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1

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

Dennis, Kristopher E.B., E-mail: kdennis@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Duncan, Graeme [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Amorim Bernstein, Karen [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Eifel, Patricia [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); McDermott, Patrick [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Prisciandaro, Joann [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Price, Robert A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

Aneja, Sanjay [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Roberts, Kenneth [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

Harris, Eleanor [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)], E-mail: Eleanor.Harris@moffitt.org; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Spangler, Ann E. [Moncrief Radiation Oncology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

ASTRO's core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2002, the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) appointed an Ad-hoc Committee on Physics Teaching to Medical Residents. The main initiative of the committee was to develop a core curriculum for physics education. Prior publications that have analyzed physics teaching have pointed to wide discrepancies among teaching programs. The committee was composed of physicists or physicians from various residency program based institutions. Simultaneously, members had associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The latter two organizations' representatives were on the physics examination committees, as one of the main agendas was to provide a feedback loop between the examining organizations and ASTRO. The document resulted in a recommended 54-h course. Some of the subjects were based on American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements (particles, hyperthermia), whereas the majority of the subjects along with the appropriated hours per subject were devised and agreed upon by the committee. For each subject there are learning objectives and for each hour there is a detailed outline of material to be covered. Some of the required subjects/h are being taught in most institutions (i.e., Radiation Measurement and Calibration for 4 h), whereas some may be new subjects (4 h of Imaging for Radiation Oncology). The curriculum was completed and approved by the ASTRO Board in late 2003 and is slated for dissemination to the community in 2004. It is our hope that teaching physicists will adopt the recommended curriculum for their classes, and simultaneously that the ABR for its written physics examination and the ACR for its training examination will use the recommended curriculum as the basis for subject matter and depth of understanding. To ensure that the subject matter and emphasis remain current and relevant, the curriculum will be updated every 2 years.

Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: klein@radonc.wustl.edu; Balter, James M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chaney, Edward L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gerbi, Bruce J. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: eklein@radonc.wustl.edu; Gerbi, Bruce J. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Price, Robert A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Balter, James M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Saint Joseph Medical Center, Reading, PA (United States); Huang, Eugene [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

American College of Radiology In-Training Examination for Residents in Radiation Oncology (2004-2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To review the results of the recent American College of Radiology (ACR) in-training examinations in radiation oncology and to provide information regarding the examination changes in recent years. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of the 2004 to 2007 ACR in-training examination was undertaken. Results: The number of residents taking the in-training examination increased from 2004 to 2007, compatible with the increase in the number of radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. The number of questions decreased from approximately 510 in 2004 and 2005, to 405 in 2006 and 360 in 2007, most of these changes were in the clinical oncology section. Although the in-training examination showed construct validity with resident performance improving with each year of additional clinical oncology training, it did so only until Level 3 for biology and physics. Several changes have been made to the examination process, including allowing residents to keep the examination booklet for self-study, posting of the answer key and rationales to questions on the ACR Website, and providing hard copies to residency training directors. In addition, all questions are now A type or multiple choice questions with one best answer, similar to the American Board of Radiology written examination for radiation oncology. Conclusion: Several efforts by the ACR have been made in recent years to make the examination an educational tool for radiation oncology residents and residency directors.

Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org; Kurtz, Elizabeth [Educational Services Division, American College of Radiology, Reston, VA (United States)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Results of the 2004 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to document adequacy of training, career plans after residency, use of the in-service examination, and motivation for choice of radiation oncology as a specialty. Methods and Materials: In 2004, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology residents in the United States. Results: The survey was returned by 297 residents (response rate, 54%). Of the respondents, 29% were female and 71% male. The most popular career choice was joining an established private practice (38%), followed by a permanent academic career (29%). Residents for whom a permanent academic career was not their first choice were asked whether improvements in certain areas would have led them to be more likely to pursue an academic career. The most commonly chosen factors that would have had a strong or moderate influence included higher salary (81%), choice of geographic location (76%), faculty encouragement (68%), and less time commitment (68%). Of respondents in the first 3 years of training, 78% believed that they had received adequate training to proceed to the next level of training. Of those in their fourth year of training, 75% believed that they had received adequate training to enter practice. Conclusions: Multiple factors affect the educational environment of physicians in training. Data describing concerns unique to resident physicians in radiation oncology are limited. The current survey was designed to explore a variety of issues confronting radiation oncology residents. Training programs and the Residency Review Committee should consider these results when developing new policies to improve the educational experiences of residents in radiation oncology.

Patel, Shilpen [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]. E-mail: spatel@umm.edu; Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wilson, John [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frank, Steven [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thakkar, Vipul V. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hansen, Eric K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

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disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

12

Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an academic career path. The following variables were ranked significantly differently in hierarchy (p < 0.05) by those seeking an academic versus private practice path with respect to having influence on the career decision: lifestyle, income, case-mix, autonomy, ability to sub-specialize, basic research, clinical research, teaching, patient care, board structure, practice environment, and mentoring. Conclusion: These data offer descriptive information regarding variables that lead to radiation oncology trainee career path decisions. Such information may be of use in modification of training programs to meet future personnel and programmatic needs within the specialty.

Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)]. E-mail: lynn.wilson@yale.edu; Flynn, Daniel F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Estimation of Citation-Based Scholarly Activity Among Radiation Oncology Faculty at Domestic Residency-Training Institutions: 1996-2007  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Advancement in academic radiation oncology is largely contingent on research productivity and the perceived external influence of an individual's scholarly work. The purpose of this study was to use the Hirsch index (h-index) to estimate the research productivity of current radiation oncology faculty at U.S. academic institutions between 1996 and 2007. Methods and Materials: We performed bibliometric citation database searches for available radiation oncology faculty at domestic residency-training institutions (n = 826). The outcomes analyzed included the total number of manuscripts, total number of citations, and the h-index between 1996 and 2007. Analysis of overall h-index rankings with stratification by academic ranking, junior vs. senior faculty status, and gender was performed. Results: Of the 826 radiation oncologists, the mean h-index was 8.5. Of the individuals in the top 10% by the h-index, 34% were chairpersons, 88% were senior faculty, and 13% were women. A greater h-index was associated with a higher academic ranking and senior faculty status. Recursive partitioning analysis revealed an h-index threshold of 15 (p <0.0001) as an identified breakpoint between the senior and junior faculty. Overall, women had lower h-indexes compared with men (mean, 6.4 vs. 9.4); however, when stratified by academic ranking, the gender differential all but disappeared. Conclusion: Using the h-index as a partial surrogate for research productivity, it appears that radiation oncologists in academia today comprise a prolific group, however, with a highly skewed distribution. According to the present analysis, the h-index correlated with academic ranking. Thus, it potentially has utility in the process of promotion decisions. Overall, women in radiation oncology were less academically productive than men; the possible reasons for the gender differential are discussed.

Choi, Mehee [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Fuller, Clifton D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)], E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest nonintegrated RO facility.

Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Sun Zhuyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ballas, Leslie [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States)] [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Patterns of Care for Lung Cancer in Radiation Oncology Departments of Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers. Methods and Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated. Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were '{>=} IB' disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities. Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.

Demiral, Ayse Nur [Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ayse.demiral@deu.edu.tr; Alicikus, Zuemre Arican [Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey); Isil Ugur, Vahide [Ankara Oncology Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Karadogan, Ilker [Izmir Private Oncology Center, Izmir (Turkey); Yoeney, Adnan [Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Andrieu, Meltem Nalca [Ankara University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Yalman, Deniz [Ege University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir (Turkey); Pak, Yuecel [Gazi University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Aksu, Gamze [Akdeniz University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey); Ozyigit, Goekhan [Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Ozkan, Luetfi [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bursa (Turkey); Kilciksiz, Sevil [Gaziantep University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gaziantep (Turkey); Koca, Sedat [Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Caloglu, Murat [Trakya University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Edirne (Turkey); Yavuz, Ali Aydin [Baskent University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Basak Caglar, Hale [Marmara University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey); Beyzadeoglu, Murat [Guelhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Igdem, Sefik [Metropolitan Florence Nightingale Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey)] (and others)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO BOX 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E. [ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., La Jolla, CA 92038 (United States); Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S. [University of Missouri, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Columbia MO 65211 (United States); Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Korgan, G.; Malekos, S. [Nanolabz, 661 Sierra Rose Dr., Reno, NV 89511 (United States); Lockard, T. [University of Nevada, Physics, Reno, NV 89557 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA for RTOG clinical trials is feasible and effective. The magnitude of registration discrepancy between institution and reviewer was presented, and the major issues were investigated to further improve this remote evaluation process.

Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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21

Head-and-Neck Target Delineation Among Radiation Oncology Residents After a Teaching Intervention: A Prospective, Blinded Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We conducted this study to determine the feasibility of incorporating a teaching intervention on target delineation into the educational curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program and to assess the short-term effects on resident skills. Methods and Materials: The study schema consisted of a baseline evaluation, the teaching intervention, and a follow-up evaluation. At the baseline evaluation, the participants contoured three clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) (70 Gy, 59.4 Gy, and 54 Gy) on six contrast-enhanced axial computed tomography images of a de-identified patient with Stage T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of the tongue. The participants attended a series of head-and-neck oncology and anatomy seminars. The teaching intervention consisted of a didactic lecture and an interactive hands-on practical session designed to improve the knowledge and skills for target delineation in the head and neck. At the follow-up evaluation, the residents again contoured the CTVs. Results: Of the 14 eligible residents, 11 (79%) actually participated in the study. For all participants, but especially for those who had not had previous experience with head-and-neck target delineation, the teaching intervention was associated with improvement in the delineation of the node-negative neck (CTV 54 Gy contour). Regardless of clinical experience, participants had difficulty determining what should be included in the CTV 59.4 Gy contour to ensure adequate coverage of potential microscopic disease. Conclusion: Incorporating a teaching intervention into the education curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program is feasible and was associated with short-term improvements in target delineation skills. Subsequent interventions will require content refinement, additional validation, longer term follow-up, and multi-institutional collaboration.

Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: bekelmaj@mskcc.org; Wolden, Suzanne; Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan)] [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan)] [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okuno, Yoshishige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Nishino, Shigeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane Medical University, Shimane (Japan); Karasawa, Kumiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Results of the 2003 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) surveys of residents and chief residents in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document demographic characteristics of current residents, career motivations and aspirations, and training program policies and resources. Methods: In 2003, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted two nationwide surveys: one of all U.S. radiation oncology residents and one of chief residents. Results: The Chief Residents' Survey was completed by representatives from all 77 programs (response rate, 100%). The Residents' Survey was returned by 229 respondents (response rate, 44%). In each, 32% of respondents were female. The most popular career after residency was private practice (46%), followed by permanent academic practice (28%). Changes that would entice those choosing private practice to consider an academic career included more research experience as a resident (76%), higher likelihood of tenure (69%), lesser time commitment (66%), and higher salary (54%). Although the majority of respondents were satisfied with educational experience overall, a number of programs were reported to provide fewer resources than required. Conclusions: Median program resources and numbers of outliers are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess the relative adequacy of experience in their own programs. Policy-making bodies and individual programs should consider these results when developing interventions to improve educational experiences of residents and to increase retention of radiation oncologists in academic practice.

Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Buck, David A. [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); Singh, Anurag K. [Washington University, Seattle, WA (United States); Engleman, Mark [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Thakkar, Vipul [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Frank, Steven J. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Flynn, Daniel [Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties. Conclusions: Trends in clinical training and resident working conditions over 3 years are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess their residency training.

Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: gondi@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bernard, Johnny Ray [Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Jabbari, Siavash [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Dad, Luqman K. [SUNY Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Li, Linna [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Poppe, Matthew M. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chollet, Casey T. [Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pilepich, Miljenko V. [UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Roach, Mack [UCSF, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Radiation Oncology BioMed Central Editorial Why "Radiation Oncology"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Claus Belka; Kevin A Camphausen; Claus Belka; Kevin A Camphausen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Feinberg, Organization as Expression 1 Melanie Feinberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

___________________________________________________________________184 A New Performativity : Wearables and Body-Devices Jeffrey Shaw and Sarah Kenderdine

Feinberg, Melanie

33

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

Mydin, Aminudin R., E-mail: aminudinrahman@googlemail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A. [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Armstrong, John G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radiation Oncology BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D-conformal-intensity modulated radiotherapy with compensators for head and neck cancer: clinical results of normal tissue sparing

Nasrin Abbasi-senger; Henning Salz; Ines Pinquart; Sven Koscielny; Susi-marie Przetak; Tilo Wiezorek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology  

SciTech Connect

Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

Weller, R.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

LOAD FORECASTING Eugene A. Feinberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's electricity price forecasting model, produces forecast of gas demand consistent with electric load. #12Gas demand Council's Market Price of Electricity Forecast Natural GasDemand Electric Load Aggregating Natural between the natural gas and electricity and new uses of natural gas emerge. T natural gas forecasts

Feinberg, Eugene A.

38

American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee Report on Electronic Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

Park, Catherine C., E-mail: cpark@radonc.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Harris, Eleanor [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Price, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wallner, Paul E. [21st Century Oncology, Inc., Ft. Myers, FL (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modulating radiation induced TGFB and ATM signaling in the DNA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TGF and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson 1 , Francis A. Cucinotta 2 and Peter O'Neill 1 1 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regression analysis of oncology drug licensing deal values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an attempt to explain wide variations in drug licensing deal value by using regression modeling to describe and predict the relationship between oncology drug deal characteristics and their licensing deal ...

Hawkins, Paul Allen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Control Group Variation in the Janus Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Variation in the Janus Studies Group Variation in the Janus Studies Benjamin Haley 1 , William Liu 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 Data from historical radiobiological mega-studies is being migrated online to enable open access to the results of these studies. The availability of these large data sets offers the possibility of merging the results of multiple studies for meta-analysis. However, researchers must overcome several hurdles in order to analyze data from disparate radiobiology studies. Variations in animal treatment, autopsy methods, and nomenclature must be accounted for before developing

43

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

44

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

45

Synopsis of History of American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1958-2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide a synopsis of the history of the association of radiation oncologists in the United States, currently known as the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), with the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the organization. Methods and Materials: The history of ASTRO, from its beginning as the American Club of Therapeutic Radiologists, is the subject of a book that is to be released with the occasion of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Society in 2008. This book was prepared by members of ASTRO's History Committee and History Working Subcommittee. The source material for the book was the archives of the Society and recorded interviews, conducted by members of the subcommittee, of members of the Society and of the past and present Society staff. The book was also based on previously published material. This article used the source material used for the Society anniversary book. Results: This synopsis of the history of the Society will provide a source of reference for anyone interested in the history of the Society from its foundation in 1958 to the present, 2008.

Montana, Gustavo S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)], E-mail: gustavo.montana@duke.edu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Bridging the "Valley of Death" in stratified medicine : commercializing molecular diagnostics in oncology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, the development of molecular companion diagnostics in oncology has underwhelmed the expectation of the medical field since the successful mapping of the human genome a decade ago. There have been several ...

Copp, Joshua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

48

Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

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Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

50

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Program Workshop I Abstracts  

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Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan and John H.J. Petrini Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Summary: The goal of our application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure based on potential genetic differences that may modulate an individual's sensitivity to low doses of radiation. Abstract: The goal of this application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure. We propose to address specific genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low dose radiation and ask the question do genetic differences exist that make some individuals more sensitive to

51

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

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Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

52

Hydrogen peroxide significantly contributes to radiation-induced genomic instability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- induced genomic instability Disha Dayal 1 , Sean M. Martin 1 , Sujatha Venkataraman 1 , Charles L. Limoli 2 , Douglas R Spitz 1 . 1 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA- 52246, 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of California, Irvine, CA-92697 Chronic metabolic oxidative stress is associated with genomic instability following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Mitochondria have long been known to be a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing oxidative stress. We hypothesized that radiation damages mitochondria, leading to oxidative stress and eventually genomic instability. This hypothesis is based on preliminary studies in parental

53

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

54

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

55

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

56

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

57

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

58

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

60

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

62

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

64

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

65

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Scripting in Radiation Therapy: An Automatic 3D Beam-Naming System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scripts can be executed within the radiation treatment planning software framework to reduce human error, increase treatment planning efficiency, reduce confusion, and promote consistency within an institution or even among institutions. Scripting is versatile, and one application is an automatic 3D beam-naming system that describes the position of the beam relative to the patient in 3D space. The naming system meets the need for nomenclature that is conducive for clear and accurate communication of beam entry relative to patient anatomy. In radiation oncology in particular, where miscommunication can cause significant harm to patients, a system that minimizes error is essential. Frequent sharing of radiation treatment information occurs not only among members within a department but also between different treatment centers. Descriptions of treatment beams are perhaps the most commonly shared information about a patient's course of treatment in radiation oncology. Automating the naming system by the use of a script reduces the potential for human error, improves efficiency, enforces consistency, and would allow an institution to convert to a new naming system with greater ease. This script has been implemented in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center since December 2009. It is currently part of the dosimetry protocol and is accessible by medical dosimetrists, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. This paper highlights the advantages of using an automatic 3D beam-naming script to flawlessly and quickly identify treatment beams with unique names. Scripting in radiation treatment planning software has many uses and great potential for improving clinical care.

Holdsworth, Clay, E-mail: clayhholdsworth@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Phillips, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

68

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

69

Oncology Center  

SciTech Connect

Efforts by the Hollings Cancer Center to earn a designation as a National Cancer Center are outlined.

Kraft, Andrew S.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

71

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A vy Mouse Autumn Bernal 1,2,3 , Dale Huang 1 , Yue Li 4 , Dana Dolinoy 5 , and Randy Jirtle 1 Department of Radiation Oncology 1 , University Program in Genetics and Genomic 2 , Integrated Toxicology & Environmental Health Program 3 , Department of Community and Family Medicine 4 , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA, Department of Environmental and Health Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 4 Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the frequency of exposures to low doses of radiation is increasing due to man-made sources such as diagnostic imaging and nuclear power. This increased exposure has led to concerns amongst the general public and the government about the

72

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? To examine genomic instability and bystander effects as non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals To provides a robust, reliable, highly sensitive assay for detecting delayed events occurring in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Experimental Approach To mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources, a low-LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated. Using a novel green fluorescence gene (GFP) reporter assay, a high through

73

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

74

High LET radiatSpace Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ InducedEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transitionion can enhance TGFβ induced EMT and cross-talk with ATM pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Minli Wang 1 , Megumi Hada 1 , Janice Huff 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Jennifer Anderson 3 , Peter O'Neill 3 and Francis A. Cucinotta 4 1 USRA Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA, 3 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, UK, 4 NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA TGFβ is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis, which involve classic Smad or non-Smad signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of epithelial genes and promoted expression of mesenchymal proteins. Ionizing radiation was found to specifically induce expression of

75

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

76

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

77

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Role of TNF-α as a Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Human Vascular Cells. Authors: Mohan Natarajan, Sumathy Mohan, Catherine Gibbons, Yan Bo and Munira A. Kadhim Institutions: Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside; Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Medical research Council, Oxford, United Kingdom Identifying reliable and sensitive signaling pathways that are implicated in adverse health effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation would allow us to understand the scientific basis of low dose-induced signaling pathways and their downstream phenotypic expression. This

82

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; 2Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington We have recently installed a low-linear energy transfer (LET) electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma- and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells, leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure,

83

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage Disrupted epithelial morphogenesis and aberrant lineage commitment following radiation and TGFβ I. Fernandez-Garcia and M.H. Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY. In the present study, we evaluated cell lineage plasticity and its phenotypic effects in the non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A in response to ionizing radiation and TGFβ. We have recently shown that the molecular profiles of mammary tumors and normal mammary gland from irradiated mice are distinct from those arising in unirradiated mice by virtue of enriched stem cell and progenitor markers. Consistent with this, we found that radiation (10-100 cGy) increases the mammary repopulation capacity in a functional and marker assays (Nguyen et al. Cancer Cell

84

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

88

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

90

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in...

91

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

95

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

96

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials...

97

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

99

European Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Project RISC-RAD Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations Laure Sabatier 1 , L.H.F Mullenders 2 , Mike Atkinson 3 , Simon Bouffler 4 , Herwig Paretzke 5 1 Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, CEA, 18 route du panorama BP6 92265 Fontenay-aux- Roses, France 2 LUMC, Department of Toxicogenetics, Postal Zone S-4-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands 3 GSF- Institute of Pathology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg Germany 4 HPA Radiation Protection Division, Centre for Radiation Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, UK 5 GSF- Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg, D-85764 Germany In radiological protection, the risks of inducing stochastic health effects (largely cancer) by a

100

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

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101

Association Between Pulmonary Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose Detected by Positron Emission Tomography Scanning After Radiation Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Radiation Pneumonitis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, {sup 18}F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis was retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.

Mac Manus, Michael P., E-mail: michael.macmanus@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Ding Zhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of NingXia Medical University, YinChuan, NingXia (China); Hogg, Annette [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Herschtal, Alan [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Ball, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

103

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

106

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 94, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

109

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

110

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

112

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

113

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

116

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

117

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

118

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

120

Smard Grid Software Applications for Distribution Network Load Forecasting Eugene A. Feinberg, Jun Fei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the distribution network. Keywords: load forecasting, feeder, transformer, load pocket, SmartGrid I. INTRODUCTION

Feinberg, Eugene A.

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121

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Office of Diversity presents: Friday Film Series 2011-2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fallen to a 30-year low. But in the same time period, retail sales from coffee have increased from $30. December 9 ­ (Baldwin Auditorium) Guns and Mothers by Thom Powers http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/gunsandmothers/

Chisholm, Rex L.

122

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

123

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

125

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

126

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

127

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

130

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

131

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

132

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

133

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

134

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation...

138

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response Aris Alexandrou and Jian Jian Li Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of California Davis, Sacramento, California, 95817 The initiation of the circadian rhythm field occurred when the Takahashi group defined a mutation in the mouse gene "Clock" and cloned the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) in the mid- 1990's (1-3). Currently more than a dozen clock genes have been identified (3-4). Disruptions in the circadian rhythm via changes in environmental conditions, such as, diet, temperature, and night/day hours lead to the pathogenesis of a multitude of diseases, such as, cancer, diabetes mellitus,

139

SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell migration of primary endothelial cells upon low LET radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell migration of primary endothelial cells upon low LET radiation exposure Xiangpeng Zheng, 1 Sumathy Mohan, 3 and Mohan Natarajan 1,2 Departments of 1 Otolaryngology, 2 Radiation Oncology, and 3 Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 The influence and mechanism of low LET radiation exposure on wound healing process is not yet fully understood. Based on the vital role of endothelial cells in migration and wound healing, this study investigated the response of endothelial cells to low-dose irradiation and the underlying mechanism. A wound was inflicted in the confluent monolayer of primary vascular endothelial cells exposing a cell-free zone on the plate. The cells were then exposed

140

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

150

Low dose radiation effects of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effects of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells effects of multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells Charles L. Limoli, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Irvine 92697-2695 Multipotent neural cells (both stem cells and their precursor cell progeny) retain their capacity to proliferate and differentiate throughout the mammalian lifespan. High numbers of these cells are located within the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular (SVZ) zone adjacent to the lateral ventricles, where they produce cells that can migrate away and differentiate into neurons (neurogenesis) and glia (gliogenesis). The realization that the brain contains such cells has sparked intense interest and speculation regarding their potential function. While significant data

151

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Real-time Study of Signal Transduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Bystander Effects Using Single Nanoparticle Optics and Single Living Cell Imaging Authors: Prakash D. Nallathamby, X. Nancy Xu, Mohan Natarajan Institutions: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas The mechanisms of bystander effects remain largely unknown. Bystander responses are thought to depend on activation of cellular communication processes. Recent studies have speculated that several crucial signal transduction pathways could play a major role in bystander effects. These crucial signal transduction pathways are controlled by a coordinated

152

Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Yoshida, Emi J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Woodhouse, Shermian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schiff, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang, Tony J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhang Pengpeng [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kutcher, Gerald J. [Department of History, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

156

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiation Shielding Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shielding Radiation Shielding Applications Heavy concrete is standard concrete in which conventional aggregate (typically gravel) is replaced with aggregate composed of a dense...

160

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

162

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

163

Synchrotron Radiation Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0007 Draft 23-September-1998 Abstract We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron...

164

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

165

Living with radiation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an account of the hopes and fears associated with ionizing radiation, extending from nuclear energy and medical radiation to nuclear weapons. They argue that a justified fear of nuclear weapons has led to a widespread, unjustified, and unreasoning fear of the beneficial applications of radiation. Although these two aspects of atomic energy are tied together-they both involve the nucleus of the atom and its radioactive rays-a deep misunderstanding of this relationship by the general public has evolved since the time of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The authors' aim is to place the beneficial applications of nuclear radiation in perspective.

Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA). Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Ketchum, L.E. (Proclinica, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

167

Solar radiation modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sun is the main energy source of the life on the Earth. Thus, solar radiation energy data and models are important for many areas of research and applications. Many parameters influence the amount of solar energy at a particular standing point of ... Keywords: Digital elevation model, Energy of quasiglobal radiation, Meteorology, Shadows, Virtual Sun motion

Klemen Zakek; Toma Podobnikar; Kritof Otir

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electromagnetic radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

Benson, Jay L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hansen, Gordon J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radiation detection system  

SciTech Connect

A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

171

Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Underwater radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM); McKnight, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

174

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Slide Shows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Health Effects of Radiation Health Effects of Radiation Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation PDF Background Radiation PDF Bystander Effects PDF Dirty Bombs PDF DNA Damage...

175

Predictive Factors for Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study sought to quantify the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients receiving mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) and to identify predictive factors for RP. Methods and Materials: We identified 75 patients with newly diagnosed HL treated with mediastinal RT and 17 patients with relapsed/refractory HL treated with mediastinal RT before or after transplant. Lung dose-volumetric parameters including mean lung dose and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy were calculated. Factors associated with RP were explored by use of the Fisher exact test. Results: RP developed in 7 patients (10%) who received mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1 in 6 cases). A mean lung dose of 13.5 Gy or greater (p = 0.04) and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy of 33.5% or greater (p = 0.009) significantly predicted for RP. RP developed in 6 patients (35%) with relapsed/refractory HL treated with peri-transplant mediastinal RT (Grade 3 in 4 cases). Pre-transplant mediastinal RT, compared with post-transplant mediastinal RT, significantly predicted for Grade 3 RP (57% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Conclusions: We identified threshold lung metrics predicting for RP in HL patients receiving mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy, with the majority of cases being of mild severity. The risk of RP is significantly higher with peri-transplant mediastinal RT, especially among those who receive pre-transplant RT.

Fox, Amy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Dosoretz, Arie P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Fisher, David C.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Freedman, Arnold S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Funding Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funding Radiation Research Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Centers for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological and...

177

National Solar Radiation Data Base

The National Solar Radiation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) is the most comprehensive collection of solar data freely available. The 1991 - 2005 NSRDB contains hourly solar radiation (including...

178

The Properties of Undulator Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Dedicated Synchrotron Radiation Facility," IEEE Trans.1983), "Characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation and of itsHandbook on Synchrotron Radiation, E. -E. Koch.1A. 65-172,

Howells, M.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Coherent Radiation in an Undulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solving the particle-radiation system in a self-consistentto clarify the coherent radiation mechanism. References 1.the Proceedings Coherent Radiation in an Undulator Y,H. Chin

Chin, Y.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

182

NVLAP Radiation Detection Instruments LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Detection Instruments LAP. Leticia Pibida uses a hand-held radiation detection device to check cargo. Photo: Copyright Robert Rathe. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

184

Radiation Effects in Nanoporous Gold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foams with filament and porous sizes in the range of nanometers could be unusually resistant to radiation because radiation induced point defects cannot...

185

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

METHOD FOR MEASURING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring an unknown integrated quantity of radiation with a condenser ionization chamber is described. The chamber is initially charged to a predetermined voltage by a voltage source. The chamber is then removed from the source and exposed to an unknown quantity of radiation for a period of time. The quantity of radiation to which the chamber was exposed is then measured by detecting the magnitude of the pulse of current necessary to recharge the chamber of its initial value through a suitable impedance. The current pulse is amplified and measured directly by a suitable pulse height analyzing system. (AEC)

Roesch, W.C.; McCall, R.C.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Molecular Profiling to Optimize Treatment in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Review of Potential Molecular Targets for Radiation Therapy by the Translational Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group  

SciTech Connect

Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been mainly based on disease stage, performance status, and co-morbidities, and rarely on histological or molecular classification. Rather than applying broad treatments to unselected patients that may result in survival increase of only weeks to months, research efforts should be, and are being, focused on identifying predictive markers for molecularly targeted therapy and determining genomic signatures that predict survival and response to specific therapies. The availability of such targeted biologics requires their use to be matched to tumors of corresponding molecular vulnerability for maximum efficacy. Molecular markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), K-ras, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) represent potential parameters guide treatment decisions. Ultimately, identifying patients who will respond to specific therapies will allow optimal efficacy with minimal toxicity, which will result in more judicious and effective application of expensive targeted therapy as the new paradigm of personalized medicine develops.

Ausborn, Natalie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Le, Quynh Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simko, Jeff [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Story, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Torossian, Artour [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lu, Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

191

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

192

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principal of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, L.H.

1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation Stress Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stresses Sij associated with the propagation of wind-generated waves are principal driving forces for several important surf-zone processes. The accurate estimation of the onshore flux of longshore-directed mean momentum Syx, using ...

S. S. Pawka; D. L. Inman; R. T. Guza

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

200

Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable to that reported in the literature. Taken together, these data suggest that hypofractionated radiation therapy using IMRT is a viable and appropriate therapeutic modality in large-breasted patients.

Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

203

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

204

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR 6268 IONIZING RADIATION DIVISION. The Neutron Interferometer. The neutron ...

206

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Technical Activities 2000" - Table of Contents, Division home page. Ionizing Radiation Division. ...

207

External audit of clinical practice and medical decision making in a new Asian oncology center: Results and implications for both developing and developed nations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The external audit of oncologist clinical practice is increasingly important because of the incorporation of audits into national maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. However, there are few reports of external audits of oncology practice or decision making. Our institution (The Cancer Institute, Singapore) was asked to externally audit an oncology department in a developing Asian nation, providing a unique opportunity to explore the feasibility of such a process. Methods and Materials: We audited 100 randomly selected patients simulated for radiotherapy in 2003, using a previously reported audit instrument assessing clinical documentation/quality assurance and medical decision making. Results: Clinical documentation/quality assurance, decision making, and overall performance criteria were adequate 74.4%, 88.3%, and 80.2% of the time, respectively. Overall 52.0% of cases received suboptimal management. Multivariate analysis revealed palliative intent was associated with improved documentation/clinical quality assurance (p = 0.07), decision making (p 0.007), overall performance (p = 0.003), and optimal treatment rates (p 0.07); non-small-cell lung cancer or central nervous system primary sites were associated with better decision making (p = 0.001), overall performance (p = 0.03), and optimal treatment rates (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Despite the poor results, the external audit had several benefits. It identified learning needs for future targeting, and the auditor provided facilitating feedback to address systematic errors identified. Our experience was also helpful in refining our national revalidation audit instrument. The feasibility of the external audit supports the consideration of including audit in national MOC programs.

Shakespeare, Thomas P. [North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, Sydney, NSW (Australia) and Cancer Institute (Singapore)]. E-mail: ThomasShakespeare@gmail.com; Back, Michael F. [Cancer Institute (Singapore); Lu, Jiade J. [Cancer Institute (Singapore); Lee, Khai Mun [Cancer Institute (Singapore); Mukherjee, Rahul K. [Cancer Institute (Singapore)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Followed by Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Predictors of the Tumor Response and the Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We have evaluated the predictors of a tumor response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and the long-term oncologic outcomes of preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery for patients who suffer from rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 274 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who had been treated with preoperative CRT and curative laparoscopic total mesorectal excision between January 2003 and January 2009. We assessed the long-term oncologic outcomes, in terms of recurrence and survival, of the treated patients. Results: Forty-two (15.3%) of the 274 patients had complete pathologic responses (pCR). The pre-CRT carcinoembryonic antigen level was the only significant predictor of a pCR on the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The overall survival at 5 years was 73.1%, with a mean survival period of 59.7 months (95% CI, 57.1-62.3). The disease-free survival at 5 years was 67.3% with a mean survival period of 54.7 months (95% CI, 51.7-57.8). The pCR group had a higher rate of overall survival at 5 years than did the non-pCR group, and the difference was significant (86.0% vs. 71.2%; hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; p = 0.03). The cumulative incidences of local and distant recurrences at 5 years were 5.8% and 28.3%, respectively. A total of 84.5% (234 of 274) of the patients had their anal sphincters preserved. Grade 3 or 4 acute and long-term toxic effects occurred in 22.2% and 8.4% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery seems safe and feasible with favorable long-term outcomes and a high rate of sphincter preservation for the patients with low-lying tumors of the rectum.

Lee, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hwan, E-mail: kimandre@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun-Gi [Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery Center, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun Min [Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery Center, St. Vincent's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Byoung Yong [Department of Medical Oncology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

217

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Toward Radiation-Resistant Ionic Liquids. Radiation Stability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Resistant Ionic Liquids. Radiation Stability of Sulfonyl Imide Anions I. A. Shkrob, T. W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, J. L. Hatcher, and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B...

224

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, Dimitrios C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos S. L. Soares

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hyperon radiative decay  

SciTech Connect

The radiative decay widths of the low-lying strange baryons are calculated both within the relativistic quark bag model and the nonrelativistic potential model. These widths are found to depend sensitively upon the quark-model dynamics through multiplet mixing and q/sup 4/q-bar admixtures. The comparison between our calculated results and the very limited experimental data is discussed.

Kaxiras, E.; Moniz, E.J.; Soyeur, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

SciTech Connect

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-926-4100 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SSRL Facility Research Associate for Small Angle X-ray Scattering The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has) program. This position has a component (roughly 50%) that involves beam line development at SSRL

Ford, James

231

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

232

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Management Commitment B. Training C. Monitoring of Individual Radiation Exposures D. Program Reviews 1 of Radiation A. Research Applications 1. Non-Human User 2. Animal Use 3. Human Use B. Clinical Applications C Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure to Radiation and Personnel Monitoring and Bioassay Program #12;A

Grishok, Alla

233

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Character of Solar and Circumsolar Radiation. Proceedings ~all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thethat attenuate the solar radiation available to terres-

Grether, Donald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thea suitable site for solar radiation measurements. A requestused to estimate the solar radiation per unit wavelength at

Grether, D.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the...

236

TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3395 (1977). H. Winick, VUV Radiation Physics, edited by E.M. W. Zemansky, Resonance Radiation and Exci- ted Atoms, (II. III. Appendix A - Radiation Trapping. Appendix B -

Poliakoff, E.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic Synchrotron Radiation at 33 GHz NOIiWNPQaa s x s sthe Cosmic Background Radiation Philip Michael Lubin Spacethe Cosmic Background Radiation. The ground-based experiment

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radiative Forcing of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities NREL's solar radiation research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation. Major capabilities include solar resource measurement,...

243

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hybrid Radiator-Cooling System  

Technology Development & Commercialization Current Challenges Coolant radiators in highway trucks are designed to transfer maximum heat at a ...

247

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Coherent Radiation in Insertion Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the coherent radiation in an undulator/wiggler with a vacuum chamber of arbitrary cross section. The backward radiation is a coherent and it has wavelengths about twice the period of the undulator/wiggler. Mostly of coherent radiation is going with the wavelengths approximately the bunch length at small angles however.

Mikhailichenko, A A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cerenkov radiation of spinning particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cerenkov radiation of a neutral particle with magnetic moment is considered, as well as the spin-dependent contribution to the Cerenkov radiation of a charged spinning particle. The corresponding radiation intensity is obtained for an arbitrary value of spin and for an arbitrary spin orientation with respect to velocity.

I. B. Khriplovich

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

251

Multilayer radiation shield  

SciTech Connect

A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

257

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceeding Plancks blackbody radiation law. Applied PhysicsA] I b ? spectral blackbody radiation intensity [W/m 2 ] kNanoscale radiation blackbody radiation limit. In addition,

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiation damage considerations  

SciTech Connect

The designs of nuclear fission and fusion power plants do not, in general, appear to make unusual demands on materials in terms of mechanical- property requirements. Radiation environments produce unique effects on the composition, microstructure, and defect population of these alloys, resulting in time-dependent and time-independent changes in mechanical properties. To illustrate these problems, the materials needs of the core of a Liquid-Metal Fast- Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and of the first wall of a fusion reactor are discussed. In the case of the LMFBR core, the phenomenon of void swelling causes serious design problems, and a search is being made for a low-swelling alloy that has adequate mechanical properties. The fusion reactor poses different problems because the neutron energy is high (14 MeV) and is accompanied by a high flux of charged particles. The long-term choices for a wall material have been narrowed to vanadium and niobium alloys. In the search for low-swelling alloys, it has become clear that minor elements play an important role in determining the nature of the radiation effects. The segregation of minor elements to void surfaces and the dispersion and reformation of second-phase precipitates are two important radiation-induced phenomena that require additional study in view of their influence on void swelling and high-temperature properties. (auth)

Frost, B.R.T.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NIST Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility. ... Radiation hardness testing; Electron-beam sterilization; Beam diagnostics; Industrial CT scanning. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On the collective curvature radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with the one possible mechanism of the pulsar radio emission, i.e., with the collective curvature radiation of the relativistic particle stream moving along the curved magnetospheric magnetic field lines. It is shown that the electromagnetic wave containing one cylindrical harmonic exp{is{\\phi}} can not be radiated by the curvature radiation mechanism, that corresponds to radiation of a charged particle moving along curved magnetic field lines. The point is that the particle in vacuum radiates the triplex of harmonics (s, s \\pm 1), so for the collective curvature radiation the wave polarization is very important and cannot be fixed a priori. For this reason the polarization of real unstable waves must be determined directly from the solution of wave equations for the media. Its electromagnetic properties should be described by the dielectric permittivity tensor \\^{\\epsilon}({\\omega},k,r), that contains the information on the reaction on all possible types of radiation.

Istomin, Ya N; Beskin, V S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Radiation control standards and procedures  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

1956-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

267

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

268

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

269

Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor response and 1-year freedom from local progression.

Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Murphy, James D. [School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

271

RADIATION DETECTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to radiation detection devices and presents a unique detection system especialiy desirable for portable type instruments using a Geiger-Mueller for a high voltage battery, thereby reducing the size and weight of the instrument, by arranging a one-shot multivibrator to recharge a capacitance applying operating potential to tho Geiger-Mueller tube each time a nuclear particle is detected. When detection occurs, the multivibrator further delivers a pulse to an appropriate indicator doing away with the necessity for the pulse amplifier conventionally intermediate between the detector and indicator in pulse detection systems.

Gundlach, J.C.; Kelley, G.G.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

Dunegan, H.L.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

275

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Research Societies with Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Societies with Radiation Concerns Academy of Radiology Research American Association of Physicists in Medicine American Nuclear Society American Roentgen Ray Society American...

276

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research: Outreach and Resources Authors: Antone L. Brooks and Lezlie A. Couch Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, Washington The...

277

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Response in Normal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genes. Using rigorous computational methods, we characterized the dose-dependent, radiation-induced gene expression of HSF-42, a primary cell culture. Our preliminary results...

278

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Poll of radiation health scientists  

SciTech Connect

A sampling of 210 university-employed radiation health scientists randomly selected from the membership lists of the Health Physics Society and the Radiation Research Society was polled in a secret ballot. The results support the positions that the public's fear of radiation is substantially greater than realistic, that TV, newspapers and magazines substantially exaggerate the dangers of radiation, that the amount of money now being spent on radiation protection is sufficient, and that the openness and honesty of U.S. government agencies about dangers of radiation were below average before 1972 but have been above average since then. Respondents give very high credibility ratings to BEIR, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and NCRP and to the individual scientists associated with their reports, and very low credibility ratings to those who have disputed them.

Cohen, B.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

283

A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy)] [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Deterministic methods in radiation transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. (eds.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMANEXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacob I. Fabrikant, MD,Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, Yale University School of

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No...

288

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Current State of Radiation Protection Philosophy.Against Pergamon Ionizing Radiation from External Sources,for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation from Supplement to

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

290

diffuse radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Apps Datasets Browse Upload data GDR Community Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon diffuse radiation Dataset Summary...

291

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the rate at which a free tachyon (faster than light particle) would emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ionizing Radiation Division Quality Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 08 47020C Low-energy Photon Brachytherapy Seeds, ... Calibrated for Surface Dose Rate 10 ... Sources Calibrated for Radiation Protection Ionization ...

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

296

Radiation Safety Work Control Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-2) Rev July-2012 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

297

Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation  

SciTech Connect

For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farrel W. Lytle Award was established by the SSRL Organization Executive Committee to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based...

299

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light shines brilliantly these days at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)". The Secretary of Energy sent these words to be conveyed at the formal opening of...

300

DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)] [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17# New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy Commission F O A M SEPARATION Progress Report for March, 1959 Abstract Appreciable cesium enrichment in the foam has been obtained using the system sodium tetraphenyl boron-Geigy reagent. Enrichment ratios varied from 1.5 to 3.5 depending upon operating conditions. The en- richment appears to depend on the ratio of the sodium tetraphenyl boron to Geigy reagent rather than on the absolute values of the indi- vidual concentrations. Further experiments are being conducted to verify and extend the range of results. Continuous countercurrent column operation has been continued.

302

Radiation and photochemistry section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highlights of this past year in the Radiation and Photochemistry Section at Argonne include: (1) picosecond optical studies of radical cations and excited states produced in hydrocarbon radiolysis provided the first kinetic measurements of ion transformation and production of triplet and singlet excited states by ion recombination. (2) studies of radical cations of alkyl-substituted amines and sulfides provided insights into ion-molecule reactions of radical cations in the condensed phase. (3) studies of the behavior of strained alkane radical cations, such as cubane {sup +}{center dot}, revealed new rearrangements and remarkable, medium-dependent differences in their structures. (4) H{center dot}atom reactions yielding e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} provided the first reliable measurements of hydrated-electron enthalpy and entropy and forced the revision of some previous thinking about the driving force in {sub aq}{sup {minus}} reactions.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field in 2002 A BioSync Report. Issued by the Structural Biology Synchrotron users Organization, October, 2002. 2 Table of Contents: Introduction .................................................................................................... 3 Abbreviations .................................................................................................. 5 Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 6 General Concerns ............................................................................................ 9 Synchrotron operations and maintenance ............................................... 9 NSLS, CHESS and the geographical distribution of beam lines

306

Effects of Atmospheric Absorption of Incoming Radiation on the Radiation Limit of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limit of the planetary radiation (longwave radiation) of a planet with oceans on its surface is determined by various mechanisms called radiation limits, which can be classified as the KomabayashiIngersoll limit and the radiation limit of ...

Hiroyuki Kurokawa; Taishi Nakamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Medical Consultation Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Continuing Medical Education Radiation Emergency Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Health Physics in Radiation...

308

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

309

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

310

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

311

Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium)] [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately accounting for radiative energy balance between the incoming solar and the outgoing infrared radiative fluxes is very important in modeling the Earth's climate. Water vapor absorption plays a critical role in the radiative heating rate ...

D. D. Turner; E. J. Mlawer

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Femto-Second Pulses of Synchrotron Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulses of Synchrotron Radiation" A. A. Zholents 1) and M. S.Pulses of Synchrotron Radiation' I) A. A. Zholents l , andpulses of syn- chrotron radiation is proposed. It is based

Zholents, A.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Radiation Budgets in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of the radiances measured by operational satellites in deriving radiation budgets is demonstrated by comparing the model calculations with the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) fluxes. The radiation budgets in the atmosphere ...

Mino-Dah Chou

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Spatial Variability of Outgoing Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanning radiometer aboard the NOAA-9 operational meteorological satellite are used to investigate the spatial variability of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). Daily and monthly radiation maps at ...

G. Louis Smith; David Rutan

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

THE RADIATION CHEMISTRY OP AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS IN RELATION TO THE RADIATION STERILIZATION OF HIGH-PROTEIN FOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Various Ionizing Radiations. Radiat. Res. , 22, 694 (1968). W. M. Garrison, Radiation Induced Reactions of AminoFrozen Aqueous Solutions, in Radiation Chemistry of Aqueous

Garrison, W.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I-III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I-V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I-V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

Michalski, Jeff, E-mail: michalski@wustl.edu [Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Mack [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Markoe, Arnold [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Radiation Oncology Associates, Sacramento, California (United States); Parliament, Matthew [Radiation Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Purdy, James A. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Valicenti, Richard K. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cox, James D. [Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

320

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Direct Detector for Terahertz Radiation - Energy ...  

Patent 7,420,225: Direct detector for terahertz radiation A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor ...

322

NREL: Solar Radiation Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's solar radiation research supports industry, government, and academia by providing solar radiation measurements, models, maps, and support services. These resources are used...

323

FAQ 4-What is radioactivity and radiation?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and radiation? What is radioactivity and radiation? Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both...

324

Present and Future Computing Requirements Radiative Transfer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiative shock (e.g., ensman 1994) gas temperature radiation temperature Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) non-equilibrium (NLTE) CaII microphysics 1GB atomic data...

325

Fiber-Optic Environmental Radiation Dosimeter  

coupled remote radiation sensor using NRLs ... Laser-heated Thermoluminescence Dosimeter for Remote Radia-tion Sensing. Appl. Phys. Lett., 68, 3377 ...

326

Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

327

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

328

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE THERMAL RADIATION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... developed for radiation ignition studies and was not adjusted from its normal settings which approximates to the radiation from a black body at 900 ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

Low Dose Radiation Program: Selected Websites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The views expressed in these links do not necessarily reflect the view of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Scientific Links Agencies with Radiation Regulatory...

330

Radiation Inspection System Lab (RISL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Inspection System Lab May 30, 2013 This team has the background and experience to test and optimize radiation detection systems from handheld background survey meters to...

331

Radiation Stability of GFR Candidate Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stability of these ceramics were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to understand the effect of radiation on lattice stability, ...

332

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

333

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

334

NIST: Testing of Radiation Detection Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing of Radiation Detection Systems. ... The GRaDER program will provide users with information about the performance of radiation instruments. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry...

336

Radiation-induced disruption of skeletal remodeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation may be exacerbated by other skeletal challenges, such as those posed by aging and physical inactivity. Our central hypothesis is that radiation modulates subsequent...

337

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...

338

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Effects in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells E.A. Blakely1, M.P. McNamara1, P.Y. Chang1, K.A. Bjornstad1, D. Sudar1, and A.C. Thompson2 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California; 2Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. Introduction The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. There are few data available on the late radiation effects of exposure in space flight to charged particle beams, the most prevalent of which are protons. Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the responses of both critical and other representative tissues

339

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) houses more than 70 instruments to analyze and record solar radiation and surface meteorology data. Learn more about this equipment by exploring the photographs below. Click on a thumbnail to view the full image. Photo of researcher working on an instrument platform in front of the SRRL building. The SRRL is located on South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado, at 39.74° N, 105.18° W, and 1,829 m AMSL. Photo of four researchers working on equipment atop the SRRL instrument deck. The SRRL's instrument deck is 96 ft long and 16 feet wide. Photo of two pyrheliometers mounted to an automatic sun-tracking base. These two SRRL pyrheliometers are mounted to automatically track the sun

340

Parameterization of Outgoing Infrared Radiation Derived from Detailed Radiative Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art radiative transfer models can calculate outgoing infrared (IR) irradiance at the top of the atmosphere (F) to an accuracy suitable for climate modeling given the proper atmospheric profiles of temperature and absorbing gases and ...

Starley L. Thompson; Stephen G. Warren

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Epidemiology of accidental radiation exposures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the information on the health effects of radiation exposure available to date comes from long-term studies of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Accidental exposures, such as those resulting from the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents, have as yet provided little information concerning health effects of ionizing radiation. This paper will present the current state of our knowledge concerning radiation effects, review major large-scale accidental exposures and the types of studies that are needed. 64 refs., 3 tabs.

Cardis, E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Sommerfeld radiation condition at threshold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove Besov space bounds of the resolvent at low energies in any dimension for a class of potentials that are negative and obey a virial condition with these conditions imposed at infinity only. We do not require spherical symmetry. The class of potentials includes in dimension $\\geq3$ the attractive Coulomb potential. There are two boundary values of the resolvent at zero energy which we characterize by radiation conditions. These radiation conditions are zero energy versions of the well-known Sommerfeld radiation condition.

Erik Skibsted

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

RADIATION DETECTING AND TELEMETERING SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is presented for measuring ionizing radiation at several remote stations and transmitting the measured information by radio to a central station. At each remote station a signal proportioned to the counting rate is applied across an electrical condenser made of ferroelectric material. The voltage across the condenser will vary as a function of the incident radiation and the capacitance of the condenser will vary accordingly. This change in capacitance is used to change the frequency of a crystalcontrolled oscillator. The output of the oscillator is coupled to an antenna for transmitting a signal proportional to the incident radiation.

Richards, H.K.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Boundary conditions for NLTE polarized radiative transfer with incident radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized NLTE radiative transfer in the presence of scattering in spectral lines and/or in continua may be cast in a so-called reduced form for six reduced components of the radiation field. In this formalism the six components of the reduced source function are angle-independent quantities. It thus reduces drastically the storage requirement of numerical codes. This approach encounters a fundamental problem when the medium is illuminated by a polarized incident radiation, because there is a priori no way of relating the known (and measurable) Stokes parameters of the incident radiation to boundary conditions for the reduced equations. The origin of this problem is that there is no unique way of deriving the radiation reduced components from its Stokes parameters (only the inverse operation is clearly defined). The method proposed here aims at enabling to work with arbitrary incident radiation field (polarized or unpolarized). In previous works an ad-hoc treatment of the boundary conditions, applying to case...

Faurobert, Marianne; Atanackovic, Olga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

Wong, Stuart J. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Meropol, Neal J., E-mail: Neal.Meropol@UHhospitals.org [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kachnic, Lisa [Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Rashid, Asif [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Watson, James C. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitchell, Edith [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollock, Jondavid [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Lee, Robert Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Haddock, Michael [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Erickson, Beth A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

348

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition » Radiator Labs Competition » Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

349

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

350

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

351

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

352

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collimators for the NSRL Beam Line For some applications we make use of collimators to shape the radiation field. We have a variety of tungsten blocks that can be stacked to...

353

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the sun, while for pyrheliometry and solar collectionlens and a sun- shade to prevent direct solar radiation fromby the solar disc and a circle 30 from the sun's center.

Hunt, A.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

High-let radiation carcinogenesis  

SciTech Connect

Recent results for neutron radiation-induced tumors are presented to illustrate the complexities of the dose-response curves for high-LET radiation. It is suggested that in order to derive an appropriate model for dose-response curves for the induction of tumors by high-LET radiation it is necessary to take into account dose distribution, cell killing and the susceptibility of the tissue under study. Preliminary results for the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice exposed to various heavy ion beams are presented. The results suggest that the effectiveness of the heavy ion beams increases with increasing LET. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the different high-LET radiations decrease between 20 and 40 rads and therefore comparisons of the relative effectiveness should be made from data obtained at doses below about 20 to 30 rads.

Fry, R.J.M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Ullrich, R.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Radiation Incident on Tilted Collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solar energy system design purposes, observations of solar radiation on a horizontal surface must be converted to values on a tilted energy collector. An empirical conversion relationship, introduced by Liu and Jordan (1960) and based on ...

P. J. Robinson

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

FAQS Reference Guide Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the December 2003 edition of DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard.

359

Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

360

Medical applications of synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Microstructure of a Radiation Fog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative humidity, temperature, droplet size distribution and transmittance of light at 632.8 nm were measured in a radiation fog. A new saturation hygrometer capable of measuring relative humidity between 95 and 105%, was used for the first ...

H. E. Gerber

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Radiation damage in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

While plastic-clad-silica (PCS) fiber shows the greatest radiation resistance, PCS fiber has been difficult to reliably connectorize for routine field operations. For this reason, all-glass fibers have been studied as an alternative to PCS. Based on available literature and some preliminary tests at Los Alamos, we have concentrated on fluorosilicate clad, step index, pure silica core fibers. This paper reviews recent laboratory data for these fibers relative to the PCS fibers. This paper also discusses use of a fiber (or any optical medium) on a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.; Ogle, J.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

364

RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1961-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition » Radiator Labs Competition » Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

366

Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development and Validation of a Heart Atlas to Study Cardiac Exposure to Radiation Following Treatment for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variations in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials: A detailed cardiac computed tomography scan atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart, left main and left anterior descending interventricular branches, and right coronary arteries on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard atlas volumes. The concordance index was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac structures were calculated and compared with gold standard contour doses. Pre- and post-atlas values were analyzed using a paired t test. Results: The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and concordance index of observer-contoured cardiac and gold standard volumes were 2.3-fold improved for all structures (p < 0.002). After application of the atlas, reported mean doses to the whole heart, left main artery, left anterior descending interventricular branch, and right coronary artery were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy, respectively, of gold standard doses. Conclusions: This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koelling, Todd [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chughtai, Aamer [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

BIOLOGY & MEDICINE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978-1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on research needs in actinide biology (CONF-770491, Seattle,J. Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 3: Lindgren, Frank T.Radiation Oncology Biology, Physics 3: 81-85 Magee, J.L and

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

Butler, Barry L. (Del Mar, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

Butler, B.L.

1985-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

NIST: Theoretical Dosimetry and Radiation-Transport ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical Dosimetry and Radiation-Transport Calculations. Summary: The fundamental photon and charged particle interaction ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

NIST: Atomic Spectros. - Spectral Continuum Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy: home page. 21. Spectral Continuum Radiation. Hydrogenic Species. Precise quantum-mechanical ...

373

NEW NIST MEDICAL-INDUSTRIAL RADIATION FACILITY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NEW NIST MEDICAL-INDUSTRIAL RADIATION FACILITY WILL HELP DEVELOP NEW TECHNOLOGIES, ESTABLISH STANDARDS. ...

374

International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94  

SciTech Connect

This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dynamical instability of collapsing radiating fluid  

SciTech Connect

We take the collapsing radiative fluid to investigate the dynamical instability with cylindrical symmetry. We match the interior and exterior cylindrical geometries. Dynamical instability is explored at radiative and non-radiative perturbations. We conclude that the dynamical instability of the collapsing cylinder depends on the critical value {gamma} < 1 for both radiative and nonradiative perturbations.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Azam, M., E-mail: azammath@gmail.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Low Dose Radiation Program: 2010 Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop »» Event Slide Show More than 150 people attended this year's workshop, held April 12-14 at the Renaissance M Street Hotel in Washington, D.C. In addition to 34 plenary talks and more than 70 poster presentations made by the program investigators, participants heard guest speakers from the National Cancer Institute and from sister low-dose programs in Europe and Japan. Remarks from DOE Dr. Anna Palmisano, Associate Director, Office of Science, Director for Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcomed the meeting participants, thanked Low Dose Radiation Research Program Manager Dr. Noelle Metting for her leadership, and acknowledged the importance of the Low Dose Program to DOE because of its unique focus and important role. She

377

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

378

Preface: Organizational Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Outpatient services provided at the hospital include diagnostic and therapeutic care, ambulatory surgery, medical and radiation oncology and ...

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

solar radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

radiation radiation Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for flat-plate collectors tilted at latitude, for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal equal to the latitude of the collector location. Source NREL Date Released January 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Central America GEF. latitude tilt GIS Mexico NREL solar solar radiation SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 241.3 KiB)

382

Timescape cosmology with radiation fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timescape cosmology represents a potentially viable alternative to the standard homogeneous cosmology, without the need for dark energy. Although average cosmic evolution in the timescape scenario only differs substantially from that of Friedmann-Lemaitre model at relatively late epochs when the contribution from the energy density of radiation is negligible, a full solution of the Buchert equations to incorporate radiation is necessary to smoothly match parameters to the epoch of photon decoupling and to obtain constraints from cosmic microwave background data. Here we extend the matter-dominated solution found in earlier work to include radiation, providing series solutions at early times and an efficient numerical integration strategy for generating the complete solution. The numerical solution is used to directly calculate the scale of the sound horizon at decoupling, and at the baryon drag epoch. The constraints on these scales from the Planck satellite data yield bounds on the timescape cosmological...

Duley, James A G; Wiltshire, David L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semiconductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

Agouridis, Dimitrios C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Blackbody radiation in ?-Minkowski spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have computed the black body radiation spectra in $\\kappa-$Minkowski space-time, using the quantum mechanical picture of massless scalar particles as well as effective quantum field theory picture. The black body radiation depends on how the field theory (and thus how the $\\kappa-$Poincar\\'e algebra) handles the ordering effect of the noncommutative space-time. In addition, there exists a natural momentum cut-off of the order $\\kappa$, beyond which a new real mode takes its shape from a complex mode and the old real mode flows out to be a new complex mode. However, the new high momentum real mode should not be physical since its contributions to the black-body radiation spoils the commutative limit.

Hyeong-Chan Kim; Chaiho Rim; Jae Hyung Yee

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.

Grether, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Estimation and Model Validation of Surface Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing Using TOGA COARE Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) radiation measurements in the western Pacific warm pool are used to estimate surface solar radiation budgets and to validate radiation model ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Wenzhong Zhao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Two-Dimensional Radiation-Turbulence Climate Model. I: Sensitivity to Cirrus Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the thermodynamic energy balance between radiation and vertical plus horizontal dynamic transports, a two-dimensional radiation-turbulence climate model is developed. This model consists of a broadband solar and IR radiation transfer ...

Szu-Cheng S. Ou; Kuo-Nan Liou

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth`s climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth's climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Imaging radiation detector with gain  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

1982-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Imaging radiation detector with gain  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM); Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos, NM); Atencio, Leroy G. (Espanola, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cerenkov radiation and scalar stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibility that a charged particle moving in the gravitational field generated by a scalar star could radiate energy via a recently proposed gravitational \\v{C}erenkov mechanism. We numerically prove that this is not possible for stable boson stars. We also show that soliton stars could have \\v{C}erenkov radiation for particular values of the boson mass, although diluteness of the star grows and actual observational possibility decreases for the more usually discussed boson masses. These conclusions diminish, although do not completely rule out, the observational possibility of actually detecting scalar stars using this mechanism, and lead us to consider other forms, like gravitational lensing.

S. Capozziello; G. Lambiase; Diego F. Torres

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radiation Protection and Licensing FNAL Radiation Physics Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/replace philosophy 8. Remote Handling capabilities 9. Alignment and Stability 10. Radioactive off-gas (especially shielded repair cells · Need remote handling capability · Problems during lifting and moving are difficult. January 13, 2012 Radiation Protection and Licensing #12;11 Repair Cell and Remote Handling capabilities

McDonald, Kirk

396

Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

Vardeny, Zeev V. (Holladay, UT); Jeglinski, Stefan A. (Durham, NC); Lane, Paul A. (Sheffield, GB)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals  

SciTech Connect

Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States). Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Surface Radiation Budget from Satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The net radiation received at the ground serves as a pseudoforcing function for the exchange of energy at the ground-air interface. Yet, information regarding this parameter is not available on a routine basis. In this study an attempt is being ...

R. T. Pinker; L. A. Corio

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, P.H.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

402

Preliminary Analysis of Surface Radiation Measurement Data Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary radiation flux measurements at the SGP extended facilities are obtained from the Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS). In this study, we examine the radiation...

403

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

404

ORISE: Understanding Radiation Video Series from REAC/TS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Radiation Video Series Basic radiation concepts explained by REACTS staff To help health officials and the public better understand radiation and radioactive...

405

Introduction and Fundamentals: Course on Advances in Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to Ionizing Radiation - is it really necessary?"Sternglass, "Environmental Radiation and Human Health," op.on the Effects of Atomic Radiation Sources and Effects of

Thomas, Ralph H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Modeling radiation characteristics of semitransparent media containing bubbles or particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and heat, mass, and radiation transfer, Journal of Non-Sacadura, J. F. , Thermal radiation properties of dispersedG. , and Viskanta, R. , Radiation characteristics of glass

Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Baillis, Dominique; Pilon, Laurent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

IONIZING RADIATION RISKS TO SATELLITE POWER SYSTEMS (SPS) WORKERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. I. Sladkova, "Radiation Levels in InterplanetaryPrognoz Satellites," Cosmic Radiation, 12_, No. 5, 716-718 (0. ArchamDeau, Mammalian Radiation Lethargy, A Disturbance

Lyman, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNLs ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

409

Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This Act establishes The Department of Environmental Quality as the designated official agency of the State of Oklahoma for all regulatory activities for the use of atomic energy and sources of radiation, except for the use of sources of radiation by diagnostic x-ray facilities. It also states rules for permits and fees related to the establishment of standards for safe levels of protection against radiation; the maintenance and submission of records; the determination, prevention and control of radiation hazards; the reporting of radiation accidents; the handling,

410

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

411

RADIATION PROTECTION QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Radiation Protection Qualification Standard Reference Guide MARCH 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank iii Table of Contents LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iv LIST OF TABLES ....................................................................................................................... iv ACRONYMS, ABBREVIATIONS and SYMBOLS ................................................................. v PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

412

Radiative Effects of Cloud-Type Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative flux changes induced by the occurrence of different cloud types are investigated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud data and a refined radiative transfer model from National Aeronautics and Space ...

Ting Chen; William B. Rossow; Yuanchong Zhang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Deep Space Mission Radiation Shielding Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space missions. In the present report, we ...

Tripathi R. K.; Wilson J. W.; Cucinotta F. A.; Nealy J. E.; Clowdsley M. S.; Kim M-H. Y.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total direct solar (from the disk of the sun) radiation.by the direct solar (coming from the disk of the sun) plussolar radiation (that originating from the disk of the sun)

Grether, Donald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Monitoring Program has been measuring UV radiation since 1994. The initial network of 12 stations employed broadband meters to measure UVB irradiance and included ancillary ...

D. S. Bigelow; J. R. Slusser; A. F. Beaubien; J. H. Gibson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Climate Forcing by Changing Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By how much does changing radiation from the sun influence the earths climate, presently and in the recent past, compared with other natural and anthropogenic processes? Current knowledge of the amplitudes and timescales of solar radiative ...

Judith Lean; David Rind

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Heat radiation from long cylindrical objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat radiated by objects smaller than or comparable in size to the thermal wavelength can be very different from the classical blackbody radiation as described by the Planck and Stefan-Boltzmann laws. We use methods ...

Golyk, Vladyslav A.

419

Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a new satellite sensor, the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment. GERB is designed to make the first measurements of the Earth's radiation budget from geostationary orbit. Measurements at high absolute ...

J. E. Harries; J. E. Russell; J. A. Hanafin; H. Brindley; J. Futyan; J. Rufus; S. Kellock; G. Matthews; R. Wrigley; A. Last; J. Mueller; R. Mossavati; J. Ashmall; E. Sawyer; D. Parker; M. Caldwell; P. M. Allan; A. Smith; M. J. Bates; B. Coan; B. C. Stewart; D. R. Lepine; L. A. Cornwall; D. R. Corney; M. J. Ricketts; D. Drummond; D. Smart; R. Cutler; S. Dewitte; N. Clerbaux; L. Gonzalez; A. Ipe; C. Bertrand; A. Joukoff; D. Crommelynck; N. Nelms; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones; G. Butcher; G. L. Smith; Z. P. Szewczyk; P. E. Mlynczak; A. Slingo; R. P. Allan; M. A. Ringer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Radiative QCD corrections a personal outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several problems related to the studies of the effects of radiative QCD corrections in the phenomenological and theoretical considerations thus summarizing the work of the QCD part of the Symposium on "Radiative Corrections: Status and Outlook".

Kataev, A L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Radiative QCD Corrections: A Personal Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several problems related to the studies of the effects of radiative QCD corrections in the phenomenological and theoretical considerations thus summarizing the work of the QCD part of the Symposium on "Radiative Corrections: Status and Outlook".

Andrei L. Kataev

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radiation Budget of the Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between precipitation and radiative heating on intraseasonal time scales in the Tropics using collocated top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiative flux measurements from special field program data [...

Jia-Lin Lin; Brian E. Mapes

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

An Integrated Surface Radiation Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated surface radiation measurement system has been developed to measure the surface radiation exchange flux. The system employs upward- and downward-looking Eppley pyrgeometers and pyranometers to separately measure four components: ...

A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Surface Radiation in the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly surface radiative fluxes in the tropical Pacific between January 1970 and February 1978 have been calculated using a radiative transfer package which includes detailed treatments of the molecular and droplet absorptions and of the surface ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Method and Apparatus for Measuring Radiation Quantities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a compact dosimeter for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation by the use of solutions which undergo a visible color change upon exposure to a predetermined quantity of radiation.

Roberts, N.O.

1950-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Smith Purcell radiation from femtosecond electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present theoretical and experimental results from a Smith-Purcell radiation experiment using the electron beam from a 17 GHz high gradient accelerator. Smith- Purcell radiation occurs when a charged particle travels ...

Korbly, Stephen E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

NREL

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the purpose, benefit, and features of the newly updated National Solar Radiation Database.

Wilcox, S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolved Radiative Transfer Model: MODTRAN.131 APMEXModerate Imaging Spectroradiometer MODTRAN MODerate spectralprovide by MODTRAN133 Table 4.2

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation ...  

Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy ... Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Radiation DetectionFluorescent Nanoparticles for ...

434

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 1999 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... effect relationships for radiation-induced stochastic ... validate the EPR dose assessment methods ... Calibration of Low-Energy Photon Brachytherapy ...

435

Optimization of radiation protection: a bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a bibliography of radiation protection optimization documents. Abstracts, an author index, and a subject index are provided.

Tang, G.R.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NIST Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Staff Directory. Browse Staff by Group. Dosimetry. Neutron Physics. Radioactivity. Search for Staff Member. ...

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: I: Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: Session I: Radiation Effects, A. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials Committee Program...

438

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

439

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: II: Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: Session II: Radiation Effects, B. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials Committee Program...

440

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physicist Sensor Science Division Ultraviolet Radiation Group. ... Ph.D. Optical Sciences and Engineering ... Orlando, FL MS Electrical Engineering, The ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation oncology feinberg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NNSA Holds Radiation Emergency Consequence Management Training...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Holds Radiation Emergency Consequence Management Training in Israel | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

442

Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

443

Solar radiation management: the governance of research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar radiation management: the governance of research #12;convening organisations The cover image, which solar geoengineering interventions would seek to address if ever deemed safe and desirable to deploy. #12;Solar radiation management: the governance of research #12;The Solar Radiation Management

Rambaut, Andrew

444

Surface Radiation Budget and Climate Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiation budget of a region is strongly tied to its climate. An 8-yr climatology of surface radiation budget components for 2.5 regions over the earth is examined in order to learn how the regional climate and surface radiation are ...

G. Louis Smith; Anne C. Wilber; Shashi K. Gupta; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with unsealed nuclear substances. Print out of wipe test kept in the logbook . For safety work practices, rightMay 2012 Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist Permit Holder to nuclear substances or radiation devices is restricted to authorized radiation users listed on the permit

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

446

Computer vision aided target linked radiation imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrated an application of video tracking to radiation detection, where a vision-based tracking system enables a traditional CZT (cadmium zinc telluride)-based radiation imaging device to detect radioactive targets that are in motion. ... Keywords: Vehicles,Target tracking,Detectors,Radiation imaging,Cameras,Streaming media

Yi Yao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Radiation hardness of the ZEUSMVD frontend chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation hardness of the ZEUS­MVD frontend chip and Strangeness production in ep scattering Natuurwetenschappen, Wiskunde en Informatica Cover photos: E.N. Ko#eman The work described in this thesis is part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 6 Radiation hardness of the Helix 3.0 95 6.1 Radiation damage e

448

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN: 2013 - 2018 MEETING THE SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE FEBRUARY 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2 Synchrotron Radiation - A Unique Tool .................................................................................................................. 1 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource .......................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Looking into the Future: Building a New User Facility Paradigm at SSRL ....................................................... 4

449

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 1 BLACKBODY RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 1 BLACKBODY RADIATION Introduction by frequency. #12;Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 2 When he tried to justify-4 lock-in amplifier. #12;Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 3 Schematic

451

Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors  

SciTech Connect

The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks? The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic How important is ATM? The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

454

Radiation Safety Work Control Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety Work Control Form Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-2) Rev July-2012 Area: Form #: Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers mitigate the radiological hazards introduced by the proposed work? Yes No (b) Can the closed state of the beam line injection stoppers be assured during the proposed work (ie., work does NOT involve injection stoppers or associated HPS)? Yes No If the answers to both questions are yes, the work can be performed safely under an SSRL RSWCF. If the answer to either question is no, then the work must be performed under a SPEAR3 RSWCF. Section 1: Description of work to be done, including date and time. (Person Responsible completes section)

455

Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purpose: To use beams of heavy ions provided by the Booster accelerator at Brookhaven to study the effects of simulated space radiation on biological and physical systems, with the goal of developing methods and materials to reduce the risk to human beings on prolonged space missions of the effects of ionizing radiation Sponsor: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Project cost $34 million over 4 years Operating costs Nearly $8 million per year in 2007 Features * beams of heavy ions extracted from the Booster accelerator with masses and energies similar to the cosmic rays encountered in space: * 1-billion electron volt (GeV)/nucleon iron-56 * 0.3-GeV/nucleon gold-97 * 0.6-GeV/nucleon silicon-28 * 1-GeV/nucleon protons * 1-GeV/nucleon titanium

457

RADIATION DOSIMETER AND DOSIMETRIC METHODS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The determination of ionizing radiation by means of single fluid phase chemical dosimeters of the colorimetric type is presented. A single fluid composition is used consisting of a chlorinated hydrocarbon, an acidimetric dye, a normalizer and water. Suitable chlorinated hydrocarbons are carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, trichlorethane, ethylene dichioride and tetracbloroethylene. Suitable acidimetric indicator dyes are phenol red, bromcresol purple, and creosol red. Suitable normallzers are resorcinol, geraniol, meta cresol, alpha -tocopberol, and alpha -naphthol.

Taplin, G.V.

1958-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to room temperature'' and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

Miller, S.D.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

459

Probing Radiative Solar Neutrinos Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by a pilot experiment conducted by F.Vannucci et al. during a solar eclipse, we work out the geometry governing the radiative decays of solar neutrinos. Surprisingly, although a smaller proportion of the photons can be detected, the case of strongly non-degenerate neutrinos brings better limits in terms of the fundamental couplings. We advocate satellite-based experiments to improve the sensitivity.

Frre, J M

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The two dimensional Cerenkov radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the power spectrum of photons generated by charged particle moving in parallel direction to the graphene-like structure with index of refraction n. While the graphene sheet is conductive, some graphene-like structures, for instance graphene with implanted ions, or, also 2D-glasses, are dielectric media, and it means that it enables the experimental realization of the Cerenkov radiation. We calculate it from the viewpoint of the Schwinger theory of sources.

Miroslav Pardy

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Radiation-hardened polymeric films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

462

Radiation-hardened polymeric films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kepler, R. Glen (Albuquerque, NM); Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

10th Radiation Physics and Protection Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Energy Authority National Network of Radiation Physics Atomic Energy Authority National Network of Radiation Physics 10 th Radiation Physics and Protection Conference Special Topic Elements of Regulating Nuclear and Radiation Activities Egyptian Law 26 -30 November 2010 To be held at EAEA Headquarter Nasr City Cairo - Egypt (www.rphysp.com) INVITATION The conference organizing committee invites scientists from the Atomic Energy , Research Centers , Universities Institutes , and all those involved in radiation Physics and its Applications in Egypt , Arab countries and abroad to participate in scientific activities of the conference . The official working language of the conference in English Conference Honorary Chairman Conference Scientific Secretary

464

Physics as an element of radiation research.  

SciTech Connect

Since its inception in 1954, Radiation Research has published an estimated total of about 8700 scientific articles up to August 2001, about 520, or roughly 6%, of which are primarily related to physics. This average of about 11 articles per year indicates steadily continuing contributions by physicists, though there are appreciable fluctuations from year to year. These works of physicists concern radiation sources, dosimetry, instrumentation for measurements of radiation effects, fundamentals of radiation physics, mechanisms of radiation actions, and applications. In this review, we have selected some notable accomplishments for discussion and present an outlook for the future.

Inokuti, M.; Seltzer, S.; Physics; National Inst. of Standards and Technology

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

THERMAL RADIATION FROM AN ACCRETION DISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effect of stimulated radiation processes on thermal radiation from an accretion disk is considered. The radial density waves triggering flare emission and producing quasiperiodic oscillations in radiation from an accretion disk are discussed. It is argued that the observational data suggest the existence of the weak laser sources in a twotemperature plasma of an accretion disk. It was shown earlier that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character and that this statement is probably valid for thermal blackbody radiation in others spectral ranges (Prigara 2003). According to this conception thermal radiation from non-uniform gas is produced by an ensemble of individual emitters.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information presented here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467