes. The enzyme systems in cellulolytic bacteria have been investigated by sequencing and bioinformatic analysis of genomes from plant biomass degrading microorganisms with valuable insights into the variety of the involved enzymes. This broadened our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of plant polymer degradation and made the enzymes applicable for modern biotechnology. A list of the truly cellulolytic bacteria described and the available genomic information was examined for proteins with cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic capability. The importance of the isolation, characterization and genomic sequencing of cellulolytic microorganisms and their usage for sustainable energy production from biomass and other residues, is emphasized.

Daniela E Koeck; Alexander Pechtl; Vladimir V Zverlov; Wolfgang H Schwarz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microbial Genomics Data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

As of March 2008, The Joint Genome Institute has released 296 Prokaryotic microbial sites, with 216 in finished status.

175

The rice genome project in?Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rice genome project in Japan Takuji Sasaki Rice Genome Research Program, National...Kannondai 2-chome, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, Japan Since 1991, the Rice Genome Research Program in Japan has carried out rice genomics, such as large-scale...

Takuji Sasaki

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human genome sequence can be thought of as an instruction manual for our species, written and rewritten over more than a billion of years of evolution. Taking a complete inventory of our genome, dissecting its genes ...

Mikkelsen, Tarjei Sigurd, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Frequency Instability Problems in North American Interconnections  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frequency Instability Problems in Frequency Instability Problems in North American Interconnections May 1, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1473 Frequency Instability Problems in North American Interconnections Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

178

Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Rayleigh-B\\'enard Instability in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the observation that electrons in graphene, in the hydrodynamic regime of transport, can be treated as a two-dimensional ultra-relativistic gas with very low shear viscosity, we examine the existence of the Rayleigh-B\\'enard instability in a massless electron-hole plasma. Firstly, we perform a linear stability analysis, derive the leading contributions to the relativistic Rayleigh number, and calculate the critical value above which the instability develops. By replacing typical values for graphene, such as thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, temperature, and sample sizes, we find that the instability might be experimentally observed in the near future. Additionally, we have performed simulations for vanishing reduced chemical potential and compare the measured critical Rayleigh number with the theoretical prediction, finding good agreement.

Furtmaier, Oliver; Karlin, Ilya; Succi, Sauro; Herrmann, Hans Jrgen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Buoyancy Instabilities in Degenerate, Collisional, Magnetized Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In low-collisionality plasmas, anisotropic heat conduction due to a magnetic field leads to buoyancy instabilities for any nonzero temperature gradient. We study analogous instabilities in degenerate {\\it collisional} plasmas, i.e., when the electron collision frequency is large compared to the electron cyclotron frequency. Although heat conduction is nearly isotropic in this limit, the small residual anisotropy ensures that collisional degenerate plasmas are also convectively unstable independent of the sign of the temperature gradient. We show that the range of wavelengths that are unstable is independent of the magnetic field strength, while the growth time increases with decreasing magnetic field strength. We discuss the application of these collisional buoyancy instabilities to white dwarfs and neutron stars. Magnetic tension and the low specific heat of a degenerate plasma significantly limit their effectiveness; the most promising venues for growth are in the liquid oceans of young, weakly magnetized n...

Chang, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Spheromak tilting instability in cylindrical geometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The internal tilting instability in a force?free spheromak plasma in cylindrical geometry is examined. It is found that this instability originally found in spherical geometry also occurs in cylindrical geometry. The analysis proceeds by first demonstrating that if no mode rational surface is present in the plasma a necessary and sufficient condition for ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability is that there exist a solution to ?B m = ? m B m where B m ?exp(i m?) with ? m

John M. Finn; Wallace M. Manheimer; Edward Ott

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Instability of nonlinear dispersive solitary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider linear instability of solitary waves of several classes of dispersive long wave models. They include generalizations of KDV, BBM, regularized Boussinesq equations, with general dispersive operators and nonlinear terms. We obtain criteria for the existence of exponentially growing solutions to the linearized problem. The novelty is that we dealt with models with nonlocal dispersive terms, for which the spectra problem is out of reach by the Evans function technique. For the proof, we reduce the linearized problem to study a family of nonlocal operators, which are closely related to properties of solitary waves. A continuation argument with a moving kernel formula is used to find the instability criteria. These techniques have also been extended to study instability of periodic waves and of the full water wave problem.

Zhiwu Lin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Instability of nonlinear dispersive solitary waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider linear instability of solitary waves of several classes of dispersive long wave models. They include generalizations of KDV, BBM, regularized Boussinesq equations, with general dispersive operators and nonlinear terms. We obtain criteria for the existence of exponentially growing solutions to the linearized problem. The novelty is that we dealt with models with nonlocal dispersive terms, for which the spectra problem is out of reach by the Evans function technique. For the proof, we reduce the linearized problem to study a family of nonlocal operators, which are closely related to properties of solitary waves. A continuation argument with a moving kernel formula are used to find the instability criteria. Recently, these techniques have also been extended to study instability of periodic waves and to the full water wave problem.

Lin, Zhiwu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydromagnetic Instabilities in the Dense Plasma Focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coaxial discharges of the Mather type owe their performance to the rapid collapse of a noncylindrical current sheath into a dense plasma focus. The lifetime of the resulting fountainlike pinch column appears to be governed by the formation of sausage instabilities; however typical estimates of the buildup time for m?=?0 hydromagnetic instabilities in cylindrical columns are at least 510 times shorter than the observed lifetimes (?50 nsec). In order to study the effect of pinch curvature a hydromagnetic stability analysis is performed in terms of the Bernstein energy principle expressed in curvilinear coordinates. A necessary stability condition for curved pinches with no axial magnetic fields turns out to be the presence of a delta?function current singularity on the axis in accordance with hard?core pinch measurements of Colgate. For noncylindrical axisymmetric pinches of finite curvature and large aspect ratio the m?=?0 instability is found to grow about 10 times slower than the corresponding cylindrical pinch case.

G. G. Comisar

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Genomic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the fundamental principles that control complex biological systems important to clean energy and environmental applications. Multidisciplinary genomic science research and...

186

Challenges in global genomics education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In spite of high expectations for the integration of genomics into medicine, it is not clear that health providers are competent to appropriately use new genomic approaches. The issue is further complicated by differences across the globe in terms of educational systems, access to genomic technologies, and priorities in health care. In this commentary we will review some of the major challenges in educating the health provider workforce about genomic medicine.

Ashwini de Abrew; Vajira H.W. Dissanayake; Bruce R. Korf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Refining Restriction Enzyme Genome Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A genome map is an ordering of a set of clones according to their believed position on a DNA string. Simple heuristics for genome map assembly based on single restriction enzyme with complete digestion data can lead to inaccuracies and ambiguities. This ... Keywords: constraint query languages, genome mapping, set constraints

Peter Z. Revesz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing P Beldade1 , WO McMillan2 and A Papanicolaou3 1 Section to an explosion of genomic data and the emergence of new research avenues. Evolutionary and ecological functional genomics, with its focus on the genes that affect ecological success and adaptation in natural populations

Beldade, Patrícia

189

Genomics in the ecological arena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...meeting-report Meeting reports 1001 60 69 70 129 Genomics in the ecological arena Luisa Orsini...Dame, IN 46556, USA 4 The Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Indiana University...emerging model system in environmental genomics. Daphnia has been a model species in...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Spiral Structure as a Recurrent Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A long-standing controversy in studies of spiral structure has concerned the lifetimes of individual spiral patterns. Much theoretical work has sought quasi-stationary spiral modes while N-body simulations have consistently displayed recurrent, short-lived patterns. The simulations manifest a recurrent cycle of true instabilities related to small-scale features in the angular momentum distribution of particles, with the decay of each instability seeding the growth of the next. Data from the recent Hipparcos mission seem to offer support for the recurrent transient picture.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Communicating Genomics:GTL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute User Meeting Sponsored By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science March 24-26, 2010 Walnut Creek Marriott Walnut Creek, California iii Contents Speaker Presentations ......................................................................................... 1 Poster Presentations........................................................................................... 11 Attendees............................................................................................................. 67 Author Index ...................................................................................................... 75 iv Posters alphabetical by first author. *Presenting author 1 Speaker Presentations Abstracts alphabetical by speaker

192

International milk genomics consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA c University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA d University of Colorado. The general goals of the Milk Genomics Consortium are to link the scientific community through milk and geno value of milk's components is known (German, Dillard, & Ward, 2002). The scientific challenge, therefore

Rocke, David M.

193

Genomics ace quits Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... end he was preparing to leave for the University of Chicago in Illinois, frustrated by Japan's lack of support for genomics and doubtful that the country would ever take a ... He is one of the country's best-funded researchers and has led some of Japan's biggest science projects. In addition, he is a successful biotechnology entrepreneur, having ...

David Cyranoski

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Genomicinstability.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instability Instability y Delayed Genetic Effects What is Genomic Instability? What is Genomic Instability? * Often, after being damaged by radiation, cells are able to repair DNA damage and reproduce normally normally. * However, sometimes damage may carry over for several generations before the unobserved damage g g causes the cell to lose control of its genome. * At this point, cells may be unable to reproduce f ll Th b i ll successfully. They may become genetically unstable, or become cancerous. Radiation-induced Genetic Damage Old Paradigm After a cell is mutated by radiation, all of its prodigy are mutated Mutation is a rare event that cannot be altered. Genomic Instability New Paradigm After a cell is exposed to radiation, biological changes are produced that, after many cell divisions, result in loss of genetic

195

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Establishing Standard Definitions for Genome  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 8, 2009 October 8, 2009 Establishing Standard Definitions for Genome Sequences Download a podcast of this release! WALNUT CREEK, CA-In 1996, researchers from major genome sequencing centers around the world convened on the island of Bermuda and defined a finished genome as a gapless sequence with a nucleotide error rate of one or less in 10,000 bases. This effectively set the quality target for the human genome effort and was quickly applied to other genome projects. If a genome sequence didn't meet this stringent criterion, it was simply considered a "draft." More than a decade later, researchers are finding that with the advent of the latest sequencing technologies the terms "draft" and "finished" are no longer sufficient to describe the varying levels of genome sequence

196

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability of Viscoelastic Poiseuille Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic Route to Melt Fracture in Polymer Extrusion: AWeakly Nonlinear Subcritical Instability generic route to melt fracture via a weakly nonlinear subcritical instability of viscoelastic Poiseuille ``subcritical'') instability due to normal stress effects; this instability appears to make melt fracture

van Saarloos, Wim

197

Electromagnetic proton cyclotron instability: heating of cool magnetospheric helium ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electromagnetic proton cyclotron anisotropy instability is excited if the hot...T ? h /T \\mid\\mid ...

S. Peter Gary; Lin Yin; Dan Winske

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

JGI - Intro to Genomics 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Introduction to Genomics: The Human Genome and Beyond An Introduction to Genomics: The Human Genome and Beyond 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next>> What is genomics? THE HUMAN BODY consists of trillions of cells. Almost all contain an entire genome--the complete set of inherited genetic information encoded in our DNA. When humans reproduce, the parents' sperm and egg DNA combine to contribute a genome's worth of genetic information to the fertilized embryo. That same information is in each of the cells that eventually make up an organism. cell, DNA helix, and protein structure Some segments of DNA, called genes or "coding" DNA, contain the chemical recipe that determines particular traits; genetics is the study of the inheritance and function of these genes. Scientists now estimate that humans have about 30,000 genes, located along threadlike, tightly coiled

199

Microtearing Instability In The ITER Pedestal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unstable microtearing modes are discovered by the GS2 gyrokinetic siimulation code, in the pedestal region of a simulated ITER H-mode plasma with approximately 400 WM DT fusion power. Existing nonlinear theory indicates that these instabilities should produce stochastic magnetic fields and broaden the pedestal. The resulted electron thermal conductivity is estimated and the implications of these findings are discussed.

K.L. Wong, D.R. Mikkelsen, G.M. Rewoldt and R. Budny

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Magnetic reconnection from a multiscale instability cascade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 215002 (2003) Chandrasekhar, S. Hydrodynamic ... ) Kumar, D. & Bellan, P. M. Nonequilibrium Alfvnic plasma jets associated with spheromak formation. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 105003 (2009) Yun, G. S. ...

Auna L. Moser; Paul M. Bellan

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Process Svstems Enaineerina Instability of Distillation Columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Svstems Enaineerina , Instability of Distillation Columns Elling W. Jacobsen and Sigurd recognized, distillation columns, operating with reflux and boilup as independent inputs, may have The dynamic behavior of distillation columns has been stud- ied quite extensively over the past decades

Skogestad, Sigurd

202

NEGATIVE COUPLING INSTABILITY AND GRANDUNIFIED BARYOGENESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oscillations, which is typically many orders of magnitude faster than the perturbative decay rate 3 orders of magnitude greater than the expansion time t H ¸ 1=H ¸ 1=! OE . a Daniel Boyanovsky presented is the frequency squared of ? k . The instability chart of the Mathieu equation is depicted in figure 1. The ¯ = 0

203

Parametric Instabilities in Turbulent, Inhomogeneous Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that parametric instabilities involving two coupled modes, with oppositely directed group velocities, saturate convectively if the medium is inhomogeneous. This work considers the modification of that result when weak long-wave turbulence is present, in addition to the background inhomogeneity. We find that the convective saturation disappears when the turbulence exceeds a certain level, absolute growth occurring instead.

Dwight R. Nicholson and Allan N. Kaufman

1974-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modulation instability in high power laser amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Widmayer, R. K. White, S. T. Yang, and B. M. VanWonterghem, "National Ignition Facility laser performanceModulation instability in high power laser amplifiers Alexander M. Rubenchik,1,* Sergey K. Turitsyn in high-power laser systems. The so-called B-integral restriction is commonly used as the criteria for MI

Turitsyn, Sergei K.

205

EXPERIMENTAL PROGRESS: CURRENT FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY STUDY *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear ­ Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa 1049-001, Portugal study of this instability is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ­ Accelerator Test Facility of light in vacuum and pe ­ the angular plasma electron frequency). The phenomena responsible for Gamma Ray

Brookhaven National Laboratory

206

WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

Boyer, Edmond

207

Magnetic instabilities in Nb3Sn strands and cables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a model for calculation of magnetic instabilities in superconducting wires with transport current and reports results of instability simulations in Nb{sub 3}Sn strands from different manufactures. The effect of magnetic instabilities on the strand and cable performance is presented and a criterion for the maximum effective sub-element size of strands for high field magnets is formulated.

Kashikhim, Vadim V.; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Navigating protected genomics data with UCSC Genome Browser in a Box.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. et al. (2013) Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV):High-performance genomics data visualization andbrowsers for comparative genomics. Bioinformatics. In press.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Genomics Division Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PIs PIs Mark Biggin Jim Bristow Jan-Fang Cheng Inna Dubchak Suzanna Lewis Chris Mungall Len Pennacchio Eddy Rubin Axel Visel Divisional Information Support Staff Seminars Diversity Directory Contact Us The characterization and analysis of genome sequences from such diverse organisms as humans to the most primitive soil microbe represent a watershed opportunity for biology. The Genomics Division is taking advantage of this wealth of new information. While it is well known that DNA encodes the basic blue print of life, it is not known how best to interpret most of this information. To address this question, laboratories within the division are developing computational, biochemical, genetic, and imaging methods to decipher the complex sequence motifs that control RNA transcription, DNA replication, and chromosome structure. The Division is

210

Genome-wide Search for Loss of Heterozygosity Using Laser Capture Microdissected Tissue of Breast Carcinoma: An Implication for Mutator Phenotype and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DSB-initiated CIN is the major driving force of breast cancer progression, and this...Familial Cancer Program. The concise handbook of family cancer syndromes. J. Natl...complexities, the present study, based on the fundamental concept that genomic instability is the...

Chen-Yang Shen; Jyh-Cherng Yu; Yen-Li Lo; Chia-Hui Kuo; Chung-Tai Yue; Yuh-Shan Jou; Chiun-Sheng Huang; Jia-Chyi Lung; and Cheng-Wen Wu

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

The acoustic instabilities in magnetized collisional dusty plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work investigates the wave propagation in collisional dusty plasmas in the presence of electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the dust ion-acoustic waves may become unstable to the reactive instability whereas dust-acoustic waves may suffer from both reactive and dissipative instabilities. If the wave phase speed is smaller than the plasma drift speed, the instability is of reactive type whereas in the opposite case, the instability becomes dissipative in nature. Plasma in the vicinity of dust may also become unstable to reactive instability with the instability sensitive to the dust material: dielectric dust may considerably quench this instability. This has implications for the dust charging and the use of dust as a probe in the plasma sheath.

Pandey, B. P., E-mail: birendra.pandey@mq.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Vladimirov, S. V., E-mail: s.vladimirov@physics.usyd.edu.au [Metamaterials Laboratory, National Research University of Information Technology, Mechanics, and Optics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Dwivedi, C. B., E-mail: jagatpurdwivedi@gmail.com [VedVijnanam Pravartanam Samitihi, Pratapgarh (Awadh), Jagatpur, Bharat (India)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Final Report: Latent Expression of Genetic Damage in Human Lung Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was aimed at furthering understanding of the latent effects of ionizing radiation. The underlying premise was that such latent (i.e., delayed) effects stemmed from radiation-induced genetic instability. As model system to investigate certain aspects of genomic instability, they proposed to look at chromosomal instability involving quasi-targeted radiation-induced breakpoints in the vicinity of the HPRT gene in EJ30 human epithelial cells. Using whole chromosome painting of the X chromosome, the authors were able to show that about 15% of randomly selected 6-thioguanine resistant (6TG{prime}) mutants involved translocations in the terminal portion of Xq. Subsequent analysis, using human genomic YAC probes confirmed that all the translocations were either within (or near Xq26.1), the cytogenetic location of HPRT, whereas none were found elsewhere involving the X chromosome.

Cornforth, Michael N.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Abstract A33: Exploring pediatric cancer genomics with the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 2014 meeting-abstract Pediatric Cancer Genomics and Epigenomics Pediatric Cancer Genomics and Epigenomics: Poster Presentations - Proffered...Abstract A33: Exploring pediatric cancer genomics with the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser Melissa...

Melissa Cline; Olena Morozova; Teresa Swatloski; Brian Craft; Mary Goldman; David Haussler; Jingchun Zhu

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

GIS: a web-based genomics information system for efficiently manipulating and accessing genome physical maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological science has entered the genome era. Global genome integrative physical and genetic mapping promises to revolutionize modern genomics research. To facilitate manipulation and applications of the results from genomics research, many...

Chen, Huaming

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes The research group Genome Evolution and Speciation (Team) to work on the analysis of genome and transcriptome sequence data (generated using 454 Roche

Rennes, Université de

216

GenomeCons: a web server for manipulating multiple genome sequence alignments and their consensus sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......December 2014 brief-report Applications Note GenomeCons: a web server for manipulating multiple genome sequence alignments and...molecular biological processes. In this study, we developed a web server, GenomeCons, for manipulating multiple genome sequence......

Tetsuya Sato; Mikita Suyama

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics database for Neisseria meningitidis Lee S, septicemia and in some cases pneumonia. Genomic studies hold great promise for N. meningitidis research genomics database and genome browser that houses and displays publicly available N. meningitidis genomes

Jordan, King

218

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics & Annotation Transfer Alban MANCHERON Raluca URICARU Eric is genome comparison good for?" Genome comparison is crucial for genome annotation, regulatory motifs identification, and vaccine design aims at finding genomic regions either specific to or in one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

LANL | Physics | Hydrodynamic Material Instabilities at extremes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Understanding hydrodynamic material instabilities at extremes Understanding hydrodynamic material instabilities at extremes The National Nuclear Security Administration science-based stockpile stewardship program funds research that will improve critical physics-based dynamic materials models. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as nuclear weapon design laboratories, are mandated to predict the reliability and durability of the nuclear weapons stockpile. This is done using state-of-the-art supercomputers and computer codes. It is also important to have state-of-the-art physics models in these codes. Los Alamos has theory experts in dynamic materials, thus creating powerful working groups when combined with experimental experts in Physics Division and elsewhere. Key to the science-based stockpile stewardship program is making

220

Pondermotive Instabilities and Microphinics - A Tutorial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase and amplitude stabilization of the fields in superconducting cavities in the presence of ponderomotive effects and microphonics was one of the major challenges that had to be surmounted in order to make superconducting rf accelerators practical. This was of particular concern in low-velocity proton and ion accelerators since the beam loading was often negligible, but was usually not relevant in electron accelerators since the beam loading was often high and the gradients low. More recent or future applications of electron linacs--for example JLab upgrade, energy recovering linacs (ERLs)--will operate at increasingly higher gradients with little beam loading, and the issues associated with microphonics and ponderomotive instabilities will again become relevant areas of research. This paper will describe the ponderomotive instabilities and the conditions under which they can occur, and review the methods by which they, and microphonics, can be overcome.

Jean Delayen

2005-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Plasma Instabilities in an Anisotropically Expanding Geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study (3+1)D kinetic (Boltzmann-Vlasov) equations for relativistic plasma particles in a one dimensionally expanding geometry motivated by ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We set up local equations in terms of Yang-Mills potentials and auxiliary fields that allow simulations of hard- (expanding-) loop dynamics on a lattice. We determine numerically the evolution of plasma instabilities in the linear (Abelian) regime and also derive their late-time behavior analytically, which is consistent with recent numerical results on the evolution of the so-called melting color-glass condensate. We also find a significant delay in the onset of growth of plasma instabilities which are triggered by small rapidity fluctuations, even when the initial state is highly anisotropic.

Romatschke, Paul [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Rebhan, Anton [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

Furth, H.P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

224

Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification of Uncultivated Organisms Mircea Podar , Martin Keller , and Philip Hugenholtz (* ü ) Abstract Whole genome amplification of single cells is emerging as a powerful technique for accessing the genomes of individual members of microbial communi- ties without the complication of identifying the source of sequence data posed by shotgun sequencing of environmental samples (metagenomics). This method holds particular promise for the molecular unveiling of uncultivated organisms that com- prise the bulk of the microbial diversity and functionality on our planet. 1 Introduction Over the last two decades, it has become increasingly apparent that microbial diversity

225

Genomics: Encyclopaedia of humble DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ENCODE Project Consortium shows through the analysis of 1% of the human genome that the humble, unpretentious non-gene sequences have essential regulatory roles (Fig. 1). ...

John M. Greally

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evolutionary Genomics of Prokaryotic Viruses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Evolutionary history of biological entities is recorded within their nucleic acid sequences and can (sometimes) be deciphered by thorough genomic analysis. In this study we (more)

Krupovic, Mart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Computational genomics on the grid.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The post-genomic era is characterized by large amount of data available from sequencing projects. The large size of biological datasets, inherent complexity of biological problems (more)

Chen, Chunxi.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Scaling the Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a scaling relation for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. The relation is tested using both numerical simulations and experimental data. We obtain collapse of growth rates for a wide range of initial conditions by using vorticity and velocity scales associated with the interfacial perturbations and the acceleration impulse. A curve fit to the collapsed growth rates yields a fairly universal model for the mixing layer thickness versus time.

Cotrell, D; Cook, A

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nonabelian plasma instabilities in Bjorken expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma instabilities are parametrically the dominant nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. In recent years the time evolution of the corresponding collective colour fields has been studied in stationary anisotropic situations. Here I report on recent numerical results on the time evolution of the most unstable modes in a longitudinally expanding plasma as they grow from small rapidity fluctuations to amplitudes where non-Abelian self-interactions become important.

Anton Rebhan

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3, *, Thomas Van Parys1,2 , Yvan Saeys GenomeView, a stand-alone genome browser specifically designed to visualize and manipulate a multitude of genomics data. GenomeView enables users to dynamically browse high volumes of aligned short-read data

Gent, Universiteit

231

Genetic analysis of the role of RNaseH2 in preventing genome instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the common synthetic lethal partner is DNA repair. ThisDNA helicase gene interaction network defined using syntheticDNA helicase gene interaction network defined using synthetic

Soltero, Stephanie Ruth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

UV-C??Irradiated Arabidopsis and Tobacco Emit Volatiles That Trigger Genomic Instability in Neighboring Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...impaired in both the production and the perception...is primed by the production of the mobile metabolite...through volatile organic compounds has been...depend on how many cell division cycles have...ankyrin repeats. Cell 88 : 57-63. Caputo...L. (2006). Solar ultraviolet-B radiation...

Youli Yao; Cristian H. Danna; Franz J. Zemp; Viktor Titov; Ozan Nazim Ciftci; Roman Przybylski; Frederick M. Ausubel; Igor Kovalchuk

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

233

UV-C??Irradiated Arabidopsis and Tobacco Emit Volatiles That Trigger Genomic Instability in Neighboring Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 d Department of Medical Sciences...and Ballare, C.L. (2006). Solar ultraviolet-B radiation alters the...pathways mediate specific effects of solar ultraviolet B radiation on leaf phenolics...

Youli Yao; Cristian H. Danna; Franz J. Zemp; Viktor Titov; Ozan Nazim Ciftci; Roman Przybylski; Frederick M. Ausubel; Igor Kovalchuk

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Diet, Lifestyle, and Genomic Instability in the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fiber, and dark green vegetables and...associated with total energy intake (all Ps...vitamin C and dark green vegetables regardless of energy adjustment and...fiber, and dark green vegetables and...associations with total energy and non-energy-adjusted...

Jessie A. Satia; Temitope Keku; Joseph A. Galanko; Christopher Martin; Ryan T. Doctolero; Akihiro Tajima; Robert S. Sandler; and John M. Carethers

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Association of survival and disease progression with chromosomal instability: A genomic exploration of colorectal cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During disease progression the cells that comprise solid malignancies undergo significant changes in gene copy number and chromosome structure. Colorectal cancer provides an excellent model to study this process. To indentify ...

Sheffer, Michal

236

Two Distinct Routes to Oral Cancer Differing in Genome Instability and Risk for Cervical Node Metastasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...8pter-p23.1 Loss 1 11,035,922 GS1-77L23 RP11-252K12 SHGC-1962 0.34 8q12-q24.2 Gain 61,101,900 134,150,084 RP11-258B14 SHGC-32354 RP11-184M21 SHGC-1948 0.52 20pter-qter Gain 1 63,025,519 RP1-82O2 RP1-81F12...

Aditi Bhattacharya; Ritu Roy; Antoine M. Snijders; Gregory Hamilton; Jesse Paquette; Taku Tokuyasu; Henrik Bengtsson; Richard C. K. Jordan; Adam B. Olshen; Daniel Pinkel; Brian L. Schmidt; Donna G. Albertson

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Replication Stress Leads to Genome Instabilities in Arabidopsis DNA Polymerase δ Mutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...region encoding the selectable hygromycin resistance marker (HptII). P and T indicate...plants. DISCUSSION In all organisms, elementary processes, such as growth, cell division...marker gene of the T-DNA conferring resistance to kanamycin was found to be inactive...

David Schuermann; Olivier Fritsch; Jan M. Lucht; Barbara Hohn

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

UV-C??Irradiated Arabidopsis and Tobacco Emit Volatiles That Trigger Genomic Instability in Neighboring Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...M., and Ballare, C.L. (2006). Solar ultraviolet-B radiation alters the attractiveness...independent pathways mediate specific effects of solar ultraviolet B radiation on leaf phenolics...Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4, Canada. | Journal Article Research Support...

Youli Yao; Cristian H. Danna; Franz J. Zemp; Viktor Titov; Ozan Nazim Ciftci; Roman Przybylski; Frederick M. Ausubel; Igor Kovalchuk

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

The human genome project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

Bell, G.I.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x Genome Majority Vote (GMV), Version 0.x The pipeline runs PRODIGAL gene predictions on all genomes, runs pan-reciprocal BLAST, and...

242

The function of genomes in bioenergetic organelles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1998 The organelle genome database project (GOBASE). Nucleic...The mito- chondrial genome of Arabidopsis is composed...native and immigrant information. Trends Plant Sci...Microbial genes in the human genome: lateral transfer...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a fungal prey. BMC Genomics 10, 567 (2009). This studythe TrichoEST functional genomics approach. Curr. Genet. 51,in Hypocrea jecorina. BMC Genomics. 9, 430 (2008) Mukherjee,

Druzhinina, Irina S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Cancer genomics and the TCGA project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research September 15, 2011 meeting-abstract Cancer Genomics Cancer Genomics: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Abstracts...San Francisco, CA Abstract A39: The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser Brian Craft 1 Kyle Ellrott 1 Mary Goldman...

David Haussler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

From Integrative Genomics to Therapeutic Targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research. 15 June 2013 review-article Reviews From Integrative Genomics to Therapeutic Targets Rachael Natrajan Paul Wilkerson Corresponding...conventional pathology with genomic profiling and functional genomics have begun to enhance our understanding of the genetic basis...

Rachael Natrajan and Paul Wilkerson

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

VIRAL EVOLUTION Genomic surveillance elucidates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIRAL EVOLUTION Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014,12,13 � Robert F. Garry,8 � S. Humarr Khan,3 � Pardis C. Sabeti1,2 � In its largest outbreak, Ebola virus disease is spreading through Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. We sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes from 78

Napp, Nils

247

Fueling Future with Algal Genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Genome in a Bottle Consortium Work Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lines for whole genome RMs and design synthetic DNA constructs that could will be a set of well-characterized whole genome and synthetic DNA RMs along

249

C3Bio.org - Tags: Genomics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif) Submit You are here: Home Tags Genomics All Categories Tags: Genomics More tags Categories All Categories 2 Resources 2...

250

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

251

Feedback Enhanced Sensitivity in Optomechanics: Surpassing the Parametric Instability Barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intracavity power, and hence sensitivity, of optomechanical sensors is commonly limited by parametric instability. Here we characterize the parametric instability induced sensitivity degradation in a micron scale cavity optomechanical system. Feedback via optomechanical transduction and electrical gradient force actuation is applied to suppress the parametric instability. As a result a 5.4 fold increase in mechanical motion transduction sensitivity is achieved to a final value of $1.9\\times 10^{-18}\\rm m Hz^{-1/2}$.

Glen I. Harris; Ulrik L. Andersen; Joachim Knittel; Warwick P. Bowen

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary tabs View(active tab) High Resolution News PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called "ELMs" By John Greenwald September 29, 2014 Tweet Widget...

253

PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary tabs View(active tab) High Resolution Press Releases PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called "ELMs" By John Greenwald September 29, 2014 Tweet...

254

Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Burov, A.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Hu, M.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

Qin, Hong [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C. [PPPL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Spheromaks, solar prominences, and Alfvn instability of current sheets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three related efforts underway at Caltech are discussed: experimental studies of spheromak formation, experimental simulation of solar prominences, and Alfvn wave instability of current sheets. Spheromak formati...

P. M. Bellan; J. Yee; J. F. Hansen

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Movement Control And Cortical Activation In Functional Ankle Instability.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Background: Functional ankle instability (FI) is a common development following first-time lateral ankle sprain, resulting in functional limitations. Local tissue damage has not been a (more)

Anderson, Kathleen Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Draft Genome Sequence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Draft Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia sp. Strain ATCC 39006, a Model Bacterium for Analysis of the Biosynthesis and Regulation of Prodigiosin, a Carbapenem, and Gas Vesicles Peter C. Fineran, a Marina C. Iglesias Cans, a Joshua P. Ramsay, b Nabil M. Wilf, b Desiree Cossyleon, a Matthew B. McNeil, a Neil R. Williamson, b Rita E. Monson, b S. Anette Becher, c Jo-Ann L. Stanton, d Kim Brügger, e Steven D. Brown, f George P. C. Salmond b Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand a ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom b ; AgResearch Ltd., Invermay Agricultural Centre, Mosgiel, New Zealand c ; Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand d ; EASIH, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom e ; Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge,

259

Modulational instability in wind-forced waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the wind-forced nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation obtained in the potential flow framework when the Miles growth rate is of the order of the wave steepness. In this case, the form of the wind-forcing terms gives rise to the enhancement of the modulational instability and to a band of positive gain with infinite width. This regime is characterised by the fact that the ratio between wave momentum and norm is not a constant of motion, in contrast to what happens in the standard case where the Miles growth rate is of the order of the steepness squared.

Brunetti, Maura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Erosion waves: transverse instabilities and fingering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two laboratory scale experiments of dry and under-water avalanches of non-cohesive granular materials are investigated. We trigger solitary waves and study the conditions under which the front is transversally stable. We show the existence of a linear instability followed by a coarsening dynamics and finally the onset of a fingering pattern. Due to the different operating conditions, both experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales involved. Nevertheless, the quantitative agreement between the stability diagram, the wavelengths selected and the avalanche morphology reveals a common scenario for an erosion/deposition process.

F. Malloggi; J. Lanuza; B. Andreotti; E. Clment

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Instabilities in the Nuclear Energy Density Functional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the field of Energy Density Functionals (EDF) used in nuclear structure and dynamics, one of the unsolved issues is the stability of the functional. Numerical issues aside, some EDFs are unstable with respect to particular perturbations of the nuclear ground-state density. The aim of this contribution is to raise questions about the origin and nature of these instabilities, the techniques used to diagnose and prevent them, and the domain of density functions in which one should expect a nuclear EDF to be stable.

M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Physical simulation study of dynamic voltage instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a physical simulation of the dynamic behavior of voltage instability in an interconnected multimachine environment. The dynamic evolving process leading to eventual voltage collapse, the scenario of the progressive reactive support reduction resulting from the MXL protection relays, the OLTC operation, and the effect of switched-in capacitor banks are examined using physical facilities in the laboratory. The physical simulation results are also compared with digital simulation results. This physical investigation provides a reliable foundation for the effective development of assessment approaches and countermeasures.

Tso, S.K.; Zhu, T.X. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zeng, Q.Y. [Electric Power Research Inst., Beijing (China); Lo, K.L. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electrical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Instability of Quantum de Sitter Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantized fields (e.g., the graviton itself) in de Sitter (dS) spacetime lead to particle production: specifically, we consider a thermal spectrum resulting from the dS (horizon) temperature. The energy required to excite these particles reduces slightly the rate of expansion and eventually modifies the semiclassical spacetime geometry. The resulting manifold no longer has constant curvature nor time reversal invariance, and back-reaction renders the classical dS background unstable to perturbations. In the case of AdS, there exists a global static vacuum state; in this state there is no particle production and the analogous instability does not arise.

Ho, Chiu Man

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

266

Beam Dynamics and Instabilities in ELIC Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the first study of beam related instabilities in lepton ring of the proposed electron-ion collider beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson lab. The design parameters are consistent with PEP-II. Present studies reveal that coupled bunch and two stream instabilities are important issues and we need feedback system. The Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab has been envisioned as future high energy particle accelerator beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF. The MEIC will consist of the existing polarized electron source complex with 12 GeV upgrade and a new ion complex with polarized and unpolarized light to medium ions. The conceptual layout is shown in Fig. 1 and the basic parameters in comparison with the similar machines are discussed in Table 1. The maximum permissible collision frequency at 1.5 GHz is dictated by the existing electron machine, allowing the relatively small charge per bunch and large crossing angle resulting in the increased beam stability and high luminosity. In this paper, we present the preliminary study of collective effects for e-ring.

S. Ahmed,B. Yunn,G. Krafft

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preferential instability in arrays of coupled lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider an array of N coupled class-B lasers in a ring geometry. We analyze the stability of the steady-state solutions for small values of the coupling strength and small damping. The problem is motivated by recent studies of laser-diode arrays, but analytical results on the possible instabilities remain limited to the case N=2. We consider N arbitrary and use the coupling strength as the bifurcation parameter. As this parameter increases from zero, we show that the first instability leads to a preferential mode of oscillations. For N even, we study this bifurcation to a time-periodic standing-wave solution and determine the direction of bifurcation. We discuss the bifurcation possibilities in terms of the parameter ?, known as the linewidth-enhancement factor, in semiconductor lasers. Increasing ? destabilizes phase locking between adjacent lasers but leads to a smooth bifurcation to periodic solutions. Inversely, decreasing ? stabilizes the laser array, but the first bifurcation leads to a hard transition to time-dependent solutions. The predictions of our analysis are in agreement with the results of a numerical study of the laser equations.

Ruo-ding Li and Thomas Erneux

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fermi Liquid Instabilities in the Spin Channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the Fermi surface instabilities of the Pomeranchuk type in the spin triplet channel with high orbital partial waves (F{sub l}{sup a} (l > 0)). The ordered phases are classified into two classes, dubbed the {alpha} and {beta}-phases by analogy to the superfluid {sup 3}He-A and B-phases. The Fermi surfaces in the {alpha}-phases exhibit spontaneous anisotropic distortions, while those in the {beta}-phases remain circular or spherical with topologically non-trivial spin configurations in momentum space. In the {alpha}-phase, the Goldstone modes in the density channel exhibit anisotropic overdamping. The Goldstone modes in the spin channel have nearly isotropic underdamped dispersion relation at small propagating wavevectors. Due to the coupling to the Goldstone modes, the spin wave spectrum develops resonance peaks in both the {alpha} and {beta}-phases, which can be detected in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In the p-wave channel {beta}-phase, a chiral ground state inhomogeneity is spontaneously generated due to a Lifshitz-like instability in the originally nonchiral systems. Possible experiments to detect these phases are discussed.

Wu, Congjun; /Santa Barbara, KITP; Sun, Kai; Fradkin, Eduardo; /Illinois U., Urbana; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Assignment of Orthologous Genes via Genome Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assignment of Orthologous Genes via Genome Rearrangement Xin Chen, Jie Zheng, Zheng Fu, Peng Nan of genomes is a fundamental and challenging problem in comparative genomics. Existing methods that assign sequence similarity and evolutionary events at a genome level, where orthologous genes are assumed

Lonardi, Stefano

270

Shotgun coverage of human genome computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

take about 1.5 million pages. The Human Genome Project would not be possible if our revolution were-author collection of chapters on the various uses of computing in the Human Genome Project. Peculiarly absent fromShotgun coverage of human genome computing Human Genome Computing, Second Edition edited by Martin

Eddy, Sean

271

Course Information IB 364: Human Genome and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course Information IB 364: Human Genome and Bioinformatics On this page: � Course Description � Technical Support Course Description Highlights advances in understanding the human genome, utilizing the human genome, applying bioinformatics to the genome, and realizing its potential to understand human

Kent, Angela

272

A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics Rose Hoberman May 2007 CMU-CS-07, or the U.S. Government. #12;Keywords: spatial comparative genomics, comparative genomics, gene clusters, max-gap clusters, gene teams, whole genome duplication, paralogons, synteny, ortholog detection #12

273

Genomics and ornithology Scott V. Edwards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Genomics and ornithology Scott V. Edwards Received: 23 September 2007 / Accepted: 27 Genomics is revolutionizing ornithology in the same ways it is reinvigorating other biological disciplines. In this review, I will highlight applications of genomics and genomics technologies to the study of the ecology

Edwards, Scott

274

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Comparative and Functional Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Comparative and Functional Genomics Volume 2007, Article ID 47304, 7 pages doi:10.1155/2007/47304 Meeting Report eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA 3 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

275

RADIATION RESEARCH 155, 263267 (2001) 0033-7587/01 $5.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability

276

Chapter 14: Genome Assembly and Annotation Process Annotation of other genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14: Genome Assembly and Annotation Process Paul Kitts Summary Box 1 Annotation of other genomes NCBI may assemble a genome prior to annotation, add annotations to a genome assembled elsewhere, or simply process an annotated genome to produce RefSeqs and maps for display in Map Viewer (Chapter 20

Levin, Judith G.

277

The Genome Database Organism-centered listing of available genomic sequence records and projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Genome Database Organism-centered listing of available genomic sequence records and projects http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome National Center for Biotechnology Information · National Library | NCBI Genome | Last Update August 19, 2013 Contact: info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Scope Since 2011, the Genome

Levin, Judith G.

278

Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic Streamlining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth Temperature and Genome Size in Bacteria Are Negatively Correlated, Suggesting Genomic.wagner@ieu.uzh.ch; nsabath@gmail.com. Accepted: March 25, 2013 Abstract Prokaryotic genomes are small and compact. Either this feature is caused by neutral evolution or by natural selection favoring small genomes--genome streamlining

Wagner, Andreas

279

Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methods in comparative genomics: genome correspondence, gene identification and motif discovery@mit.edu, nickp@genome.wi.mit.edu, bwb@genome.wi.mit.edu, bab@mit.edu, lander@wi.mit.edu (1) MIT/Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, 320 Charles St., Cambridge MA 02139 (2) MIT Computer Science

Kellis, Manolis

280

Extreme Genomics By Scouring the Genomes of 50 HIV-Resistant People, Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme Genomics By Scouring the Genomes of 50 HIV-Resistant People, Study Takes Aim at Rare Gene Genome Variation, and his colleagues think that the complete genome sequences of those fortunate few against the viral strain that usually infects humans. That's because the CCR5 protein is Extreme Genomics

Dolbow, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On the hyperelastic softening and elastic instabilities in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elastic material instabilities are precursors to failure in defect-free graphene single...instability is identified which occurs prior to the configuration of maximum true stress...submicrometre region of the graphene sheet is probed to the largest deformation levels, and this...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Investigation of the Instability Ingredient in Midlatitude Cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of instability throughout the life cycle of a mid­latitude cyclone is presented, including a diagnosis instability in a winter precipitation event. An analysis of the mechanisms respon­ sible for the evolution is the gas constant for dry air, ~ V g is the geostrophic wind ( ~ V g = 1 f ?? k \\Theta r p OE), and ¸ g

Martin, Jonathan E.

283

Short communication Localized structures generated by subcritical instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1829 Short communication Localized structures generated by subcritical instabilities O. Thual(1 cases the possible ori- gin of localized structures lies in the existence of a subcritical instability.1051/jphys:0198800490110182900 #12;1830 structure in the vicinity of a subcritical instabi- lity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

284

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights Kevin Viner1 and breaks subcritical critical Nh/U = 0.5 Nh/U = 0.8 #12;Subcritical Instability: An Example three peaks · Nh/U = 0.6 · U/NL = 0.1 · nonrotating · Time-dependent model initialized with subcritical steady wave

285

Wind-Induced Instability of Structures [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 May 1971 research-article Wind-Induced Instability of Structures [and...G. V. Parkinson D. Dicker Forms of wind-induced instability of structures are...structural response frequency over a discrete wind speed range and amplification and phase...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An Instability Leading to Failure of Polyethylene in Uniaxial Creep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Instability Leading to Failure of Polyethylene in Uniaxial Creep L. J. ZAPAS and J. M. CRISSMAN model, a point of instability is pre- dicted for the uniaxial creep of high density polyethylene. From dead load experiments it has been found that the instabil- ity occurs for linear -polyethylene

287

Magnetorotational instability in a rotating liquid metal annulus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......stability analysis. Stability diagrams are drawn in dimensionless...instabilities|magnetic fields|MHD|planetary systems...1923). (ii) Ideal MHD limit. As , the other...reduces to 3 Stability diagrams and growth rates The stability...1998). (In ideal MHD, instability extends......

Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman; Akira Kageyama

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The modified two stream instability at nonmagnetic planets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the role the modified two stream instability plays in the interaction of the solar wind with non-magnetized planets. The instability leads to the production of energetic electrons that can be responsible for the observed x-ray emission.

Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Shapiro, V. D.; Uecer, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92091 (United States); Quest, K. B. [ECE Department, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92091 (United States)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Whistler Instability in an Electron-Magnetohydrodynamic Spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional magnetic vortex, propagating in the whistler mode, has been produced in a laboratory plasma. Its magnetic energy is converted into electron kinetic energy. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions are formed which give rise to kinetic whistler instabilities. The propagating vortex radiates whistler modes along the ambient magnetic field. A new instability mechanism is proposed.

R. L. Stenzel; J. M. Urrutia; K. D. Strohmaier

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Parametrical NMR instability in simple metals at nanokelvin temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paramagnetic state of a highly polarized copper nuclear-spin system under transverse pumping is theoretically studied at ultralow temperatures. The parametrical instability is investigated and the threshold amplitudes are calculated versus the detuning of pumping frequency from the Larmor frequency. It is shown that sample shape greatly affects the values of the instability threshold.

T. Buishvili; R. Khomeriki; L. Tkeshelashvili

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

JGI - 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 2, 2008 July 2, 2008 Pine Tree, Boat-Boring Bivalve "Bugs", Duck Weed, Oil-Producing Microalgae, Stinkbird Gut, 40 Others Top DOE Joint Genome Institute 2009 Genome Sequencing Targets WALNUT CREEK, CA-In the continuing effort to tap the vast, unexplored reaches of the earth's microbial and plant domains for bioenergy and environmental applications, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has announced its latest portfolio of DNA sequencing projects that it will undertake in the coming year. The 44 projects, culled from nearly 150 proposals received through the Community Sequencing Program (CSP), represent over 60 billion nucleotides of data to be generated through this biodiversity sampling campaign-roughly the equivalent of 20 human genomes. "The scientific and technological advances enabled by the information

292

Approaching Pomeranchuk Instabilities from Ordered Phase: A Crossing-symmetric Equation Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore features of a 3D Fermi liquid near generalized Pomeranchuk instabilities using a tractable crossing symmetric equation method. We approach the instabilities from the ordered ferromagnetic phase. We find quantum multi-criticality as approach to the ferromagnetic instability drives instability in other channel(s). It is found that a charge nematic instability precedes and is driven by Pomeranchuk instabilities in both the l = 0 spin and density channels.

Kelly Reidy; Khandker Quader; Kevin Bedell

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Observation of Beam ION Instability in Spear3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weak vertical coupled bunch instability with oscillation amplitude at {mu}m level has been observed in SPEAR3. The instability becomes stronger when there is a vacuum pressure rise by partially turning off vacuum pumps and it becomes weaker when the vertical beam emittance is increased by turning off the skew quadrupole magnets. These confirmed that the instability was driven by ions in the vacuum. The threshold of the beam ion instability when running with a single bunch train is just under 200 mA. This paper presents the comprehensive observations of the beam ion instability in SPEAR3. The effects of vacuum pressure, beam current, beam filling pattern, chromaticity, beam emittance and bunch-by-bunch feedback are investigated in great detail. In an electron accelerator, ions generated from the residual gas molecules can be trapped by the beam. Then these trapped ions interact resonantly with the beam and cause beam instability and emittance blow-up. Most existing light sources use a long single bunch train filling pattern, followed by a long gap to avoid multi-turn ion trapping. However, such a gap does not preclude ions from accumulating during one passage of the single bunch train beam, and those ions can still cause a Fast Ion Instability (FII) as predicted by Raubenheimer and Zimmermann. FII has been observed in ALS, and PLS by artificially increasing the vacuum pressure by injecting helium gas into the vacuum chamber or by turning off the ion pumps in order to observe the beam ion instability. In some existing rings, for instance B factory, the beam ion instability was observed at the beginning of the machine operation after a long period of shutdown and then it automatically disappeared when the vacuum was better. However, when the beam emittance becomes smaller, the FII can occur at nominal conditions as observed in PLS, SOLEIL and SSRF. This paper reports the observations of beam ion instabilities in SPEAR3 under different condition during a period of one year, which includes single bunch train instability (FII) and multi-bunch train instability. Note that the instability may be not the same even with the same beam due to the change of the vacuum with time. SPEAR3 has a circumference of 234 m with a harmonic number of 372. SPEAR3 runs with six bunch train filling pattern in order to suppress the possible beam ion instability. Table 1 lists the main parameters of SPEAR3. The vacuum of SPEAR3 ranges from 0.1 to 0.5 nTorr, which varies from section to section.

Teytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City; Cai, Y.; Corbett, W.J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Safranek, J.A.; Schmerge, J.F.; Sebek, J.J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a collisional quantum magnetoplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modulational instability of right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic electron cyclotron (CPEM-EC) wave in a magnetized quantum plasma is studied taking into account the collisional effects. Employing quantum hydrodynamic and nonlinear Schrdinger equations, the dispersion relation of modulated CPEM-EC wave in a collisional plasma has been derived. It is found that this wave is unstable in such a plasma system and the growth rate of the associated instability depends on various parameters such as electron Fermi temperature, plasma number density, collision frequency, and modulation wavenumber. It is shown that while the increase of collision frequency leads to increase of the growth rate of instability, especially at large wavenumber limit, the increase of plasma number density results in more stable modulated CPEM-EC wave. It is also found that in contrast to collisionless plasma in which modulational instability is restricted to small wavenumbers, in collisional plasma, the interval of instability occurrence can be extended to a large domain.

Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Bafandeh, F.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Angle Instability Detection in Power Systems with High Wind Penetration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Angle Instability Detection in Power Angle Instability Detection in Power Systems with High Wind Penetration Using PMUs YC Zhang National Renewable Energy Laboratory Yingchen.zhang@nrel.gov 27/28 June 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program Angle Instability Detection in Power Systems with High Wind Penetration Using Synchrophasor Measurements  Project Objective * Utilize synchrophasor measurements to estimate the equivalent inertia of a power source such as synchronous generators or wind turbine generators * Develop angle instability detection method for a system with high wind penetration using the synchrophasor measurements 2 3 Background Submitted to IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics * In case of angular instability, some machines will have

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute parametric instability Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Physics 4 Multi-mode spatio-temporal instability in non-Boussinesq convection Summary: and absolute instabilities in high temperature convection 5 4...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy-driven weibel instability Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Survey of collective instabilities and beamplasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams Summary: detailed infor- mation. 2. Anisotropy-driven collective instabilities in...

299

Dusty Plasma Dynamics During a Void Instability: Heartbeat Instability M. Mikikian, L. Coudel, M. Cavarroc, Y. Tessier, L. Boufendi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dusty Plasma Dynamics During a Void Instability: Heartbeat Instability M. Mikikian, L. Couëdel, M.mikikian@univ-orleans.fr Abstract When a three-dimensional dust cloud is present in a plasma, a dust-free region, called void, is usually observed in the plasma centre. Forces involved in the void existence are an inward electrostatic

Boyer, Edmond

300

Abstract A33: Exploring pediatric cancer genomics with the UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University of California, Santa Cruz, CA. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu) is a set of web-based tools to display, investigate and analyze cancer genomics data and associated clinical data. Experimental quantities...

Melissa Cline; Olena Morozova; Teresa Swatloski; Brian Craft; Mary Goldman; David Haussler; Jingchun Zhu

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Planetesimal Capture in the Disk Instability Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We follow the contraction and evolution of a typical Jupiter-mass clump created by the disk instability mechanism, and compute the rate of planetesimal capture during this evolution. We show that such a clump has a slow contraction phase lasting ~3x10^5 years. By following the trajectories of planetesimals as they pass through the envelope of the protoplanet, we compute the cross-section for planetesimal capture at all stages of the protoplanet's evolution. We show that the protoplanet can capture a large fraction of the solid material in its feeding zone, which will lead to an enrichment of the protoplanet in heavy elements. The exact amount of this enrichment depends upon, but is not very sensitive to the size and random speed of the planetesimals.

Ravit Helled; Morris Podolak; Attay Kovetz

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gravitational instability of slowly rotating isothermal spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the statistical mechanics of rotating self-gravitating systems by allowing properly for the conservation of angular momentum. We study analytically the case of slowly rotating isothermal spheres by expanding the solutions of the Boltzmann-Poisson equation in a series of Legendre polynomials, adapting the procedure introduced by Chandrasekhar (1933) for distorted polytropes. We show how the classical spiral of Lynden-Bell & Wood (1967) in the temperature-energy plane is deformed by rotation. We find that gravitational instability occurs sooner in the microcanonical ensemble and later in the canonical ensemble. According to standard turning point arguments, the onset of the collapse coincides with the minimum energy or minimum temperature state in the series of equilibria. Interestingly, it happens to be close to the point of maximum flattening. We determine analytically the generalization of the singular isothermal solution to the case of a slowly rotating configuration. We also consider slowly ...

Chavanis, P H

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The instability of silicene on Ag(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used low energy electron microscopy to directly visualize the formation and stability of silicene layers on a Ag(111) substrate. Theoretical calculations call into question the stability of this graphene-like analog of silicon. We find that silicene layers are intrinsically unstable against the formation of an sp{sup 3}-like hybridized, bulk-like silicon structure. The irreversible formation of this bulk-like structure is triggered by thermal Si adatoms that are created by the silicene layer itself. To add injury to insult, this same instability prevents the formation of a fully closed silicene layer or a thicker bilayer, rendering the future large-scale fabrication of silicene layers on Ag substrates unlikely.

Acun, A.; Poelsema, B.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Gastel, R. van [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)] [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Alfven cyclotron instability and ion cyclotron emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional solutions of compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) are studied in the cold plasma approximation. For finite inverse aspect ratio tokamak plasmas the two-dimensional eigenmode envelope is localized at the low magnetic field side with the radial and poloidal localization on the order of a/{radical}m and a/(fourth root of m), respectively, where m is the dominant poloidal mode number. Charged fusion product driven Alfven Cyclotron Instability (ACI) of the compressional Alfven eigenmodes provides the explanation for the ion cyclotron emission (ICE) spectrum observed in tokamak experiments. The ACI is excited by fast charged fusion products via Doppler shifted cyclotron wave-particle resonances. The ion cyclotron and electron Landau dampings and fast particle instability drive are calculated perturbatively for deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas. Near the plasma edge at the low field side the velocity distribution function of charged fusion products is localized in both pitch angle and velocity. The poloidal localization of the eigenmode enhances the ACI growth rates by a factor of {radical}m in comparison with the previous results without poloidal envelope. The thermal ion cyclotron damping determines that only modes with eigenfrequencies at multiples of the edge cyclotron frequency of the background ions can be easily excited and form an ICE spectrum similar to the experimental observations. Theoretical understanding is given for the results of TFTR DD and DT experiments with {upsilon}{sub {alpha}0}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 1 and JET experiments with {upsilon}{sub {alpha}0}/{upsilon}{sub A} > 1.

Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Unraveling the Threads: Simplest cotton genome  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 Unraveling the Threads: Simplest cotton genome offers clues for fiber improvements From the stockings decorating mantles to the new outfits in display windows calling to shoppers, cotton is woven into the fabric of the holiday season. For bioenergy researchers, however, fiber composition matters more than color and texture as each cotton strand is composed of more than two dozen coils of cellulose, a target biomass for next-generation biofuels. In the December 20, 2012 edition of Nature, an international consortium of researchers from 31 institutions including a team from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) present a high-quality draft assembly of the simplest cotton (Gossypium raimondii) genome. Additionally,

307

DOE Joint Genome Institute Completes Soybean Genome- Data Released to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Release: December 8, 2008 Press Release: December 8, 2008 DOE Joint Genome Institute Completes Soybean Genome- Data Released to Advance Biofuel, Food, & Feed Research WALNUT CREEK, CA- The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has released a complete draft assembly of the soybean (Glycine max) genetic code, making it widely available to the research community to advance new breeding strategies for one of the world's most valuable plant commodities. Soybean not only accounts for 70 percent of the world's edible protein, but also is an emerging feedstock for biodiesel production. Soybean is second only to corn as an agricultural commodity and is the leading U.S. agricultural export. DOE JGI's interest in sequencing the soybean centers on its use for biodiesel, a renewable, alternative fuel with the highest energy content of

308

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Soybean Genome Analysis Reveals Pathways for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 13, 2010 January 13, 2010 Soybean Genome Analysis Reveals Pathways for Improving Biodiesel, Disease Resistance, and Reducing Waste Runoff WALNUT CREEK, CA-Soybean, one of the most important global sources of protein and oil, is now the first legume species with a published complete draft genome sequence. The sequence and its analysis appear in the January 14 edition of the journal Nature. The research team comprised 18 institutions, including the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Purdue University and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The DOE, National Science Foundation, USDA and United Soybean Board supported the research. helix made of soybeans

309

DOE Joint Genome Institute: New Genomic Model Defines Microbes by  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 8, 2009 September 8, 2009 New Genomic Model Defines Microbes by Diet-Provides Tool for Tracking Environmental Change WALNUT CREEK, CA-In line with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) interest in characterizing the biotic factors involved in global carbon cycling, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) characterizes a diverse array of plants, microorganisms, and the communities in which they reside to inform options for reducing and stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gases. Through a novel genomic approach detailed in the September 7 online edition and on the cover September 14 of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team of scientists led by the University of New South Wales and the DOE JGI demonstrates how the microbial diversity of the oceans can be analyzed without necessarily

310

Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dust-induced instability in a rotating plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of immobile dust on stability of a magnetized rotating plasma is analyzed. In the presence of dust, a term containing an electric field appears in the one-fluid equation of plasma motion. This electric field leads to an instability of the magnetized rotating plasma called the dust-induced rotational instability (DRI). The DRI is related to the charge imbalance between plasma ions and electrons introduced by the presence of charged dust. In contrast to the well-known magnetorotational instability requiring the decreasing radial profile of the plasma rotation frequency, the DRI can appear for an increasing rotation frequency profile.

Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Lominadze, J. G.; Tsypin, V. S.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Galvao, R. M. O. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, N.S.W. 2006 (Australia); Kharadze Abastumani National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a, Kazbegi Ave., Tbilisi 0160 (Georgia); Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University, 45, Sovetskaya Str., Syzran, Samara Region 446001 (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Prediction of core saturation instability at an HVDC converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core saturation instability has occurred on several HVDC schemes resulting from interactions between second harmonic and dc quantities (voltages and currents) on the ac side of the converter and fundamental frequency quantities on the dc side of the converter. The instability can be reinforced by unbalanced saturation of the converter transformers. The paper presents an analytical method which can be used to quickly screen ac and dc system operating conditions to predict where core saturation instability is likely to occur. Analytical results have been confirmed using the digital transients simulation program PSCAD/EMTDC.

Burton, R.S. [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Fuchshuber, C.F. [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Woodford, D.A. [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Gole, A.M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Human Genome Education Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will contribute to the final revisions of each unit during the second-year of this grant.

Richard Myers; Lane Conn

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Genomics, Intellectual Disability, and Autism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editor: Mefford et al. (Feb. 23 issue) provide an excellent review of the genomic factors in autism but do not mention that the quantitative contribution of the enumerated genetic factors to the rates of autism is small, as compared with the contribution of nongenomic (i.e. environmental)... To the Editor: Mefford et al. (Feb. 23 issue)1 provide an excellent review of the genomic factors in autism but do not mention that the quantitative contribution of the enumerated genetic factors to the rates of autism is small, as compared with the ...

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Genomics, Health Care, and Society  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editor: Hudson, in her otherwise comprehensive review article on genomic medicine (Sept. 15 issue), did not mention the issue of reimbursement and the role of payers such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In my outpatient clinic, many patients decline testing for a BRCA... To the Editor: Hudson, in her otherwise comprehensive review article on genomic medicine (Sept. 15 issue),1 did not mention the issue of reimbursement and the role of payers such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In my outpatient clinic, ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

; Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLES ; Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium* Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome

Kellis, Manolis

318

Kin selection, genomics and caste-antagonistic pleiotropy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Special feature 1001 14 70 Kin selection, genomics and caste-antagonistic pleiotropy David...evolution of social behaviours. The genomics revolution now provides the opportunity...Outlook: kin selection and social insect genomics The revolution in social insect genomics...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Genome and proteome annotation: organization, interpretation and integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...In addition, the Human Genome Variation Society aims...of genomic variation information. With this in mind...variation within the human genome. The elucidation of...beginning of the 1000 genomes project (Siva 2008) aims to...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Magnetorotational instability in a rotating liquid metal annulus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Magnetorotational instability in a rotating liquid metal annulus Hantao Ji 1 Jeremy Goodman 2 Akira Kageyama 1 3 E-mail: hji@pppl.gov 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA 2 Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ......

Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman; Akira Kageyama

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse experiments on KSTAR By John Greenwald March 18, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A look into the...

322

PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse experiments on KSTAR By John Greenwald March 19, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A look into the...

323

PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary tabs View(active tab) High Resolution News PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse experiments on KSTAR By John Greenwald March 18, 2014 Tweet...

324

Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in non-Newtonian complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability is studied in a non-Newtonian dusty plasma with an experimentally verified model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 145003 (2007)] of shear flow rate dependent viscosity. The shear flow profile used here is a parabolic type bounded flow. Both the shear thinning and shear thickening properties are investigated in compressible as well as incompressible limits using a linear stability analysis. Like the stabilizing effect of compressibility on the KH instability, the non-Newtonian effect in shear thickening regime could also suppress the instability but on the contrary, shear thinning property enhances it. A detailed study is reported on the role of non-Newtonian effect on KH instability with conventional dust fluid equations using standard eigenvalue analysis.

Banerjee, D.; Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Activation of conductive pathways via deformation-induced instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the pattern transformation of periodic elastomeric cellular structures, the purpose of this work is to exploit this unique ability to activate conductive via deformation-induced instabilities. Two microstructural ...

Ni, Xinchen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dynamical fracture instabilities due to local hyperelasticity at crack tips  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a crack propagating through a brittle material increases, a dynamical instability leads to an increased roughening of the fracture surface. Cracks moving at low speeds create atomically flat mirror-like ...

Markus J. Buehler; Huajian Gao

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Re-defining the Empirical ZZ Ceti Instability Strip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the new ZZ Ceti stars (hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf variables; DAVs) discovered within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Mukadam et al. 2004) to re-define the empirical ZZ Ceti instability strip. This is the first time since the discovery of white dwarf variables in 1968 that we have a homogeneous set of spectra acquired using the same instrument on the same telescope, and with consistent data reductions, for a statistically significant sample of ZZ Ceti stars. The homogeneity of the spectra reduces the scatter in the spectroscopic temperatures and we find a narrow instability strip of width ~950K, from 10850--11800K. We question the purity of the DAV instability strip as we find several non-variables within. We present our best fit for the red edge and our constraint for the blue edge of the instability strip, determined using a statistical approach.

Anjum S. Mukadam; D. E. Winget; Ted von Hippel; M. H. Montgomery; S. O. Kepler; A. F. M. Costa

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microturbulence in DIII-D tokamak pedestal. I. Electrostatic instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic driftwave instabilities in a tokamak edge have been carried out to study the turbulent transport in the pedestal of an H-mode plasma. The simulations use annulus geometry and focus on two radial regions of a DIII-D experiment: the pedestal top with a mild pressure gradient and the middle of the pedestal with a steep pressure gradient. A reactive trapped electron instability with a typical ballooning mode structure is excited by trapped electrons in the pedestal top. In the middle of the pedestal, the electrostatic instability exhibits an unusual mode structure, which peaks at the poloidal angle ?=?/2. The simulations find that this unusual mode structure is due to the steep pressure gradients in the pedestal but not due to the particular DIII-D magnetic geometry. Realistic DIII-D geometry appears to have a stabilizing effect on the instability when compared to a simple circular tokamak geometry.

Fulton, D. P.; Holod, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Lin, Z., E-mail: zhihongl@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiao, Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF FUNCTIONAL ANKLE INSTABILITY AND BALANCE EXERCISE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional ankle instability (FAI) is a poorly defined entity but commonly used to describe patients who sustain multiple ankle injuries with slight or no external provocation and have a subjective feeling of ankle "giving way". There have been...

Jain, Tarang Kumar

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Parametric Subharmonic Instability of the Internal Tide at 29N  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observational evidence is presented for transfer of energy from the internal tide to near-inertial motions near 29N in the Pacific Ocean. The transfer is accomplished via parametric subharmonic instability (PSI), which involves interaction ...

J. A. MacKinnon; M. H. Alford; Oliver Sun; Rob Pinkel; Zhongxiang Zhao; Jody Klymak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Instability, intermixing and electronic structure at theepitaxialLaAl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

intermixing and electronic structure at the epitaxialLaAlO3SrTiO3(001) heterojunction. Instability, intermixing and electronic structure at the epitaxialLaAlO3...

332

Dynamical Screening and Excitonic Instability in Bilayer Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron interactions in undoped bilayer graphene lead to an instability of the gapless state, which-layer symmetry breaking, and energy gap opening at the Dirac point. In contrast with single-layer graphene, the bilayer ...

Levitov, Leonid

333

The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most o...

Kagan, Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Moisture-Stratiform Instability for Convectively Coupled Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple model of two vertical modes is constructed and analyzed to reveal the basic instability mechanisms of convectively coupled waves. The main novelty of this model is a convective parameterization based on the quasi-equilibrium concept and ...

Zhiming Kuang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Kink instability suppression with stochastic cooling pickup and kicker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kink instability is one of the major beam dynamics issues of the linac-ring based electron ion collider. This head-tail type instability arises from the oscillation of the electron beam inside the opposing ion beam. It must be suppressed to achieve the desired luminosity. There are various ways to suppress the instability, such as tuning the chromaticity in the ion ring or by a dedicated feedback system of the electron beam position at IP, etc. However, each method has its own limitation. In this paper, we will discuss an alternative opportunity of suppressing the kink instability of the proposed eRHIC at BNL using the existing pickup-kicker system of the stochastic cooling system in RHIC.

Hao Y.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Negative-mass Instability in Nonlinear Plasma Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative-mass instability (NMI), previously found in ion traps, appears as a distinct regime of the sideband instability in nonlinear plasma waves with trapped particles. As the bounce frequency of these particles decreases with the bounce action, bunching can occur if the action distribution is inverted in trapping islands. In contrast to existing theories that also infer instabilities from the anharmonicity of bounce oscillations, spatial periodicity of the islands turns out to be unimportant, and the particle distribution can be unstable even if it is at at the resonance. An analytical model is proposed which describes both single traps and periodic nonlinear waves and concisely generalizes the conventional description of the sideband instability in plasma waves. The theoretical results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations carried out for a regime accentuating the NMI effect.

I.Y. Dodin, P.F. Schmit, J. Rocks and N.J. Fisch

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at the Crossroads of Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...55108 4 Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute...with light as a sole energy source (photoautotrophic...production of clean, solar-generated energy in the form of H2, and...59). Ongoing genome projects offer the scientific...

Arthur R. Grossman; Elizabeth E. Harris; Charles Hauser; Paul A. Lefebvre; Diego Martinez; Dan Rokhsar; Jeff Shrager; Carolyn D. Silflow; David Stern; Olivier Vallon; Zhaoduo Zhang

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Strategies and tools for whole genome alignments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of the assembled mouse genome makespossible, for the first time, an alignment and comparison of two largevertebrate genomes. We have investigated different strategies ofalignment for the subsequent analysis of conservation of genomes that areeffective for different quality assemblies. These strategies were appliedto the comparison of the working draft of the human genome with the MouseGenome Sequencing Consortium assembly, as well as other intermediatemouse assemblies. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignmentsexhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90 percent ofknown coding exons in the human genome. We have obtained such coveragewhile preserving specificity. With a view towards the end user, we havedeveloped a suite of tools and websites for automatically aligning, andsubsequently browsing and working with whole genome comparisons. Wedescribe the use of these tools to identify conserved non-coding regionsbetween the human and mouse genomes, some of which have not beenidentified by other methods.

Couronne, Olivier; Poliakov, Alexander; Bray, Nicolas; Ishkhanov,Tigran; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Rubin, Edward; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

Roberts, Simon

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Gene Map of the Human Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sanger.ac.uk/ Stanford Human Genome Center http://www-shgc.stanford.edu/ Wellcome Trust Centre for Human...sanger.ac.ukl Stanford Human Genome Center http://www-shgc.stanford.edu/ Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics http...

G. D. Schuler; M. S. Boguski; E. A. Stewart; L. D. Stein; G. Gyapay; K. Rice; R. E. White; P. Rodriguez-Tom; A. Aggarwal; E. Bajorek; S. Bentolila; B. B. Birren; A. Butler; A. B. Castle; N. Chiannilkulchai; A. Chu; C. Clee; S. Cowles; P. J. R. Day; T. Dibling; N. Drouot; I. Dunham; S. Duprat; C. East; C. Edwards; J.-B. Fan; N. Fang; C. Fizames; C. Garrett; L. Green; D. Hadley; M. Harris; P. Harrison; S. Brady; A. Hicks; E. Holloway; L. Hui; S. Hussain; C. Louis-Dit-Sully; J. Ma; A. MacGilvery; C. Mader; A. Maratukulam; T. C. Matise; K. B. McKusick; J. Morissette; A. Mungall; D. Muselet; H. C. Nusbaum; D. C. Page; A. Peck; S. Perkins; M. Piercy; F. Qin; J. Quackenbush; S. Ranby; T. Reif; S. Rozen; C. Sanders; X. She; J. Silva; D. K. Slonim; C. Soderlund; W.-L. Sun; P. Tabar; T. Thangarajah; N. Vega-Czarny; D. Vollrath; S. Voyticky; T. Wilmer; X. Wu; M. D. Adams; C. Auffray; N. A. R. Walter; R. Brandon; A. Dehejia; P. N. Goodfellow; R. Houlgatte; J. R. Hudson Jr.; S. E. Ide; K. R. Iorio; W. Y. Lee; N. Seki; T. Nagase; K. Ishikawa; N. Nomura; C. Phillips; M. H. Polymeropoulos; M. Sandusky; K. Schmitt; R. Berry; K. Swanson; R. Torres; J. C. Venter; J. M. Sikela; J. S. Beckmann; J. Weissenbach; R. M. Myers; D. R. Cox; M. R. James; D. Bentley; P. Deloukas; E. S. Lander; T. J. Hudson

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Unlocking the Secrets of the Genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary objective of the Human Genome Project was to produce high-quality sequences not just for the human genome but also for those of the chief model organisms: Escherichia coli, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), ...

Celniker, Susan E.

342

Ion-Cyclotron Instability in the TFR Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density fluctuations in the ion-cyclotron frequency range have been observed in the TFR tokamak by microwave scattering. The geometry was such that the selected fluctuation wave vector was aligned across the confining magnetic field in the outside region of the torus. A threshold for the onset of the instability as a function of the discharge current has been observed. A plausible explanation of this instability in terms of current-driven ion-cyclotron electrostatic wave is discussed.

TFR Group

1978-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Instability issues for the ESS linac and rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comments are made on beam instability issues in the ESS linac and rings. The topics of interest in the linac are halo generation in the absence and presence of machine imperfections, and also the stability of the momentum ramping of the output beam. In the case of the rings, the main concern is for fast coherent transverse instabilities due to the combined effect of coupled electron-proton oscillations and interaction with the wall impedances.

Rees, G. H. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, CLRC (United Kingdom)

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electromagnetic Ion-Beam Instabilities in the Solar Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stability of a plasma consisting of two, unequal, isotropic, ion beams streaming along a uniform magnetic field has been investigated by numerically solving the full electromagnetic, Vlasov, linear dispersion relation for high-? plasmas. Three instabilities are found: One is closely associated with the usual Alfvn mode and the two others with the "fast" or magnetosonic mode. The importance of these instabilities for certain neutral-beam-injection experiments and in the solar wind is emphasized.

Michael D. Montgomery; S. Peter Gary; D. W. Forslund; W. C. Feldman

1975-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

345

Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

Mendona, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade de So Paulo, 05508-090 So Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Suppression of Rayleigh Taylor instability in strongly coupled plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rayleigh Taylor instability in a strongly coupled plasma medium has been investigated using the equations of generalized hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the visco-elasticity of the strongly coupled medium due to strong inter particle correlations leads to a suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability unless certain threshold conditions are met. The relevance of these results to experiments on laser compression of matter to high densities including those related to inertial confinement fusion using lasers has also been shown.

Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Kinematic interpretation of string instability in a background gravitational field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unstable regime in which the string oscillating modes develop imaginary frequencies is shown to be characterized, kinematically, by a positive relative acceleration among the different points of the string. Instability occurs when this acceleration, induced by the background curvature, is large enough to make the extension of the corresponding causally connected region smaller than the string maximal size. This kinematic characterization is applied, in particular, to discuss string instability in a static and spherically symmetric gravitational background.

M. Gasperini

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Black Hole Instabilities and Exponential Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, a general analysis has been given of the stability with respect to axisymmetric perturbations of stationary-axisymmetric black holes and black branes in vacuum general relativity in arbitrary dimensions. It was shown that positivity of canonical energy on an appropriate space of perturbations is necessary and sufficient for stability. However, the notions of both "stability" and "instability" in this result are significantly weaker than one would like to obtain. In this paper, we prove that if a perturbation of the form $\\pounds_t \\delta g$---with $\\delta g$ a solution to the linearized Einstein equation---has negative canonical energy, then that perturbation must, in fact, grow exponentially in time. The key idea is to make use of the $t$- or ($t$-$\\phi$)-reflection isometry, $i$, of the background spacetime and decompose the initial data for perturbations into their odd and even parts under $i$. We then write the canonical energy as $\\mathscr E\\ = \\mathscr K + \\mathscr U$, where $\\mathscr K$ and $...

Prabhu, Kartik

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gravitational instability of slowly rotating isothermal spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the statistical mechanics of rotating self-gravitating systems by allowing properly for the conservation of angular momentum. We study analytically the case of slowly rotating isothermal spheres by expanding the solutions of the Boltzmann-Poisson equation in a series of Legendre polynomials, adapting the procedure introduced by Chandrasekhar (1933) for distorted polytropes. We show how the classical spiral of Lynden-Bell & Wood (1967) in the temperature-energy plane is deformed by rotation. We find that gravitational instability occurs sooner in the microcanonical ensemble and later in the canonical ensemble. According to standard turning point arguments, the onset of the collapse coincides with the minimum energy or minimum temperature state in the series of equilibria. Interestingly, it happens to be close to the point of maximum flattening. We determine analytically the generalization of the singular isothermal solution to the case of a slowly rotating configuration. We also consider slowly rotating configurations of the self-gravitating Fermi gas at non zero temperature.

P. -H. Chavanis

2002-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

The (In)Stability of Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of numerical simulations which examine the dynamical stability of known planetary systems, a star with two or more planets. First we vary the initial conditions of each system based on observational data. We then determine regions of phase space which produce stable planetary configurations. For each system we perform 1000 ~1 million year integrations. We examine upsilon And, HD83443, GJ876, HD82943, 47UMa, HD168443, and the solar system (SS). We find that the resonant systems, 2 planets in a first order mean motion resonance, (HD82943 and GJ876) have very narrow zones of stability. The interacting systems, not in first order resonance, but able to perturb each other (upsilon And, 47UMa, and SS) have broad regions of stability. The separated systems, 2 planets beyond 10:1 resonance, (we only examine HD83443 and HD168443) are fully stable. Furthermore we find that the best fits to the interacting and resonant systems place them very close to unstable regions. The boundary in phase space between stability and instability depends strongly on the eccentricities, and (if applicable) the proximity of the system to perfect resonance. In addition to million year integrations, we also examined stability on ~100 million year timescales. For each system we ran ~10 long term simulations, and find that the Keplerian fits to these systems all contain configurations which may be regular on this timescale.

Rory Barnes; Thomas Quinn

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparative Sequencing of Plant Genomes: Choices to Make The first sequenced genome of a plant,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMENTARY Comparative Sequencing of Plant Genomes: Choices to Make The first sequenced genome of a plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, was published ,6 years ago (Arabidopsis Genome Initiative, 2000). Since that time, the complete rice genome (Oryza sativa; Goff et al., 2002; Yu et al., 2002; International Rice

Purugganan, Michael D.

352

A Possible Genome To Architecture Project (GenToA) [The Meta-Genome Project?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concern about the Human Genome project, comparing it with buying a book written in a language nobodyA Possible Genome To Architecture Project (GenToA) [The Meta-Genome Project?] Installed: 2 Aug 2010 can a genome specify an information-processing architecture that grows itself guided by interaction

Sloman, Aaron

353

Whole-genome shotgun assembly and comparison of human genome assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whole-genome shotgun assembly and comparison of human genome assemblies Sorin Istraila , Granger G a whole-genome shotgun assembly (called WGSA) of the human genome generated at Celera in 2001. The Celera. With the nearly complete human DNA sequence [National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Build 34] now

Shatkay, Hagit

354

From genome to proteome: developing expression clone resources for the human genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From genome to proteome: developing expression clone resources for the human genome Gary Temple1 Mammalian Gene Collection, National Human Genome Research Institute and 2 National Center for Biotechnology human genome sequence, it has become possible and highly productive to compare the sequences of m

355

Population genomics20-02-2009 Antnio Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics 1 António Rodrigues (PDBC 2008) Bruno Santos (PDBC 2008) #12;Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Contents 2 2 1000 genome project 1 Motivation and Introduction New generation sequencing

Goldschmidt, Christina

356

Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The International Aphid Genomics Consortium we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

FCTO Projects and the Materials Genome Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Materials Genome Initiative, held on December 2, 2014.

358

GDB - Human Genome Database final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the DOE final report for the GDB, Human Genome Database, project at the Johns Hopkins University.

Talbot, C. Conover, Jr.

2002-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Genome Institutes Automation Approach and Historythroughput environment; automation does not necessarilyissues Islands of Automation modular instruments with

Roberts, Simon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Human Genome Center (SHGC) began collaborating withscientific goals, and the JGI SHGC kept pace, focusing on

Gilbert, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radiation Induced Nanocrystal Formation in Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The irradiation of metallic glasses to induce nanocrystallization was studied in two metallic glass compositions, Cu50Zr45Ti5 and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5. Atomic mobility was described using a model based on localized excess free volume due to displace...

Carter, Jesse

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

DATA QUALITY IN GENOME DATABASES (Research Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATA QUALITY IN GENOME DATABASES (Research Paper) Heiko Müller Humboldt University Berlin, Germany@dbis.informatik.hu-berlin.de Abstract: Genome databases store data about molecular biological entities such as genes, proteins, diseases is their importance in the process of drug discovery. Genome data is analyzed and interpreted to gain so-called leads

Weske, Mathias

363

Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Biology 2005, 6:312 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Large-scale discovery and validation of functional elements in the human genome-mail: bbernst@fas.harvard.edu. Manolis Kellis. E-mail: manoli@mit.edu Published: 1 March 2005 Genome Biology

Kellis, Manolis

364

Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch Meeting report Mobile DNA: genomes under the influence Cédric Feschotte and Ellen J Pritham Feschotte. Email: cedric@uta.edu Published: 30 June 2006 Genome Biology 2006, 7:320 (doi:10.1186/gb-2006

Pritham, Ellen J.

365

Genome Biology 2004, 6:302 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Biology 2004, 6, Technologiepark 927, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium. E-mail: Yves.vandepeer@psb.ugent.be Published: 21 December 2004 Genome at http://genomebiology.com/2004/6/1/302 © 2004 BioMed Central Ltd A report on the Plant Genomics European

Gent, Universiteit

366

Inferring Ancestral Chloroplast Genomes with Inverted Repeat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inferring Ancestral Chloroplast Genomes with Inverted Repeat Liying Cui # , Feng Yue + , Claude W 87131 Abstract--- Genome evolution is shaped not only by nucleotide substitutions, but also by structural changes including gene and genome duplications, inser­ tions/deletions and gene order

Tang, Jijun

367

Genome Biology 2007, 8:R34 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchrefereedresearchinteractionsinformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Biology 2007, 8:R34 analytics tool for genome assemblies Michael C Schatz*, Adam M Phillippy*, Ben Shneiderman and Steven L the original work is properly cited. Hawkeye: a visual analytics tool for genome assembliesHawkeye is a new

Shneiderman, Ben

368

Computational Approaches Towards Human Genome Annotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Approaches Towards Human Genome Annotation Mark Gerstein Molecular Biophysics of the human genome. My talk will be concerned with topics within this area, in particular annotating pseudogenes (protein fossils) in the genome. I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

369

Experimental genomics of fitness in yeast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Review articles 1001 70 129 Experimental genomics of fitness in yeast Graham Bell * * graham...084533 ) Liti, G. , 2009 Population genomics of domestic and wild yeasts. Nature...1126/science.1091317 ) Experimental genomics of fitness in yeast. | The set of single-gene...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Rice functional genomics research in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compiled by Zhu Chen Rice functional genomics research in China Bin Han 1 7 * Yongbiao...People's Republic of China Rice functional genomics is a scientific approach that seeks to...facilitated research in rice functional genomics in China. The Ministry of Science and...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Pairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COM­ BAT is applied to comparative analysis between yeast genomes, and between the human genomePairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and Optical­maps by Bing Sun A dissertation submitted a research problem and the need of persistence to accomplish a goal. He introduced the CAPO project to me

Mohri, Mehryar

372

Meeting report The changing face of genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this technology into studying transcriptional regulator binding in the human genome, with applicationsMeeting report The changing face of genomics Manolis Kellis Address: The Broad Institute AGBT / AMS meeting on Advances in Genome Biology & Technology Marco Island, Florida, USA, February 4

Kellis, Manolis

373

Pairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In experiments COM- BAT is applied to comparative analysis between yeast genomes, and between the human genomePairwise Comparison Between Genomic Sequences and Optical-maps by Bing Sun A dissertation submitted a research problem and the need of persistence to accomplish a goal. He introduced the CAPO project to me

Mohri, Mehryar

374

SCIENCE, POLITICS. AND THE HUMAN GENOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ Robert Cook-Deegan. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. 1. Human Genome Project. 2. Human geneSCIENCE, POLITICS. AND THE HUMAN GENOM A scrupulous . . . narrative of the genesis and opening- DEEGAN #12;#12;#12;#12;The GENE WARS Science, Politics, and theHuman Genome ROBERT COOK-DEEGAN W - W

Richardson, David

375

Genomic Comparisons of Humans and Chimpanzees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic Comparisons of Humans and Chimpanzees Ajit Varki1 and David L. Nelson2 1 Glycobiology to human evolution, development, and disease. Sequence differences from the human genome were confirmed in the sidebar Online Sources of Information Regarding the Chimpanzee Genome. At the outset, we also emphasize

376

Genomics-based drug discovery venture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genomics-based drug discovery venture ... The Cambridge, Mass.-based company calls its DiscoverEase program "functional genomics"designed to isolate and rapidly determine not only genes but also the related functions of critical proteins. ... Other genomics programs sequence vast amounts of human genetic information. ...

ANN THAYER

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Genomics Rises To Drug Discovery Challenge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genomics Rises To Drug Discovery Challenge ... Functional genomics and functional proteomics provide a set of powerful tools to help identify novel cellular targets ... With pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology firms always looking for ways to discover new medicines more quickly and more efficiently, they are increasingly turning to new genomics and proteomics technologies to speed things along. ...

STU BORMAN

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

379

Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

Pringle, Anne

380

One day seminar: Genetics and Genomics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE One day seminar: Genetics and Genomics of Infectious Diseases Malaria and TB 14th June 2013 University of St Andrews - School of Medicine Pathogen genome research allows exquisite to understanding disease progression. Pathogen genome sequencing is accessible to most. Outputs have broad

Brierley, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fraud strikes top genome lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

Marshall, E.

1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

Corces, Victor G.

383

The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kltz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

21, 2008 21, 2008 Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient Lineage, Confounding Array of Complex Capabilities WALNUT CREEK, CA-As Aesop said, appearances are deceiving-even in life's tiniest critters. From first detection in the 1880s, clinging to the sides of an aquarium, to its recent characterization by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a simple and primitive animal, Trichoplax adhaerens, appears to harbor a far more complex suite of capabilities than meets the eye. The findings, reported in the August 21 online edition of the journal Nature, establish a group of organisms as a branching point of animal evolution and identify sets of genes, or a "parts list," employed by organisms that have evolved along particular branches.

385

Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

Pennacchio, Len A.

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transforming Growth Factor ?-1 (TGF-?1) Is a Serum Biomarker of Radiation Induced Fibrosis in Patients Treated With Intracavitary Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor ? -1 (TGF-?1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R and D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-?1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-?1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. Results: The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-?1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 5016 pg/mL, P<.0001); and women with moderate to severe RIF (34,462 4713 pg/mL, P<0.0001). Patients with moderate to severe RIF had significantly elevated TGF-?1 levels when compared with those with none to mild RIF before surgery (P=.0014) during IBAPBI (P?0001), and the elevation persisted at 6 months (P?.001), 12 months (P?.001), 18 months (P?.001), and 24 months (P=.12). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TGF-?1 values predicting moderate to severe RIF was generated with an area under the curve (AUC){sub ROC} of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-?1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusions: TGF-?1 levels correlate with the development of moderate to severe RIF. The pre-IBAPBI mean TGF-?1 levels can serve as an early biomarker for the development of moderate to severe RIF after IBAPBI.

Boothe, Dustin L. [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Coplowitz, Shana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Greenwood, Eleni [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Christos, Paul J. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K. S. Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9008@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

LOCAL RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INSTABILITIES IN MAGNETICALLY STRATIFIED MEDIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study local radiation magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in static, optically thick, vertically stratified media with constant flux mean opacity. We include the effects of vertical gradients in a horizontal background magnetic field. Assuming rapid radiative diffusion, we use the zero gas pressure limit as an entry point for investigating the coupling between the photon bubble instability and the Parker instability. Apart from factors that depend on wavenumber orientation, the Parker instability exists for wavelengths longer than a characteristic wavelength {lambda}{sub tran}, while photon bubbles exist for wavelengths shorter than {lambda}{sub tran}. The growth rate in the Parker regime is independent of the orientation of the horizontal component of the wavenumber when radiative diffusion is rapid, but the range of Parker-like wavenumbers is extended if there exists strong horizontal shear between field lines (i.e., horizontal wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field). Finite gas pressure introduces an additional short-wavelength limit to the Parker-like behavior, and also limits the growth rate of the photon bubble instability to a constant value at short wavelengths. We also consider the effects of differential rotation with accretion disk applications in mind. Our results may explain why photon bubbles have not yet been observed in recent stratified shearing box accretion disk simulations. Photon bubbles may physically exist in simulations with high radiation to gas pressure ratios, but higher spatial resolution will be needed to resolve the asymptotically growing unstable wavelengths.

Tao, Ted; Blaes, Omer [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance 'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance Fusion Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance Fusion Plasmas Real time steering of microwave beams is used to suppress deleterious modes on DIII-D. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of General Atomics

389

Magnetic instabilities in collisionless astrophysical rotating plasma with anisotropic pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique is developed for analytical study of instabilities in collisionless astrophysical rotating plasma with anisotropic pressure that may lead to magnetic turbulence. Description is based on a pair of equations for perturbations of the radial magnetic field and the sum of magnetic field and perpendicular plasma pressures. From these equations, a canonical second-order differential equation for the perturbed radial magnetic field is derived and, subsequently, the dispersion relation for local perturbations. The paper predicts two varieties of hybrid instabilities due to the effects of differential plasma rotation and pressure anisotropy: The rotational-firehose and rotational-mirror ones. When the gravitation force is weak compared with the perpendicular pressure gradient, a new family of instabilities (the pressure-gradient-driven) is revealed.

Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Erokhin, N. N. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Lominadze, J. G. [Kharadze Abastumani National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a, Kazbegi Ave., Tbilisi 0160 (Georgia); Nodia Institute of Geophysics, 1, Aleksidze Str., Tbilisi 0193 (Georgia); Smolyakov, A. I. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon S7N 5E2 (Canada); Churikov, A. P. [Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University, 45, Sovetskaya Str., Syzran, Samara Region 446001 (Russian Federation)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Generation of electromagnetic structures via modulational instability of drift waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation mechanism for large scale electromagnetic structures (blobs) is considered by employing the technique of four-wave interactions (modulational instability). It is shown that primary electrostatic turbulence may generate elongated electromagnetic structures with poloidal modulations. Such structures are principally related to drift-Alfven waves. The analysis fully takes into account finite ion temperature effects and associated diamagnetic contributions to Reynolds stress. The turbulent generation of blobs has instability growth rates which scale similar to the zonal flow instabilities, {gamma}{approx}, where q is a characteristic wave vector of large scale modes, and V-tilde is a characteristic amplitude of the velocity of turbulent fluctuations. This analysis is shown to be fully consistent with results of an earlier analysis by using the wave kinetic equation.

Smolyakov, A. I. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Nuclear Fusion Institute, Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', 1 Kurchatov Square, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Characterization of the magnetorotational instability from a turbulent background state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments in spherical Couette flow (flow between concentric rotating spheres) with an imposed magnetic field have yielded induced magnetic fields consistent with the magnetorotational instability. This might be expected due to the decreasing rotation rate profile in the base state. The observation is at odds though with existing theory in that the base state has a significant turbulent component. We characterize the observed induced magnetic fields as well as the velocity disturbance underlying the instability. The saturated state shows a variety of patterns and dynamics depending on applied magnetic field strength and rotation rate. The observed phase diagram is in qualitative agreement with linear stability theory. We also compare the observed stability diagram with that of MHD instabilities calculated by Hollerbach and Skinner.

Daniel S. Zimmerman; Santiago A. Triana; Daniel R. Sisan; W. Andrew Tillotson; William Dorland; Daniel P. Lathrop

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Instabilities simulations with wideband feedback systems: CMAD, HEADTAIL, WARP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transverse mode coupling (TMCI) and electron cloud instabilities (ECI) pose fundamental limitations on the acceptable beam intensities in the SPS at CERN. This in turn limits the ultimate achievable luminosity in the LHC. Therefore, future luminosity upgrades foresee methods for evading TMCI as well as ECI. Proposed approaches within the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project include new optics with reduced transition energy as well as vacuum chamber coating techniques. As a complementary option, high bandwidth feedback systems may provide instability mitigation by actively damping the intra-bunch motion of unstable modes. In an effort to evaluate the potentials and limitations of such feedback systems and to characterise some of the specifications, a numerical model of a realistic feedback system has been developed and integrated into available instabilities simulation codes. Together with the implementation of this new feedback system model, CMAD and HEADTAIL have been used to investigate the impact of differen...

Li, Kevin; Fox, J D; Pivi, M; Rivetta, C; Rumolo, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cassava Genomics: can genomic technology benefit smallholder farmers in Africa? (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steve Rounsley of the University of Arizona speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Rounsley, Steve [University of Arizona

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Universality of the Plastic Instability in Strained Amorphous Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By comparing the response to external strains in metallic glasses and in Lenard-Jones glasses we find a quantitative universality of the fundamental plastic instabilities in the athermal, quasistatic limit. Microscopically these two types of glasses are as different as one can imagine, the latter being determined by binary interactions, whereas the former by multiple interactions due to the effect of the electron gas that cannot be disregarded. In spite of this enormous difference the plastic instability is the same saddle-node bifurcation. As a result the statistics of stress and energy drops in the elasto-plastic steady state are universal, sharing the same system-size exponents.

Ratul Dasgupta; Smarajit Karmakar; Itamar Procaccia

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in fast z-pinches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simplified analytic model is presented to describe the implosion of a plasma column by an azimuthal magnetic field of sufficient magnitude to drive a strong shock wave into the plasma. This model is employed together with buoyancy-drag-based models of nonlinear single-mode and turbulent multimode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth to investigate the mixing process in such fast z-pinches. These models give predictions that characterize limitations the instability can impose on the implosion in terms of maximum convergence ratios (CR) attainable for an axially coherent pinch. Both the implosion and instability models are validated with results from high-resolution numerical simulations.

Miles, A R

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

History of the DOE Human Genome Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

History of the DOE Human Genome Program History of the DOE Human Genome Program The following history is taken from the U.S. Department of Energy 1991-91 Human Genome Program Report (June 1992). This is an archived item. A brief history of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Human Genome Program will be useful in a discussion of the objectives of the DOE program as well as those of the collaborative U.S. Human Genome Project. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of DOE and its predecessor agencies--the Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration--have long sponsored research into genetics, both in microbial systems and in mammals, including basic studies on genome structure, replication, damage, and repair and the consequences of genetic

397

PLAZA: A Comparative Genomics Resource to Study Gene and Genome Evolution in Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...requires a centralized plant genomics infrastructure where all information generated by different...Vandepoele and Van de Peer, 2005) are hybrid systems integrating gene information...this genome information, a centralized infrastructure is required where all data generated...

Sebastian Proost; Michiel Van Bel; Lieven Sterck; Kenny Billiau; Thomas Van Parys; Yves Van de Peer; Klaas Vandepoele

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Agricultural Microbes Genome 2: First Glimpses into the Genomes of Plant-Associated Microbes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...occurring. This new era of research allows a comprehensive study...Genome Conference. Meeting abstracts are archived on the World Wide...United States Department of Energy, Germantown, MD) discussed...Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program, will also include...

Sophien Kamoun; Saskia A. Hogenhout

399

Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Genomes as geography: using GIS technology to build interactive genome feature maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many commonly used genome browsers display sequence annotations and related attributes as horizontal data tracks that can be toggled on and off according to user preferences. Most genome browsers use only simple ...

Mary E Dolan; Constance C Holden; M Kate Beard; Carol J Bult

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial

Eddy, Sean

402

Comparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48 Sinorhizobium strains comprising five genospecies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequencing the genomes of 48 strains of Sinorhizobium reveals a large heterogeneity in strategies for colonization in this family

Masayuki Sugawara; Brendan Epstein; Brian D Badgley; Tatsuya Unno; Lei Xu; Jennifer Reese; Prasad Gyaneshwar; Roxanne Denny; Joann Mudge; Arvind K Bharti; Andrew D Farmer; Gregory D May; Jimmy E Woodward; Claudine Mdigue; David Vallenet; Aurlie Lajus; Zo Rouy; Betsy Martinez-Vaz; Peter Tiffin; Nevin D Young; Michael J Sadowsky

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Generalized genetical genomics : advanced methods and applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Generalized genetical genomics (GGG) is a systems genetics approach that combines the analysis of genetic variation with population-wide assessment of variation in molecular traits in (more)

Li, Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Transition to longitudinal instability of detonation waves is generically associated with Hopf bifurcation to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transition to longitudinal instability of detonation waves is generically associated with Hopf We show that transition to longitudinal instability of strong detonation solu- tions of reactive detonations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.5 Structure of the equations

Texier, Benjamin - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

405

Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel July 2008 Keywords: Boiling Microchannels Visualisation Flow boiling instabilities Heat transfer a b intensification heat removal. Flow boiling heat transfer in microchannel geometry and the associated flow

Aussillous, Pascale

406

Diagnostics of subsynchronous vibrations in rotating machinery - methodologies to identify potential instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rotordynamic instability can be disastrous for the operation of high speed turbomachinery in the industry. Most ??instabilities?? are due to de-stabilizing cross coupled forces from variable fluid dynamic pressure around a rotor component, acting...

Kar, Rahul

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Barotropic Rossby Waves Radiating from Tropical Instability Waves in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical instability waves are triggered by instabilities of the equatorial current systems, and their sea level signal, with peak amplitude near 5N, is one of the most prominent features of the dynamic topography of the tropics. Cross-spectral ...

J. Thomas Farrar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Collateral  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collateral Damage Collateral Damage Using targeted irradiation to understand radiation-induced effects in bystander cells chromosomal A typical example of chromosomal instability induction measured by chromosome-type aberrations in primary human lymphocytes at delay time post-irradiation of a fraction of the cell population. Similar types of aberrations were observed in whole irradiated population but were not observed in untreated cells. Munira Kadhim Background: It has long been understood that radiation exposure can influence cellular changes. Studies indicate that even very low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particle irradiation, such as that from environmental radon, can affect cells. Radiation-induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells and as a

409

Update on the Maize Genome Sequencing Project The Maize Genome Sequencing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on the Maize Genome Sequencing Project The Maize Genome Sequencing Project Vicki L. Chandler Genome Sequencing Project. The momentum for this endeavor has been building within the maize (Zea mays- sion. This Update reviews the project goals and the expected deliverables deriving from the two funded

Brendel, Volker

410

Progress in theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is given of the basic results of modern theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma. Both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations are considered. Main attention is given to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), discovered earlier by Velikhov, and the rotational-convective instability (RCI) discussed in a number of papers of astrophysical trend. For qualitative explanation of the results, a local approach is used which, with equilibrium plasma pressure gradient and/or nonsymmetry of perturbations, requires operation with nonlocal azimuthal perturbed magnetic field. The gravity and effects of pressure anisotropy are taken into account. In addition to hydrodynamic, the electrodynamic approach is formulated. The drift effects are considered. Analyzed are the ideal instabilities and those depending on the dissipative effects: viscosity and heat conductivity. The MRI is considered at presence of the charged dust particles. Besides the local approach, the nonlocal approach is formulated for the plasma model with a steplike profile of angular rotation frequency. Alongside with perturbations which frequencies are small compared to the ion cyclotron frequency, the perturbations are analyzed with frequencies larger than the ion cyclotron frequency. The latter corresponds to the Hall regime and subregime of nonmagnetized plasma.

Mikhailovskii, A. B. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Nuclear Fusion (Russian Federation); Lominadze, J. G. [Kharadze Abastumani National Astrophysical Observatory (Georgia); Churikov, A. P. [Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University (Russian Federation); Pustovitov, V. D. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Nuclear Fusion (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Instability of coupled systems with delay1 Reinhard Racke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instability of coupled systems with delay1 Reinhard Racke Department of Mathematics and Statistics University of Konstanz 78457 Konstanz, Germany reinhard.racke@uni-konstanz.de Abstract: We consider linear, Quintanilla & Racke [9], or Pr¨u? [29], in particular for connections to Volterra equations. Indeed

Racke, Reinhard

412

Turing instability in reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Turing instability is studied in two-component reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear diffusion terms, and the regions in parametric space where Turing patterns can form are determined. The boundaries between super- and subcritical bifurcations are found. Calculations are performed for one-dimensional brusselator and oregonator models.

Zemskov, E. P., E-mail: zemskov@ccas.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnicyn Computing Center (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Interacting viscous instabilities in microfluidic systems Thomas Cubaud*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interacting viscous instabilities in microfluidic systems Thomas Cubaud*a and Thomas G. Mason, evolution, and stability of microfluidic flows involving two or more miscible fluids that have different viscosities. When two liquids that have widely different viscosities are injected into a rigid microfluidic

Cubaud, Thomas

414

Viscous damping of r-modes: Small amplitude instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the viscous damping of r-modes of compact stars and analyze in detail the regions where small amplitude modes are unstable to the emission of gravitational radiation. We present general expressions for the viscous damping times for arbitrary forms of interacting dense matter and derive general semi-analytic results for the boundary of the instability region. These results show that many aspects, such as the physically important minima of the instability boundary, are surprisingly insensitive to detailed microscopic properties of the considered form of matter. Our general expressions are applied to the cases of hadronic stars, strange stars, and hybrid stars, and we focus on equations of state that are compatible with the recent measurement of a heavy compact star. We find that hybrid stars with a sufficiently small core can masquerade as neutron stars and feature an instability region that is indistinguishable from that of a neutron star, whereas neutron stars with a core density high enough to allow direct Urca reactions feature a notch on the right side of the instability region.

Mark G. Alford; Simin Mahmoodifar; Kai Schwenzer

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Controlling Plasma Instabilities: A Multidisciplinary Approach Bedros Afeyan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of Maryland, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at UC Davis, Livermore. His work has e2 me e2 c 1 137 A NIF Hohlraum is a Laser-Plasma Instability (LPI) Candy Store Non of the plasma conditions or interaction modalities that are dominant on the NIF were ever accessed on Nova or Omega. Its

Levi, Anthony F. J.

416

Measurements of laser-plasma instability relevant to ignition hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce x-rays for imploding a fusion capsule symmetrically. The speckled nature of laser beams used in ICF is an important factor in laser-plasma instability processes. For example, models which calculate the spatial growth of convective instability by properly accounting for the laser speckles successfully predict the observed onsets of backscattering due to stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering instabilities (SBS and SRS). Assuming pump depletion as the only saturation mechanism in these models results in very large predicted levels of SBS and SRS backscattering from the long-scale plasmas expected in ignition hohlraums. However, in the long-scale plasmas studied in the Nova and Trident lasers [E. M. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 57}, 2101 (1986) and N. K. Moncur {ital et al.}, Appl. Opt. {bold 34}, 4274 (1995)], SRS and SBS are observed to saturate much below the levels expected from pump depletion. While the mechanism of SBS saturation is not understood at present, the observations of SRS saturation are qualitatively understood. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Fernandez, J.C.; Bauer, B.S.; Cobble, J.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Kyrala, G.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Watt, R.G.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Wood, W.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Failor, B.H. [Physics International, San Leandro, California 94577 (United States)] [Physics International, San Leandro, California 94577 (United States); Kirkwood, R.; MacGowan, B.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

Melrose, Don

418

Nonlinear saturation of nonresonant internal instabilities in a straight spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An initial value numerical solution of the time?dependent nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations demonstrates that spheromak equilibria which are linearly unstable to nonresonant helical internal perturbations saturate at low amplitude without developing singularities. These instabilities thus represent the transition from an axisymmetric to a nonaxisymmetric equilibrium state caused by a peaking of the current density.

W. Park; S. C. Jardin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Dynamic Evolution of the Ion-Acoustic Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive a differential equation governing the evolution of the turbulent energy during the course of the ion-acoustic instability. It is shown that the modification of the electron distribution function constitutes an efficient mechanism of saturation. The saturated energy is found to be lower than that obtained in any theory of saturation by ions.

Tu Khiet and H. Abdel-Gawad

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in relativistic hadronic models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-gas phase transitions in asymmetric nuclear matter give rise to a distillation effect that corresponds to the formation of droplets of high-density symmetric matter in a background of a neutron gas possibly with a very small fraction of protons. In the present work we test the model dependence of this effect. We study the spinodal instabilities of asymmetric nuclear matter within six different mean-field relativistic models with both constant and density-dependent coupling parameters. We also consider the effects of introducing the {delta} meson and the nonlinear {omega}-{rho} coupling. It is shown that the distillation effect within density-dependent models is not so efficient and is comparable to results obtained for nonrelativistic models. Thermodynamical instabilities of nuclear matter neutralized by electrons as found in stellar matter are also investigated. The high Fermi energy of electrons completely erases the instability of density-dependent models. The other models still show a small region of instability but the distillation effect completely disappears because the electron presence freezes the proton fluctuations.

Avancini, S. S.; Menezes, D. P. [Departamento de Fisica, CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Florianopolis, CP 476, CEP 88.040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brito, L.; Provide circumflex ncia, C. [Centro de Fisica Teorica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Chomaz, Ph. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/IN2P3-CNRS), Boite Postale 5027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Dynamical instabilities in density-dependent hadronic relativistic models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unstable modes in asymmetric nuclear matter (ANM) at subsaturation densities are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field density-dependent hadron models. The size of the instabilities that drive the system are calculated and a comparison with results obtained within the nonlinear Walecka model is presented. The distillation and antidistillation effects are discussed.

Santos, A. M.; Brito, L.; Providencia, C. [Centro de Fisica Teorica, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Prediction of Thermoacoustic Instabilities: Numerical Study of Mach number Effects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montpellier , France This paper presents a method for the prediction of combustion instability in gas turbine in the frequency domain as an eigenvalue problem. Flame-acoustic interaction is considered using an n - -model is applicable to complex geometries. The appearance and convection of entropy waves and as well

Nicoud, Franck

423

The influence of internal friction on rotordynamic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal friction has been known to be a cause of whirl instability in built-up rotors since the early 1900's. This internal damping tends to make the rotor whirl at shaft speeds greater than a critical speed, the whirl speed usually being equal...

Srinivasan, Anand

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radiative properties of pair-instability supernova explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......supermassive stars like Car (Davidson Humphreys...converts kinetic energy to thermal and radiative...instability. The alternative core-collapse...mass means that the energy released is to be...An attractive alternative, which needs further...magnetar model whereby energy is added to a SN......

Luc Dessart; Roni Waldman; Eli Livne; D. John Hillier; Stphane Blondin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electrical charging during the sharkskin instability of a metallocene melt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow instabilities are widely studied because of their economical and theoretical interest, however few results have been published about the polymer electrification during the extrusion. Nevertheless the generation of the electrical charges is characteristic of the interaction between the polymer melt and the die walls. In our study, the capillary extrusion of a metallocene polyethylene (mPE) through a tungsten carbide die is characterized through accurate electrical measurements thanks a Faraday pail. No significant charges are observed since the extrudate surface remains smooth. However, as soon as the sharkskin distortion appears, measurable charges are collected (around 5 10-8 C/m2). Higher level of charges are measured during the spurt or the gross-melt fracture (g.m.f) defects. This work is focused on the electrical charging during the sharkskin instability. The variation of the electrical charges versus the apparent wall shear stress is investigated for different die geometries. This curve exhibits a linear increase, followed by a sudden growth just before the onset of the spurt instability. This abrupt charging corresponds also to the end of the sharkskin instability. It is also well-known that wall slip appears just at the same time, with smaller velocity values than during spurt flow. Our results indicate that electrification could be a signature of the wall slip. We show also that the electrification curves can be shifted according to the time-temperature superposition principle, leading to the conclusion that molecular features of the polymer are also involved in this process.

S. Tonon; A. Lavernhe-Gerbier; F. Flores; A. Allal; C. Guerret-Picourt

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Instabilities in the Envelopes and Winds of Very Massive Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high luminosity of Very Massive Stars (VMS) means that radiative forces play an important, dynamical role both in the structure and stability of their stellar envelope, and in driving strong stellar-wind mass loss. Focusing on the interplay of radiative flux and opacity, with emphasis on key distinctions between continuum vs. line opacity, this chapter reviews instabilities in the envelopes and winds of VMS. Specifically, we discuss how: 1) the iron opacity bump can induce an extensive inflation of the stellar envelope; 2) the density dependence of mean opacity leads to strange mode instabilities in the outer envelope; 3) desaturation of line-opacity by acceleration of near-surface layers initiates and sustains a line-driven stellar wind outflow; 4) an associated line-deshadowing instability leads to extensive small-scale structure in the outer regions of such line-driven winds; 5) a star with super-Eddington luminosity can develop extensive atmospheric structure from photon bubble instabilities, or from ...

Owocki, Stanley P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landfill Instability and Its Implications for Operation, Construction, and Design By: W. Douglas landfill waste slide, a 300,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving a geosynthetic clay liner, and a 100,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving leachate recirculation. Other failures of lesser magnitude also

428

Laser-seeded modulation instability within LHC proton beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for seeding the modulation instability (MI) within an SPS-LHC proton beam using a laser pulse is presented. Using simulations, we show that a laser pulse placed ahead of a proton beam excites axially symmetric selfmodulation modes within the proton beam and leads to peak accelerating fields that are comparable to previously proposed seeding methods.

Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Yi, S. Austin; Pukhov, Alexander; Shvets, Gennady [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

New Developments in TDR Cable Surveillance of Potential Instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Developments in TDR Cable Surveillance of Potential Instability C.H. Dowding, M.L. Dussud & K employs a case history to describe deployment of new TDR cable and communication technologies to monitor" installed over a recent subsidence event. A TDR cable was installed horizontally along with more typical

430

Jumping solitary waves in an autonomous reactiondiffusion system with subcritical wave instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jumping solitary waves in an autonomous reaction­diffusion system with subcritical wave instability as solutions to a reaction­diffusion system with a subcritical short-wavelength instability. We demonstrate systems with a subcritical oscillatory instability.17 Here we present a new type of solitary traveling

Epstein, Irving R.

431

Rayleigh-Taylor instability and resulting failure modes of ablatively imploded inertial-fusion targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a theory of these instabilities and potential modes of failure caused by them. Discussions are given for the following: small amplitude growth of the outside surface instability; and modes of failure resulting from nonlinear development of the inside surface instability.

Montierth, L.; Morse, R.

1983-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Exploring the early origins of the synapse by comparative genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...origins of the synapse by comparative genomics Kenneth S Kosik * * ( kosik@lifesci...the existing core genes. A comparative genomics approach to one cellular machine-the...validation of these views. A comparative genomics approach to the entire cellulome may...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bioadhesion in ascidians: a developmental and functional genomics perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ascidians: a developmental and functional genomics perspective Roberta Pennati 1 Ute Rothbacher...knowledge from a developmental and functional genomics point of view can advance our understanding...bioadhesion|ascidians|papillae|functional genomics|gene networks| 1. Introduction The...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Deciphering the Diploid Ancestral Genome of the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recognized within the Brassicaceae family (Figure 1A). Within lineage...Mummenhoff, K. (2011). Cabbage family affairs: The evolutionary...genomics in the Brassicaceae: Building blocks of crucifer genomes...many other plant species by multi-genome comparison. Additionally...

Feng Cheng; Terezie Mandáková; Jian Wu; Qi Xie; Martin A. Lysak; Xiaowu Wang

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Diversity and genomics of Antarctic marine micro-organisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clarke and N. Johnston Diversity and genomics of Antarctic marine micro-organisms...larger scale. Insights from initial genomics studies on both cultivated organisms...marine bacteria|marine microbial genomics|bacterioplankton diversity|Southern...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Comparative genomics of two newly isolated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Comparative genomics of two newly isolated Dehalococcoides strains of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA Comparative genomics of Dehalococcoides strains and an enrichment were performed using a microarray targeting genes from all available sequenced genomes

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

437

Forensic Genomics: Kin Privacy, Driftnets and Other Open Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Human Genome Project, Cold and hot hits, Data protection, Informational privacy. 1. INTRODUCTIONForensic Genomics: Kin Privacy, Driftnets and Other Open Questions Frank Stajano University sequencing the entire genome of a person becomes sufficiently cheap as to become a routine operation

Cambridge, University of

438

The Evolution of the Anopheles 16 Genomes Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the imminent completion of a set of reference genome assemblies for 16 species of Anopheles mosquitoes. In addition to providing a generally useful resource for comparative genomic analyses, these genome sequences ...

Waterhouse, Robert

439

Abstract SY36-01: Functional genomics and cancer dependencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CA Abstract SY36-01: Functional genomics and cancer dependencies William C. Hahn...Institute, Boston, MA. Recent advances in genomics continue to elucidate the genetic lesions...Format: William C. Hahn. Functional genomics and cancer dependencies. [abstract...

William C. Hahn

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Abstract LB-317: Interactive pipeline for reproducible genomics analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Interactive pipeline for reproducible genomics analyses Michael Considine 1 Hilary S...Jersey, Ewing Township, NJ. Automated Genomics Analysis (AGA) is a program to analyze...to interactively perform reproducible genomics analysis using clinical covariates in...

Michael Considine; Hilary S. Parker; Yingying Wei; Xiao X. Xia; Leslie Cope; Michael F. Ochs; Elana J. Fertig

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Abstract IA14: Functional genomics and cancer vulnerabilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Research. November 2014 meeting-abstract Genomics Genomics: Oral Presentations - Invited Abstracts Abstracts...2013; San Diego, CA Abstract IA14: Functional genomics and cancer vulnerabilities William C. Hahn Dana-Farber...

William C. Hahn

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Abstract 5087: UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser 2.0  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract nr 3720. doi:1538-7445.AM2012-3720 The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium: interfacing genomics and cancer medicine. | The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium (GCGC) is an international collaborative platform that amalgamates...

Jingchun Zhu; Brian Craft; Teresa Swatloski; Kyle Ellrott; Mary Goldman; Christopher Wilks; Singer Ma; Christopher Szeto; Eric Collisson; David Haussler

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nonaxisymmetric magnetorotational instability in ideal and viscous plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excitation of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating laboratory plasmas is investigated. In contrast to astrophysical plasmas, in which gravitation plays an important role, in laboratory plasmas it can be neglected and the plasma rotation is equilibrated by the pressure gradient. The analysis is restricted to the simple model of a magnetic confinement configuration with cylindrical symmetry, in which nonaxisymmetric perturbations are investigated using the local approximation. Starting from the simplest case of an ideal plasma, the corresponding dispersion relations are derived for more complicated models including the physical effects of parallel and perpendicular viscosities. The Friemann-Rotenberg approach used for ideal plasmas is generalized for the viscous model and an analytical expression for the instability boundary is obtained. It is shown that, in addition to the standard effect of radial derivative of the rotation frequency (the Velikhov effect), which can be destabilizing or stabilizing depending on the sign of this derivative in the ideal plasma, there is a destabilizing effect proportional to the fourth power of the rotation frequency, or, what is the same, to the square of the plasma pressure gradient, and to the square of the azimuthal mode number of the perturbations. It is shown that the instability boundary also depends on the product of the plasma pressure and density gradients, which has a destabilizing effect when it is negative. In the case of parallel viscosity, the MRI looks like an ideal instability independent of viscosity, while, in the case of strong perpendicular viscosity, it is a dissipative instability with the growth rate inversely proportional to the characteristic viscous decay rate. We point out, however, that the modes of the continuous range of the magnetohydrodynamics spectrum are not taken into account in this paper, and they can be more dangerous than those that are considered.

Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Erokhin, N. N. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Lominadze, J. G. [Kharadze Abastumani National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a, Kazbegi Ave., Tbilisi 0160, Georgia (United States); Galvao, R. M. O. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Churikov, A. P. [Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University, 45, Sovetskaya Str., Syzran, Samara Region 446001 (Russian Federation); Smolyakov, A. I. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Tsypin, V. S. [Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

BUOYANCY INSTABILITIES IN A WEAKLY COLLISIONAL INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is a weakly collisional plasma in which the transport of heat and momentum occurs primarily along magnetic-field lines. Anisotropic heat conduction allows convective instabilities to be driven by temperature gradients of either sign: the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the outskirts of clusters and the heat-flux buoyancy-driven instability (HBI) in their cooling cores. We employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities, self-consistently including the effects of anisotropic viscosity (i.e., Braginskii pressure anisotropy), anisotropic conduction, and radiative cooling. We find that, in all but the innermost regions of cool-core clusters, anisotropic viscosity significantly impairs the ability of the HBI to reorient magnetic-field lines orthogonal to the temperature gradient. Thus, while radio-mode feedback appears necessary in the central few Multiplication-Sign 10 kpc, heat conduction may be capable of offsetting radiative losses throughout most of a cool core over a significant fraction of the Hubble time. Magnetically aligned cold filaments are then able to form by local thermal instability. Viscous dissipation during cold filament formation produces accompanying hot filaments, which can be searched for in deep Chandra observations of cool-core clusters. In the case of MTI, anisotropic viscosity leads to a nonlinear state with a folded magnetic field structure in which field-line curvature and field strength are anti-correlated. These results demonstrate that, if the HBI and MTI are relevant for shaping the properties of the ICM, one must self-consistently include anisotropic viscosity in order to obtain even qualitatively correct results.

Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bogdanovic, Tamara; Reynolds, Christopher S., E-mail: kunz@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: tamarab@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: chris@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

Murphy, Nicholas A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Young, Aleida K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States) [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Chengcai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States) [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lin, Jun [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States) [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Ni, Lei [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)] [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Genome Biology 2004, 5:343 commentreviewsreportsdepositedresearchinteractionsinformationrefereedresearch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://genomebiology.com/2004/5/9/343 © 2004 BioMed Central Ltd A report on the Keystone Symposium `Structural Genomics', held-dollar-plus folly? Two concurrent Keystone Symposia, `Structural Genomics' and `Frontiers in Structural Biology set up an auto- mated pipeline to annotate proteins of known structure but unknown function. The push

447

DOE JGI Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing, part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) video production describing the Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing process at the US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Miranda Harmon-Smith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Functional Genomics of Nervous System Development and Disease .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The goal of functional genomics is to elucidate the relationship between an organism's genotype and phenotype. A key characteristic of functional genomics is the use (more)

Miller, Michael Ryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

SciTech Connect: Achievements of structural genomics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Achievements of structural genomics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Achievements of structural genomics You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's...

450

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Peach Genome Offers Insights into Breeding  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 24, 2013 March 24, 2013 Peach Genome Offers Insights into Breeding Strategies for Biofuels Crops Rapidly growing trees like poplars and willows are candidate "biofuel crops" from which it is expected that cellulosic ethanol and higher energy content fuels can be efficiently extracted. Domesticating these crops requires a deep understanding of the physiology and genetics of trees, and scientists are turning to long-domesticated fruit trees for hints. The relationship between a peach and a poplar may not be obvious at first glance, but to botanists both trees are part of the rosid superfamily, which includes not only fruit crops like apples, strawberries, cherries, and almonds, but many other plants as well, including rose that gives the superfamily its name.

451

Tangential Neutral-Beam-Driven Instabilities in the Princeton Beta Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During tangential neutral-beam injection into the PBX tokamak, bursts of two types of instabilities are observed. One instability occurs in the frequency range 120-210 kHz and the other oscillates predominantly near the frequency of bulk plasma rotation (20-30 kHz). Both instabilities correlate with drops in neutron emission and bursts in charge-exchange neutral flux, indicating that beam ions are removed from the center of the plasma by the instabilities. The central losses are comparable to the losses induced by the fishbone instability during perpendicular injection.

W. W. Heidbrink; K. Bol; D. Buchenauer; R. Fonck; G. Gammel; K. Ida; R. Kaita; S. Kaye; H. Kugel; B. LeBlanc; W. Morris; M. Okabayashi; E. Powell; S. Sesnic; H. Takahashi

1986-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

452

Secondary instability as cause of minor disruptions in density limit tokamak plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental evidence was found in JET plasmas of a new instability at the onset of minor disruptions. This instability is observed during the growth of the well known m/n = 2/1 magnetic island and is localized close to it, behaving as a secondary instability to the island. The large heat fluxes towards the plasma edge, characteristic of minor disruptions, occur during the low rotation phase of the magnetic island at a time the amplitude of the secondary instability suffers a large increase. No poloidal or toroidal mode numbers could be assigned to the secondary instability.

Salzedas, F. [JET EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Eng. Phys. Department, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Association Euratom-IST, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Radiation-generated Short DNA Fragments May Perturb Non-homologous End-joining and Induce Genomic Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......itatively similar to the observations obtained with synthetic DNA fragments, supporting the importance of DNA size dependency...were qualitatively similar to those stimulated by short synthetic DNA fragments, supporting the importance of DNA size dependency......

Dalong Pang; Thomas A. Winters; Mira Jung; Shubhadeep Purkayastha; Luciane R. Cavalli; Sergey Chasovkikh; Bassem R. Haddad; Anatoly Dritschilo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Targeted and Nontargeted Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Delayed Genomic Instability in Human Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...humans receive some radiation exposure, mostly...risks associated with radiation exposure come from populations exposed to ionizing radiation, primarily from epidemiologic...However, those doses, in the range of 0.2 to 2.5...

Lei Huang; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; and William F. Morgan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Inhibition of BUB1 Results in Genomic Instability and Anchorage-independent Growth of Normal Human Fibroblasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...suggesting that the two processes are interrelated and may be affected by...suggesting that the two processes are interrelated and may be affected by...suggesting that the two processes are interrelated and may be affected by...

Antonio Musio; Cristina Montagna; Desire Zambroni; Esterina Indino; Ottavia Barbieri; Lorenzo Citti; Anna Villa; Thomas Ried; and Paolo Vezzoni

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

High-Resolution Analysis of Chromosomal Breakpoints and Genomic Instability Identifies PTPRD as a Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene in Neuroblastoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deleted region, whereas primers RH26036 and SHGC-84333 map within the region determined...There is an 20 fold decrease in RH26036 and SHGC-84333 PCR product relative to WI-10059...of homozygous loss. Primers RH26036 and SHGC-84333 map within the putative region...

Raymond L. Stallings; Prakash Nair; John M. Maris; Daniel Catchpoole; Michael McDermott; Anne O'Meara; Fin Breatnach

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromere CEN11 does not induce chromosome instability when integrated into the Aspergillus nidulans genome.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chromosome stability. Thus, CENII does not prevent chromosomal integration...results show that yeast CENii does not prevent chromosomal integration...results indicate that yeast CENJ I does not mitotically destabilize...In R. C. King (ed.), Handbook of genetics. vol. 1. Plenum...

M T Boylan; M J Holland; W E Timberlake

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Comparative genomics analysis of Liberibacter species to elucidate pathogenesis and culturability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 1 (2014) Comparative genomics analysis of Liberibacterof citrus, comparative genomics of this strain with other

Leonard, Michael T.; Fagen, Jennie R.; McCullough, Connor M.; Davis-Richardson, Austin G.; Davis, Michael J.; Triplett, Eric W.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Multidimensional Instability and Dynamics of Spin Avalanches in Crystals of Nanomagnets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We obtain a fundamental instability of the magnetization-switching fronts in superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials such as crystals of nanomagnets, ferromagnetic nanowires, and systems of quantum dots with large spin. We develop the instability theory for both linear and nonlinear stages. By using numerical simulations we investigate the instability properties focusing on spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets. The instability distorts spontaneously the fronts and leads to a complex multidimensional front dynamics. We show that the instability has a universal physical nature, with a deep relationship to a wide variety of physical systems, such as the Darrieus-Landau instability of deflagration fronts in combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and thermonuclear supernovae, and the instability of doping fronts in organic semiconductors.

O. Jukimenko; C.?M. Dion; M. Marklund; V. Bychkov

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

Proteogenomics : applications of mass spectrometry at the interface of genomics and proteomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of proteomics and genomics to unravel the specificities ofetry and comparative genomics to analyze multiple genomes,genome, Comp. Funct. Genomics, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 244253,

Castellana, Natalie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation-induced genomic instability" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Plant Genomics Vol 3.pmd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Populus Populus Genome Initiative Stephen DiFazio Department of Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26508-6057 USA Email: spdifazio@mail.wvu.edu 8 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background on Populus Biology The genus Populus consists of about 29 species organized into six major sections that occur primarily in the Northern Hemisphere (Eckenwalder 1996). Species from the different sections of the genus have diverse ecological characteristics. Two of the most economically important sections (Aigeiros and Tacamahaca) contain species collectively known as cottonwoods. These occur mostly in riparian zones and are characterized by primarily ruderal life history, dominating early successional stages and thriving on flood-mediated disturbance (Braatne et al. 1996; Karrenberg et al. 2002). The other major section of the genus (section Populus,

462

Genome-Wide siRNA-Based Functional Genomics of Pigmentation Identifies Novel Genes and Pathways That Impact Melanogenesis in Human Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

siRNA-Based Functional Genomics of Pigmentation Identifiespoorly understood. Functional genomics based on RNA-mediatedof RNAi-based functional genomics to identify novel genes,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Chapter 18 - The Genomics of Cladoceran Physiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent advances in genomic approaches and their increasing application to a wide range of taxa are contributing to the rapid development of the field of physiological genomics. Understanding the relationship between organisms and their environment is central to this field that focuses on genomic exploration of the physiological mechanisms that underlie organism-environment interactions and phenotypic plasticity. Cladoceran crustaceans have long been the subject of physiological investigation and are now tractable and versatile models for physiological genomics. A wide diversity of habitats and physiologies along with the recent development of genomic tools, most notably in the genus Daphnia, make cladocerans a compelling taxonomic group to investigate the relationship between genome structure, function and physiological mechanisms in a comparative framework that will also illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying these mechanisms. In this chapter we highlight a series of case studies to illustrate the potential to use cladocerans to illuminate the physiological mechanisms that mediate the response of organisms to environmental challenges. We focus on the genus Daphnia because of the rich history in ecological, evolutionary, and physiological research on this group and the recent investigations into its ecoresponsive genome. Finally, we prospectively outline productive avenues for future investigation.

Drthe Becker; Kay Van Damme; Elizabeth Turner; Joseph R. Shaw; John K. Colbourne; Michael E. Pfrender

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Visualizing Magneto-Rotational Instability and Turbulent Angular Momentum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turbulent Angular Momentum Transport Turbulent Angular Momentum Transport Magneto-Rotational Instability and Turbulent Angular Momentum Transport hydroentropyvisit0400.s.x2005.png In space, gases and other matter often form swirling disks around attracting central objects such as newly formed stars. The presence of magnetic fields can cause the disks to become unstable and develop turbulence, causing the disk material to fall onto the central object. This project will carry out large-scale simulations to test theories on how turbulence can develop in such a scenario. These simulations may provide insights into magnetically caused instabilities being studied on a smaller scale in laboratory experiments. In this image volume rendering has been used to visualize the time evolution of hydrodynamic entropy. The color

466

Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core A New Material for Warm-White LEDs Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate Laser/X-ray Methodologies Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Ruthenium Complexes The Electronic Origin of Photoinduced Strain Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds MARCH 12, 2013 Bookmark and Share The simple perovskite structure of EuTiO3 illustrated above shows the essential competing structural instabilities. At the center of the figure is the oxygen cage rotation, and to the right is the central titanium

467

The Possibility of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in Solar Spicules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transversal oscillations of spicules axes may be related to the propagation of magnetohydrodynamic waves along them. These waves may become unstable and the instability can be of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type. We use the dispersion relation of kink mode derived from linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations. The input parameters of the derived dispersion equation, namely, spicules and their ambient medium densities ratios as well as their corresponding magnetic fields ratios, are considered to be within the range $0-1$. By solving the dispersion equation numerically, we show that for higher densities and lower magnetic fields ratios within the range mentioned, the KHI onset in type II spicules conditions is possible. This possibility decreases with an increase in Alfven velocity inside spicules. A rough criterion for appearing of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is obtained. We also drive a more reliable and exact criterion for KHI onset of kink waves.

Ajabshirizadeh, A; Vekalati, R E; Molaverdikhani, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Nonsnaking doubly diffusive convectons and the twist instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doubly diffusive convection in a three-dimensional horizontally extended domain with a square cross section in the vertical is considered. The fluid motion is driven by horizontal temperature and concentration differences in the transverse direction. When the buoyancy ratio N = ?1 and the Rayleigh number is increased the conduction state loses stability to a subcritical, almost two-dimensional roll structure localized in the longitudinal direction. This structure exhibits abrupt growth in length near a particular value of the Rayleigh number but does not snake. Prior to this filling transition the structure becomes unstable to a secondary twist instability generating a pair of stationary, spatially localized zigzag states. In contrast to the primary branch these states snake as they grow in extent and eventually fill the whole domain. The origin of the twist instability and the properties of the resulting localized structures are investigated for both periodic and no-slip boundary conditions in the extended direction.

Beaume, Cdric, E-mail: ced.beaume@gmail.com; Knobloch, Edgar, E-mail: knobloch@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bergeon, Alain, E-mail: alain.bergeon@imft.fr [Universit de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mcanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Alle Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, France and CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)] [Universit de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mcanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Alle Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, France and CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Instabilities of uniform filtration flows with phase transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New mechanisms of instability are described for vertical flows with phase transition through horizontally extended two-dimensional regions of a porous medium. A plane surface of phase transition becomes unstable at an infinitely large wavenumber and at zero wavenumber. In the latter case, the unstable flow undergoes reversible subcritical bifurcations leading to the development of secondary flows (which may not be horizontally uniform). The evolution of subcritical modes near the instability threshold is governed by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation. Two examples of flow through a porous medium are considered. One is the unstable flow across a water-bearing layer above a layer that carries a vapor-air mixture under isothermal conditions in the presence of capillary forces at the phase transition interface. The other is the vertical flow with phase transition in a high-temperature geothermal reservoir consisting of two high-permeability regions separated by a low-permeability stratum.

Il'ichev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Steklov Institute of Mathematics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ilichev@mi.ras.ru; Tsypkin, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Numerical simulation of the Tayler instability in liquid metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electrical current through an incompressible, viscous and resistive liquid conductor produces an azimuthal magnetic field that becomes unstable when the corresponding Hartmann number exceeds a critical value in the order of 20. This Tayler instability, which is not only discussed as a key ingredient of a non-linear stellar dynamo model (Tayler-Spruit dynamo), but also as a limiting factor for the maximum size of large liquid metal batteries, was recently observed experimentally in a column of a liquid metal (Seilmayer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 244501, 2012}. On the basis of an integro-differential equation approach, we have developed a fully three-dimensional numerical code, and have utilized it for the simulation of the Tayler instability at typical viscosities and resistivities of liquid metals. The resulting growth rates are in good agreement with the experimental data. We illustrate the capabilities of the code for the detailed simulation of liquid metal battery problems in realistic geometries.

Weber, Norbert; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom; Wondrak, Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

Rose, Harvey Arnold [New Mexico Consortium; Lushnikov, Pavel [University of New Mexico

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

Secular stability and instability in stellar systems surrounding massive objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the stability of a low-mass stellar system surrounding a massive central object. Examples of such systems include the centers of galaxies or star clusters containing a massive black hole, and the Oort comet cloud. If the self-gravity of the stellar system is the dominant non-Keplerian force, such systems may be subject to slowly growing (secular) lopsided instabilities. Stability to secular modes is largely determined by the dependence of the distribution function F on angular momentum J. If dF/dJ 0, as is expected if there is a loss cone at low angular momentum, all spherical systems in which F=0 at J=0 (an empty loss cone) are only neutrally stable, and flattened, non-rotating systems are generally unstable. These results suggest that secular instabilities may dominate the structure and evolution of the stellar systems in the centers of galaxies.

Scott Tremaine

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

Critical confinement and elastic instability in thin solid films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a flexible plate is peeled off a thin and soft elastic film bonded to a rigid support, uniformly spaced fingering patterns develop along their line of contact. While, the wavelength of these patterns depends only on the thickness of the film, their amplitude varies with all material and geometric properties of the film and that of the adhering plate. Here we have analyzed this instability by the regular perturbation technique to obtain the excess deformations of the film over and above the base quantities. Furthermore, by calculating the excess energy of the system we have shown that these excess deformations, associated with the instability, occur for films which are critically confined. We have presented two different experiments for controlling the degree of confinement: by pre-stretching the film and by adjusting the contact width between the film and the plate.

Animangsu Ghatak; Manoj K. Chaudhury

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

474

Lipid membrane instability and poration driven by capacitive charging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new model for the interaction of an electric pulse with a lipid membrane is proposed. Using this model we show that when a DC electric pulse is applied to an insulating lipid membrane separating fluids with different conductivities, the capacitive charging current through the membrane drives electrohydrodynamic flow that destabilizes the membrane. The instability is transient and decays as the membrane charges. The bulk conductivity mismatch plays an essential role in this instability because it results in a different rate of charge accumulation on the membrane's physical surfaces. Shearing stresses created by the electric field acting on its own induced free charge are non-zero as long as the charge imbalance exists. Accordingly, the most unstable mode is related to the ratio of membrane charging time and the electrohydrodynamic time.

Jonathan T. Schwalbe; Petia M. Vlahovska; Michael J. Miksis

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

475

Dynamical instabilities of warm npe matter: {delta} meson effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of {delta} mesons on the dynamical instabilities of cold and warm nuclear and stellar matter at subsaturation densities are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field hadron models (NL3, NL{rho}, and NL{rho}{delta}) with the inclusion of the electromagnetic field. The distillation effect and the spinodals for all the models considered are discussed. The crust-core transition density and pressure are obtained as a function of temperature for {beta}-equilibrium matter with and without neutrino trapping. An estimation of the size of the clusters formed in the nonhomogeneous phase and the corresponding growth rates are made. It is shown that cluster sizes increase with temperature. The effects of the {delta} meson on the instability region are larger for low temperatures, very asymmetric matter, and densities close to the spinodal surface. It increases the distillation effect above {approx}0.4{rho}{sub 0} and has the opposite effect below that density.

Pais, Helena; Santos, Alexandre; Providencia, Constanca [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Stabilization of beam-weibel instability by equilibrium density ripples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an approach to achieve suppression/complete stabilization of the transverse electromagnetic beam Weibel instability in counter streaming electron beams by modifying the background plasma with an equilibrium density ripple, shorter than the skin depth; this weakening is more pronounced when thermal effects are included. On the basis of a linear two stream fluid model, it is shown that the growth rate of transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be reduced to zero value provided certain threshold values for ripple parameters are exceeded. We point out the relevance of the work to recent experimental investigations on sustained (long length) collimation of fast electron beams and integral beam transport for laser induced fast ignition schemes, where beam divergence is suppressed with the assistance of carbon nano-tubes.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@gmail.com; Kaw, Predhiman; Das, A.; Sengupta, S. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Ravindra Kumar, G. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)] [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in elastic-plastic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical model for the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in solids under conditions of high-energy density is presented, in order to describe the evolution of small perturbations at the solid-vacuum interface. The model shows that plasticity determines the maximum perturbation amplitude and provides simple scaling laws for it as well as for the time when it is reached. After the maximum amplitude is reached, the interface remains oscillating with a period that is determined by the elastic shear modulus. Extensive two-dimensional simulations are presented that show excellent agreement with the analytical model. The results suggest the possibility to experimentally evaluate the yield strength of solids under dynamic conditions by using a Richtmyer-Meshkov-instability-based technique.

A. R. Piriz, J. J. Lpez Cela, N. A. Tahir, and D. H. H. Hoffmann

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

478

Transposable Elements and Genetic Instabilities in Crop Plants  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Transposable elements have long been associated with certain unstable loci in maize and have been intensively studied by McClintock and others. It is known that a transposable element can control the expression of the structural genes at the locus where it resides. These controlling elements in maize are now beginning to be studied at the molecular level. Using recombinant molecular probes we have been able to describe the changes induced by the controlling element Ds at the shrunken locus. Ds elements appear to be large and dissimilar insertions into the wild-type locus - two elements actually map within the transcribed region of the gene. Genetic instabilities have been described in other economically important plants but the bases for these phenomena have not been understood. We believe that it is likely that some of these instabilities are the result of transposable element activity much as in the case of maize.

Burr, B.; Burr, F.

1981-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

479

Gradient instabilities of electromagnetic waves in Hall thruster plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a linear analysis of gradient plasma instabilities in Hall thrusters. The study obtains and analyzes the dispersion equation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves based on the two-fluid model of a cold plasma. The regions of parameters corresponding to unstable high frequency modes are determined and the dependence of the increments and intrinsic frequencies on plasma parameters is obtained. The obtained results agree with those of previously published studies.

Tomilin, Dmitry [Department of Electrophysics, Keldysh Research Centre, Moscow 125438 (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Hydrodynamic detonation instability in electroweak and QCD phase transitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrodynamic stability of deflagration and detonation bubbles for a first order electroweak and QCD phase transition has been discussed recently with the suggestion that detonations are stable. We examine here the case of a detonation more carefully. We find that in front of the bubble wall perturbations do not grow with time, but behind the wall modes exist which grow exponentially. We briefly discuss the possible meaning of this instability.

Mark Abney

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

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481

High-Frequency Driven Ion-Cyclotron Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of the high-frequency driven ion-cyclotron instability is investigated and shown, for a Q-machine plasma column with symmetric external excitation, to correspond to a three-wave resonant process in which an electron-plasma wave decays into an electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave and an oppositely propagating electron-plasma wave, all waves being in their lowest-order mode.

P. D. Edgley; R. N. Franklin; S. M. Hamberger; R. W. Motley

1975-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

482

The effect of internal magnetic structure on the fishbone instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmas exhibiting the ``fishbone`` instability studied on the PBX-M tokamak show a distinct relationship between the plasma shape, the internal magnetic structure, and the presence or absence of fast ion losses associated with the fishbone mode. We have, for the first time, carried out measurements of the magnetic safety factor profile in fishbone-unstable plasmas, and used the knowledge of the associated experimental equilibria to compare the stability and fast ion loss properties of these plasmas with experimental observations.

Roberts, D.W.; Powell, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kaita, R.; Bell, R.; Chance, M.; Hatcher, R.; Holland, A.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Pomphrey, N.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; White, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Levinton, F. [Fusion Physics and Technologies, Torrance, CA (United States); Asakura, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Duperrex, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gammel, G. [Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

The effect of internal magnetic structure on the fishbone instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmas exhibiting the fishbone'' instability studied on the PBX-M tokamak show a distinct relationship between the plasma shape, the internal magnetic structure, and the presence or absence of fast ion losses associated with the fishbone mode. We have, for the first time, carried out measurements of the magnetic safety factor profile in fishbone-unstable plasmas, and used the knowledge of the associated experimental equilibria to compare the stability and fast ion loss properties of these plasmas with experimental observations.

Roberts, D.W.; Powell, E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Kaita, R.; Bell, R.; Chance, M.; Hatcher, R.; Holland, A.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Pomphrey, N.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; White, R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Levinton, F. (Fusion Physics and Technologies, Torrance, CA (Uni

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Prospects for baryon instability search with long-lived isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the possibility of observation of baryon instability processes occurring inside nuclei by searching for the remnants of such processes that could have been accumulated in nature as mm long-lived isotopes. As an example, we discuss here the possible detection of traces of {sup 97}Tc, {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 99}Tc in deep-mined nonradioactive tin ores.

Efremenko, Yu. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)][Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Bugg, W.; Cohn, H. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Kamyshkov, Yu. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)][Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Parker, G.; Plasil, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Three dimensional electromagnetic wavepackets in a plasma: Spatiotemporal modulational instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear interaction of an intense electromagnetic beam with relativistic collisionless unmagnetized plasma is investigated by invoking the reductive perturbation technique, resting on the model of three-dimensional nonlinear Schrdinger (NLS) equation with cubic nonlinearity which incorporates the effects of self-focusing, self-phase modulation, and diffraction on wave propagation. Relying on the derived NLS equation, the occurrence of spatiotemporal modulational instability is investigated in detail.

Borhanian, J.; Hosseini Faradonbe, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P. O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P. O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Automatic annotation of organellar genomes with DOGMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dual Organellar GenoMe Annotator (DOGMA) automates the annotation of extra-nuclear organellar (chloroplast and animal mitochondrial) genomes. It is a web-based package that allows the use of comparative BLAST searches to identify and annotate genes in a genome. DOGMA presents a list of putative genes to the user in a graphical format for viewing and editing. Annotations are stored on our password-protected server. Complete annotations can be extracted for direct submission to GenBank. Furthermore, intergenic regions of specified length can be extracted, as well the nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences of the genes.

Wyman, Stacia; Jansen, Robert K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Instability of single-phase natural circulation under multiple loops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural circulation loop passively conveys heat from heat sources to heat sinks without mechanical pump. Various plants have natural circulation systems, e.g., solar heaters, Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). The core of LMFBR is cooled by forced convection of single-phase liquid sodium in normal operation. After the accident, the decay heat of the core is designed to be cooled by the natural circulation of the liquid sodium. The natural circulation cooling is very important from a viewpoint of passive safety concept. Here, the natural circulation in single loop system had been studied by many researchers. In a multiple loop system, the instability of natural circulation was more complicated because of the interaction between the loops. In this study, the effects of the multiple loop on the natural circulation instability were investigated numerically. The multiple loops system with one heating tube and two cooling tubes were evaluated. The one-dimensional energy and momentum equations were solved using Finite Difference Method. The flow regimes of the instability were evaluated with varying the heat flux. In multiple loop system, the observed flow was classified into five regimes including chaotic regime. The flow regimes were qualitatively explained by the stability of the attractor in the phase space.

Satoh, A.; Okamoto, K.; Madarame, H. [Univ. of Tokyo, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The Weibel instability in a strongly coupled plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the growth rate of the Weibel instability is calculated for an energetic relativistic electron beam penetrated into a strongly coupled plasma, where the collision effects of background electron-ion scattering play an important role in equations. In order to calculate the growth rate of the Weibel instability, two different models of anisotropic distribution function are used. First, the distribution of the plasma and beam electrons considered as similar forms of bi-Maxwellian distribution. Second, the distribution functions of the plasma electrons and the beam electrons follows bi-Maxwellian and delta-like distributions, respectively. The obtained results show that the collision effect decreases the growth rate in two models. When the distribution function of electrons beam is in bi-Maxwellian form, the instability growth rate is greater than where the distribution function of beam electrons is in delta-like form, because, the anisotropic temperature for bi-Maxwellian distribution function in velocity space is greater than the delta-like distribution function.

Mahdavi, M., E-mail: m.mahdavi@umz.ac.ir; Khanzadeh, H. [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

is a Bioinformatics Scientist at the Institute for Genomic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mihai Pop is a Bioinformatics Scientist at the Institute for Genomic Research. He earned his PhD in Computer Science from Johns Hopkins University in 2000. His research interests include genome assembly and comparative genomics. Adam Phillippy is a Bioinformatics Software Engineer at The Institute for Genomic

Salzberg, Steven

490

Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome International Human Genome Sequencing. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some

Eddy, Sean

491

Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

Fertin, Guillaume

492

Genome Organization and Gene Expression Shape the Transposable Element Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Organization and Gene Expression Shape the Transposable Element Distribution The distribution of transposable elements (TEs) in a genome reflects a balance between insertion rate and selection shaping the organization of genomes. Past research has shown that TEs tend to accumulate in genomic

Alvarez, Nadir

493

THE CAMPAIGN FOR UC SANTA CRUZ THE GENOMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CAMPAIGN FOR UC SANTA CRUZ THE GENOMICS INSTITUTE #12;OVERVIEW The UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute provides the framework for the next great leap in the science of genomics. ensured it would genomic science and speed the benefits of discoveries that improve and save lives. Cancer, autoimmune

California at Santa Cruz, University of

494

Assembly and Analysis of Extended Human Genomic Contig Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ibc.wustl.edu; states@ibc.wustl.edu Abstract The Human Genome Project (HGP) has led to the deposit of human genomic The U.S. Human Genome Project, coordinated by the United States Department of Energy (DOEAssembly and Analysis of Extended Human Genomic Contig Regions Eric C. Rouchka and David J. States

Rouchka, Eric

495

Genomic Signal Processing: From Matrix Algebra to Genetic Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Scale Molecular Biological Data The Human Genome Project, and the resulting sequencing of complete genomes, fueled (GSVD); pseudoinverse projection; blind source separation (BSS) algorithms; genome-scale RNA expression now be measured on genomic scales (e.g., refs. 3 and 4). For the first time in human history

Utah, University of

496

Discovery of functional elements in 12 Drosophila genomes using evolutionary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Project{, Emily Hodges12 , Angie S. Hinrichs4 , Anat Caspi13 , Benedict Paten4,5,14 , Seung for comparative studies. The sequencing of the human genome and the genomes of dozens of other metazoan speciesARTICLES ; genomes using evolutionary

Kellis, Manolis

497

The Mastermind Attack on Genomic Data Michael T. Goodrich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Moreover, a project to fully sequence 1,000 human genomes in the next few years is already under way [24 diploid human genomes will be economically affordable. The milestone of the first human genome sequence draft in 2001 [12], [39] has recently been followed by the first diploid human genome sequence [26

Goodrich, Michael T.

498

Update on human genome completion and annotations: Protein information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on human genome completion and annotations: Protein information resource Cathy Wu1 The high-throughput genome projects have resulted in a rapid accumulation of genome sequences for a large-PSD, SwissProt and TrEMBL) proteins--organised into more than 36,290 PIR superfamilies, Human Genomics 95760

499

Phylogenetics of modern birds in the era of genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Phylogenetics of modern birds in the era of genomics Scott V Edwards * W Bryan Jennings Andrew...witnessed the advent and maturation of the genomics era, the completion of the chicken genome...for birds. A variety of comparative genomics strategies, including adoption of objective...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

APPLIED GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.agtc.med.wayne.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED GENOMICS TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.agtc.med.wayne.edu CURRENT SERVICES CONTACT INFORMATION Dr. Susan J. Land, Ph.D. Laboratory Director ABOUT THE FACILITY The Applied Genomics Technology Center (AGTC-of-the-art, fee-for-service genomics center that provides a wide range of genomic technologies to the medical

Berdichevsky, Victor