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1

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

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Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

3

Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

Dennis, Kristopher E.B., E-mail: kdennis@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Duncan, Graeme [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Amorim Bernstein, Karen [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Eifel, Patricia [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); McDermott, Patrick [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Prisciandaro, Joann [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Price, Robert A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

Aneja, Sanjay [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Roberts, Kenneth [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

Harris, Eleanor [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)], E-mail: Eleanor.Harris@moffitt.org; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Spangler, Ann E. [Moncrief Radiation Oncology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ASTRO's core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2002, the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) appointed an Ad-hoc Committee on Physics Teaching to Medical Residents. The main initiative of the committee was to develop a core curriculum for physics education. Prior publications that have analyzed physics teaching have pointed to wide discrepancies among teaching programs. The committee was composed of physicists or physicians from various residency program based institutions. Simultaneously, members had associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The latter two organizations' representatives were on the physics examination committees, as one of the main agendas was to provide a feedback loop between the examining organizations and ASTRO. The document resulted in a recommended 54-h course. Some of the subjects were based on American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements (particles, hyperthermia), whereas the majority of the subjects along with the appropriated hours per subject were devised and agreed upon by the committee. For each subject there are learning objectives and for each hour there is a detailed outline of material to be covered. Some of the required subjects/h are being taught in most institutions (i.e., Radiation Measurement and Calibration for 4 h), whereas some may be new subjects (4 h of Imaging for Radiation Oncology). The curriculum was completed and approved by the ASTRO Board in late 2003 and is slated for dissemination to the community in 2004. It is our hope that teaching physicists will adopt the recommended curriculum for their classes, and simultaneously that the ABR for its written physics examination and the ACR for its training examination will use the recommended curriculum as the basis for subject matter and depth of understanding. To ensure that the subject matter and emphasis remain current and relevant, the curriculum will be updated every 2 years.

Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: klein@radonc.wustl.edu; Balter, James M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chaney, Edward L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gerbi, Bruce J. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: eklein@radonc.wustl.edu; Gerbi, Bruce J. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Price, Robert A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Balter, James M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Saint Joseph Medical Center, Reading, PA (United States); Huang, Eugene [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

American College of Radiology In-Training Examination for Residents in Radiation Oncology (2004-2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To review the results of the recent American College of Radiology (ACR) in-training examinations in radiation oncology and to provide information regarding the examination changes in recent years. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of the 2004 to 2007 ACR in-training examination was undertaken. Results: The number of residents taking the in-training examination increased from 2004 to 2007, compatible with the increase in the number of radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. The number of questions decreased from approximately 510 in 2004 and 2005, to 405 in 2006 and 360 in 2007, most of these changes were in the clinical oncology section. Although the in-training examination showed construct validity with resident performance improving with each year of additional clinical oncology training, it did so only until Level 3 for biology and physics. Several changes have been made to the examination process, including allowing residents to keep the examination booklet for self-study, posting of the answer key and rationales to questions on the ACR Website, and providing hard copies to residency training directors. In addition, all questions are now A type or multiple choice questions with one best answer, similar to the American Board of Radiology written examination for radiation oncology. Conclusion: Several efforts by the ACR have been made in recent years to make the examination an educational tool for radiation oncology residents and residency directors.

Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org; Kurtz, Elizabeth [Educational Services Division, American College of Radiology, Reston, VA (United States)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...

12

Results of the 2004 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to document adequacy of training, career plans after residency, use of the in-service examination, and motivation for choice of radiation oncology as a specialty. Methods and Materials: In 2004, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology residents in the United States. Results: The survey was returned by 297 residents (response rate, 54%). Of the respondents, 29% were female and 71% male. The most popular career choice was joining an established private practice (38%), followed by a permanent academic career (29%). Residents for whom a permanent academic career was not their first choice were asked whether improvements in certain areas would have led them to be more likely to pursue an academic career. The most commonly chosen factors that would have had a strong or moderate influence included higher salary (81%), choice of geographic location (76%), faculty encouragement (68%), and less time commitment (68%). Of respondents in the first 3 years of training, 78% believed that they had received adequate training to proceed to the next level of training. Of those in their fourth year of training, 75% believed that they had received adequate training to enter practice. Conclusions: Multiple factors affect the educational environment of physicians in training. Data describing concerns unique to resident physicians in radiation oncology are limited. The current survey was designed to explore a variety of issues confronting radiation oncology residents. Training programs and the Residency Review Committee should consider these results when developing new policies to improve the educational experiences of residents in radiation oncology.

Patel, Shilpen [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]. E-mail: spatel@umm.edu; Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wilson, John [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frank, Steven [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thakkar, Vipul V. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hansen, Eric K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an academic career path. The following variables were ranked significantly differently in hierarchy (p < 0.05) by those seeking an academic versus private practice path with respect to having influence on the career decision: lifestyle, income, case-mix, autonomy, ability to sub-specialize, basic research, clinical research, teaching, patient care, board structure, practice environment, and mentoring. Conclusion: These data offer descriptive information regarding variables that lead to radiation oncology trainee career path decisions. Such information may be of use in modification of training programs to meet future personnel and programmatic needs within the specialty.

Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)]. E-mail: lynn.wilson@yale.edu; Flynn, Daniel F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with unsealed nuclear substances. Print out of wipe test kept in the logbook . For safety work practices, rightMay 2012 Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist Permit Holder to nuclear substances or radiation devices is restricted to authorized radiation users listed on the permit

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

17

An Analysis of Universality in Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the formulation of his law of thermal emission, Kirchhoff conferred upon blackbody radiation the quality of universality [G.Kirchhoff, Annalen der Physik 109, 275 (1860)]. Consequently, modern physics holds that such radiation is independent of the nature and shape of the emitted object. Recently, Kirchhoff's experimental work and theoretical conclusions have been reconsidered [P.M.L. Robitaille, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science 31(6), 1263 (2003). In this work, Einstein's derivation of the Planckian relation is reexamined. It is demonstrated that claims of universality in blackbody radiation are invalid.

Pierre-Marie Robitaille

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Estimation of Citation-Based Scholarly Activity Among Radiation Oncology Faculty at Domestic Residency-Training Institutions: 1996-2007  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Advancement in academic radiation oncology is largely contingent on research productivity and the perceived external influence of an individual's scholarly work. The purpose of this study was to use the Hirsch index (h-index) to estimate the research productivity of current radiation oncology faculty at U.S. academic institutions between 1996 and 2007. Methods and Materials: We performed bibliometric citation database searches for available radiation oncology faculty at domestic residency-training institutions (n = 826). The outcomes analyzed included the total number of manuscripts, total number of citations, and the h-index between 1996 and 2007. Analysis of overall h-index rankings with stratification by academic ranking, junior vs. senior faculty status, and gender was performed. Results: Of the 826 radiation oncologists, the mean h-index was 8.5. Of the individuals in the top 10% by the h-index, 34% were chairpersons, 88% were senior faculty, and 13% were women. A greater h-index was associated with a higher academic ranking and senior faculty status. Recursive partitioning analysis revealed an h-index threshold of 15 (p <0.0001) as an identified breakpoint between the senior and junior faculty. Overall, women had lower h-indexes compared with men (mean, 6.4 vs. 9.4); however, when stratified by academic ranking, the gender differential all but disappeared. Conclusion: Using the h-index as a partial surrogate for research productivity, it appears that radiation oncologists in academia today comprise a prolific group, however, with a highly skewed distribution. According to the present analysis, the h-index correlated with academic ranking. Thus, it potentially has utility in the process of promotion decisions. Overall, women in radiation oncology were less academically productive than men; the possible reasons for the gender differential are discussed.

Choi, Mehee [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Fuller, Clifton D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)], E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest nonintegrated RO facility.

Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Sun Zhuyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ballas, Leslie [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States)] [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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21

Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO BOX 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E. [ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., La Jolla, CA 92038 (United States); Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S. [University of Missouri, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Columbia MO 65211 (United States); Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Korgan, G.; Malekos, S. [Nanolabz, 661 Sierra Rose Dr., Reno, NV 89511 (United States); Lockard, T. [University of Nevada, Physics, Reno, NV 89557 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

Patterns of Care for Lung Cancer in Radiation Oncology Departments of Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers. Methods and Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated. Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were '{>=} IB' disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities. Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.

Demiral, Ayse Nur [Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ayse.demiral@deu.edu.tr; Alicikus, Zuemre Arican [Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey); Isil Ugur, Vahide [Ankara Oncology Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Karadogan, Ilker [Izmir Private Oncology Center, Izmir (Turkey); Yoeney, Adnan [Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Andrieu, Meltem Nalca [Ankara University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Yalman, Deniz [Ege University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey); Pak, Yuecel [Gazi University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Aksu, Gamze [Akdeniz University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey); Ozyigit, Goekhan [Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Ozkan, Luetfi [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bursa (Turkey); Kilciksiz, Sevil [Gaziantep University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gaziantep (Turkey); Koca, Sedat [Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Caloglu, Murat [Trakya University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Edirne (Turkey); Yavuz, Ali Aydin [Baskent University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Basak Caglar, Hale [Marmara University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Beyzadeoglu, Murat [Guelhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Igdem, Sefik [Metropolitan Florence Nightingale Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey)] (and others)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA for RTOG clinical trials is feasible and effective. The magnitude of registration discrepancy between institution and reviewer was presented, and the major issues were investigated to further improve this remote evaluation process.

Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 1 BLACKBODY RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 1 BLACKBODY RADIATION Introduction by frequency. #12;Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 2 When he tried to justify-4 lock-in amplifier. #12;Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 3 Schematic

25

Head-and-Neck Target Delineation Among Radiation Oncology Residents After a Teaching Intervention: A Prospective, Blinded Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We conducted this study to determine the feasibility of incorporating a teaching intervention on target delineation into the educational curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program and to assess the short-term effects on resident skills. Methods and Materials: The study schema consisted of a baseline evaluation, the teaching intervention, and a follow-up evaluation. At the baseline evaluation, the participants contoured three clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) (70 Gy, 59.4 Gy, and 54 Gy) on six contrast-enhanced axial computed tomography images of a de-identified patient with Stage T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of the tongue. The participants attended a series of head-and-neck oncology and anatomy seminars. The teaching intervention consisted of a didactic lecture and an interactive hands-on practical session designed to improve the knowledge and skills for target delineation in the head and neck. At the follow-up evaluation, the residents again contoured the CTVs. Results: Of the 14 eligible residents, 11 (79%) actually participated in the study. For all participants, but especially for those who had not had previous experience with head-and-neck target delineation, the teaching intervention was associated with improvement in the delineation of the node-negative neck (CTV 54 Gy contour). Regardless of clinical experience, participants had difficulty determining what should be included in the CTV 59.4 Gy contour to ensure adequate coverage of potential microscopic disease. Conclusion: Incorporating a teaching intervention into the education curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program is feasible and was associated with short-term improvements in target delineation skills. Subsequent interventions will require content refinement, additional validation, longer term follow-up, and multi-institutional collaboration.

Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: bekelmaj@mskcc.org; Wolden, Suzanne; Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan)] [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan)] [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NREL: MIDC/University of Texas Panamerican Solar Radiation Lab...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center collects Irradiance and Meterological data from the University of Texas Panamerican (UTPA) Solar Radiation Lab (SRL)....

28

Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okuno, Yoshishige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Nishino, Shigeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane Medical University, Shimane (Japan); Karasawa, Kumiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORAU Director More Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System-Freedom of Information/Privacy Act, Office of

31

The Blackbody Radiation in D-Dimensional Universes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The blackbody radiation is analyzed in universes with $D$ spatial dimensions. With the classical electrodynamics suited to the universe in focus and recurring to the hyperspherical coordinates, it is shown that the spectral energy density as well as the total energy density are sensible to the dimensionality of the universe. Wien's displacement law and the Stefan-Boltzmann law are properly generalized.

Tatiana R. Cardoso; Antonio S. de Castro

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Results of the 2003 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) surveys of residents and chief residents in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document demographic characteristics of current residents, career motivations and aspirations, and training program policies and resources. Methods: In 2003, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted two nationwide surveys: one of all U.S. radiation oncology residents and one of chief residents. Results: The Chief Residents' Survey was completed by representatives from all 77 programs (response rate, 100%). The Residents' Survey was returned by 229 respondents (response rate, 44%). In each, 32% of respondents were female. The most popular career after residency was private practice (46%), followed by permanent academic practice (28%). Changes that would entice those choosing private practice to consider an academic career included more research experience as a resident (76%), higher likelihood of tenure (69%), lesser time commitment (66%), and higher salary (54%). Although the majority of respondents were satisfied with educational experience overall, a number of programs were reported to provide fewer resources than required. Conclusions: Median program resources and numbers of outliers are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess the relative adequacy of experience in their own programs. Policy-making bodies and individual programs should consider these results when developing interventions to improve educational experiences of residents and to increase retention of radiation oncologists in academic practice.

Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Buck, David A. [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); Singh, Anurag K. [Washington University, Seattle, WA (United States); Engleman, Mark [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Thakkar, Vipul [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Frank, Steven J. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Flynn, Daniel [Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties. Conclusions: Trends in clinical training and resident working conditions over 3 years are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess their residency training.

Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: gondi@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bernard, Johnny Ray [Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Jabbari, Siavash [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Dad, Luqman K. [SUNY Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Li, Linna [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Poppe, Matthew M. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chollet, Casey T. [Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pilepich, Miljenko V. [UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Roach, Mack [UCSF, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University  

SciTech Connect

We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, 11077, Bowling Green KY 42101 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

MASTER UCRL-9537 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MASTER MASTER UCRL-9537 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Berkeley, California Contract No.W-7405-eng-48 A NHARMONIC POTENTIAL CONSTANTS AND THEIR DEPENDENCE UPON BOND LENGTH Dudley R. Herschbach and Victor W. Laurie January 1961 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

38

UCRL-5257 Rev. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UCRL-5257 Rev. UCRL-5257 Rev. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory Liver more : California Contract No. W- 7405 -eng -48 PEACEFUL USES OF FUSION Edward Teller July 3, 1958 Printed for the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission f . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account by an agency of t h e United States United States Government nor of their employees, or assumes any legal accuracy, completeness, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

39

Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Does Unruh radiation accelerate the universe? A novel approach to dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In braneworld scenario, the brane accelerates in the bulk, and hence it perceives a thermal bulk filled with Unruh radiation. We put forward that there may be an energy exchange between Unruh radiation in the bulk and the dark matter confined to the brane, which accelerates the universe.

Hongsheng Zhang; Zong-Hong Zhu

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiation Oncology BioMed Central Editorial Why "Radiation Oncology"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Claus Belka; Kevin A Camphausen; Claus Belka; Kevin A Camphausen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Radiation Dominated Universe for Jordan-Brans-Dicke Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology with a standard kinetic term for the scalar field and no mass term has the same radiation dominated solution as standard Einstein cosmology without the cosmological constant. Because of this, the primordial nucleosynthesis (Big - Bang nucleosynthesis) result obtained for standard cosmology remains the same for Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology. We show that Jordan-Brans-Dicke cosmology with a mass term for the scalar field as well as explaining dark energy for the present era, can also explain radiation dominated cosmology for the primordial nucleosynthesis era.

M. Arik; L. Amon Susam

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Establishment of the Radiation Detection Laboratory at Fisk University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are highly suitable for the room temperature-based detection of gamma radiation. The surface preparation of Au contacts on surfaces of CZT detectors is typically conducted after (1) polishing to remove artifacts from crystal sectioning and (2) chemical etching, which removes residual mechanical surface damage however etching results in a Te rich surface layer that is prone to oxidize. Our studies show that CZT surfaces that are only polished (as opposed to polished and etched) can be contacted with Au and will yield lower surface currents. Due to their decreased dark currents, these as-polished surfaces can be used in the fabrication of gamma detectors exhibiting a higher performance than polished and etched surfaces with relatively less peak tailing and greater energy resolution.032}

Arnold Burger, Ph.D.

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Messenger Sector of SUSY Flavour Models and Radiative Breaking of Flavour Universality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flavour messenger sectors and their impact on the soft SUSY breaking terms are investigated in SUSY flavour models. In the case when the flavour scale M is below the SUSY breaking mediation scale M_S, the universality of soft terms, even if assumed at M_S, is radiatively broken. We estimate this effect in a broad class of models. In the CKM basis that effect gives flavour off-diagonal soft masses comparable to the tree-level estimate based on the flavour symmetry.

Calibbi, Lorenzo; Pokorski, Stefan; Ziegler, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

48

Hydrogen peroxide significantly contributes to radiation-induced genomic instability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- induced genomic instability Disha Dayal 1 , Sean M. Martin 1 , Sujatha Venkataraman 1 , Charles L. Limoli 2 , Douglas R Spitz 1 . 1 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA- 52246, 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of California, Irvine, CA-92697 Chronic metabolic oxidative stress is associated with genomic instability following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Mitochondria have long been known to be a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing oxidative stress. We hypothesized that radiation damages mitochondria, leading to oxidative stress and eventually genomic instability. This hypothesis is based on preliminary studies in parental

49

Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

Mydin, Aminudin R., E-mail: aminudinrahman@googlemail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A. [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Armstrong, John G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Estimation of radiation doses for atomic-bomb survivors in the Hiroshima University Registry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study presents the Hiroshima University Registry of atomic bomb survivors, of which the total number is about 270,000, and application of absorbed doses. From this registry, we picked up 49,102 survivors and applied organ doses based on the dosimetry system 1986 (DS86), which is named the Atomic Bomb Survivor 1993 Dose (ABS93D). The applied dose data are based on the tables listed in the DS86 final report such as the free-in-air kermas, the house shielding factors, and organ dose factors for the active bone marrow and the breast. Calculations for the 13 other organs provided in DS86 are possible. To obtained the organ doses for each survivor, it is necessary to obtain information concerning (1) place exposed, (2) whether they were shielded or not, and (3) age. ABS93D body transmission factors for active bone marrow for neutrons and gamma rays agreed with DS 86 to within a few percent. Of the survivors studied, 35, 123 of them were used for the relative risk estimation of leukemia mortality, adopting the same method as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) for comparison. For the observation period from 1968 to 1989, the analyzed relative risks for leukemia mortality at 1 Gy by shielded kerm and by active bone marrow dose are 2.01 and 2.37, respectively, which are consistent with the RERF results. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Hoshi, M.; Matsuura, M.; Hayakawa, N.; Kamada, N. [Hiroshima Univ., Kasumi (Japan); Ito, C. [Hiroshima A-bomb Casualty Council Health Management Promotion Center, Senda-machi Naka-ku (Japan)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radiation Oncology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D-conformal-intensity modulated radiotherapy with compensators for head and neck cancer: clinical results of normal tissue sparing

Nasrin Abbasi-senger; Henning Salz; Ines Pinquart; Sven Koscielny; Susi-marie Przetak; Tilo Wiezorek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Program Workshop I Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan and John H.J. Petrini Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Summary: The goal of our application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure based on potential genetic differences that may modulate an individual's sensitivity to low doses of radiation. Abstract: The goal of this application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure. We propose to address specific genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low dose radiation and ask the question do genetic differences exist that make some individuals more sensitive to

53

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A vy Mouse Autumn Bernal 1,2,3 , Dale Huang 1 , Yue Li 4 , Dana Dolinoy 5 , and Randy Jirtle 1 Department of Radiation Oncology 1 , University Program in Genetics and Genomic 2 , Integrated Toxicology & Environmental Health Program 3 , Department of Community and Family Medicine 4 , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA, Department of Environmental and Health Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 4 Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the frequency of exposures to low doses of radiation is increasing due to man-made sources such as diagnostic imaging and nuclear power. This increased exposure has led to concerns amongst the general public and the government about the

54

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

55

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

56

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

57

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

58

Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology  

SciTech Connect

Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

Weller, R.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

60

Solar neutrino spectrum, sterile neutrinos and additional radiation in the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results from the SNO, Super-Kamiokande and Borexino experiments do not show the expected upturn of the energy spectrum of events (the ratio $R \\equiv N_{obs}/N_{SSM}$) at low energies. At the same time, cosmological observations testify for possible existence of additional relativistic degrees of freedom in the early Universe: $\\Delta N_{eff} = 1 - 2$. These facts strengthen the case of very light sterile neutrino, $\

P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PHYSICISTS, 1938 I Staff of the Radiation Labora-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA PHYSICISTS, 1938 I Staff of the Radiation Labora- CALIFORNIA PHYSICISTS, 1938 I Staff of the Radiation Labora- tory and associated physicists under the yoke of the 60-inch cyclotron magnet. Left to right row 1: J. H. Lawrence, R. Serber, P. C. Aebersold, F. N. D. Kurie, R. T. Birge, E. 0. Lawrence, D. Cooksey, A. H. Snell, L. W. Alvarez, P. H. Abelson. row 2: J. G. Backus, A. Langsdorf, J. G. Hamilton, S. J. Simmons, E. M. McMillan, R. R. Wilson, W. M. Brobeck, E. M. Lyman, J. J. Livingood. row 3: D. H. Sloan, R. Cornog, M.D. Kamen, W. B. Mann, J. R. Oppenheimer, E. S. Viez, D. C. Kalbfell, W. W. Salisbury. SCIENTIFIC LEADERS OF THE S-1 PROJECT I Considering the feasibility of the 184- inch cyclotron project at Berkeley, March 29, 1940. Left to right Ernest 0. Lawrence, Arthur H. Compton, Vannevar Bush, James B. Conant, Karl T. Comp

62

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

63

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

64

Radiation Measurements at the Campus of Fukushima Medical University through the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake and Subsequent Nuclear Power Plant crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An earthquake, Tohoku region Pacific Coast earthquake, occurred on the 11th of March, 2011, and subsequent Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents have been stirring natural radiation around the author's office in Fukushima Medical University (FMU). FMU is located in Fukushima city, and is 57 km (35 miles) away from northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This paper presents three types of radiation survey undertaken through the unprecedented accidents at the campus and the hospital of FMU. First, a group of interested people immediately began radiation surveillance; the group members were assembled from the faculty members of "Life Sciences and Social Medicine" and "Human and Natural Sciences". Second, the present author, regardless of the earthquake, had serially observed natural radiations such as gamma radiation in air with NaI scintillation counter, atmospheric radon with Lucas cell, and second cosmic rays with NaI scintillation. Gamma radiation indicated most drastic change, i.e., peak v...

Kobayashi, Tsuneo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Role of TNF-α as a Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Human Vascular Cells. Authors: Mohan Natarajan, Sumathy Mohan, Catherine Gibbons, Yan Bo and Munira A. Kadhim Institutions: Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside; Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Medical research Council, Oxford, United Kingdom Identifying reliable and sensitive signaling pathways that are implicated in adverse health effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation would allow us to understand the scientific basis of low dose-induced signaling pathways and their downstream phenotypic expression. This

66

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

67

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

68

Yale University Radiation Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spillage in case of accident. Store liquid waste containers in secondary containers. 10. If radioactive

Haller, Gary L.

69

Scripting in Radiation Therapy: An Automatic 3D Beam-Naming System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scripts can be executed within the radiation treatment planning software framework to reduce human error, increase treatment planning efficiency, reduce confusion, and promote consistency within an institution or even among institutions. Scripting is versatile, and one application is an automatic 3D beam-naming system that describes the position of the beam relative to the patient in 3D space. The naming system meets the need for nomenclature that is conducive for clear and accurate communication of beam entry relative to patient anatomy. In radiation oncology in particular, where miscommunication can cause significant harm to patients, a system that minimizes error is essential. Frequent sharing of radiation treatment information occurs not only among members within a department but also between different treatment centers. Descriptions of treatment beams are perhaps the most commonly shared information about a patient's course of treatment in radiation oncology. Automating the naming system by the use of a script reduces the potential for human error, improves efficiency, enforces consistency, and would allow an institution to convert to a new naming system with greater ease. This script has been implemented in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center since December 2009. It is currently part of the dosimetry protocol and is accessible by medical dosimetrists, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. This paper highlights the advantages of using an automatic 3D beam-naming script to flawlessly and quickly identify treatment beams with unique names. Scripting in radiation treatment planning software has many uses and great potential for improving clinical care.

Holdsworth, Clay, E-mail: clayhholdsworth@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Phillips, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High LET radiatSpace Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ InducedEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transitionion can enhance TGFβ induced EMT and cross-talk with ATM pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Minli Wang 1 , Megumi Hada 1 , Janice Huff 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Jennifer Anderson 3 , Peter O'Neill 3 and Francis A. Cucinotta 4 1 USRA Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA, 3 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, UK, 4 NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA TGFβ is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis, which involve classic Smad or non-Smad signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of epithelial genes and promoted expression of mesenchymal proteins. Ionizing radiation was found to specifically induce expression of

71

American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee Report on Electronic Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

Park, Catherine C., E-mail: cpark@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Harris, Eleanor [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Price, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wallner, Paul E. [21st Century Oncology, Inc., Ft. Myers, FL (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; 2Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington We have recently installed a low-linear energy transfer (LET) electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma- and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells, leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure,

73

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ I. Fernandez-Garcia and M.H. Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY. In the present study, we evaluated cell lineage plasticity and its phenotypic effects in the non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A in response to ionizing radiation and TGFβ. We have recently shown that the molecular profiles of mammary tumors and normal mammary gland from irradiated mice are distinct from those arising in unirradiated mice by virtue of enriched stem cell and progenitor markers. Consistent with this, we found that radiation (10-100 cGy) increases the mammary repopulation capacity in a functional and marker assays (Nguyen et al. Cancer Cell

74

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

76

Post-doctoral Fellowships University of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

syndrome RecQ helicase in human fibroblasts. Aging Cell 6: 53-61. Sharma A, Awasthi S, Harrod CK, Matlock2010 -2011 Post-doctoral Fellowships University of Washington Seattle, WA Human RecQ helicases in biology and oncology Background: Mutations in the human RecQ helicase genes, WRN, BLM and RECQL4, lead

Monnat, Ray

77

Modulating radiation induced TGFB and ATM signaling in the DNA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TGF and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson 1 , Francis A. Cucinotta 2 and Peter O'Neill 1 1 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology,...

78

Regression analysis of oncology drug licensing deal values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an attempt to explain wide variations in drug licensing deal value by using regression modeling to describe and predict the relationship between oncology drug deal characteristics and their licensing deal ...

Hawkins, Paul Allen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Real-time Study of Signal Transduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Bystander Effects Using Single Nanoparticle Optics and Single Living Cell Imaging Authors: Prakash D. Nallathamby, X. Nancy Xu, Mohan Natarajan Institutions: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas The mechanisms of bystander effects remain largely unknown. Bystander responses are thought to depend on activation of cellular communication processes. Recent studies have speculated that several crucial signal transduction pathways could play a major role in bystander effects. These crucial signal transduction pathways are controlled by a coordinated

80

SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell migration of primary endothelial cells upon low LET radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell migration of primary endothelial cells upon low LET radiation exposure Xiangpeng Zheng, 1 Sumathy Mohan, 3 and Mohan Natarajan 1,2 Departments of 1 Otolaryngology, 2 Radiation Oncology, and 3 Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 The influence and mechanism of low LET radiation exposure on wound healing process is not yet fully understood. Based on the vital role of endothelial cells in migration and wound healing, this study investigated the response of endothelial cells to low-dose irradiation and the underlying mechanism. A wound was inflicted in the confluent monolayer of primary vascular endothelial cells exposing a cell-free zone on the plate. The cells were then exposed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMANEXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacob I. Fabrikant, MD,Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, Yale University School of

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response Aris Alexandrou and Jian Jian Li Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of California Davis, Sacramento, California, 95817 The initiation of the circadian rhythm field occurred when the Takahashi group defined a mutation in the mouse gene "Clock" and cloned the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) in the mid- 1990's (1-3). Currently more than a dozen clock genes have been identified (3-4). Disruptions in the circadian rhythm via changes in environmental conditions, such as, diet, temperature, and night/day hours lead to the pathogenesis of a multitude of diseases, such as, cancer, diabetes mellitus,

83

Low dose radiation effects of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effects of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells effects of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells Charles L. Limoli, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Irvine 92697-2695 Multipotent neural cells (both stem cells and their precursor cell progeny) retain their capacity to proliferate and differentiate throughout the mammalian lifespan. High numbers of these cells are located within the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular (SVZ) zone adjacent to the lateral ventricles, where they produce cells that can migrate away and differentiate into neurons (neurogenesis) and glia (gliogenesis). The realization that the brain contains such cells has sparked intense interest and speculation regarding their potential function. While significant data

84

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of California...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

California Chemistry Building and Radiation Lab - CA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (CHEMISTRY BUILDING AND RADIATION LABORATORY) (CA.05) Eliminated from...

85

Princeton University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHG 72711 PRINCETON UNIVERSITY INSTRUCTIONS FOR INVENTION DISCLOSURE FORM This Invention Disclosure Form is for use by University Faculty, Staff, and Students to report the...

86

University of Missouri | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Missouri Missouri Research Research at Mizzou Vice Chancellor for Research Core Facilities Research Centers Undergraduate Research Research News & Multimedia DOE Research Reports UM Researchers in E-print Network Illumination Magazine Harnessing Radioactivity for Cancer Therapy Scientists from the University of Missouri, Oak Ridge National Lab and the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine harness alpha particles for radiation cancer therapy. Gold Coated Lanthanide Phosphate Nanoparticles for Targeted Alpha Generator Radiotherapy, PLOS ONE Alpha Particle Therapy, Credit: Nathan Hurst Search this site: Search UM Columbia has a reputation of excellence in teaching and research and is the flagship campus of the four-campus University of Missouri System. Resources

87

NNSA, Temple University Successfully Remove Radiological Device...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of Environmental Health and Radiation Safety at Temple University. The operation was led by NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). GTRI collaborates with partner...

88

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination and internal exposures to radiation? Disposable gloves __X__ Disposable booties_____ Lab coat __XRUA # 1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS Radiation radioactive contamination and/or radiation fields? Wipes and liquid scintillation counting C. At what

Singer, Mitchell

90

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.californiasolarcenter.org/history_pv.html http://www.eere.energy.gov/basics/renewable_energy/solar.html http://www.nrel.gov/ncpv/ http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/education/index.htm http://www.nrel.gov/data/pix/searchpix.html http://www.ases.org/ http://www.seia.org/cs/about_solar_energy and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

Oregon, University of

91

The Universe Adventure - Today's Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: Today's Accelerating Universe 4: Today's Accelerating Universe The Universe Today Dark matter has aided in forming the universe we see today; however, many questions regarding the cosmos remain. What is the status of the Universe today? We know the Universe is expanding... But what do we know about the expansion? Supernova survey. Surveys of supernova provide scientists with information about the history of the Universe. Classroom Cosmology Classroom Cosmology: Toilet Paper Cosmology In 1997 advances in telescope technology allowed astronomers to conduct redshift surveys of very distant type Ia supernovae. This enabled them to look further back into the Universe's history than previously possible. Their stunning results rivaled Hubble's original discovery and turned cosmology on its head. While most theoretical models predicted that the

92

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research: Outreach and Resources Authors: Antone L. Brooks and Lezlie A. Couch Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, Washington The...

93

RUA # _1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be used to prevent contamination and internal exposures to radiation? Disposable gloves __X__ DisposableRUA # _1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS Radiation areas. B. How will you detect radioactive contamination and/or radiation fields? Wipes and liquid

Singer, Mitchell

94

Synopsis of History of American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1958-2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide a synopsis of the history of the association of radiation oncologists in the United States, currently known as the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), with the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the organization. Methods and Materials: The history of ASTRO, from its beginning as the American Club of Therapeutic Radiologists, is the subject of a book that is to be released with the occasion of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Society in 2008. This book was prepared by members of ASTRO's History Committee and History Working Subcommittee. The source material for the book was the archives of the Society and recorded interviews, conducted by members of the subcommittee, of members of the Society and of the past and present Society staff. The book was also based on previously published material. This article used the source material used for the Society anniversary book. Results: This synopsis of the history of the Society will provide a source of reference for anyone interested in the history of the Society from its foundation in 1958 to the present, 2008.

Montana, Gustavo S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)], E-mail: gustavo.montana@duke.edu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

96

Millersville University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Violence Weapons Theft Use of University Equipment Section VII COMMUNICATIONS Guidelines for placing VIII EMPLOYEE SAFETY AND HEALTH Campus Emergency Procedures Threat Assessment Team Suspicious Leave Annual Leave #12; Section IX ATTENDANCE AND LEAVE continued Personal Leave Sick Leave Sick

Hardy, Christopher R.

97

Final Report for Research Conducted at The Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego from 2/2002 to 8/2003 for ''Aerosol and Cloud-Field Radiative Effects in the Tropical Western Pacific: Analyses and General Circulation Model Parameterizations''  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Final report from the University of California San Diego for an ongoing research project that was moved to Brookhaven National Laboratory where proposed work will be completed. The research uses measurements made by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to quantify the effects of aerosols and clouds on the Earth's energy balance in the climatically important Tropical Western Pacific.

Vogelmann, A. M.

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Bridging the "Valley of Death" in stratified medicine : commercializing molecular diagnostics in oncology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, the development of molecular companion diagnostics in oncology has underwhelmed the expectation of the medical field since the successful mapping of the human genome a decade ago. There have been several ...

Copp, Joshua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Universe Adventure - Origins of the CMB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins of the CMB Decoupling of Matter The first light radiated after decoupling is now known as the CMB. During the first 380,000 years after the Big Bang, the universe was so...

100

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA University Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Church Street SE Minneapolis, MN 55455-0110 Office: 612-624-3557 Fax: 612-626-6278 www.uservices.umn.edu MEMORANDUM January 29, 2010 TO: Executive Team, Twin Cities Deans, Faculty Researchers FROM: Kathleen O'Brien, Vice President Subject: Status Report on the University of Minnesota and the Central Corridor Light

Amin, S. Massoud

102

NC STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY HOUSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

name to enter it on your application. Only current and accepted students will appear in the search box of the application process 1 #12;NC STATE UNIVERSITY SELECT THE FALL 2012 TERM 2 Once accepted by NC State, students accepting the terms and conditions associated with the Agreement. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE #12;NC STATE

103

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Charles Limoli  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Biology, University of California, Irvine Funded Project Radiobiology of Neural Cancer Stem Cells Publications Elmore, E., Lao, X.Y., Kapadia, R., Giedzinski, E., Limoli,...

104

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY RADIATION SAFETY OPERATIONS MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, L.W. Tiong, L.K. Steele, J.J. Johnson, and J.L. Beck, Report NUREG/CR-6012, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory

Bertini, Robert L.

105

Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Understanding (MOU) between USACE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) dated July 5, 2001, and subject for interagency consultation if the decommissioning criteria at 10 CFR Section 20.1402 are determined, resulting from the disposal of radiologically contaminated waste from the nearby Apollo Nuclear Fuel

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

106

THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES HEALTH & WELLNESS CENTER University Health-8958 Healthcare Compliance Information Florida State University's University Health Services (UHS) is staffed service laboratory; pickup service is available for students whose insurance requires the use of Lab Corps

Weston, Ken

107

Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Universe Adventure - Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index Pages Index Pages Help Teachers Credits Developers Feedback Links Glossary: A-E | F-J | K-O | P-T | U-Z Fundamentals of Cosmology Cosmology The Beginnings of Cosmology The Ancient Universe The Modern Universe -> Cosmic Conundrums: Cosmology Light The Electromagnetic Spectrum -> Movie: Travelling Photons -> Down the Rabbit Hole: At the Speed of Light -> Classroom Cosmology: The Speed of Light Apparent Magnitude -> Sidequest: Absolute and Apparent Magnitude -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Luminosity versus Observed Brightness -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Standard Candles -> Cosmic Conundrums: Light Matter Blackbody Radiation -> Movie: Temperature Matter and Atoms -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Electric Charge -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Quantum Mechanics -> Cosmic Conundrums: Matter

109

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: University of Riyadh. Solar air conditioning. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on solar air conditioning at the University of Riyadh in Riyhadh, Saudi Arabia is presented. Topics relevant to the university's proposed solar cooling laboratory are discussed: absorption systems and various contingencies, photovoltaic solar collectors and thermoelectric elements, measuring instruments, solar radiation measurement and analysis, laboratory specifications, and decision theories. Dual cycle computations and equipment specifications are included among the appendices.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

111

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

112

University Research Program in Robotics - "Technologies for Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems in directed Stockpile Work (DSW) Radiation and Campaigns", Final Technical Annual Report, Project Period 9/1/06 - 8/31/07  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University Research Program in Robotics (URPR) is an integrated group of universities performing fundamental research that addresses broad-based robotics and automation needs of the NNSA Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and Campaigns. The URPR mission is to provide improved capabilities in robotics science and engineering to meet the future needs of all weapon systems and other associated NNSA/DOE activities.

James S. Tulenko; Carl D. Crane

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-926-4100 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SSRL Facility Research Associate for Small Angle X-ray Scattering The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has) program. This position has a component (roughly 50%) that involves beam line development at SSRL

Ford, James

114

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

116

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

117

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

119

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development and Validation of a Heart Atlas to Study Cardiac Exposure to Radiation Following Treatment for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variations in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials: A detailed cardiac computed tomography scan atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart, left main and left anterior descending interventricular branches, and right coronary arteries on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard atlas volumes. The concordance index was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac structures were calculated and compared with gold standard contour doses. Pre- and post-atlas values were analyzed using a paired t test. Results: The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and concordance index of observer-contoured cardiac and gold standard volumes were 2.3-fold improved for all structures (p < 0.002). After application of the atlas, reported mean doses to the whole heart, left main artery, left anterior descending interventricular branch, and right coronary artery were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy, respectively, of gold standard doses. Conclusions: This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koelling, Todd [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chughtai, Aamer [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Universe Adventure - The Modern Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Universe Modern Universe Like astronomers throughout history, modern cosmologists are interested in making an accurate model of the Universe. Starting with the laws of physics which explain how fundamental particles and forces interact, physicists derive general equations describing the evolution of the Universe's structure. Cosmologists use experimental evidence to select a set of initial conditions enabling them to solve the general equations, and calculate the state of the Universe at times in the past, present, or future. This generates a possible model, which can be tested by comparing the phenomena it predicts with observational data. In this manner, following the rigorous scientific method, cosmologists work to build a successful Universal model. In the next section we will examine evidence for the current Big Bang

123

COURSE NOTES: Radiation Damage in Metals (NEEP 541)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... "Radiation Damage in Metals (NEEP 541)." Department of Engineering Physics. Fall 2005. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Launch Site

124

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genomic Instability and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genomic Instability and Low Dose Low Dose Rate Radiation. Authors: Lei Huang, Suzanne Grim, William F. Morgan Institutions: University of Maryland. Humans will always receive...

125

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce N. Ames  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of California, Berkeley Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Comparison of Low-Dose Radiation, Endogenous Oxidants, and Micronutrient Deficiencies through Analyses of DNA...

126

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gene Expression Profiles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with funding from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program...

127

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Susan S. Wallace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Susan S. Wallace University of Vermont Past Funded Project Free Radical DNA Damage Produced Endogenously and by Low Dose Radiation in Human Cells: Quantitation, Consequences, and...

128

Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

129

An adaptive radiation model for the origin of new gene functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foster, P.L. Adaptive radiation of a frameshift mutation inThe Ecology of Adaptive Radiation, (Oxford University Press,18 th , 2004) An adaptive radiation model for the origin of

Francino, M. Pilar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

University of Wisconsin Cirrus Remote Sensing Pilot Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period of 26 October 1989 through 6 December 1989 a unique complement of measurements was made at the University of WisconsinMadison to study the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. Simultaneous observations were obtained from a ...

Steven A. Ackerman; William L. Smith; Ed W. Eloranta; Chris J. Grund; Robert O. Knuteson; Henry E. Revercomb; Donald P. Wylie

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

132

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fudan University HSK level 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi 0 Australian National University Plasma Research

Takada, Shoji

135

Poll of radiation health scientists  

SciTech Connect

A sampling of 210 university-employed radiation health scientists randomly selected from the membership lists of the Health Physics Society and the Radiation Research Society was polled in a secret ballot. The results support the positions that the public's fear of radiation is substantially greater than realistic, that TV, newspapers and magazines substantially exaggerate the dangers of radiation, that the amount of money now being spent on radiation protection is sufficient, and that the openness and honesty of U.S. government agencies about dangers of radiation were below average before 1972 but have been above average since then. Respondents give very high credibility ratings to BEIR, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and NCRP and to the individual scientists associated with their reports, and very low credibility ratings to those who have disputed them.

Cohen, B.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

137

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization...  

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the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Chaun-Yuan Li Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC Why this Project? To evaluate the roles...

138

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Universe Adventure - Expansion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expansion: Chunk-by-Chunk Expansion: Chunk-by-Chunk A sample of the Universe. A very small portion of the Universe. In order to better understand the significance of expansion, let's look at a cubic sample of space. By considering a finite volume we can follow changes in the size of the Universe as we move forwards and backwards in time. Remember, only the size of the cube will change. The galaxies inside the cube stay the same size. This animation illustrates how our cubic piece of the Universe changes with time. If the Universe followed the simplest expansionary models, its size would increase linearly with time. The Universe would continue to expand at a constant rate forever. If you look at only a narrow time-slice of the Universe's history, it does, in fact, appear that this is how the Universe

140

The Universe Adventure - Credits  

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School) GraphicWeb Design Melissa McClure (student, University of Rochester) Jonathan Thai (student, UC Irvine) 2005 Summer (Universe Adventure rev 2.0) Lead Content guided by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BOOMERanG Analysis Finds Flat Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BOOMERanG Analysis BOOMERanG Analysis Finds Flat Universe BOOMERanG Analysis Finds Flat Universe NERSC's Mcurie System Helps Uncover Evidence of 'Cosmological Constant' Proposed, Rejected by Einstien December 12, 1999 Newly released data from the 1997 North American test flight of BOOMERanG, which mapped anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) in a narrow strip of sky, show a pronounced peak in the CMB "power spectrum" at an angular scale of about one degree, strong evidence that the universe is flat. Analyzed at the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the new data also suggest the existence of a cosmological constant, a form of countergravitational "dark energy" thought to fill the universe.

142

Emergent universe in spatially flat cosmological model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scenario of an emergent universe provides a promising resolution to the big bang singularity in universes with positive or negative spatial curvature. It however remains unclear whether the scenario can be successfully implemented in a spatially flat universe which seems to be favored by present cosmological observations. In this paper, we study the stability of Einstein static state solutions in a spatially flat Shtanov-Sahni braneworld scenario. With a negative dark radiation term included and assuming a scalar field as the only matter energy component, we find that the universe can stay at an Einstein static state past eternally and then evolve to an inflation phase naturally as the scalar field climbs up its potential slowly. In addition, we also propose a concrete potential of the scalar field that realizes this scenario.

Kaituo Zhang; Puxun Wu; Hongwei Yu

2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nevada University Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

illnesses and disabilities · Development of professionals and future leaders in the area of transportationNUTC Nevada University Transportation Center University of Nevada, Las Vegas Sustainable Transporation in Arid Regions 2007-2009 Biennial Report 5 #12;2007-2009 Nevada University Transportation Center

Ahmad, Sajjad

144

DOE Solar Decathlon: Team Ontario: Queen's University, Carleton University,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Ontario: Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin Team Ontario: Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Team website: ontariosd.ca Photo of members of the Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2013 team on the deck of their partially constructed house. Several members are laughing and throwing snowballs. Enlarge image The Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2013 team (Courtesy of the Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College Solar Decathlon 2013 team) he Queen's University, Carleton University, and Algonquin College audiovisual presentation Jury Feedback Architecture Contest Market Appeal Contest Engineering Contest Communications Contest Team Deliverables Project Manual Construction Drawings

145

University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida (Building Energy Efficient Homes for America) Jump to: navigation, search Name University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Florida...

146

Norwich University, Stanford University and Kentucky/Indiana...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy, (202) 779-3295 Jason.Lutterman@ee.doe.gov Norwich University, Stanford University and Team KentuckyIndiana Take the Affordability Contest and University of...

147

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

148

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

10th Radiation Physics and Protection Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Energy Authority National Network of Radiation Physics Atomic Energy Authority National Network of Radiation Physics 10 th Radiation Physics and Protection Conference Special Topic Elements of Regulating Nuclear and Radiation Activities Egyptian Law 26 -30 November 2010 To be held at EAEA Headquarter Nasr City Cairo - Egypt (www.rphysp.com) INVITATION The conference organizing committee invites scientists from the Atomic Energy , Research Centers , Universities Institutes , and all those involved in radiation Physics and its Applications in Egypt , Arab countries and abroad to participate in scientific activities of the conference . The official working language of the conference in English Conference Honorary Chairman Conference Scientific Secretary

150

NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Declared a national user facility in 1993, NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility (CSR) allows industry, government, and university researchers to examine the effects and applications of as much as 50,000 suns of concentrated solar radiation using a High-Flux Solar Furnace and long-term exposure using an ultraviolet (UV) concentrator.

Lewandowski, A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA OBSERVATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA OBSERVATORIES Postdoctoral Scholar - Employee The University of California Observatories invites applications for one Postdoctoral Scholar of funding. For appointments within the University of California, the total duration of an individual

California at Santa Cruz, University of

152

University Connections | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile Research on the "Go" with OSTI mobile Get the EDUconnections widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! University Spotlight Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) connects with university research departments and libraries across the nation to increase awareness of DOE's valuable scientific and technical information. OSTI "spotlights" individual universities with connections to DOE scientific research programs. Visit our spotlight below to see examples of universities that are supporting and advancing scientific research and discovery! University Spotlight Visit our Spotlight Archive to learn about great colleges and universities

153

Oncology Center  

SciTech Connect

Efforts by the Hollings Cancer Center to earn a designation as a National Cancer Center are outlined.

Kraft, Andrew S.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

University and College Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... University of Kentucky Office of External Scholarships Dr. Lisa Broome-Price Lisa.broome-price@uky.edu (859) 257-1537 OR Experiences in ...

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

155

Stanford University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Prof. Wendy Mao create amorphous diamond Stanford University Dept. of Sustainability and Energy Management Stanford School of Engineering San Francisco, bordered by the Bay and...

156

PULSE at Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging...

157

DOE Virtual University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy Virtual University (DVU) is a central venue for executing, managing, partnering and sharing corporate learning activities and programs. The DVU provides employees cost...

158

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY University System of Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specialties in accounting information systems, business intelligence, electronic commerce, enterprise resource selective student body representing 49 U.S. states and more than 100 nations. The University continues the State of Georgia and the region through the benefits of higher education, offering both campus

Hutcheon, James M.

159

Observational evidence favors a static universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The common attribute of all Big Bang cosmologies is that they are based on the assumption that the universe is expanding. However examination of the evidence for this expansion clearly favours a static universe. The major topics considered are: Tolman surface brightness, angular size, type 1a supernovae, gamma ray bursts, galaxy distributions, quasar distributions, X-ray background radiation, cosmic microwave background radiation, radio source counts, quasar variability and the Butcher--Oemler effect. An analysis of the best raw data for these topics shows that they are consistent with expansion only if there is evolution that cancels the effects of expansion. An alternate cosmology, curvature cosmology, is in full agreement with the raw data. This tired-light cosmology predicts a well defined static and stable universe and is fully described. It not only predicts accurate values for the Hubble constant and the temperature of cosmic microwave background radiation but shows excellent agreement with most of the topics considered. Curvature cosmology also predicts the deficiency in solar neutrino production rate and can explain the anomalous acceleration of {\\it Pioneer} 10.

David F. Crawford

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? To examine genomic instability and bystander effects as non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals To provides a robust, reliable, highly sensitive assay for detecting delayed events occurring in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Experimental Approach To mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources, a low-LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated. Using a novel green fluorescence gene (GFP) reporter assay, a high through

162

Radiation Safety Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From University phones, dial direct............................................................................................ 555

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

164

The multiverse and the origin of our universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiverse is a hierarchy in the number of universes, increasing stepwise towards infinity. It is an evolutionary system, in which universes survive only near critical mass. That mass is actually a factor of 1.94 less than the critical mass, and this is found to be consistent with the baryon density inferred from nucleosynthesis in our universe; it is also precisely verified as a cosmological effect. That factor seems to have originated in the multiverse for causing intersecting expansions of its universes, such that mixing occurs of debris from aging galaxies (over proton-decaying time scales). It follows that there is an inter-universal medium (IUM), probably having the demand of new universes in balance with the supply of dark radiation and sub-atomic particles from the decaying galaxies. The mixing causes the universes to have the same quantum, relativity, gravity, and particle physics as our universe. The making of a universe from the radiation and sub-atomic particles occurs through re-vitalizing the protons, and other particles as well, by gravitational energy obtained in accretion of the IUM. This process therefore begins wherever the IUM space density reaches proton density, near 10 E18 kg m E-3. The process continues quietly as the sweeping-up and gravitational accretion proceeds, until the near-critical mass is reached. Some of the IUM debris must also be pervading our present universe, steadily or in partially accreted lumps. The model therefore predicts that the IUM sub-atomic particles appear as our dark matter, and its radiation component as our dark energy, both near 0 K temperatures. The dark energy may cause expansion phenomena, in addition to the above non-flatness expansion, from an accretion lump that arrived at our universe at age near 9 x 10 E9 y.

Tom Gehrels

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

166

Universal software safety standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper identifies the minimum subset required for a truly universal safety-critical software standard. This universal software standard could be used in but is not limited to the following application domains: commercial, military and space ... Keywords: software safety, system safety, validation, verification

P. V. Bhansali

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CORNELL UNIVERSITY POLICY LIBRARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 Cornell University prohibits the smoking or carrying of lighted cigars, cigarettes or pipes in all Brochure Cornell University Dining Brochure Faculty Handbook Human Resource Policy 6.11.4, Staff Complaint and Grievance Procedure Student Handbook City of Ithaca Municipal Code Respiratory Effects of Passive Smoking

Manning, Sturt

168

UNIVERSITIES IN TEXAS, PRIVATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caption FOR PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN TEXAS, PRIVATE SUPPORT IS THE ENGINE OF QUALITY. Indeed, state support (general revenues) today provides just one-third of Texas A&M University's total budget per student as Texas A&M. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE http://www.science.tamu.edu 3257 TAMU College Station

169

UNIVERSITY POLICE ANNUAL SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY POLICE 2013 ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act The University of New Orleans. Please take a moment to read the following information. #12;ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY GUIDE 2013

Kulp, Mark

170

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

171

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

172

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

173

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition » Radiator Labs Competition » Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

174

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition » Radiator Labs Competition » Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

175

Enforcement Letter, Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, 1999 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, 1999 Enforcement Letter, Stony Brook University Hospital - April 15, 1999 April 15, 1999 Issued to Stony Brook University Hospital related to a Failed Interlock at the Radiation Therapy Facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the facts and circumstances concerning an event at the Radiation Therapy Facility (RTF) occurring in March 1998. In November 1998, DOE conducted an investigation to determine whether violations of DOE's nuclear safety rules associated with the event had occurred. The resulting Investigation Summary Report was transmitted to you on February 19, 1999. On March 11, 1999, you participated in an Enforcement Conference, along with Brookhaven

176

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA OBSERVATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA OBSERVATORIES POSTDOCTORAL SCHOLAR ­ EMPLOYEE The University of California Observatories invites applications for one Postdoctoral Scholar of California, the total duration of an individual's postdoctoral service may not exceed five years, including

California at Santa Cruz, University of

177

Delaware State University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Delaware State University Delaware State University Research Office of the Associate Provost for Research General Research Capability Center for Integrated Biological & Environmental Research Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Delaware IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Faculty Research DSU Leads the Way in Better Buildings DSU is one of the first university partners in the US to join the Department of Energy's Better Buildings inititative to reduce its carbon footprint by 25% by 2015. Secretary of Energy Chu participated in the DSU kick-off program to commemorate the school's efforts in July 2012. Read more about this showcase project. Search this site: Search Prestigious research projects underway by Delaware State University (DSU) serve to enhance DSU's land-grant mission and its contributions to the

178

University | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University University Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Assume data was reviewed by someone at UT-Austin prior to adding to website. Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989 - 2010

179

Ideal Gas Stephani Universes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stephani Universes that can be interpreted as an ideal gas evolving in local thermal equilibrium are determined, and the method to obtain the associated thermodynamic schemes is given

Bartolom Coll; Joan Josep Ferrando

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Quantum mechanical Universal constructor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arbitrary quantum states cannot be copied. In fact, to make a copy we must provide complete information about the system. However, can a quantum system self-replicate? This is not answered by the no-cloning theorem. In the classical context, Von Neumann showed that a `universal constructor' can exist which can self-replicate an arbitrary system, provided that it had access to instructions for making copy of the system. We question the existence of a universal constructor that may allow for the self-replication of an arbitrary quantum system. We prove that there is no deterministic universal quantum constructor which can operate with finite resources. Further, we delineate conditions under which such a universal constructor can be designed to operate dterministically and probabilistically.

Pati, A K; Pati, Arun K.; Braunstein, Samuel L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quantum mechanical Universal constructor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arbitrary quantum states cannot be copied. In fact, to make a copy we must provide complete information about the system. However, can a quantum system self-replicate? This is not answered by the no-cloning theorem. In the classical context, Von Neumann showed that a `universal constructor' can exist which can self-replicate an arbitrary system, provided that it had access to instructions for making copy of the system. We question the existence of a universal constructor that may allow for the self-replication of an arbitrary quantum system. We prove that there is no deterministic universal quantum constructor which can operate with finite resources. Further, we delineate conditions under which such a universal constructor can be designed to operate dterministically and probabilistically.

Arun K. Pati; Samuel L. Braunstein

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

182

Texas Tech University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University :: TechAnnounce http Academic Departmental Citing scheduling conflicts with the Texas Oklahoma-Texas Tech football game and international environmental reporters, experts and industry and government leaders to the Hub City. Texas Tech

Rock, Chris

183

NCAR and the Universities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has a responsibility for enhancing and assisting the national university-based atmospheric research effort. This responsibility is met partly by programs of research at NCAR that involve ...

Wilmot N. Hess

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EPCglobal : a universal standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the likelihood of EPCglobal becoming the universal RFID standard by presenting a framework of ten factors used to analyze and determine if EPCglobal is moving in the right direction. The ten factors ...

Aguirre, Juan Ignacio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Universal desktop fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in digital design and fabrication technologies are leading toward single fabrication systems capable of producing almost any complete functional object. We are proposing a new paradigm for manufacturing, which we call Universal Desktop Fabrication ...

T. Vilbrandt; E. Malone; H. Lipson; A. Pasko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Thermodynamics of Fractal Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in a fractal universe. We find that one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation of the fractal universe in the form of the entropy balance relation $ \\delta Q=T_h d{S_h}$, where $ \\delta Q $ and $ T_{h} $ are the energy flux and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerated observer just inside the apparent horizon. We find that the entropy $S_h$ consists two terms, the first one which obeys the usual area law and the second part which is the entropy production term due to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fractal universe. This shows that in a fractal universe, a treatment with nonequilibrium thermodynamics of spacetime may be needed. We also study the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the framework of fractal universe. When the temperature of the apparent horizon and the matter fields inside the horizon are equal, i.e. $T=T_h$, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled provided the deceleration and the equation of state parameters ranges either as $-1 \\leq q thermodynamics can be secured in a fractal universe by suitably choosing the fractal parameter $\\beta$.

Ahmad Sheykhi; Zeinab Teimoori; Bin Wang

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Abstract The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high...

191

Role of ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response in human neural stemprogenitor cells and differentiated cell types Adayabalam Balajee Columbia University Medical...

192

Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman,...

193

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UT -OT IB-0064. January 2010. Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) CER. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office...

195

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Universe Adventure - Early Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Models of the Universe Ready for Blast-off Space exploration missions contribute greatly to our understanding of the Universe. With our new understanding of the fundamental...

198

J Apostolov Zlatomir D University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Tennessee-Knoxville Group C Group I Saparov Bayrammurad University of Delaware Nguyen Lam T. Florida State University Kanitpanyacharoen K itpanyach Waruntorn Warunt...

199

Auburn University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University Place Auburn, Alabama Zip 36849 Product Largest university in Alabama, enrolling approximately 23,000 students in 230 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs....

200

Split University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Split University Place Zagreb, Croatia Sector Hydro, Solar Product Croatia-based electrical engineering faculty of Split University....

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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201

Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Tuesday 10/8/02 Chair: Lars Pettersson 1:30-1:40 Anders Nilsson Welcome 1:40-2:30 Gabor Somorjai University of California, Berkeley and LBLN Need for New Directions of Research at the Frontiers of Catalysis Science 2:30-3:00 Geoff Thornton University of Manchester Influence of defects on the reactivity of ZnO 3:00-3:30 Anders Nilsson Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Surfaces and Reactions 3:30-3:45 Break Chair: Anders Nilsson 3:45-4:15 Lars Pettersson Stockholm University Adsorbate-Substrate Bonding: An Experimental and Theoretical MO Picture 4:15-4:45 Miquel Salmeron Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Photoelectron Spectroscopy studies of surfaces in high pressure gas

202

California Stanford University of University Institute of University California of Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Stanford University of University Institute of University California of Southern Technology California ____________________________________________________________ February 15, 2011 Dear Representative, As Congress considers funding options for the remainder of fiscal year (FY) 2011, California

Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

203

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy ORAU 89lA-42 VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ON VENTILATION SYSTEMS JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT JANUARY 1989 ORAU 89IA-42 3 VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ON VENTILATION SYSTEMS JONES CHEMICAL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Prepared by M.R. Landis Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Project Staff J.D. Berger R.D. Condra J.F. Lisco C.F. Weaver Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -

204

Universe Adventure Web Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universe Universe Adventure Web Standards for the Smart Physics Student Author: Patrick Lii - plii@ugastro.berkeley.edu Date: August 3, 2007 ABSTRACT You may be wondering: why are the Universe Adventure web standards so impor- tant? And why do I have to read this stupid document about them? The old versions of our site were plagued with messy (and faulty) coding: the pages were littered with broken links, missing images, broken flash files, and all sorts of other problems which made the site highly inaccessible. When we tried to fix these errors, we found that the coding was so incredibly messy that a simple edit like changing some of the words in a paragraph or adding an image took hours rather than minutes. In fact, the coding was so horrific that we simply constructed an entirely new site rather than making the laborious attempt to fix the old one. In order to make sure that future students working

205

DOE Cites University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations DOE Cites University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations March 7, 2006 - 11:42am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to the University of Chicago (University), the Management and Operating contractor for DOE's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), for nuclear safety violations identified through several safety reviews and inspections conducted by DOE. A series of reviews and inspections, the most recent of which occurred in 2005, identified breakdowns in the contractor's quality improvement, radiation protection, work process, and independent and management assessment programs. Prior to 2005, senior contractor management at ANL

206

University Location Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location Project Description Location Project Description Boise State University Boise, Idaho Boise State University has undertaken a study of the structural setting and geothermal potential at Neal Hot Springs that will integrate geology, geochemistry, and geophysics to analyze the site on the western Snake River plain. Boise State will determine if Neal Hot Springs sustains the necessary rock dilation and conduit pathways for hydrothermal fluid flow and successful geothermal development. The result will be new data acquisition, including a deep geophysical survey and fault surface data. Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado Colorado School of Mines will conduct an investigation near Homedale, Idaho, an area that straddles volcanic rock and unconsolidated sediments.

207

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Quantum Universe Hitoshi Murayama (Berkeley)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Universe Hitoshi Murayama (Berkeley) University of Tennessee, Jan 22, 2007 #12;COBE showed quantum origin of the universe #12;400Kyr 13.7Byr 1min 10 -10sec #12;To understand physics at the largest made of? · How did it come to be? · Why do we exist? Moving from philosophy to physics Quantum Universe

Murayama, Hitoshi

210

Director, health Physics Office Columbia University  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f. 3 -J f. 3 -J Mr. Philip tori0 Director, health Physics Office Columbia University 289 Engineering Terrace 520 West 120th Street New York, New York 10027 NY.3 "I A\, 4 f- ' :""5 . . ;. ,_ i._ ' L, Dear Mr. Lorio: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on Columbia University facilities to determine whether they contain residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Manhattan Engineer District or the Atomic Energy Commission (predecessors to DOE). A radiological survey indicated that the radiation levels are equal to natural background in all areas not currently in use for licensed operations with radionuclides, Therefore, no remedial action is required,

211

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Monte Carlo Track Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monte Carlo Track Structure Simulations for Low-LET Selected Cell Radiation Studies Walt Wilson Washington State University Tri-Cities Why This Project There are many types of...

213

Graduate Handbook Clemson University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Handbook Clemson University #12;2 Table of Contents Introduction to fundamental knowledge in a student's chosen area of concentration (i.e., applied fluid mechanics, construction to fundamental knowledge in a student's chosen area of concentration (i.e., applied fluid mechanics, construction

Bolding, M. Chad

214

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- substation design engineers, protective relay engineers, dispatchers in the control centers etc. AnotherRequirements Specification for and Evaluation of an Automated Substation Monitoring System Mladen for the Automated Analysis Substation System (AASS) implemented at Texas A&M University, aimed at monitoring

Manning, Sturt

215

Texas Tech University System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University System :: Huffaker Named as Texas Tech System General Counsel http://www.texastech.edu/stories/12-03-TTUS-Washington-DC-Trip.php[4/2/2012 8:13:27 AM] Chancellor Hance and leadership from the Texas visited with Texas Tech students and Congressional interns while in Washington, D.C. March 27, 2012 Texas

Rock, Chris

216

UNIVERSITY OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (FMIS) ON-LINE QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE Reference Guide FIXED ASSETS SYSTEM (FFX) Scrn Num Screen Name 502 Asset Maintenance Use this screen-2093 Fixed Assets System (FFX), Inventory Maintenance - transfer, disposal of equipment, decal, equipment

217

Models for universal usability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how model-based approaches can support designers and developers to address a number of challenges raised by universal usability, such as the possibility of obtaining user interfaces able to adapt to any device and usability evaluation ... Keywords: abstract user interfaces, authoring environments, heterogeneous clients, multi-platform user interfaces, remote evaluation, task Models

Fabio Patern

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Universal nonlinear entanglement witnesses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We give a universal recipe for constructing nonlinear entanglement witnesses able to detect nonclassical correlations in arbitrary systems of distinguishable and/or identical particles for an arbitrary number of constituents. The constructed witnesses are expressed in terms of expectation values of observables. As such, they are, at least in principle, measurable in experiments.

Kotowski, Marcin; Kotowski, Michal [College of Inter-Faculty Individual Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Warsaw University, PL-Warszawa (Poland); Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/44, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Kus, Marek [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/44, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

220

Broadband and universal service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 254(b)(3) of the 1996 Telecommunications Act established the objective that residents of rural areas should have access to advanced telecommunications and information services comparable to services in urban areas. Pursuant to the passage of ... Keywords: Broadband policy, Empirical analysis, Rural, Telecommunications policy, Universal service

David Gabel

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

222

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION STUDIES Texas Tech University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of decommissioning old nuclear power plants, building and commissioning new plants and waste disposal. The panel also Executive and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. The LoA group work together in areas of common interestEPSRC/STFC Review of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Engineering A report prepared for EPSRC and STFC

Rock, Chris

223

Oral Histories: Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D. Conducted December 22, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments September 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Educational Background and Early Involvement in Radiation Research Brookhaven Acquaintances and Early Hospital Research (Circa 1952) Vulnerable Populations and Acceptable Risks Research at the University of Rochester (1952-57) Relationship with Newell Stannard and Stafford Warren (1952-57) Participation in "Project Sunshine" and Move to the University of California, Davis (Mid '50s to '58) Participation in Beagle Studies at the University of California at Davis (1958 to '60s) Budget Concerns and Goldman's Other Radiation Research Projects (1965 to Late '60s)

224

California Stanford University of University of Institute of University California Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Stanford University of University of Institute of University California Southern Technology California March 13, 2012 The Honorable Dianne Feinstein 331 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510-0504 Dear Senator Feinstein: On behalf of California's research universities, we write

Southern California, University of

225

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

226

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in...

227

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Universe Adventure - Redshift  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expansion of the Universe Expansion of the Universe Redshift Expansion of Space Redshifts Light The expansion of space redshifts light. As space expands, light waves get stretched and their wavelengths shift. The more that light is stretched, the longer its wavelengths become, and the color of each wave shifts toward the red end of the light spectrum. We say that this light is redshifted. The Doppler Effect in action. A moving fire truck's siren changes pitch as it moves past you. This is known as the Doppler Effect. To get a better idea of how this actually works, we'll look at a common phenomenon: the Doppler Effect. Imagine you hear a fire truck coming right toward you. As the truck approaches, the pitch of the siren gets higher and higher. As soon as the truck passes you however, the pitch drops lower as

230

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEUP FY2011 Process Presentation to NEAC December 9, 2010 Marsha Lambregts, NEUP-IO Manager FUNDED R&D PROPOSALS BY STATE 2010 * Awards/Full Submissions - 42/128 * Awards to PIs for first time - 29 * Awards to junior faculty - 20 * Awards that are experimental - 30 * Awards in materials and waste - 30 * Awards to Nuclear Engineering Faculty - 18 * Number of universities receiving awards - 26 * Number of awards with lab partners - 20 * Number of universities receiving awards for first time - 8 2 2010 INFRASTRUCTURE * Major Reactor: 4 awards for a total of $3.75 M * Minor Reactor: 12 awards for $1.95 M * General Scientific Infrastructure: 33 award for $7.47 M * Since 2009, $ 19.438 M has been awarded in General Scientific Infrastructure (did not issue Major or Minor Reactor calls in 2009).

231

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Regional University Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance Alliance Developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory in collaboration with NETL-Regional University Alliance WVU National Research Center for Coal and Energy Fossil Consulting Services, Inc. The AVESTAR(tm) Center provides a state-of- the-art, highly realistic, dynamic simulator for a coal-fired power plant using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology with CO 2 capture. The system is based on Invensys' DYNSIM ® software

233

WESTERN UNIVERSITY Disaster Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Assumptions 1.7.1 Emergency 1.7.2 Disaster 1.8 Concept of Operations 1.8.1 Background 1.8.2 Emergency Response/Administrative Unit Responsibilities 1.8.8 Situation Reports 2. UTILIZING THE DISASTER PLAN 2.1 Emergency Process Members ­ Individual Responsibilities #12;WESTERN UNIVERSITY Disaster Plan January, 2013 2.7.1 VP

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

234

Universal battery terminal connector  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a universal battery terminal connector for connecting either a top post battery terminal or a side post battery terminal to a battery cable. The connector comprises an elongated electrically conductive body having: (a) first means for connection to a top post battery terminal; (b) second means for connection to a side post battery terminal, and (c) third means for receiving one end of a battery cable and providing an electrical connection therewith.

Norris, R.W.

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

University Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

universities/highlights/ The Office of Science is universities/highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {B0DFBA1D-D6A0-4920-8E73-4779F8F5ACEA}http://science.energy.gov/np/highlights/2013/np-2013-12-a/ Modeling Cosmic Nucleosynthesis First measurements of isotopes produced by Argonne's new CARIBU facility provide insight into the creation of the elements in the universe. Thu, 09

236

College/University: University of Indonesia; Jakarta, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Education College/University: University of Indonesia; Jakarta, Indonesia Highest degree: B, under revision First name: Meta Last name: Djojosubroto Date of birth: 21.11.1975 Country: Indonesia E

Manstein, Dietmar J.

237

The Universe Adventure - The Homogenous and Isotropic Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our View of the Universe Our View of the Universe All observations that have been made using the most powerful telescopes show that the universe looks the same in all directions. The average density of galaxies is the same throughout the universe and does not change with distance or direction. This is called the Cosmological Principle. Distribution of Galaxies On average and at large scales, the distribution of galaxies is the same throughout the universe. Since the expansion of space occurs evenly at every point in the universe, galaxies are separating from each other at about the same pace, giving the universe a nearly uniform density and structure. As a result, the universe appears smooth at large distance scales. In scientific terms, it is said to be homogeneous and isotropic.

238

NEVADA UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of professionals and future leaders in the area of transportation systems. · Support of career growthNEVADA UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTER UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS 2011-2012 ANNUAL REPORT #12 University Transportation Center (NUTC) Vision: The NUTC will strive to become a nationally recognized center

Ahmad, Sajjad

239

White Paper Synchrotron Radiation Sources for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper Synchrotron Radiation Sources for the Future Sol Gruner1,2,3 , Don Bilderback1 of Nuclear Studies (LNS) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 Source: http://erl.chess.cornell.edu/papers/WhitePaper_v41.pdf #12;WhitePaper_v41.doc 04/02/011 White Paper Synchrotron Radiation Sources for the Future Sol

Gruner, Sol M.

240

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

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241

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials...

242

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

244

Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HOPE for radiation belt storm probes HOPE for radiation belt storm probes Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes The HOPE analyzer is one of a suite of instruments that was successfully launched as part of the Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission. August 30, 2012 Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203 Email "Today we are boldly going where no spacecraft ever wants to go."

245

Fermilab Today | University of Arizona  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A&M University Dec. 12, 2012 NAME: Texas A&M University HOME TOWN: College Station, Texas MASCOT: Reveille COLORS: Maroon and white COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: Early 1980s....

246

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Princeton University - NJ 08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton University - NJ 08 Princeton University - NJ 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY (NJ.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.08-2 Site Operations: During 1940's, performed experiments on uranium isotope separation and experiments for the development of diffusion barrier material for the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. NJ.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NJ.08-1 NJ.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.08-2 NJ.08-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NJ.08-1 NJ.08-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

247

2009 University Coal Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 University Coal Research Program 2009 University Coal Research Program Description The University Coal Research (UCR) Program provides grants to U.S. colleges and universities to support fundamental research and to develop efficient and environmentally responsible fossil energy technologies. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the program is carried out by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

248

1993 - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 2, 2001... differentiability of convex functions on various Banach spaces,'' Regional Functional Analysis Conference, Miami University , Oxford, Ohio. 8.

249

Postscript - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERSC/MSRI Workshop. on. Parallel Symbolic Computation. CECM. Centre for Experimental &. Constructive Mathematics. Simon Fraser University. Berkeley...

250

European Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Project RISC-RAD Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations Laure Sabatier 1 , L.H.F Mullenders 2 , Mike Atkinson 3 , Simon Bouffler 4 , Herwig Paretzke 5 1 Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, CEA, 18 route du panorama BP6 92265 Fontenay-aux- Roses, France 2 LUMC, Department of Toxicogenetics, Postal Zone S-4-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands 3 GSF- Institute of Pathology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg Germany 4 HPA Radiation Protection Division, Centre for Radiation Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, UK 5 GSF- Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg, D-85764 Germany In radiological protection, the risks of inducing stochastic health effects (largely cancer) by a

251

CURRICULUM VITAE University of Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRICULUM VITAE University of Idaho NAME: Scarnecchia, Dennis L. DATE: July 26, 2004 RANK OR TITLE of Idaho 1990-June 1998, Associate Professor, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, University of Idaho 1985-90, Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Ecology, Iowa State University 1986

252

University of Toronto Governing Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In policies approved by the Governing Council, the University community has held that the essential purpose on any issue without reference to prescribed doctrine, as well as the right to criticize the University use of University facilities, in accordance with its policies as they are defined from time to time

Sun, Yu

253

DOE Solar Decathlon: Gallery of Kentucky/Indiana: University...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KentuckyIndiana: University of Louisville, Ball State University and University of Kentucky Photos of University of Louisville, Ball State University and University of Kentucky's...

254

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors Nuclear engineering programs and departments with an initial emphasis in fission were formed in the late 1950's and 1960's from interdisciplinary efforts in many of the top research universities, providing the manpower for this technical discipline. In the same time period, for many of these programs, university nuclear reactors were constructed and began their operation, providing some of the facilities needed for research and training of students engaged in this profession. However, over the last decade, the U.S. nuclear science and engineering educational structure has not only stagnated but has reached a state of

255

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors Nuclear engineering programs and departments with an initial emphasis in fission were formed in the late 1950's and 1960's from interdisciplinary efforts in many of the top research universities, providing the manpower for this technical discipline. In the same time period, for many of these programs, university nuclear reactors were constructed and began their operation, providing some of the facilities needed for research and training of students engaged in this profession. However, over the last decade, the U.S. nuclear science and engineering educational structure has not only stagnated but has reached a state of

256

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

257

Collaborative University Research Education | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborative University Research Collaborative University Research SHARE Collaborative University Research ORNL scientist Jonathan Mielenz works in an anaerobic chamber used to handle biomass-degrading microbes at the Joint Institute for Biological Sciences.Source: ORNL Flickr site With a strong commitment to education, ORNL maintains relationships with many educational institutions and organizations. Many student and faculty programs are administered through Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and include opportunities for undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, faculty, and some pre-college students. The lab also partners with the University of Tennessee in several joint research efforts and though programs aimed at training the next generation of interdisciplinary scientists. These collaborations include:

258

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

259

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University Coal Research University Coal Research Universities frequently win Fossil Energy research competitions or join with private companies to submit successful research...

260

Clean Cities: Clean Cities University Online Learning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Online Learning to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Clean Cities University Online Learning on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Clean Cities University Online...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Florida International University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archive Spotlight Archive Contact Florida International University Professors and Faculty of Interest Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle against Neuro-AIDS Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Exceptional Students and Alumnus DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional De DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional Development Corps

262

The Universe Adventure - Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Cosmology and Space Cosmic Journey A site chronicling the history of scientific cosmology, presented by the American Institute of Physics. Hubble Ultra-Deep Field Skywalker Lets you explore the famous Hubble Deep Field photo, which is the deepest view (in the visible spectrum) into the sky to date. QuietBay Constellation Tutorial A fun and easy tutorial to familiarize yourself with the night sky. Astronomy Picture of the Day Astronomy Picture of the Day features a new image from the universe every day, with short explanations written by professional astronomers. The Solar System NASA site that includes images and profiles of the planets (plus Pluto). Earth Guide An Earth planetary science site created by the Japan Science and Technology Agency describing many of the features of Earth and its place in the

263

NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naing Naing Aung, Xingbo Liu Naing Naing Aung, Xingbo Liu 03-12-2012 Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring of Boiler Tubes WestVirginiaUniversity College of Engineering and Mineral Resources DoE Award No. DE- FE0005717 Project Objectives  To develop in-situ corrosion monitoring sensors for corrosion of USC boiler tubes in next generation coal-based power systems  To develop thermal-electric based energy harvesting and telecommunication devices for the self-powered wireless ready sensor system Current Milestones July to September 2011 Initiate preliminary high-temperature electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probe design October to December 2011 To complete the design and construction of (ECR)

264

The Universe Adventure - Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matter and Atoms Matter and Atoms Richard Feynman "If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that...all things are made of atoms." -Richard P. Feynman, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics All is atoms Matter is made of atoms, and atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Everything in the Universe is made of matter. Though matter exists in many different forms, each form is made out of the same basic constituents: small particles called atoms. Atoms themselves are made of smaller particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.

265

The University of Chicago,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

a?-&= a?-&= d -j-his document consists Of............--- -,...figures pages an_d...~.....~~.....--.-----~--~~es k --ye.. No ,.... &...ot /u cople:s, 3' . . . . . . . . . . . . SERVICE & supply SUBCONTRACT # 740~37-m 115 This subcontract entered into this 1st day of.Agril 1944 by and between The University of Chicago, a corporation not for pecuniary profit organized under the laws of the State of Illinois, of Chica,o, Yontractorfl and R. Krasberg & Sons ALif Illinois (hereinafter called the g. co. a corpration organized under the laws of the State 6f. llllnols , of Chicago, llllnols (hereinafter called the ltSubcorltractorlt. VW?REAS, the Contractor has heretofore entered into a contract with the United States of America (represented by its duly designated contracting officer) under

266

Universal RFP 11202k  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AND OBJECTIVES AND OBJECTIVES UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP (UMG) is seeking proposals from qualified energy service providers (ESP) and generators interested in assisting us in an effort to protect the environment through the consumption of renewable electricity and to reliably meet the electrical needs of our facilities. We hope to reduce emissions and alleviate other negative environmental impacts of our energy consumption. Therefore UMG is seeking to purchase 100% green power for our facility in Santa Monica, CA. Our preference is to purchase a product with the greatest amount of new renewable generation. UMG is looking to spend the same amount it currently spends on electricity or as close to that as possible. UMG wants a fixed rate product that is not tied to the PX price. UMG will only switch electricity providers if

267

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Status 1 Status Presentation to Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) June 15, 2011 Michael Worley, NEUP Program Manager NEUP Funding is Program Driven Program Directed Funding Program Supported Funding Mission Supported Funding Natl. Labs Universities DOE-NE HQ Peer Review DOE NE Program Drivers 2 3 Summary of Improvements and New Programs for FY 2011 * Expand "Blue Sky" Research and Development (R&D) * Initiate Integrated Research Projects (IRP) * Expand and improve peer review data base * Evaluate adoption of NRC and NNSA Metrics as appropriate to NEUP * Conduct peer review at pre-application stage for R&D 2011 Proposed NEUP Budget - $61.8M * Program Directed Integrated Research Projects (IRP) - $12.0M (NEW)

268

Pennsylvania State University | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Old Main, Credit: George Chriss Old Main, Credit: George Chriss Research Research at Penn State Capabilities and Projects Institutes of Energy and the Environment Huck Institutes of Life Sciences Materials Research Institute Eberly College of Science Alternative Energy Research Research Publications Faculty Expertise Database Research News DOE Research Results Penn State Commencement 2012 United States Secretary of Energy Dr. Steven Chu was the commencement speaker at Penn State's Eberly College of Science 2012 spring graduation ceremony held May 5 at the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus. Read more. Search this site: Search Over the past ten years, more than 28,000 graduate degrees were conferred by Penn State, including over 6,300 doctoral degrees. Resources About Penn State

269

Iowa State University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Beardshear Hall Beardshear Hall Research Research & Economic Development Research Units ISU Technology Search Students & Research at ISU DOE ARPA-E Biofuel Project DOE Office of Science Funding ISU & Ames Lab Tech Marketing Summaries ISU research in Energy Citations Database ISU research in E-print Network Ames Laboratory is a DOE National Laboratory operated under contract by Iowa State University Physicist developing, improving designer optical materials Chemists discover proton mechanism used by flu virus to infect cells ISU, Ames Lab's Bryden & McCorkle win 2010 R&D 100 Award New tool for cell research may help unravel secrets of disease Search this site: Search ISU's vision is to lead the world in advancing the land-grant ideas of putting science, technology, and human creativity to work.

270

The Universe Adventure - Composition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elemental Abundances Elemental Abundances Understanding Our History A Star is Born An accretion disk forms during the birth of a star. There are precise physical and chemical processes that govern the evolution of planets, stars, and galaxies. By analyzing the structure and chemical content of astronomical objects, scientists can garner valuable information about what the universe's conditions must have been like long ago in order to account for currently observed elemental ratios. Formation of a Galaxy A forming galaxy. The Composition of the Earth We can begin in our own backyard. Geologists have determined that the Earth is composed primarily of heavy elements (those containing many protons and neutrons). The crust and mantle are made up of compounds containing large traces of oxygen, nickel, aluminum, magnesium, iron, silicon, and sulfur.

271

The Universe Adventure - Feedback  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Contact Us First Name (optional): Simpson Last Name (optional): Homer E-Mail Address (if you would like to hear back from us): How can we contact you? Occupation (high school student, physics teacher, cosmologist, et cetera): What is your occupation? Type: Type of Feedback Organization/Format Content Fundamentals of Cosmology Evidence for the Big Bang Eras of the Cosmos The Final Frontier Glossary Other Comments and Feedback: We appreciate your comments! - The Universe Adventure Team submit reset [ top ] Site Content National Science Foundation Department of Energy S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation [ Site Map ] optimized for Firefox [ UC Berkeley ] [ UC Berkeley Physics ] [ Particle Adventure! ] [ Contact Us ] Copyright © 2005 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division |

272

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BLISS AND LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FACILITY BUFFALO, NEW YORK J. D. BERGER Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division DRAFT REPORT APRIL 1992 c -. ..". FlLS\COPY x_.. --. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BLISS AND LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FACILITY 110 HOPKINS STREET BUFFALO, NEW YORK Prepared by J. D. Berger Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environmental Systems Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Project Staff R. D. Condra D. A. Gibson M. J. Laudernan R. B. Slaten Prepared for Department of Energy

273

Efficient universal blind computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party's quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party's computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(J log(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

Vittorio Giovannetti; Lorenzo Maccone; Tomoyuki Morimae; Terry G. Rudolph

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

275

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Association Between Pulmonary Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose Detected by Positron Emission Tomography Scanning After Radiation Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Radiation Pneumonitis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, {sup 18}F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis was retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.

Mac Manus, Michael P., E-mail: michael.macmanus@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Ding Zhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of NingXia Medical University, YinChuan, NingXia (China); Hogg, Annette [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Herschtal, Alan [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Ball, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protein synthesis. Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute, Florida State University and the University of Texas Houston have established an essential role for an...

279

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

280

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - New Mexico State University"s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth"s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project"s first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Solar Decathlon: Norwich University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Norwich University Norwich University Team website: www.nusd2013.org Photo of members of the Norwich University Solar Decathlon 2013 team standing in front of a building on campus. Enlarge image The Norwich University Solar Decathlon 2013 team (Courtesy of the Norwich University Solar Decathlon 2013 team) he Norwich University audiovisual presentation Jury Feedback Architecture Contest Market Appeal Contest Engineering Contest Communications Contest Team Deliverables Project Manual Construction Drawings Menu and Recipes Neither the United States, nor the Department of Energy, nor the Alliance for Sustainable Energy LLC, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

282

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of California Chemistry  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

California Chemistry California Chemistry Building and Radiation Lab - CA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (CHEMISTRY BUILDING AND RADIATION LABORATORY) (CA.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Berkeley , California CA.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1989 CA.05-2 Site Operations: Performed research in areas including nuclear fission and the TTA extraction process. CA.05-3 CA.05-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed CA.05-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CA.05-1 CA.05-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (CHEMISTRY BUILDING AND

283

Elizabeth City State University: Elizabeth City, North Carolina (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Solar Radiation Monitoring Network operated from July 1985 through December 1996. Funded by DOE, the six-station network provided 5-minute averaged measurements of direct normal, global, and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance. The data were processed at NREL to improve the assessment of the solar radiation resources in the southeastern United States. Historical HBCU data available online include quality assessed 5-min data, monthly reports, and plots. In January 1997 the HBCU sites became part of the CONFRRM solar monitoring network and data from the two remaining active stations, Bluefield State College and Elizabeth City State University, are collected by the NREL Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

284

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

285

PAR solar radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PAR solar radiation PAR solar radiation Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Mean values of PAR Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day for 40km cells for 1 year (month, season, year) based on data from 1995 to 2005 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders Source INPE (National Institute for Spatial Research) and LABSOLAR (Laboratory of Solar Energy/Federal University of Santa Catarina) - Brazil Date Released August 05th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated August 05th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords INPE LABSOLAR PAR solar radiation renewable energy South America SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 977.7 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 1.8 MiB)

286

REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the University Police, the University's armored car vendor, and the staff of the Florida Museum of Natural

Roy, Subrata

287

UNIVERSITY STUDENT TITLE OF TALK OU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... EL University of Puerto Rico Rivera-Cotty, Norman Instrumentation of Geothermal Heat Pump Test System EL Loyola University ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Universal Lighting Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Universal Lighting Technologies develops, manufactures and markets energy efficient lighting technologies including HID, CFLs and ballasts. References Universal...

289

University Partnerships / Academic Alliances | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > University Partnerships Academic Alliances University...

290

BNL | Physics of the Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Capabilities Facilities Physics of the Universe image Exploring the Frontiers of Energy, Intensity and the Cosmos Brookhaven leads high-energyparticle physics experiments...

291

1999 - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 16, 2001 ... October 14th ``Doing Math in the Presence of Technology,'' Colloquium, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Miami University of Ohio...

292

Fermilab Today | Baylor University Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Run 2B Level 1 Tracking Trigger (XFT) PARTICLE PHYSICS RESEARCH FOCUS: Higgs boson, QCD, searches for new phenomena WHAT SETS PARTICLE PHYSICS AT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY...

293

Fermilab Today | University of Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to emerge from the Large Hadron Collider. Our theory group also works on nonperturbative quantum field theory. WHAT SETS PARTICLE PHYSICS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA APART? OU...

294

Fermilab Today | Boston University Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

simulations of quantum chromodynamics, cosmology, and the application of mathematics to quantum field theory. WHAT SETS PARTICLE PHYSICS AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY APART? We have a...

295

Universe creation on a computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer.

Gordon McCabe

2005-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: Onsite Research - University Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Onsite Research University Projects The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to overcome a growing national problem of a diminishing number of new energy...

297

University Turbine Systems Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The primary areas of university research were combustion, aerodynamics/heat transfer, and materials, with a few projects in the area of instrumentation, sensors and life (ISL).

Leitner, Robert; Wenglarz, Richard

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thesis - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midwest Symposium on Circuit Theory, Colorado State University, pp. 13.0-13.10 . 1965. [31] R. McConnell. A Certifying Algorithm for the Consecutive Ones...

299

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

University of Colorado Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot water system Brief Contest Report Hot water system Brief Contest Report Recognizing that the sun is an abundant source of clean energy that reaches the earth at an intensity of up to 1000 Watts/m 2 , the University of Colorado will be showcasing top-of-the-line technology in which solar radiation is converted into heat for the purposes of heating the home and providing domestic hot water. Solar Thermal System - Basics Colorado's 2005 Solar Decathlon team has chosen to harness the sun's thermal energy with 4 arrays of 20 Mazdon evacuated tube collectors manufactured by Thermomax, as shown in Figure 1 below. These collectors have incredibly high efficiencies - about 60% over the course of an entire day. In addition, the evacuated tube collectors resist internal condensation and corrosion more effectively than their counterparts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

303

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

305

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

306

Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 94, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

308

University Graduate School Academic Bulletin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scholar of Psychological and Brain Sciences William Estes Oscar R. Ewing Professor of Philosophy J), Elliot R. Smith* (Psychological and Brain Sciences), Olaf Sporns* (Psychological and Brain Sciences144 University Graduate School 2009-2010 Academic Bulletin Cognitive Science University Graduate

Indiana University

309

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance within the CSU System. #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 3 · Chaired the CSU-04 2004-05 Fullerton System-Wide #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 10 University · International travel · Facilities use · Deferred maintenance Working with the University's Risk Management

de Lijser, Peter

310

CURRICULUM VITAE University of Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRICULUM VITAE University of Idaho NAME: Wall, Richard Wayne DATE: August 25, 2006 RANK OR TITLE of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, 1989, EE M.Engr., Electrical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, 1989, EE Certificates and Licenses: Professional Registration: State of Idaho Professional Engineer

Kyte, Michael

311

CURRICULUM VITAE University of Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRICULUM VITAE University of Idaho NAME: Abdel-Rahim, Ahmed DATE: December 15, 2005 RANK OR TITLE) Certificates and Licenses: Professional Engineer (PE), State of Idaho EXPERIENCE: Teaching, Extension and Research Appointments: Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering Department, University of Idaho, Moscow

Kyte, Michael

312

Council of University Transportation Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council of University Transportation Centers 13th Anniversary CUTC Awards Banquet January 9, 2010 Omni Shoreham Hotel Washington, D.C. #12;Council of University Transportation Centers 13th Anniversary Awards Banquet Saturday, January 9, 2010 Welcome Stephen Albert, CUTCVice-President WesternTransportation

Nagurney, Anna

313

Universal: Order (2013-SE-26004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc. to pay a $7,264 civil penalty after finding Universal had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 454 units of model B140R277HP, a noncompliant fluorescent lamp ballast.

314

University IPv4 Deployment Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... edu.usd. University of South Dakota, [3] 3/3/3 [I], [1] 2/2/2 [I], [1] 1/1/1 [I]. edu.sdstate. South Dakota State University, [3] 3/0/2 [I], [2] 2/2/2 [O], [1] 1/0/ ...

315

Universal service: A new definition?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of ''universal service obligation'' (USO) has been around for decades; however, its definition continues to change. The notion that the last mile of fixed-line access should be subsidized has spread around the world, despite well reasoned ... Keywords: Auctions, Pricing policy, Subsidy, Universal service/access/connectivity

James Alleman; Paul Rappoport; Aniruddha Banerjee

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

318

Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

NEUP Approved Universities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEUP Approved Universities NEUP Approved Universities NEUP Approved Universities U.S. universities and colleges must apply to the U.S. Department of Energy to administer NEUP scholarships and fellowships. That is done through a separate solicitation operated by the Department of Energy's Idaho field office. If your university is not listed below, contact NEUP@inl.gov. Approved Universities Auburn University Boise State University Clemson University College of Southern Maryland Colorado School of Mines Duke University Francis Marion University Georgia Institute of Technology Idaho State University Illinois Institute of Technology Kansas State University Lakeshore Community College Linn State Technical College Massachusetts Institute of Technology Miami Dade College Missouri University of Science & Technology

320

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Oak Ridge Universities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oak Ridge Oak Ridge Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Projects U.S. Department of Energy C O M P R E H E N S I V E R A D I O L O G I C A L S U R V E Y O F F - S I T E P R O P E R T Y X N I A G A R A F A L L S S T O R A G E S I T E L E W l s T o N , N E W Y O R K J . D . B E R G E R R a d i o l o g i c a l M a n p o w e r E d u c a t i o n ' Site Assessment Program Research, and Training Division FINA], May REPORT 1 9 8 4 COMPREHENSIVE MDIOLOGICAI SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY X NIAGARA FAI-LS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON' NEI'I YORK u. s. F o r m e r l y U t i l i z e d P r e p a r e d f o r Department of EnergY a s p a r t o f t h e S i t e s - - R e u e d i a l A c t i o n P r o g r a m R a d i o l o g i c a l M a n p o w e r E d u c a t i o n , O a k R i d g e O a k R i d g e , J . D . B e r g e r P r o j e c t J . B u r d e n * R . D . C o n d r a D . L . D a v i s J . S . E p l e r * P . W . F r a m e W . 0 . H e l t o n R . C . G o s s l e e S t a f f J . A . P e r r y I { . L . S n i t h T . J . S o w e l l G . M . S t e p h e n s L . B . T a u s * C . F . W e a v e r B . S . Z a c h a r e k Prepared by S i t e A s s e

323

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds M. Ovtchinnikov and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. G. Ellingson and E. E.Takara Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction We are concerned with three-dimensional (3D) effects of longwave (LW) radiative transfer (RT) through inhomogeneous clouds. In cloud models, LW RT is typically calculated under the independent

325

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's resource assessment and forecasting research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo of Mary Anderberg Mary Anderberg - Scientist M.S. Physics, University of Denver B.S. Physics, Auburn University Mary performs solar radiometric data quality analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and provides programming support for the resource integration section. She also contributed to the National Solar Radiation Database update. In addition, Mary is the Web administrator of the Renewable Resource Data Center, for which she provides UNIX, C, Perl, and HTML support. Photo of Afshín Andreas Afshín Andreas - Senior Scientist

326

LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY 900 VETERAN AVENUE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 AND DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This manuscript is a contribution to the monograph edited by Daniel S. Berman and Dean Mason, entitled "Clinical Nuclear Cardiology". These studies were supported by Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF THE HEART Heinrich R. Schelbert, M.D., Michael E. Phelps, Ph.D. and David E. Kuhl, M.D. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

327

Ontario Universities: Going Greener The University of Western Ontario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biological wastewater treatment and gasification of municipal wastes. o Reducing the effects of mining an estimated energy savings of 5500 gigajoules/year As part of its yearly capital renewal plan, the University

Ma, Bin

328

The Universe Adventure - Formation and Structure of the Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Geometry of the Universe and Structure Formation BOOMERanG and the CMB CMB data collected by the balloon-based BOOMERanG and MAXIMA experiments provided crucial evidence in...

329

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

330

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

332

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure Pamela J Sykes, Michelle R Newman, Benjamin J Blyth and Rebecca J Ormsby Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 Australia. (pam.sykes@flinders.edu.au). Our goal is to study the mechanisms involved in biological responses to low doses of radiation in vivo in the dose range that is relevant to population and occupational exposures. At high radiation doses, DNA double-strand breaks are considered the critical lesion underlying the initiation of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, at the very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks

333

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Gravitational Instability in Radiation Pressure Dominated Backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I consider the physics of gravitational instabilities in the presence of dynamically important radiation pressure and gray radiative diffusion, governed by a constant opacity, kappa. For any non-zero radiation diffusion rate on an optically-thick scale, the medium is unstable unless the classical gas-only isothermal Jeans criterion is satisfied. When diffusion is "slow," although the dynamical Jeans instability is stabilized by radiation pressure on scales smaller than the adiabatic Jeans length, on these same spatial scales the medium is unstable to a diffusive mode. In this regime, neglecting gas pressure, the characteristic timescale for growth is independent of spatial scale and given by (3 kappa c_s^2)/(4 pi G c), where c_s is the adiabatic sound speed. This timescale is that required for a fluid parcel to radiate away its thermal energy content at the Eddington limit, the Kelvin-Helmholz timescale for a radiation pressure supported self-gravitating object. In the limit of "rapid" diffusion, radiation does nothing to suppress the Jeans instability and the medium is dynamically unstable unless the gas-only Jeans criterion is satisfied. I connect with treatments of Silk damping in the early universe. I discuss several applications, including photons diffusing in regions of extreme star formation (starburst galaxies & pc-scale AGN disks), and the diffusion of cosmic rays in normal galaxies and galaxy clusters. The former (particularly, starbursts) are "rapidly" diffusing and thus cannot be supported against dynamical instability in the linear regime by radiation pressure alone. The latter are more nearly "slowly" diffusing. I speculate that the turbulence in starbursts may be driven by the dynamical coupling between the radiation field and the self-gravitating gas, perhaps mediated by magnetic fields. (Abridged)

Todd A. Thompson

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

width measurement and control width measurement and control M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo H. Tomizawa, N. Kumagai SPring-8, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Institute June 26, 2004 International Symposium on Ultrafast Accelerators for Pulse Radiolysis Femtosecond Electron Bunch Diagnostics Incoherent Radiation Coherent Radiation Streak Camera or Single-shot Acquisition of Spectrum Bunch Form Factor Bunch Shape Fluctuation Method 2nd Order Correlation Bunch Form Factor

336

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

337

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

338

The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Las Vegas, Nevada Introduction We have used a single-column model (SCM) to examine the sensitivity of fundamental quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameterizations of clouds and cloud microphysics. When an SCM, which consists of one isolated column of a global atmospheric model, is forced with observational estimates of horizontal advection terms, the parameterizations within the SCM produce time-dependent fields which can be

339

UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 1 Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater-Supplemented Digester Elutriate in the Fermentor 2. The Effect of Differential- Heating of Digester Elutriate on its

District of Columbia, University of the

340

International Programs Oregon State University,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Philippines Vietnam Azerbaijan Ghana* Malawi Slovakia Cambodia Guatemala Mexico South Korea AVAILABILITY, AZERBAIJAN Major: Industrial Engineering, minor: Business, Senior Education: Crescent Valley High School (FLEX exchange program); Qafqaz University (Azerbaijan), 2005-07 Experience: Future Leaders Exchange

Escher, Christine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Purdue University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Purdue University Purdue University Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Purdue University Name Purdue University Address West Lafayette, IN Zip 47907 Phone number (765) 494-4600 Website http://www.purdue.edu/ Coordinates 40.42747955036°, -86.920051574707° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.42747955036,"lon":-86.920051574707,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY BENEFITS INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the transaction has transpired. Optional Retirement Plan (ORP) It takes 5 years of membership to be vested in this program. When you depart from the University, you need to complete an ORP-3 form to indicate your plans

343

Fermilab Today | Oklahoma State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University group is involved in top quark studies, searches for a non-Standard Model Higgs boson, heavy flavor tagging and upgrade of the pixel detector in the ATLAS experiment....

344

Is the Universe really expanding?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hubble law, determined from the distance modulii and redshifts of galaxies, for the past 80 years, has been used as strong evidence for an expanding universe. This claim is reviewed in light of the claimed lack of necessary evidence for time dilation in quasar and gamma-ray burst luminosity variations and other lines of evidence. It is concluded that the observations could be used to describe either a static universe (where the Hubble law results from some as-yet-unknown mechanism) or an expanding universe described by the standard Lambda cold dark matter model. In the latter case, size evolution of galaxies is necessary for agreement with observations. Yet the simple non-expanding Euclidean universe fits most data with the least number of assumptions. From this review it is apparent that there are still many unanswered questions in cosmology and the title question of this paper is still far from being answered.

John G. Hartnett

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

PNNL: About PNNL - University Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

students In 2011 PNNL and Washington State University partnered to pilot a program in which graduate students in selected areas would do part of their dissertation work at PNNL....

346

The University Intercampus Program in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................................................6 E. Balancing Program Load and Outside Work....................................................7 FThe University of KANSAS Intercampus Program in Communicative Disorders AUDIOLOGY Au.D. HANDBOOK ......................................................... 5 II. Au.D. Program

Peterson, Blake R.

347

Hamdard University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hamdard University Hamdard University Jump to: navigation, search Name Hamdard University Place Karachi, Pakistan Zip 74600 Sector Solar Product University setting up Pakistan's first solar lab. Coordinates 24.88978°, 67.028511° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.88978,"lon":67.028511,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Visualizing the protein sequence universe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern biology is experiencing a rapid increase in data volumes that challenges our analytical skills and existing cyberinfrastructure. Exponential expansion of the Protein Sequence Universe (PSU), the protein sequence space, together with the costs ... Keywords: azure, blast, cog, computational bioinformatics, data visualization, data-enabled life sciences, delsa, em, hadoop, hive, mapreduce, mpi, multidimensional scaling, needleman-wunsch, protein annotation, protein sequence universe, psu, sammon, sequence similarity, twister, uniprot, uniref

Larissa Stanberry, Roger Higdon, Winston Haynes, Natali Kolker, William Broomall, Saliya Ekanayake, Adam Hughes, Yang Ruan, Judy Qiu, Eugene Kolker, Geoffrey Fox

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

University Advanced Coal Generation Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was a sponsor of projects conducted under the auspices of two consortia that support university research for coal-based power generation: the Biomass and Fossil Fuel Research Alliance (BF2RA) in the United Kingdom and the University Turbine System Research (UTSR) program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This technical update report describes the progress made in both of those ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

351

Energy Balance Partitioning and Net Radiation Controls on Soil MoisturePrecipitation Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of model runs using the University of Oklahomas Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) were conducted to investigate the relative impacts of energy balance partitioning and net radiation on soil moistureprecipitation feedbacks in ...

Aubrey R. Jones; Nathaniel A. Brunsell

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Evaluating Mesoscale Model Predictions of Clouds and Radiation with SGP ARM Data over a Seasonal Timescale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the predictions of radiative and cloud-related processes of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research (PSUNCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). It is based on extensive comparison of ...

Franoise Guichard; David B. Parsons; Jimy Dudhia; James Bresch

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The major facilities at SLAC are the linac, End Station A, SPEAR and SSRL, PEP II, SLC, and the FFTB fundamental objects called quarks. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) uses the SPEAR storage

354

PPPL--2702 Power Radiated from ITER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

702 702 " Power Radiated from ITER and CIT by Impurities D E ~ O 014715 J. Cummings, S. A. Cohen, R Hulse, D. E. Post, M. H. Redi and J. Perkinst Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton University, Rinceton, NJ 08543 Abstract The MIST code has been used to model impurity radiation from the edge and core plasmas in ITER and CIT. A broad range of parameters have been varied, including Zeff, impurity species, impurity transport coefficients, and plasma temperature and density profiles, especially at the edge. For a set of these parameters representative of the baseline ITER ignition scenario, it is seen that impurity radiation, which is produced in roughly equal amounts by the edge and core regions, can make a major improvement in divertor operation without compromising core

355

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

356

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

357

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional VaryMatrix.png Collaboration with mathematicians and computational...

359

Robert Gordon University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Robert Gordon University Address Centre for Research in Energy and the Environment The Robert Gordon University Schoolhill Place Aberdeen Zip AB10 1FR Sector Marine...

360

California State University CSU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State University CSU Jump to: navigation, search Name California State University (CSU) Place Los Angeles, California Zip 90802-4210 Sector Solar Product One of the largest higher...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Rice University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Rice University team on a deck extending from their unfinished Solar Decathlon house. The house is sided in corrugated metal. Rice University students display team spirit while...

362

NETL Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDF-539KB NETL-RUAs five universities are regionally recognized and share a long history of supporting NETLs energy research. Additionally, the member universities have...

363

Colorado State University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado State University Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado State University Place Colorado Utility Id 56493 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

364

University of Colorado Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; University of Colorado Technologies Available for Licensing The University of Colorado ...

365

CECM: Summer Meeting 2007 - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lunch at the Himalayan Peak restaurant. Shrum Science Building P8495 ? Simon Fraser University ? 8888 University Drive ? Burnaby ? BC ? V5A 1S6 ? Canada ? p...

366

University of Michigan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Michigan Jump to: navigation, search Name University of Michigan Place Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip 48109 Product Offers research across all disciplines. References...

367

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Crosscutting Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal...

368

HancherAuditorium University Creative Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Government Iowa Memorial Union Iowa House Hotel University Bookstore University Box Office Center for Student Planning, Design and Construction Office of Sustainability Utilities and Energy Management Human Resources

Stanier, Charlie

369

University of Colorado Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy ...  

University of Colorado Technology Marketing Summaries. Here youll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the University of Colorado ...

370

NETL Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Program Team NETL Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) About NETL-RUA - Integrated Program Team Integrated Program Team Member Universities History Mission Team...

371

NETL Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State University Institutes of Energy and the Environment, 2008-present Director, Biomass Energy Center, Pennsylvania State University, 2006-present Associate Professor,...

372

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University Coal Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Universities frequently win Fossil Energy research competitions or join with private companies to submit successful research proposals. Today approximately 16 percent of the Office of Fossil Energy's annual R&D funding goes to academic institutions. The University Coal Research Program Universities have traditionally fared well in the Energy Department's open competitions for federal research grants and contracts. In 1979, however, the Department took an additional step to encourage greater university participation in its fossil energy program. The agency set aside funding for a special university-only competition that required professors to conduct cutting-edge research alongside students who were pursuing advanced

373

Fermilab Today | Northern Illinois University Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nothern Illinois University June 4, 2009 NAME: Northern Illinois University HOME TOWN: DeKalb, Illinois MASCOT: Huskie SCHOOL COLORS: Cardinal red and black PARTICLE PHYSICS...

374

CECM: Summer Meeting 2007 - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandy Rutherford being introduced by Michael Monagan. Shrum Science Building P8495 ? Simon Fraser University ? 8888 University Drive ? Burnaby ? BC ? V5A...

375

CECM: Summer Meeting 2007 - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandy Rutherford talking about applications of queuing theory in the public sector. Shrum Science Building P8495 ? Simon Fraser University ? 8888 University...

376

CECM: Summer Meeting 2007 - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandy Rutherford with Nikolas Karalis during the poster session. Shrum Science Building P8495 ? Simon Fraser University ? 8888 University Drive ? Burnaby ? BC...

377

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

379

University of Iowa Cerenkov light test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Memorandum of Understanding requests beam time at Fermilab during the Winter 2005-2006 Meson Test Run to measure the signal size from various configurations of Cerenkov light generators and phototubes. The University of Iowa has pioneered in application of Cerenkov radiation for high-energy detectors. One of the results of this effort is the huge forward calorimeter for CMS (at the LHC) with a half million quartz fibers in iron. The laboratory plans to use this expertise to develop a variety of detectors making use of Cerenkov light and phototubes as the active elements in calorimeters for high-energy particles. There are three immediate applications related to forward angle calorimeters in CMS; ZDC, CASTOR, and the HE upgrade. The University of Iowa will make the detailed design for the Zero Degree Calorimeter. The proposed design uses tungsten plates interleaved with sheets of quartz fibers. In the EM part the plates are perpendicular to the beam, in the rear hadronic part they are at an angle of 45{sup o}. Because of the limited cross sectional area of the plates, there will be considerable leakage of shower particles out of the four sides. We plan to measure this leakage and compare the results with simulations. The leakage will be measured by placing a polished aluminum tank, 4 in wide, 20 in long and 8 in deep on top of absorber material made of blocks of tantalum and copper. The fluid in the tank, that generates the Ccrcnkov light, could be water; but ethylene glycol (antifreeze, but without the added color) would be better. Being non-polar, it is not corrosive like water, and it has a higher index of refraction, 1.42 vs. 1.33. The larger index of refraction would result in more Cerenkov light and better coupling to the PMT. The University of Iowa has been asked to design the light guides for CASTOR that take the light from the quartz plates, in which the light is produced, and carry it to the PMTs. These plates, interleaved with tungsten plates, are oriented at 45{sup o}. The University of Iowa has been asked to consider methods for replacing the scintillators in the HE hadronic calorimeter with quartz plates, which will not be harmed by the high radiation levels expected with the proposed LHC upgrade in luminosity. The success of this project depends on finding an extremely effective way to couple the Cerenkov light into wave-length shifting fibers. These various configurations can all be simulated to some degree, but it is essential that the simulations be accompanied by laboratory tests. In most cases 120 GeV protons will be adequate, but in some cases there will also need to be tests using 8 and/or 16 GeV electrons. For all of the tests, the setup will be small, at most only a few cubic feet. There will be no gas supply or complicated mechanical devices. The active devices will be a few PMTs. The overall project will consist of a number of short, simple experiments, each lasting from one to three days. The MTB is an excellent facility for such tests.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

382

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

383

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation...

387

DOE Solar Decathlon: Norwich University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Norwich University Norwich University Delta T-90 House www.nusd2013.org Norwich University's mission at the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 is to show that high-performance, solar-powered dwellings can be affordable and beautiful. The Delta T-90 House accommodates New England's unique seasons and is designed to be affordable for those earning 20% less than the Vermont median income. Design Philosophy The house explores the hidden values and richness within a conservation-based lifestyle and respects the interdependency between the economy and the built environment. The Delta T-90 House is guided by the beliefs that high-performance, solar-powered dwellings should be available to all and that good design is not a function of cost. By maximizing the building envelope first and then using simplified mechanical systems as a

388

Tuning universality far from equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical phase transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm.

Markus Karl; Boris Nowak; Thomas Gasenzer

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

The University of Rochester | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Rochester River Campus Rochester River Campus Research Research at Rochester Synergy Centers & Institutes Medical Center Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Big Data at the University of Rochester Student Contributions to Research Nobel Laureates associated with UR & DOE DOE Research Reports Featured Research: High Energy Density Plasma Science DOE's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences supports basic research at the University of Rochester Fusion Science Center to explore and control the properties of magnetic fields in high energy density plasmas. Read more. Omega Laser Facility * Laboratory for Laser Energetics DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Search this site: Search The University is a vibrant center for discovery and innovation, with researchers engaged in cutting-edge work across the humanities,

390

DOE Solar Decathlon: Purdue University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purdue University Purdue University Purdue University's INhome-short for Indiana home-earned an overall second-place finish at the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011. After the competition, the house was relocated to Chatham Square, a new housing development in Lafayette, Indiana, that is part of a broader neighborhood revitalization effort. The house is unchanged from its Solar Decathlon configuration except that the garage was moved to the opposite side of the house to accommodate the shape of the lot. The house was on display throughout 2012 and is currently offered for sale. The INhome provides a realistic and balanced vision for ultra-efficient housing. It is fully functional yet practical and features efficient systems and sustainable design without sacrificing modern comforts and

391

DOE Solar Decathlon: Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford University Stanford University Start.Home solardecathlon.stanford.edu For the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013, Stanford University designed the Start.Home to provide energy efficiency at the push of a button to a new generation of environmentally conscious occupants. With modular architecture and advanced controls to optimize each component, the house aims to spark a revolution by lowering the entry barrier for an ultra-efficient house and making sustainability trendy, social, and affordable. Design Philosophy The Start.Home is built on a simple, three-by-three modular grid and integrates core, public, and private modules as well as multiple technologies to optimize value and energy efficiency. These spaces can be added or subtracted to allow the house to grow with the family by filling

392

Bucknell University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University University Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name Bucknell University Address Civil & Mechanical Engineering Departments, Hydraulic Flume, 701 Moore Avenue, Dana Engineering Building Place Lewisburg, PA Zip 17837 Sector Hydro Phone number (570) 577-3193 Website http://www.bucknell.edu/x16287 Coordinates 40.955691952072°, -76.88521027565° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.955691952072,"lon":-76.88521027565,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

The Age of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A minimum age of the universe can be estimated directly by determining the age of the oldest objects in the our Galaxy. These objects are the metal-poor stars in the halo of the Milky Way. Recent work on nucleochronology finds that the oldest stars are 15.2+/-3.7 Gyr old. White dwarf cooling curves have found a minimum age for the oldest stars of 8 Gyr. Currently, the best estimate for the age of the oldest stars is based upon the absolute magnitude of the main sequence turn-off in globular clusters. The oldest globular clusters are 11.5+/-1.3 Gyr old, implying a minimum age of the universe of t_universe > 9.5 Gyr (95% confidence level).

Brian Chaboyer

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Universal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Universal Energy Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Solar Product Universal Energy is a PV module and solar hot water systems manufacturer. Universal Energy has a manufacturing base in Nanjing, China. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

The University of WisconsinMadison 9 The University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. PHYSICS LIBRARY 4220 Chamberlin Hall 1150 University Avenue, 608­262­9500 physics.library.wisc.edu WENDT LIBRARY 215 N. Randall Avenue, 608­262­3493 wendt.library.wisc.edu This is the primary library for engi

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

396

University Coal Research/Historically Black Colleges and Universities &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Coal Research/Historically Black Colleges and Universities & Other Minority Institutions Contractor Review Mtg. University Coal Research/Historically Black Colleges and Universities & Other Minority Institutions Contractor Review Mtg. June 3, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Day 1 - Session A Day 1 - Session B Day 2 - Session A Day 2 - Session B Posters - Project Accomplishments 2000 Awards Abstracts of 2002 Awards Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

397

University Coal Research / Historically Black Colleges and Universities &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Coal Research / Historically Black Colleges and Universities & Other Minority Institutions Contractors University Coal Research / Historically Black Colleges and Universities & Other Minority Institutions Contractors Review Meeting June 9-10, 2004 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Opening Session Session A Session B Abstract Only Abstract & Poster Presentation of Project Accomplishments Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

398

University of New Orleans/1 University Calendar/2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Anthropology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA, 11 Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact, and ethanol for 1 hour to remove fat, oil, waxes and resins. This was followed by a series of Acid. of Arch. Sci. 36, 1342­1353 (2009). 30. Luzzadder-Beach, S., Beach, T. P. & Dunning, N. P. Wetland fields

Kulp, Mark

399

The Age of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globular clusters are the oldest objects in the Galaxy whose age may be accurately determined. As such globular cluster ages provide the best estimate for the age of the universe. The age of a globular cluster is determined by a comparison between theoretical stellar evolution models and observational data. Current uncertainties in the stellar models and age dating process are discussed in detail. The best estimate for the absolute age of the globular clusters is $14.6\\pm 1.7\\,$Gyr. The one-sided, 95\\% confidence limit on the lower age of the universe is $12.2\\,$Gyr.

Brian Chaboyer

1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

24 Universities Receiving Funding to Train Next Generation of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bradley University Peoria, IL 999,981 Indiana University Indianapolis, IN 1,323,532 University of Kentucky Research Foundation Lexington, KY 1,500,000 University of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Vacuum quantum fluctuation energy in expanding universe and dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article is based on the Planckon densely piled vacuum model and the principle of cosmology. With Planck era as initial conditions and including early inflation, we have solved the Einstein-Friedmann equations to describe the evolution of the universe, a reasonable relation between dark energy density and vacuum quantum fluctuation energy density is obtained. The main results are : 1) the solution of Einstein-Friedmann equations has yielded the result $\\frac{{{\\rho}_{de}}}{{{\\rho}_{vac}}}\\sim{{(\\frac{{{t}_{P}}}{{{T}_{0}}})}^{2}}\\sim{{10}^{-122}} $ (Planck time ${{t}_{P}}={{10}^{-43}}s$ and universe age ${{T}_{0}}={{10}^{18}}s$);2) at inflation time ${{t}_{\\inf}}={{10}^{-35}}s$, the calculated universe radiation energy density is $\\rho ({{t}_{\\inf}})\\sim{{10}^{-16}}{{\\rho}_{vac}}$ and the corresponding temperature is ${{E}_{c}}\\sim{{10}^{15}}GeV$ consistent with GUT phase transition temperature;3) it is showed that the expanding universe is a non-equilibrium open system constantly exchanging energy with vacuum; during its expanding, the Planckons in universe lose quantum fluctuation energy and create cosmic expansion quanta-cosmons, the energy of cosmons is the lost part of vacuum quantum fluctuation energy and contributes to the total energy of the universe with the calculated value ${{E}_{\\cos mos}}={{10}^{22}}{{M}_{\\otimes}}{{c}^{2}}$ (${{M}_{\\otimes}}$ is solar mass) agreed with astronomic data; 4) the gravity potential and gravity acceleration of cosmons are derived with the nature of repulsive force, indicating that the cosmon may be the candidate of dark energy quantum; 5) solution to three well known cosmic problems of Big Bang model is presented.

Shun-Jin Wang

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

SyracuseUniversityAdvisingCatalog2011-2012 Syracuse University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN OPERATIONAL WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ALGORITHM FOR PUERTO RICO Eric Harmsen Department.com In this study an operational water and energy balance algorithm for Puerto Rico (GOES- PRWEB) was developed data. The ground level, 1-km resolution solar radiation product became available in Puerto Rico

Raina, Ramesh

403

Universal Parsing Agent - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Universal Parsing Agent ...

404

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

405

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Utah Medical Research  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Utah Medical Research Utah Medical Research Center - UT 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, MEDICAL RESEARCH CENTER (UT.02) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Salt Lake City , Utah UT.02-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 UT.02-1 Site Operations: Research and development on animal inhalation of uranium dust during the 1950s. UT.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria UT.02-1 UT.02-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium UT.02-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes UT.02-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, MEDICAL RESEARCH CENTER UT.02-1 - DOE Letter; Fiore to Schiager; Subject: Elimination of

409

Heavy ion radiation damage simulations for CMOS image sensors Henok Mebrahtua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy ion radiation damage simulations for CMOS image sensors Henok Mebrahtua , Wei Gaoa , Paul J, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT Damage in CMOS image sensors caused by heavy ions and range of ions in matter) simulation results of heavy ion radiation damage to CMOS image sensors

Hornsey, Richard

410

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Colette A. Sacksteder § , DJ Black ‡ , Heather Smallwood § , David G. Camp II † , and Thomas C. Squier § § Cell Biology and Biochemistry; † Biological Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 ‡ School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Kansas City MO 64110 The goal of this research is to identify the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt to low dose radiation exposure. Previously we have shown a radiation dependent increase of Calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages (RAW). Therefore we hypothesize that CaM and associated signaling complexes are sensors of low-dose radiation, resulting in alterations in energy metabolism and gene expression. The ultimate experimental goal

411

ARM - Field Campaign - RAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA STations govCampaignsRAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA STations (RADAGAST) Campaign Links AMF Niamey Deployment AMF Niamey Data Plots RADAGAST Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : RAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA STations (RADAGAST) 2006.01.01 - 2007.01.07 Website : http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/nim Lead Scientist : Anthony Slingo Description Science Plan for the ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Niamey, 2006 Draft: 3 February 2005 Anthony Slingo, Environmental Systems Science Centre, University of Reading, UK 1. Background Despite a great deal of effort over many years, significant disagreements persist between estimates of the partitioning of the Earth's radiation budget between the atmosphere and surface. While the radiation budget at

412

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

417

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Financing Initiative Focus Area: Industry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/universal_ownership.pdf Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Screenshot References: Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors[1] Logo: Universal Ownership: Why Environmental Externalities Matter to Institutional Investors Summary "This study assesses the financial implications of unsustainable natural

419

Applied Radiation and Isotopes 65 (2007) 814817 Technical note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as lithium fluoride (LiF), is higher at low energies due to the higher effective atomic number Cancer Care Centre, Department of Medical Physics, Crown St, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia c Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Gwyneville 2518, NSW, Australia

Yu, K.N.

420

Fog-82: A Cooperative Field Study of Radiation Fog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cloud Physics Section of the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-State University of New York at Albany conducted a cooperative field study (FOG-82) during the autumn of 1982 as part of an ongoing radiation-fog research program. A computer-...

Michael B. Meyer; G. Garland Lala; James E. Jiusto

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

6th International Conference on Biophysics & Synchrotron Radiation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 6th International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Rdiation was held at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, from August 4-8, 1998, with pre-conference activities on August 3. Over 300 attendees and 65 presenters participated in the conference that was collaboratively hosted by the University of Chicago, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources and the Advanced Photon Source.

Moffat, Keith

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effects of Aerosols on the Radiative Properties of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of anthropogenic aerosols, in the form of ship exhaust effluent, on the microphysics and radiative properties of marine stratocumulus is studied using data gathered from the U.K. Met. Office C-130 and the University of Washington C-...

Jonathan P. Taylor; Martin D. Glew; James A. Coakley Jr.; William R. Tahnk; Steven Platnick; Peter V. Hobbs; Ronald J. Ferek

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Daniel E. Archer Ph.D., Experimental Nuclear Structure Physics, Florida State University, 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in radiation detectors for Homeland Security, the NMIS ­ Nuclear materials Identification System, and CMTB Highway Patrol in an effort to secure California borders against the nuclear threat; and acting as LeadDaniel E. Archer Ph.D., Experimental Nuclear Structure Physics, Florida State University, 1996 M

424

Action Plan UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, financially and philosophically, to a carbon-neutral future. Since the signing, he and the university have sustainability. Additional Strategies and Projects Transportation Currently, transportation accounts for less, transportation will play a larger role in its greenhouse gas profile. The Climate Action Plan recommends

Taylor, Jerry

425

Universal service and disabled people  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EU regulatory framework enacted 25 May 2011 has the objective to provide functionally equal access to telecommunication services for disabled persons. What are the rules, who are the target groups, and what obstacles do they face when using various ... Keywords: Disabled people, European regulation, Relay services, Universal service

Nico van Eijk; Joost Poort

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Procedures for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be required that describes the purpose for the costs and the direct benefit to the proposed project's scopeFLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Procedures for Participant Support Costs Effective: May 15, 2006 Budgeting for Participant Costs Whenever Participant Support Costs are proposed in a budget, a detailed justification

Weston, Ken

427

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Results of parity checker training tion builds a small network up instead of whittling a huge network down. Antsaklis Department of Electrical Engineering University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, IN 46556 Abstract An algorithm for constructing and training multilayer neural networks, dependence identification,is presented

Rennels, David A.

428

What's informatics at Indiana University?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Indiana University School of Informatics was the first of its kind in the United States (2000). It includes programs in Bloomington and at IUPUI in Indianapolis. The School has developed a unique undergraduate curriculum that allows students to ... Keywords: bioinformatics, chemical informatics, computing, human-computer interaction/design, informatics, media arts and science, security

James Shea

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Graduate Seminar University of Regina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Regina Title: On the energy of graphs Date: Tuesday December 1, 2009 Time: 1:00 p.m. Place: Math & Stats Lounge (CW 307.20) Abstract The concept of the energy of a graph was defined by Ivan Gutman in 1978 and originates from theoretical chemistry. To determine the energy of a graph, we

Argerami, Martin

430

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL AFFAIRS MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: A. Employees are encouraged to utilize the preferred University partnership with Anthony Travel when destination and the specific travel dates, noting that the boarding pass was lost; and b) there is a hotel or other third party receipt supporting the person's trip. The traveler must provide the hotel bill

Riesenhuber, Maximilian

431

WASTE DISPOSAL SECTION CORNELL UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/07 WASTE DISPOSAL SECTION CORNELL UNIVERSITY PROCEDURE for DISPOSAL of RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS This procedure has been developed to ensure the safety of those individuals who handle radioactive waste identified hazardous waste, or other unusual issues require special consideration. Contact the Department

Manning, Sturt

432

Photon rockets in (anti-)de Sitter universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A class of exact solutions of Einstein's equations is presented which describes accelerating photon rockets in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter universe. These are particular members of the Robinson-Trautman family of axially symmetric spacetimes with pure radiation. In particular, generalizations of (type D) Kinnersley's rockets and (type II) Bonnor's rockets to the case of a non-vanishing cosmological constant are given. Some of the main physical properties of these solutions are investigated, and their relation to the C-metric solution which describes uniformly accelerated black holes is also given.

Jiri Podolsky

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

Radiation effects in the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Clouds and radiation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local heterogeneity Key, Erica University of Miami, RSMAS Minnett, Peter University of Miami Improving our comprehension of the influence of clouds in the polar regions is important as a prerequisite to refining our understanding of the earth's climate system. Polar clouds modulate the radiative heat loss to space in the regions that serve as the heat sink of the climate system. The local feedbacks between cloud formation and changing surface albedo that result from the ice melting and refreezing cycle, and the small space scales over which significant gradients occur, render this a very complex system to study. Difficulties in making appropriate measurements in the harsh Arctic environment lead to sparse, if not absent information on the

436

Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Yoshida, Emi J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Woodhouse, Shermian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schiff, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang, Tony J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhang Pengpeng [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kutcher, Gerald J. [Department of History, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Content Owner: Lisa Dunn |...

438

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute of Science David Baker, University of Washington Ian Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS: 99, Menlo Park, California, 94025, USA Tel:...

439

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

440

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Universe Adventure - Galaxial Motion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bulk Motions of Galaxies Bulk Motions of Galaxies Galaxy Diagram The Structure of a typical Spiral Galaxy. Galaxies are most often found in clusters and are thus subject to gravitational forces from their neighbors. The relative motion that results from these interactions causes deviations from the cosmological principle called bulk flow. Measuring the peculiar velocities enables cosmologists to calculate the masses of interacting galaxies. Using this technique scientists can estimate the total density of matter in the Universe. During the recombination epoch, the Universe had cooled sufficiently for nucleosynthesis to occur. However, this process produces only a few elements, and looking at the abundance of these elements today is indicative of the rate of nucleosynthesis and the amount of baryonic mass

442

The Universe Adventure - Dark Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Dark Energy An artist's conception of Dark Energy. Imagine you toss an apple straight up into the air. Due to gravity, one would expect the apple to come right back down to earth. But what if it doesn't? What if, due to some unseen force your apple continues going up, at an accelerated rate, no matter how much gravity pleads and begs for the apple to come back down. Could this really happen? Could there really be "anti-gravity?" On the scale of the Universe, there is; say "hello" to Dark Energy. In the most basic sense, Dark Energy is akin to negative gravity. Where gravity is attractive, Dark Energy is repulsive. Dark Energy causes the Universe to expand at an increasing rate. For example, to a viewer on earth, gravity would attract a distant galaxy towards Earth, but Dark

443

Oak Ridge Associated Universities II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Prepared by Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities II Prepared for Division of Fuel - Cycle and Material Safety II U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission L RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W. R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY P. W. FRAME Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT January 1983 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W.R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY Prepared for Division of Fuel Cycle and Material Safety U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission P. W. Frame Project Staff J. D. Berger A. J. Liu R. D. Condra A. M. Pitt G. R. Foltz T. J. Sowell J. R. Frazier C. F. Weaver R. C. Gentry T. S. Yoo Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities

444

The University of Maryland | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Maryland Maryland Research Division of Research Centers and Institutes Energy Research Climate Adaption Research National Security Research Faces of Research Nobel Laureates associated with UMD & DOE DOE Research Results Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) The University of Maryland's NEES is a multi-institutional research center, one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) established by the U.S. Department of Energy. The group's focus is developing highly ordered nanostructures that offer a unique testbed for investigating the underpinnings of storing electrical energy. Search this site: Search Founded in 1856, the University of Maryland is Maryland's flagship institution and plays a leadership role as one of the country's premier centers for academic scholarship and research.

445

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, from December 1982 to October 1987 Department of Ener Technical Services B y ivision Oak Ridge Operations Office December 1989 -1 _--_ _ ~~~ ---- m.. *-*...___, .a. dez4em. A I LEGAL NoT1CE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. '

446

The age of the universe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the current controversy on the age of the universe is presented. It is shown that the age of the oldest star, globular clusters, yields an age estimate of approximately 14 {+-} 2 {+-} 2 Gyr (where the first {+-} is statistical and the second systematic, and the two should {ital not} be added in quadrature), with a firm lower bound of {ge} 10 Gyr. It is shown how radioactive dating, nucleocosmochronology, also yields a firm lower bound of {approx_gt} 10 Gyr. The currently favored values for the Hubble constant, when converted to ages using a cosmological model with zero cosmological constant, are shown {ital not} to be in conflict with statistical and systematic uncertainties at the present time when one takes both into account, even for critical density universes. 25 refs. , 3 figs., 1 tab.

Schramm, D.N.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A map of the universe  

SciTech Connect

We have produced a new conformal map of the universe illustrating recent discoveries, ranging from Kuiper belt objects in the Solar system, to the galaxies and quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This map projection, based on the logarithm map of the complex plane, preserves shapes locally, and yet is able to display the entire range of astronomical scales from the Earth s neighborhood to the cosmic microwave background. The conformal nature of the projection, preserving shapes locally, may be of particular use for analyzing large scale structure. Prominent in the map is a Sloan Great Wall of galaxies 1.37 billion light years long, 80 percent longer than the Great Wall discovered by Geller and Huchra and therefore the largest observed structure in the universe.

Gott III, J. Richard; Juric, Mario; Schlegel, David; Hoyle, Fiona; Vogeley, Michael; Tegmark, Max; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jon

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Universe Adventure - Fundamental Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Particles Fundamental Particles Chart of Fundamental Particles All matter in the universe is comprised of fundamental particles. So what exactly makes up this matter? All matter is made of fundamental particles that came into being at the birth of the Universe. Quarks experience the strong force which is carried by massless particles called gluons. They bond together in specific combinations to form protons, neutrons, and other hadrons. Leptons do not experience the strong force but may interact via the electromagnetic force, the weak force, or both. Anti-quarks and anti-leptons are exactly the same as their quark and lepton counterparts, but have an opposite charge. All massive particles are influenced by the force of gravity. Quark-Gluon Plasma: 10-12 Seconds After the Big Bang

449

Multi-Dimensional Effects in Longwave Radiative Forcing of PBL Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Dimensional Effects in Longwave Radiative Forcing of PBL Clouds D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida 1. Introduction Numerical cloud models nearly universally employ one-dimensional (1D) treatments of radiative transfer (RT). Radiative transfer is typically implemented as a 2- or 4-stream approximation to the

450

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

University Reciprocating Engine Program Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Reciprocating Engine Program Review University Reciprocating Engine Program Review April 9-10, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Meeting Overview & Outcomes [PDF-192KB] Agenda [PDF-143KB] DOE/EERE/DER Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines Program The Advanced University Reciprocating Engine Research Program (AUREP) is a Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Program managed within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Click on the link above to find abundant information on the natural gas reciprocating engine program (Technology Primer, Related Programs, Documents & Resources, News & Events, Solicitations and the DER Site Map). Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

452

Millersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health Services is dedicated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratories as ordered by a medical provider. Health Services works cooperatively with Quest, ACM, and CDDMillersville University Health Services Health Form Instructions Millersville University Health, and health education. Health Services Information Millersville University Health Services is centrally

Hardy, Christopher R.

453

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Radiation Shielding Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shielding Radiation Shielding Applications Heavy concrete is standard concrete in which conventional aggregate (typically gravel) is replaced with aggregate composed of a dense...

455

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

456

Synchrotron Radiation Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0007 Draft 23-September-1998 Abstract We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron...

457

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

458

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

459

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

460

Living with radiation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an account of the hopes and fears associated with ionizing radiation, extending from nuclear energy and medical radiation to nuclear weapons. They argue that a justified fear of nuclear weapons has led to a widespread, unjustified, and unreasoning fear of the beneficial applications of radiation. Although these two aspects of atomic energy are tied together-they both involve the nucleus of the atom and its radioactive rays-a deep misunderstanding of this relationship by the general public has evolved since the time of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The authors' aim is to place the beneficial applications of nuclear radiation in perspective.

Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA). Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Ketchum, L.E. (Proclinica, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

462

Connecting Blackbody Radiation, Relativity, and Discrete Charge in Classical Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is suggested that an understanding of blackbody radiation within classical physics requires the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, the restriction to relativistic (Coulomb) scattering systems, and the use of discrete charge. The contrasting scaling properties of nonrelativistic classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics are noted, and it is emphasized that the solutions of classical electrodynamics found in nature involve constants which connect together the scales of length, time, and energy. Indeed, there are analogies between the electrostatic forces for groups of particles of discrete charge and the van der Waals forces in equilibrium thermal radiation. The differing Lorentz- or Galilean-transformation properties of the zero-point radiation spectrum and the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum are noted in connection with their scaling properties. Also, the thermal effects of acceleration within classical electromagnetism are related to the existence of thermal equilibrium within a gravitational field. The unique scaling and phase-space properties of a discrete charge in the Coulomb potential suggest the possibility of an equilibrium between the zero-point radiation spectrum and matter which is universal (independent of the particle mass), and an equilibrium between a universal thermal radiation spectrum and matter where the matter phase space depends only upon the ratio mc^2/kT. The observations and qualitative suggestions made here run counter to the ideas of currently accepted quantum physics.

Timothy H. Boyer

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Tactile Sensation Imaging for Artificial Palpation Jong-Ha Lee1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, each of these techniques has limitations, including the exposure to radiation, excessive costs University, Philadelphia, PA 19040, USA {jong,cwon}@temple.edu 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas, transparent waveguide and the total internal reflection principle. The developed sensor is used to detect

Won, Chang-Hee

464

Artificial Tactile Sensation Imaging for Healthcare Application Jong-Ha Lee1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limitations, including the exposure to radiation, excessive costs, and complexity of machinery. Artificial, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital-layer optical waveguide as a sensing probe. In our device, total internal reflection principle is utilized

Won, Chang-Hee

465

Page 430 The California State University Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 430 The California State University Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES The Honorable Edmund G. Brown, Jr. Governor of California The Honorable Gavin Newsom Lieutenant Governor of California The Honorable John Pérez Speaker of the Assembly

Ravikumar, B.

466

Page 430 The California State University Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 430 The California State University Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES The Honorable Edmund G. Brown, Jr. State Capitol Governor of California Sacramento 95814 The Honorable Gavin Newsom State Capitol Lieutenant Governor of California

Ravikumar, B.

467

The California State University Page 429Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The California State University Page 429Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES The Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger State Capitol Governor of California Sacramento 95814 The Honorable John Garamendi State Capitol Lieutenant Governor of California

Ravikumar, B.

468

Page 426 The California State University Sonoma State University 2010-2011 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 426 The California State University Sonoma State University 2010-2011 Catalog TRUSTEES OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES The Honorable Arnold Schwarzenegger State Capitol Governor of California Sacramento 95814 The Honorable John Garamendi State Capitol Lieutenant Governor of California

Ravikumar, B.

469

University students' satisfaction of studying in e-university: Hamdan Bin Mohammed e-University case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-learning is a new trend in vibrant educational environment. The study method is unique as it allows learners to get education interactively through extensive use of information technology and web based technology. Many universities such as University ... Keywords: Hamdan Bin Mohammad e-University, e-learning, evaluation, satisfaction, satisfaction level

Abdullah AlSagheer Hamdan Bin

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Impact of Shortwave Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols on the Summer Season Heat Low over Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-stream scattering scheme based on the delta-Eddington approximation is incorporated into the Florida State University Limited Area Model for computing the shortwave radiative fluxes due to dust aerosols over the Saudi Arabian region and to ...

Saad Mohalfi; H. S. Bedi; T. N. Krishnamurti; Steven D. Cocke

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Narrow- and Broad-Band Satellite Measurements of Shortwave Radiation: Conversion Simulations with a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oregon State University/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory general circulation model has been employed as a vehicle for suggesting and exploring various means of converting narrow-band measurements of reflected solar radiation from the ...

Robert D. Cess; Gerald L. Potter

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

DOE Announces $375,000 Grant to Lincoln University and the University...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

engineering program. The partnership between Lincoln University, a minority-serving higher education institution in Jefferson City, and the University of Missouri-Rolla...

473

The Catholic University of America, George Washington University, and American University Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 PRIMARY FACULTY CONTACT Bill Jelen School of Architecture and Planning The Catholic University of America 620 Michigan Ave., NE Washington, D.C. 20064 jelen@cua.edu (202) 344-5513 PRIMARY STUDENT CONTACT Kyle Noell School of Architecture and Planning The Catholic University of America 620 Michigan Ave., NE Washington, D.C. 20064 91noell@cardinalmail.cua.edu (301) 648-0506 As Built Project Manual 22 August 2013 Harvest Team Capitol dc www.teamcapitoldc.org Construction Documents Project Manual Published 8/22/2013 U.S. D.O.E. Solar Decathlon 2013 Page - 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents .................................................................................................................................................................. 2

474

Posters Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Radiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties to Ice Crystal Size and Shape in General Circulation Model Simulations D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada J. E. Kristjánsson Department of Geophysics University of Oslo, Norway M. J. Newman Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Introduction Recent research (e.g., Mitchell and Arnott 1994) has shown that the radiative properties of cirrus clouds (i.e., optical depth, albedo, emissivity) depend on the shapes and sizes of ice crystals. For instance, the cloud albedo may vary by a factor of two, depending on whether hexagonal columns or bullet rosette ice crystals are assumed for a given ice water path (IWP). This variance occurs primarily because, at sizes characteristic of cirrus

475

Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer on Low-Level Cyclogenesis M. J. Leach and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina Introduction Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems (e.g., Slingo et al. 1988), small-scale systems such as thunderstorms (Chen and Cotton 1988), and squall lines (Chin, submitted). The generation of circulation on large scales results from the creation of divergence in the upper troposphere and the maintenance of low-level potentially unstable air, and the maintenance of baroclinicity throughout

476

Spectrum of gravitational radiation from primordial turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy injection into the early universe can induce turbulent motions of the primordial plasma, which in turn act as a source for gravitational radiation. Earlier work computed the amplitude and characteristic frequency of the relic gravitational wave background, as a function of the total energy injected and the stirring scale of the turbulence. This paper computes the frequency spectrum of relic gravitational radiation from a turbulent source of the stationary Kolmogoroff form which acts for a given duration, making no other approximations. We also show that the limit of long source wavelengths, commonly employed in aeroacoustic problems, is an excellent approximation. The gravitational waves from cosmological turbulence around the electroweak energy scale will be detectable by future space-based laser interferometers for a substantial range of turbulence parameters.

Gogoberidze, Grigol [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, GE-0160 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kahniashvili, Tina [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Plaza, New York, New York 10003 (United States); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, GE-0160 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Decoherence in the cosmic background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the possibility of detecting nontrivial quantum phenomena in observations of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR), for example, if the Universe could be found in a coherent superposition of two states corresponding to different CBR temperatures. Such observations are sensitive to scalar primordial fluctuations but insensitive to tensor fluctuations, which are therefore converted into an environment for the former. Even for a free inflaton field minimally coupled to gravity, scalar-tensor interactions induce enough decoherence among histories of the scalar fluctuations as to render them classical under any realistic probe of their amplitudes.

Mariano Franco; Esteban Calzetta

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Nuclear Energy University Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy University Program Energy University Program Nuclear Energy University Program NEUP Award Recipients FY2009 to FY2013 Click on the icons to find out the values of the awards given to each school. The darker the icon, the more recent the award. Drag and zoom map to see more recipients. Investing in the next generation of nuclear energy leaders and advancing university-led nuclear innovation is vital to fulfilling the Office of Nuclear Energy's (NE) mission. This is accomplished primarily through NE's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which was created in 2009 to consolidate university support under one initiative and better integrate university research within NE' technical programs. NEUP engages U.S. colleges and universities to conduct research and development (R&D), enhance infrastructure and support student education

480

California State University, Fullerton EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California State University, Fullerton EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN Revised March 2012 #12;Foreward The California State University's Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) defines the scope of preparedness and incident Presidential Directive (HSPS5), the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the California Standardized

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology university" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

University of Southern California 2010 -2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Southern California 2010 - 2011 Distinguished Lecturer Series Viterbi Keynote Thursday, March 3, 2011 Dr. Elwyn Berlekamp Professor Emeritus University of California, Berkeley of California, Berkeley Wednesday, April 6, 2011 "Markov, Wiener and Shannon: a Progression" Dr. Andrew Viterbi

Safonov, Michael G.

482

1 Introduction - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proof: Let us write r 1; :::; rs for the rows of M. For each row rk of M and each ...... the construction of universal Gr obner bases and universal standard forms. A.

483

Nuclear Energy University Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy University Program Nuclear Energy University Program NEUP Award Recipients FY2009 to FY2013 Click on the icons to find out the values of the awards given to each school. The...

484

University Programs Listing-Professional Educators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

University programs listing in lipids, fats, oils, surfactants and related materials. University Programs Listing-Professional Educators Professional Educators Common Interest Group aocs awards Educators fats global inform job listings member mem

485

Quantum Mechanics and Representation Theory Columbia University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Mechanics and Representation Theory Peter Woit Columbia University Texas Tech, November 21 2013 Peter Woit (Columbia University) Quantum Mechanics and Representation Theory November 2013 1 / 30 #12;Does Anyone Understand Quantum Mechanics? "No One Understands Quantum Mechanics" "I think

Woit, Peter

486

Tel Aviv University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Tel Aviv University Place Tel Aviv, Israel Zip 69978 Sector Solar Product R&D of solar energy, fuel cells and new materials References Tel Aviv University1...

487

External Program Review University of Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7/20/2012 External Program Review University of Idaho Overview 1 Program review, as it is widely that the University of Idaho "exercise the leadership and coordination necessary for periodic program review

Kyte, Michael

488